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GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 19, 2011 COVER PHOTO: JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

RICH HOWELLS PHOTOS /FOR GO LACKAWANNA

3 NEWS

Harpist Barbara Dexter performs during the Second Friday art walk in Clarks Summit. PHOTOS: Page 13

NEWS

Page 4 – Commissioners take turns on stand Page 6 – Man walking 58 hours for asthma awareness Page 7 – Best Buy worker finds porn on customer laptop Page 10 – Council introduces Minooka zoning legislation

13 ARTS Page 14 – Support sought for NP library Page 18 – DEAL DETECTIVE: Stack coupons, boost savings Page 22– Comedian Carolla at Mt. Airy Page 32 – Spelling champ gets hero’s welcome

33 SPORTS Page 33 – Tunkhannock falls in title game Page 38 – No. 10 draft picks have done well in past Page 42 – OPINION: Hitting hurt Valley View

ARTS

OUR TEAM GO Lackawanna Editor Christopher J. Hughes 558-0113 chughes@golackawanna.com Reporter/Photographer Rich Howells – 558-0483 rhowells@golackawanna.com General Manager Paul Andrews – 558-0845 pandrews@golackawanna.com

Obituaries – 558-0113 News Tips – 558-0113 news@golackawanna.com Missed Paper – 829-5000 Classified – 1-800-273-7130 Advertising – 829-7101 Subscriptions – 1-800-252-5603 Hours of Operation – 9a.m. – 6p.m. 210 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton 18503

SPORTS

Innovation never ceases to amaze It’s been almost two years since former Arkansas Republican Gov. Mike Huckabee declared the death of journalism on the blog for his political action committee. Yet here I sit. I’ve often said that journalism will never die. Print? Sure, in time. Reporters? Not a chance. Editors? Well, I hope not. But it’s innovation like the scheme I discovered this week that make me feel like things are going to be alright. A newspaper in Maine has completely converted its news operation to what could be a completely free online delivery format, save for the necessary dues to programmers and

BEHIND THE BYLINES CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES debuggers. The system apparently operates on Google Docs to build a workflow similar to the traditional copy desk. Story “slugs,” or reporter descriptions of the piece, serve as the file names. For example, this piece is called 0619go_column.hughes. Simple enough. Copy editors use specific characters to separate headlines from body copy, and comments are used to keep notes out of the general workflow. Action folders move the stories from reporters and editors to the publishing desk, and a

WordPress plugin is used to port headlines, photos, credits and more into the blog content management system. Further integration allows editors to assign a print headline in WordPress to be used in layout through InDesign. It’s an amazing cloud-based workflow that not only allows for publishing from anywhere – presumably even from smartphones with a WordPress app – as it likely reduces cost and improves much needed newstoom attention to the Internet. That, and a Nieman Report also released this week, continue to give me new hope for the industry. That report said that a focus on communities and not money-making alternatives like paywalls are much more effective business models.

I certainly smiled after reading that one. We certainly do a lot of email based work here, and that goes for many fields far outside the scope of journalism. But the thought of an entire newsroom hooked in through Google Docs and WordPress? That’s really something to keep an eye on. CMS systems are pricey. I know. My former role with this company showed me just how much a news business can spend to make their hard work appear online. As print operations around the country continue to consider whether they should shut down, newsrooms have to think further ahead than ever before. Kudos to the Maine newsroom that’s ahead of the curve - where we all need to be.

Christopher J. Hughes thinks this is an amazing idea. E-mail him at chughes@golackawanna.com.

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2011-170 Advertising

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829-7293 829-7242 kpelleschi@timesleader.com jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

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Sunday, June 19, 2011

GOLackawanna

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TRIAL OF A.J. MUNCHAK AND ROBERT CORDARO

NEWS

Corruption case goes to jury Monday

ARTS JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Former Lackawanna County Commissioner Robert Cordaro speaks with the media after his testimony on Thursday as Atty. William Costopoulos looks on.

Week 3 to begin with closing arguments By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

tis Paradise Island in the Bahamas in 2004 or 2005. On the family vacation, DePhillips said he encountered the Cordaro family along with the families of Glenn Gress and West Scranton funeral home director Al Hughes. During that vacation, DePhillips said he saw Hughes playing blackjack for $10,000 per hand. It’s alleged that

SPORTS

S

CRANTON – The public corruption case against A.J. Munchak and Robert Cordaro will be in the jury’s hands Monday following closing arguments and instructions from U.S. District Judge A. Richard Caputo on how they’re to determine whether the current and former Lackawanna County commissioners are

guilty or not guilty of any of the 41 counts against them. Caputo adjourned court proceedings at 2:40 p.m. following defense testimony Friday, the 10th day of the trial, that included a revolving door of 11 witnesses who spoke on Cordaro’s behalf. Among them was Victor A. DePhillips, president and CEO of Signature Building Systems in Scranton, who spoke about a trip to Atlan-

See TRIAL, Page 5

“The jury has certainly heard our side of the case, and we’re confident that they’ll acquit when they begin to deliberate next week.” — Robert Cordaro

A.J. Munchak smiles as he leaves federal court on Friday afternoon.


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 19, 2011

TRIAL OF A.J. MUNCHAK AND ROBERT CORDARO

ARTS

NEWS

On defense, Munchak made admissions as Cordaro attacked

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Lackawanna County Commissioner A.J. Munchak testified Wednesday in his own defense.

Commissioners get to tell their side SPORTS

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES and TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER Go Lackawanna and Times Leader staff

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CRANTON – After six full days of testimony against them, attorneys for Lackawanna County Commissioner A.J. Munchak and former commissioner Robert Cordaro were able to call the defendants to the stand to give their side of the story. While Munchak admitted on

the stand that he broke state rules regarding cash campaign donations, Cordaro used the opportunity to degrade testimony from those given government immunity from criminal prosecution. Munchak, the first defense witness, said Wednesday during five hours of testimony that he did not pocket any cash that was given to him by either Louis Costanzo of L.R. Costanzo or John Grow. The men’s dona-

tions, he added, did not influence their ability to gain government contracts or appointments to the Lackawanna County Multi-Purpose Stadium Authority, respectively. He admitted under cross examination by Assistant U.S. Attorney William Houser that not reporting the cash contributions was wrong. “I know that I had to report all See DEFENSE, Page 5

“I know that I had to report all cash contributions, and I didn’t. It was a mistake. In my position, I should have known … I’ve learned it subsequently.” — A.J. Munchak

Former Lackawanna County Commissioner Robert Cordaro was on the attack during his testimony on Thursday.


Sunday, June 19, 2011

GOLackawanna

TRIAL OF A.J. MUNCHAK AND ROBERT CORDARO

Hughes delivered $10,000 a month in cash or checks to Cordaro on behalf of Acker Associates, and defense attorneys have worked to illustrate his gambling habits and need for additional income throughout the trial. Paul Taramelli, the former county chief of staff during Cordaro and Munchak’s run as majority commissioners from 2004 to 2007, said he had known Cordaro for 20 years and worked for the Friends of Munchak and Cordaro campaign. Fundraising events like golf tournaments often included cash donations above the $100 limit. Taramelli said he was instructed by the commissioners

DEFENSE Continued from page 4

cash contributions, and I didn’t. It was a mistake,” Munchak said. “In my position, I should have known … I’ve learned it subsequently.” Houser characterized Munchak’s signature on campaign finance reports as a “lie.” “You’re saying it was a lie. I’m saying it was a wrong act,” Munchak said, adding that he believed the reports to be true at the time he signed them. Prosecutors focused heavily on the commissioner’s gambling habits, outlining $43,000 in casino markers paid through his Pennstar Bank account from Jan. 1, to Dec. 31, 2005. That amount included $8,000 in markers specifically purchased on New Year’s Eve 2005. In one particular trip, Munchak said he and Robert Conway, president of Alicon Environmental, Inc., shared expenses at Foxwoods Resort Casino in Preston, Conn. Alicon was responsible for the removal of 20 tons of pigeon droppings from the Lackawanna County Courthouse, and the government alleges they bribed Cordaro for a county contract in early 2006. “That was the only (gambling) trip with a vendor,” Munchak said. After taking over the checking account for the political action

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO

Robert Cordaro smiles as he leaves court on Friday.

John Heim of A.J. Guzzi General Construction of Clarks Summit said Ronald Cordaro, using the analogy of a horse race, asked him if he wanted to “bet on the winning horse.” Heim said Ronald Cordaro asked him to make a contribution to former Lackawanna County Commissioner Robert Cordaro and fellow majority Commissioner A.J. Munchak’s campaign. He believed he was asked for $3,000 to $5,000. Heim’s testimony differed from other businessmen, all of whom have admitted paying kickbacks to either Cordaro or Munchak out of fear they would lose contracts they had with the county. John Grow later testified he gave a $500 cash contribution to Munchak in 2003. Questioned by Munchak’s attorney, Chris Powell, Grow denied the money was meant to influence the commissioners into appointing him to the board.

Day 7: June 14 Internal Revenue Service Special Agent Denise Cole said Wednesday that Cordaro racked up $701,559.57 in cash expenditures from 2004 to 2007, his time as a majority commissioner alongside Munchak. He allegedly paid $50,000 placed in a red paper box to Shawn Tuffy, whose Dunmore home at 57 Tiffany Drive Cordaro bought. His children’s tuition payments for Scranton Prep and the University of Rochester included $67,844.38 in cash. And bank deposits and cash payments toward his lines of credit amounted to $380,749 – all while Cordaro was claiming $122,725 in taxable income in 2005 and losses of $252,474 in 2006 and $8,900 in 2007. Officials say Cordaro failed to report additional income totaling $408,500 in those years. It’s alleged that Acker Associates partner P.J. McLaine and Highland Associates executive Don Kalina gave the former commissioner cash during that time out of fear of losing their county contracts. “If the jury does not believe the witnesses, there is no tax claim,” IRS Revenue Agent Raymond Eppley said under cross examination from Cordaro’s co-counsel, Jerry Johnson, on Tuesday. But if they do, it leaves Cordaro on the hook for $98,856 in taxes, according to Eppley’s calculations based on filed returns and testimony that began last week.

Day 8: June 15 For once, the public corruption trial focused squarely on Munchak as he took the stand for five hours after the prosecution rested its case.

In a series of questions from Powell, Munchak denied he accepted $60,000 in cash from Kalina, that he accepted $5,000 cash from L.R. Costanzo President Louis Costanzo in exchange for county contracts, and that he accepted $500 in cash from Grow for a seat on the Lackawanna County Multi-Purpose Stadium Authority. He admitted to receiving campaign contributions from Costanzo and Grow, but denied pocketing the cash. “All monies I received were put into the campaign,” he said. He admitted under cross examination by Assistant U.S. Attorney William Houser that not reporting cash contributions over $100 was wrong. “I know that I had to report all cash contributions, and I didn’t. It was a mistake,” Munchak said. “In my position, I should have known … I’ve learned it subsequently.” He also admitted that the description given to $25,150 in campaign contributions was false. They were reported in payments of $50 each and labeled “unidentified contributions -- deposit detail lost.” “I broke a state violation, and reluctantly I have to take responsibility for that,”he said.

Day 9: June 16 On Thursday, former Lackawanna County Commissioner Robert Cordaro launched his counterattack. And he didn’t hold back. Government witnesses who said he extorted money from them? They were liars who, facing their own legal troubles, took the easy way out when they were offered immunity, Cordaro said. The federal investigators who questioned them? They used strong-arm tactics and threats of prosecution to coerce witnesses into saying what the government wanted them to say, he said. And the more than $700,000 he spent in cash on cars, school tuition, country club fees and other expenses from 2004 to 2007? It wasn’t kickback money, but part of $350,000 in cash savings he kept in safe deposit boxes and a home safe that Cordaro, an attorney, earned over the years from his law practice and other businesses, he said.

Day 10: June 17 A series of character witnesses testify on behalf of Cordaro before U.S. District Judge A. Richard Caputo adjourns at 2:40 p.m. He tells jurors that closing statements will be heard Monday morning, after which they will be instructed on the process they are to follow in order to find Cordaro and Munchak either guilty or not guilty of the 41 counts against them.

SPORTS

and unfortunately they took it.” Cordaro focused on attacking the credibility of many of the witnesses against him. His prime target was Al Hughes, a West Scranton funeral director who prosecutors say passed tens of thousands of dollars in kickbacks to Cordaro from the civil engineering firm Acker Associates. Hughes also alleged Cordaro was a silent partner in a cell tower project that netted Cordaro and others $14,000 each. Acker Associates is among eight businesses the government alleges paid kickbacks to Cordaro and Munchak during their tenure as majority commissioners from 2004 to 2008 out of fear they would lose lucrative contracts with the county. Cordaro vehemently denied he was a partner in the cell tower deal or that he ever accepted money from Hughes, whom he portrayed as a degenerate gambler mired in financial troubles. Questioned by his attorney, William Costopoulos, Cordaro said Hughes routinely lost tens of thousands of dollars betting on football, including a $10,000 bet he once made with Cordaro. Gambling was so ingrained in Hughes’ blood that he once lost another $10,000 bet with Cordaro regarding whether Sno Mountain would go through with the purchase of Montage Mountain from the county, Cordaro said.

Continued from page 3

Day 6: June 13

ARTS

committee Friends of Munchak and Cordaro, he said he approved several items he believed to be related to the campaign. Prosecutors allege those payments include Cordaro’s personal dues to the Glenmaura National Golf Club and Scranton County Club. “If he had people that he was entertaining and it was campaign-related, Mr. Cordaro would say, ‘This is a campaign expense,’ and I would approve it,” Munchak said. Cordaro, who testified Thursday, took a more offensive approach to bolstering his defense. He spent nearly six hours on the stand sparring with Assistant U.S. Attorney Bruce Brandler as he reviewed the myriad of allegations against Cordaro and his co-defendant, A.J. Munchak. Brandler set the tone for the day of often contentious testimony when he reminded Cordaro of the campaign promise he made to end “pay for play” schemes and cronyism in the county. “You not only continued that practice, you escalated it to whole new corrupt level,” Brandler said. “You personally got over $400,000 in cash by shaking down contractors wanting to do business with the county.” “Completely false,” Cordaro shot back. “You and the government gave them immunity to tell the story you wanted to be told. … You offered them an easy way out

TRIAL

TRIAL TIMELINE - WEEK TWO

NEWS

to pay tips using cash that came in, normally paying $50 each to waitresses, bartenders and other staff members at venues. Cordaro’s co-counsel, Jerry Johnson, asked a series of character witnesses about their opinion of his “reputation for being truthful, honest,

and a law-abiding citizen.” Dr. Catherine RichmondCullen, curriculum specialist for Northeast Educational Intermediate Unit #19, said she joined Cordaro on an arts education advisory council. “We found him very accommodating and delightful to work with,” she said. Philadelphia Atty. Mark Cavanaugh said he considered Cordaro “a man of the highest integrity,” and Peter Della Porta, the director of technology for the city of Philadelphia, said he would trust the former commissioner with his life. “The jury has certainly heard our side of the case, and we’re confident that they’ll acquit when they begin to deliberate next week,” Cordaro said Friday outside the William J. Nealon Federal Building. Closing arguments are expected to begin Monday at 9:30 a.m.

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NEWS

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GOLackawanna

Heroin found in hit-and-run vehicle

SPORTS

ARTS

By MATT MORGIS Go Lackawanna intern

OLD FORGE — Police say a borough resident drove her car into an embankment, fled the scene and left her car damaged and with drugs inside. Police charged Ashley Cadwalder, 20, of Winter St., with leaving a damaged vehicle unattended, driving with a suspended and possession of a controlled substance and drug paraphernalia after the alleged June 8 incident. According to the affidavit: The Old Forge Police Department responded to a call claiming a hit-and-run accident near Lori Lane. As police arrived on the scene, the officer was flagged down and told by a motorist about a vehicle down the street with front end damage. As police investigated the tip, a maroon colored Volkswagen Jetta was found. Registration proved the owner to be Cadwalder. In plain view on the driver’s side floor, police saw glassine packets marked “Outlaw” contained a white powder that they suspected contained heroin. A hypodermic needle was also in the line of sight. After receiving a phone call from Cadwalder’s father, Paul, police were able to locate her at a friend’s home on Sonny Drive. In an interview with police, she claimed to be going through hard times. As she was driving, she said she started crying, became unable to see and struck the embankment and drove away. She admitted that the heroin packets and needles were hers, and she tried to discard the drugs before leaving the vehicle. Ms. Cadwalder said she used the heroin the evening before. Cadwalder was arrested by Officer Nicholas Bernardi, and she is being held for lack of $10,000 bail. She was arraigned June 8, and a preliminary hearing is set for Thursday, June 16.

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Asthma walk stays local 58-hour Scranton trek to end today By TYLER MILES Go Lackawanna intern

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CRANTON – A Throop man continued his annual effort to raise awareness about the effects of asthma this weekend. Dale Zawicki, who began his annual “Walk Away from Asthma” walk Friday at 8 a.m., around Scranton’s Courthouse Square, was expected to continue walking for 58 hours, finishing today, Sunday, June 19. Last year, Zawicki walked from Scranton to Washington, D.C. It took the 31-year-old Mt. Cobb native eight days to traverse nearly 250 miles.

“It was a lot harder than I really anticipated,” Zawicki said. “There was people that helped me along the way - random people that were just really, really nice.” Growing up with asthma, Zawicki said he knows first-hand the debilitating effects it can have on a person. Other members of his family have had it as well, and now he worries for his two sons, Austin and Logan. “They are big into baseball and sports and activities just being kids. I don’t really want them to have to suffer through things like I did,” he explained. Zawicki was first afflicted with asthma when he was only eight years old, but he now has the inflammatory disease under

CRIMINAL COMPLAINTS The following criminal complaints were filed in Lackawanna County Court between June x and x:

MOSCOW

• Diane Dolinsky, 54, of Pond Rd., Moscow, was charged June 8 for resisting arresting, fleeing police, disobeying traffic control, improper entrance of a limited access highway, careless driving, reckless driving, personal use of marijuana, driving under the influence of a controlled substance, and recklessly endangering another person. According to the affidavit, three Pennsylvania State Police Troopers were dispatched for reports of a car traveling east on the westbound side of Interstate 84. Dolinsky allegedly tried to flee police before stopping in the median between the highway. After a preliminary alcohol screening, Dolinsky was found to have a blood alcohol content

control. It can flare up, he said, if he overexerts himself. “I’m not a big runner. I don’t like to go too hard because my asthma will kick in, but I walk a lot,” said Zawicki. “I have a longer, faster stride when I’m out training. I wouldn’t call it power walking, but it’s a decent amount of speed.” He often takes the 30-minute walk from his Throop home to the Fortis Institute, Scranton, where he is studying massage therapy. With a full-time class schedule and the beginning of a new job, he wasn’t able to do a long distance walk like he did in 2010. He hopes that this year’s walk of nearly 60 miles straight can match or even top last

of .14. Police also found a brown container with marijuana inside her vehicle. The arresting officer was State Trooper Alex Douglas. Dolinsky was arraigned June 9 and held for a lack of $5,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for June 16.

SCRANTON

• Shelly Cuevas, 42, of West Parker St., Scranton, faces charges on multiple counts of burglary, forgery, identity theft, theft by unlawful taking, accessing a device issued to another, and receiving stolen property. Cuevas, an employee of Green Ridge Health Care, allegedly broke into Michael Castelgrande’s home while he was staying at the Green Ridge Healthcare Center and took his wallet. A credit card from the wallet was used three times at different locations for purchases ranging from $75 to $330. Cuevas was seen on surveillance video at multiple locations using the cards and signing Castelgrande’s name. She was arraigned on June 10 and held for lack of $5,000

year’s feat. He chose Courthouse Square for the 2011 event to attract some attention from passers-by. “Hopefully it gets really busy. The more support and donations the Zawicki better,” Zawicki said. He also hoped others would join him during his nearly three-day effort. “Even if you can’t make a donation, come down and take a walk. The more people that are coming down, the more I feel motivated and know I’m doing a good thing.” Zawicki said he knows the risks of such an extended effort. He has suffered from heat exhaustion twice before and once even stopped sweating completely. Last year, he said, a park ranger just outside of Virginia had to stop him and bring him into her home to get him hydrated again. “I’m doing it for a good cause, you know? I’m not just some crazy guy walking around the courthouse square for the weekend,” he laughed. The event is sponsored by Zawicki, and donations can be made at www.firstgiving.com/walkawayfromasthma. All proceeds benefit the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America.

bail. A preliminary hearing is set for June 20. • Lindsey Evans, 26, of Brick St., Scranton, faces charges of simple assault and possession of drug paraphernalia following an alleged June 8 incident in Olyphant. According to the affidavit, officers were called to the scene after Robert Atkinson claimed to be struck in the back with a metal pipe by Evans during a domestic argument. Evans was taken into custody for the alleged assault. Police discovered syringes and numerous small bags were found along with a burnt spoon commonly used to prepare heroin inside her purse. She admitted the bags were used for heroin in her possession. Evans was arrested by Scranton Officer John Evanina and arraigned on June 8. She was held for a lack of $10,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for June 15. • James Scanlon, 44, of Wyoming Ave., Scranton, faces charges of theft and receiving stolen property after an incident on June 10. According

to the affidavit, Scanlon was seen by witnesses taking tires from a vehicle behind Mannin’s Garage on Capouse Avenue and transporting them down the street in a green shopping cart. The arresting officer was Ptlm. Eric Jordan. Scanlon is currently being held on $3,000 bail after an arraignment on June 10. A preliminary hearing is set for June 20. • Lamar Smith, 24, of North Main Ave., Scranton, faces charges of criminal trespassing and criminal mischief after a June 12 incident. After receiving news that his girlfriend, Tanair Murphy, did not want to see him anymore, Smith allegedly kicked down the front door of her residence. Murphy was not assaulted or threatened, according to the affidavit. The arresting officer was Ptlm. Brennan McDermott. Smith was arraigned on June 12 and is being held for lack of $10,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for June 20. - Compiled by Matt Morgis


Sunday, June 19, 2011

7

GOLackawanna

Best Buy employee discovers child porn on laptop of Gouldsboro man Upon checking the folders, seven or eight pictures of young children that appeared to be between the ages of 11 and 16 age were allegedly discovered. Police seized the laptop and hard drive. In an in-depth forensic analysis, more images were allegedly uncovered depicting sexual abuse of children.

Smith was voluntarily brought by detectives to the Lackawanna County District Attorney’s office where he told authorities with that he browsed Internet sites depicting images of young nude girls. He said he is sexually attracted to 12- and 13-year-old girls. Smith denied ever having

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sexual contact with a minor. He also expressed he is only interested in nude images, and not girls engaged in sexual intercourse. The arresting officer was Scranton Detective Jennifer Gerrity. Smith was arraigned June 10 and released on $10,000 unsecured bail. A preliminary hearing is set for June 20.

NEWS

SCRANTON - A Gouldsboro man was taken into custody by city police on June 10 after an employee with Best Buy’s Geek Squad found several images of child pornography on his hard drive. Glenn Smith, 51, of Sunset Drive, was charged with one count each of possession of child pornography and criminal use of a communication facility after the alleged discovery. According to the avadavat: Scranton police arrived at the Best Buy location in Dickson City just before 3 p.m. after receiving a report of child pornography found on a laptop computer. Eric McFarland and William Esgro were the computer

technicians that were currently working on the computer. Smith dropped his laptop and a hard drive off at the store earlier that day to have the files transferred from the hard drive to the laptop. McFarland checked to make sure all the files were relocated successfully due to an unusual amount of “My Document” folders.

293144

By MATT MORGIS Go Lackawanna intern


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Scranton officer charged for alleged assault

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – A current Scranton patrolman faces charges including official oppression after an alleged incident Sunday, June 12, at The V Spot, 906 Providence Rd., Scranton. Mark Miller, 32, of Prospect Ave., faces one count each of terroristic threats, official oppression, disorderly conduct and harassment, and two counts of simple assault in charges filed June 16. According to an affidavit: The Lackawanna County District Attorney’s office received a report written by Scranton Sgt. Timothy Charles about the physical altercation at the V Spot on June 14.

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES PHOTO

Scranton Ptlm. Mark Miller leaves his arraignment on Thursday, June 16.

Miller, along with Brian Gannon and Christopher Kahanic, attempted to enter the bar while carrying alcohol, according to security guard Matthew Sobies-

Police: Throop man hit pregnant girlfriend By MATT MORGIS Go Lackawanna intern

THROOP - A borough man allegedly assaulted his pregnant girlfriend during an incident last Sunday. Christopher Tronchin, 24, of Boulevard Ave., is facing charges of simple assault, reckless endangerment of another person, harassment and disorderly conduct after his girlfriend, Kara Ann Cosgrove, called authorities reporting the altercation. According the affidavit: Police arrived at Boulevard Ave., to find Cosgrove very upset and requesting EMS services. She told police that she was 20 weeks along in her pregnancy. Cosgrove told police her boyfriend, Tronchin, assaulted her and left a bruise on her left biceop, a cut behind her right ear and struck her stomach. After she was escorted to the ambulance for further evaluations, she told police not to charge her boyfriend who lived “down the street.” Police then canvassed the area and asked residents if they knew where to find Tronchin. Tronchin identified himself and was taken into custody. He was arraigned June 13, and is held for a lack of 10 percent of $2,500 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for June 21.

ki. Miller and Gannon said that they were “Scranton cops,” and Gannon allegedly showed him a fake badge as he is not employed by the department. Miller allegedly told Sobieski that he was going to “punch him in the face” when he was asked to show his police badge a second time. He then began fighting with Robert Ruddy, an offduty security guard for the bar, and Michelle Smolskis. Miller allegedly punched the two and was “stepping on their chests.” Lackawanna County Detective John Munley interviewed Sobieski after reviewing the report. He told Munley that when the men refused to leave after they approached the door carrying alcohol, he warned them

that he would call police. “Oh yeah, (expletive), I’m a Scranton cop,” Miller allegedly replied. Miller also allegedly told Sobieski that “if anything happens to him, he will ‘(expletive) Mr. Sobieski up,’” according to the affidavit. “I will make your life a living hell. I will pull you over every time I could. I will arrest you and put you in jail for the rest of your life,” Miller allegedly continued. “I will kill you.” Sobieski told the detective that “he was in fear for his life at this time.” Surveillance footage showed Miller showing his badge in an attempt to enter the bar and striking Smolskis and Ruddy.

DUNMORE BOROUGH COUNCIL

Lease agreement to boost Dunmore finances By STEPHANIE LONGO For Go Lackawanna

DUNMORE - In what has been described as a “win-win” situation for Dunmore, council unanimously approved a motion on Monday night that promises to bring the borough $20,000 through a previously an untapped revenue source. The agreement moves Dunmore into a 10year land lease agreement with Besko Media Advertising Company of Hamlin, which will lease land on part of the borough’s Department of Public Works complex in the Keystone Industrial Park alongside Interstate 81 North. Besko will erect and maintain a twosided billboard structure on the land leased from the borough. The lease allows the borough to earn approximately $20,000 per year with a five percent increase in revenue every two years. At the end of the ten-year period, the borough stands to make $25,000 annually from the lease agreement. Besko will assume all responsibility for the parcel. “This is money that Dunmore Borough could sorely use to fund other projects that weren’t budgeted for this year, revenuewise,” said Councilman Paul Nardozzi. “This

is a windfall for us and we could use it for other expenses that might arise between now and the end of the year. They have already given us $5,000, which we put into our general fund. Every municipality has things that pop up that weren’t budgeted for. This is only June so this will be a great help to us.” In other news, council approved a motion entering into a lease agreement with the Scranton-Lackawanna Human Development Agency Head Start Program to use space in the Dunmore Community Center in the amount of $1,300 per month beginning July 1 and ending June 30, 2014. The new lease increased the rental fee by $100. In a 5-1 vote, the borough passed a motion entering into a two-year lease agreement with the Dunmore Senior Center for use of the Dunmore Community Center for $1.00 annually. The lease will run from July 1 until June 30, 2013. Councilman Sandy Cancelleri abstained from the vote. Also, Peter Cordaro, Scott Perry, and Christopher Rinaldi were unanimously appointed to the Dunmore Police Department’s part-time reserve officer list. The newly-appointed officers will serve the borough on an as-needed basis.

Miller offered no comment as he left his arraignment on Thursday afternoon. He was released on $5,000 unsecured bail. Gannon, 27, is charged with one count each of simple assault, impersonating a public official, disorderly conduct and harassment. He was arraigned June 17 and released on $5,000 unsecured bail. Kahanic, 26, was arraigned June 17 on disorderly conduct and harassment charges and released on his own recognizance. Preliminary hearings for the men are set for June 22. Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy said Miller is currently on unpaid administrative leave pending an internal investigation.

Authorities seek more info on dead Newton Twp. woman By SHAUNA McNALLY For Go Lackawanna

NEWTON TWP. – Authorities have identified the woman whose body was discovered June 11 at 14058 Church Hill Road, Newton Township. Lackawanna County Coroner Tim Rowland hopes family members of the woman, CarolAnn Marie Bryer, 49, will come forward. Newton Township Police Chief Bob Reese said Bryer Bryer’s body was discovered in a first floor bedroom by a family that was touring the condemned house with a real estate agent. Reese said Bryer was last seen January 15, 2010. She was formerly the owner of the Newton Township house until, according to police, she was removed from the home after authorities condemned the property. Authorities do not believe there was foul play involved at this time. Anyone with information should call the Lackawanna County Coroner’s office at (570) 963-6100.


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

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GOLackawanna

Authority opts out of public meeting

SPORTS

ARTS

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – The cancellation of a City Council public caucus with the Scranton Redevelopment Authority on Tuesday regarding the authority’s defaulted loan left Council President Janet Evans questioning their accountability in the matter. While it was mainly cancelled due to lack of a quorum, with only threemembersofcouncilpresent, Evans said SRA board chairman WilliamLazor“refused”toattend. Mayor Chris Doherty was out of the country, Tax Collector William Courtright had a prior commitment, and council said they received no response from other members of city administration. “Mr. Lazor stated that if we want to discuss anything, we can attendaScrantonRedevelopment Authority meeting when it is held sometime in July…I find that type of response unacceptable…The parties involved, really, should have been here,” Evans said. The SRA purchased the city’s delinquent taxes from 2004, 2005, and 2005 with a line-of-credit loan on Dec. 20, 2007, and the city is now responsible for the $1,560,398.80 debt after the authority recently defaulted. The city also owes interest of $227.56 per day through the date of payment.ItwasduetoPennstarBank on or before June18. “Not only are you A: holding up the legislation, but B: it appears that you’re hiding from the public,” Evans said of the SRA. Council solicitor Boyd Hughes felt that the loan was a case of malfeasance and that the loan “never should have been made,” as the SRA “has no liability.” “I think the city could up a defense that Pennstar made an improper loan, that they knew when the loan was made that it could not be collected under the terms of the note,” Hughes said. Lazor did not return a request for comment.

Sunday, June 19, 2011 SCRANTON CITY COUNCIL

Minooka legislation introduced

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – City Council unanimously passed the first reading of legislation on Tuesday that will change the zoning of a parcel of land in Minooka. If given final passage, the legislation may stop an outside developer from building a proposed housing development. The 17-acre section, located near the 100 to 200 block of Davis Street, is currently zoned as a C-N, or a commercial neighborhood area, yet the surrounding area is R-1A, or a medium to low density residential district. Minooka residents packed council chambers in a public hearing on June 7 to express their overwhelming support of changing the zoning to R-1A to assure that only single-family homes could be built on the property. Glenn Worgan, vice president and principal of the Delaware Valley Development Co. and equitable owner of property, explained to council his company’s intentions for the property during the caucus. They proposed building a 76unit affordable, low-income housing development, and Worgan said city officials, including Office of Economic and Community Development Executive Director Linda Aebli, are in support of the project. John Finnerty, president of the Minooka Neighborhood

RICH HOWELLS PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Delaware Valley Development Co. Vice President Glenn Worgan speaks at a Scranton City Council public caucus on June 7.

Association, countered with a petition signed by 522 Minooka residents, citing increased traffic flow, road capacity and deterioration, water runoff, school capacity, greater criminal activity, safety concerns, and decreased property values as issues they believe would occur with the development’s construction. Worgan felt these concerns were unjustified. Council voted 3-0 in favor of rezoning the property. Councilman Pat Rogan and Jack Loscombe were absent from

the meeting. “In my opinion, attorney Finnerty brought forth stronger concerns than Mr. Morgan. Besides the differing of opinion between attorney Finnerty and Mr. Morgan, the most important piece of the puzzle behind all the legal red tape is what the people of Minooka want,” Councilman Frank Joyce said. “Last month, I walked various streets in Minooka and discussed this issue with residents, probably around 150 in total. Out of all of those resi-

dents, everyone was in favor of changing the zoning to R-1A.” Council solicitor Boyd Hughes said that when he researched the parcel of land, he found that it had previously been zoned as R-1A, but when new zoning code was adopted in 1993, it was changed to C-N for no clear reason. He felt that the property “sticks out like a sore thumb” as a C-N zone. Councilman Bob McGoff asked Hughes if the Delawarebased developer could legally See MINOOKA, Page 16

Council comments further on Renda appointment

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON –City Council officially appointed former city business administrator Stu Renda to the Scranton Sewer Authority at their June 7 meeting, but some members say they did not do so willingly. Renda, whose wife Liz Renda currently serves as director of finance for the Scranton Parking Authority, was chosen to fill the unexpired term of Matthew Flynn. Flynn passed away on May 5, leaving the remaining term to expire on Dec. 31, 2012. Ryan McGowan replaced Mr. Renda as the

business administrator in January. The vote was 3-1, with Council Vice President Pat Rogan dissenting. Councilman Bob McGoff was absent from the June 7 meeting. “When Mr. Renda was the business administrator, he had a very lackluster record of getting back to City Council regarding various issues, so I will be voting no,” Rogan said at council’s May 31 meeting. Councilman Jack Loscombe said he agreed with Rogan, calling Renda an “enabler” of Mayor Chris Doherty’s agenda,

but voted in the affirmative because council’s votes on authority appointments “don’t matter.” Loscombe was referring to an incident in March of 2010, when the council “supermajority” attempted to make their own appointments to the Scranton Redevelopment Authority and the Scranton Parking Authority. Doherty had selected Robert Timlin and Joseph Matyjevich, respectively, to fill the authority seats, but council rejected See RENDA, Page 16


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Medical college cuts back Scranton school impacted by loss of $4 million in state funding and sour national economy

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Financial issues The financial problems stem from “three broad reasons,” Nora said: the drop in expected state funding, the estimated $120 million cost of a new medical school under construction (TCMC currently uses space at Lackawanna College), and the sour economic climate that continues to curb donations. The college, which opened in August 2009, is taking a three-pronged approach to weather the bad times and emerge on solid financial footing, Nora said. Along with the cuts, the college is looking for new sources of money, including seeking additional support from Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania. The insurance giant “provided a certain level of initial support” with startup costs and construction of the new school, Nora said, “and we are asking for additional support over the next five years as we get our finances in order.” The college is also grateful for efforts

Three classes enrolled The college has three classes of 65 students each and will add a fourth class this fall, Nora said. The school has “several hundred clinical volunteer faculty.” The eight people not coming back next year are part of about 40 paid faculty. Of those, two were part-time faculty who spent most of their time teaching, but six were “predominantly researchers” or involved in administration. Research is important to a medical college, Nora said, because it helps students learn the “process and the milieu” of the medical profession, and because it can help advance the ever-changing field of medicine. Research will continue at TCMC but will be more carefully focused. Students have been involved in research on topics “as varied as chewed tobacco to breast feeding to autism,” Nora said. Third-year students are set to begin applying such experience in clinical settings throughout the region, she added. “What this school means to the region and what it will mean is so important,” Nora said. “It’s not surprising that new organizations in these times have financial issues.” While the cuts come barely two months after the college’s first president, Dr. Robert M. D’Alessandri, announced he was stepping down, Nora stressed they are “absolutely not” a result of anything D’Alessandri did. State cuts and the economic downturn are the primary culprits, she said. Nora noted news in The Chronicle of Higher Education last week that The University of California at Riverside failed to earn preliminary accreditation for a planned medical college from the LCME precisely because the California legislature hasn’t promised to support the idea. “Finances are difficult all over,” Nora said. “The important thing is that we have a plan, we’re going to have this taken care of, and we’re going to be just fine.”

ARTS

SCRANTON – The loss of an expected $4 million in state funding – coupled with the continuing tough economic times – has forced The Commonwealth Medical College to trim faculty by eight members and make cuts in other staff and programs, interim President Dr. Lois Margaret Nora said Tuesday. The total budget has been sliced by more than $3 million – a reduction of more than 10 percent, Nora said. The cuts won’t impact the college’s core mission to train new doctors and medical professionals, Nora stressed. To keep that promise, she noted six of the eight faculty members who will not return next year were heavily involved in research or administration and did not spend a lot of time teaching. Still, the money problems pose a threat to the college’s education status. “Our financial challenges are significant enough that we understand they contributed to the decision by the LCME – the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, the accrediting body for the MD-granting programs in the United States – to put TCMC on probation” this year. The school still has preliminary accreditation, and the LCME has given the go-ahead to accept another class of incoming students next year, Nora said. But the probation does mean it will take longer to earn “provisional accreditation” – something Nora said the college had hoped to reach this year – followed by full accreditation.

by some Harrisburg legislators trying to restore funding in the upcoming state budget, which must be finalized by July1. The third part of the plan is to look for “new types of partnerships and affiliations to strengthen the school going forward,” Nora said, working with other schools and institutions to keep costs down while keeping college offerings solid. Spokeswoman Anne Green also said the college is trying to extend its line of credit with a local bank.

NEWS

By MARK GUYDISH For Go Lackawanna


GOLackawanna

SCRANTON - Pennsylvania American Water announced upgrades on Wednesday to approximately 8,900 feet of water main along Luzerne Street to improve reliability for customers, reduce service disruptions and increase water flows for firefighting. The cost of the system improvements is approximately $2.7 million. Pennsylvania American Water will replace approximately 5,400 feet of existing 16-inch cast iron water main, dating back to the early 1900s, with

new 16-inch ductile-iron pipe between Main and Keyser avenues. Additionally, 3,500 feet of six-inch water main, originally installed in 1893, will be replaced with new eight-inch pipe from 13th Avenue to Sherman Street. “This is an area that has a history of main breaks in recent years,” said Anthony Gangemi, superintendent, field operations, Pennsylvania American Water. ”With this significant capital investment, we will help ensure our water system’s stability to provide reliable service for many years to come.” The company also will replace a pressure-reducing station along Luzerne Street. The station serves as a secondary feed to Taylor, Old Forge and the west side of Scranton. Work is set to begin the week of June 20. The company expects to complete the pressurereducing station replacement

SPORTS

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Almost 2,000 ‘Dump the Pump’ with COLTS By MATT MORGIS Go Lackawanna intern

SCRANTON - Lackawanna County participated in the sixth annual Dump the Pump Day on June 16 as the County of Lackawanna Transit System offered free rides on all of its routes to help promote the use of public transportation. As people would get on and off buses on Wyoming Avenue on Thursday, they were presented with flyers and information packets describing the “Dump the Pump” initiative, along with other details about bus rates, schedules, carpooling and more. Patrons also received buttons and entered raffles for free Tshirts. “There was a calculation we did where we found out 17,000 gallons of gas would be saved if everyone in Lackawanna County would take the bus to and from work for only one day,” COLTS Communications Director Gretchen Wintermantel explained. According to Wintermantel, 1,832 extra people decided to take the bus on Thursday to support the cause. The total people that road the transit bus was 6,280 – up from 4,448 riders last Thursday. “We are really trying to get more people to ride because of the environment,” Wintermantel said. “Even if people are car

pooling or walking, it helps and is good for the environment. Plus, they won’t have to pay the high gas prices.” COLTS is doing its own part to cut down on those gas prices. The transit system introduced its first four diesel-electric hybrid buses in March, and Wintermantel said another nine have been ordered. The hybrid buses offer 35 percent greater fuel efficiency than more traditional models. Later this year, riders can expect to see new routes throughout the region as COLTS completes its restructuring effort. That move to eliminate underused routes and increase access to area shopping centers is expected to be completed by October 3. Nelson Salcedo, a COLTS bus driver of five years, said his favorite part of the job is the people. He believes more people are taking advantage of public transportation, and events like Dump the Pump make residents pay more attention to the effects their cars could have on the environment. Brandon Hatalski, a frequent bus rider who does not own a car, said he loves riding public transportation. “It’s a great sense of community,” Hatalski explained. “I’ve made friends and I have no problem paying the $1.10 to get to where I need to be.”

work and water main installation, including transfer of all customer services and final paving restoration, by November. During construction, customers might experience temporary

service interruptions, discolored water and/or lower than normal water pressure. Crews will work as quickly as possible to shorten the length of these temporary inconveniences.

Drivers in the area may experience temporary delays during work hours. For more information, contact Pennsylvania American Water’s customer service center at 1-800-565-7292.

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Sunday, June 19, 2011

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Sunday, June 19, 2011

GOLackawanna

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2. Angelica Cordero poses with her art piece “Madama Butterfly� at the Music Studio. 3. Sara Duckworth, Steven Russell, and Jillian Penyak. 4. Alyssa Lazar performing at the Music Studio. 5. Barbara Dexter playing the harp at Borough Hall.

SPORTS

RICH HOWELLS /FOR GO LACKAWANNA

1. Sheila Grady and Will Krisanda at Everything Natural.

ARTS

ifteen Abington area businesses participated in the Second Friday Clarks Summit Art Walk on June 10. The monthly gathering is organized by the Arts Council of the Abingtons. Along with artists featuring various works in various media, the event included live music performances from harpist Barbara Dexter, the Clarks Summit Chamber Ensemble, Brenda Fernandes, and more. For details on how to get involved in future events, search for Arts Council of the Abingtons on Facebook.


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Public support sought for North Pocono library

M

OSCOW – The staff of the North Pocono Library hopes that they can break ground on a new stateof-the-art facility in the spring of 2012. With population on the rise in the region, the current facility located at 113 Van Brunt St., Moscow, isn’t capable of supporting the rapidly growing community.

“Because of the new people moving into the community, this community had outgrown the library more than 10 years ago. Even without a rise in the size of the community, the building is in declining condition and we really just need a new home,” said Library Director Susan JefSUBMITTED PHOTO fery. A population boom in the The existing 1,300 square foot North Pocono region has relibrary has little room to house sulted in the need for a larger its many collections. facility with greater space for Many large programs are held storage and events. next door at the Moscow borough building. And there is no already received a Redevelopspace to display the books well, ment Assistance Capitol Promaking it difficult for patrons to gram grant for $250,000. find what they’re looking for. They have gained support The new North Pocono Public from the Lackawanna County Library, which will be located at Library system and one gener1315 Church St., ous anonymous doMoscow, is deGET nor. Board memsigned to fix many of INVOLVED bers have also given the current facility’s generously. problems. For details on how The library is you can help, call Plans include a seeking extra supthe North Pocono large community port from additionPublic Library at hall allowing for al corporate donors (570) 842-4700. seating for up to 90 and citizens, as well people. Other imas more grants to provements include achieve a $3.2 million goal. room for larger collections and The new library will raise new spacious areas for chilproperty value and provide an dren’s programming. economic boost to the commuThe library plans to provide nity. Staff members hope it will additional space for outdoor acalso allow people to search for tivities, a business center with jobs and take advantage of other computers and fax machines, services to survive the current and advanced computer techjagged economy. nology throughout the building. Libraries are also a key re“The North Pocono Public Lisource for communities and brary is spearheading exciting families. The hope is that the and much-needed plans to connew North Pocono Public Listruct a new, modern facility brary will be a family venue that that will meet the needs of the brings residents together. community now and for gener“It is wonderful that generaations to come,” Terry Barret, litions of families - grandparents, brary board president, said. parents, and children - can enjoy “Now is the time to get it done.” the library together and benefit Corporate, private, and govfrom it in many different ways.” ernment support has started to board member Dottie Magnotta come together. said. For example, the library has

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SPORTS

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NEWS

By TYLER MILES Go Lackawanna intern


Sunday, June 19, 2011

GOLackawanna

15

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Allied Services Rehab Hospital recently recognized 34th Annual National Nursing Assistants Week, held June 13 to 17. The 2011 Theme is “New Roles, New Goals.” Nursing Assistants play a vital role in the rehabilitation hospital, caring for patients as they work to regain health and independence. Pictured, from left, are, Allison Sollers RA I, Noelle Smith RA I, Erin Gawlik RA I, Yvonne O’Neill RA II, Andrew Lynn RA, Beatrice Hobbs RA I, Emelia Hernandez RA I, and Ellen Roe RA I.

Delta Airlines will begin daily nonstop jet service from the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport to Atlanta on Sept. 7. Flights from Avoca to Atlanta’s Hartsfield International Airport started in1993 . But in 2009, Delta pulled the flights, claiming “the flights weren’t generating

CORPORATE LADDER Ronk joins Foley Law Firm

She also acted as an advocate and managed guardianship disputes for nursing home residents. The Foley Law Firm is Foley, McLane, Foley, McDonald & MacGregor with offices at 600 Linden St., Scranton and 26 N. Sixth St., Stroudsburg.

L.R. Costanzo announces hires, promotions

Vice President of Operations Matthew D. Michalek has announced the following promotions and hires at L.R. Costanzo. Paul Chorba, Peckville, an L.R. Costanzo team member for eight years, has been promoted to Project Superintendent. In his new capacity, Chorba is responsible for providing supervision, coordination, and scheduling of all construction activities, while promoting overall project safety, including job site inspections and record keeping. Bradley Ondrick, Clarks Summit,

airports for connector flights to Dallas, Texas. The Marcellus Shale natural gas drilling boom has playing a large role in that increase. Centini said that with Atlanta crossed off the to-do list, he is next eyeing flights to Boston, Pittsburgh, Washington, Orlando, Myrtle Beach and Dallas.

Capan

Chorba

has been hired as a Mechanical Systems Technician III. He is a technical expert who maintains and repairs heating, refrigeration, ventilation and cooling systems and other mechanical equipment. Ondrick has over 15 years in commercial, industrial, and large scale refrigeration emergency repair and installation. He is also an instructor for the Career Technology Center of Lackawanna County’s adult education HVAC program. He has worked for Stark Enterprises and McClure Company. James Connor, Scranton, has been hired as Project Superin-

Connor

Ronk

Ondrick

tendent. In this position, he provides supervision and coordination of construction activities in a professional manner that maintains client relations. He comes to L.R. Costanzo with nearly 40 years experience, and is a structural concrete installations expert. Nicholas Capan, Patterson, N.J., has been hired as a Scheduler/ Planner. He is responsible for managing the implementation of project control’s principles relative to the planning, scheduling, and execution of complex projects. Capan possesses over 38 years of planning, scheduling, and cost experience. He has worked

Greg Elliott Elm Street Manager United Neighborhood Centers of NEPA

Shane

for Foster Wheeler as a Senior Scheduler/Project Controls Specialist and ABB/Lummus Crest as a Principal Scheduler. Timothy J. Shane, Clarks Summit, has been hired as a Senior Superintendent. He is responsible for providing management, supervision and coordination of construction activities. Shane comes to L.R. Costanzo with nearly 40 years in the commercial construction industry. His most recent assignment was with Keating Building Corporation, where he supervised projects at various casinos, prisons, and water treatment plants.

SPORTS

The Foley Law Firm has added Atty. Glenn L. Ronk to their team of personal injury lawyers. Ronk will focus her practice in representing clients with workers’ compensation claims. A Texas native, she is a graduate of The College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Mass., and earned her law degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Law, Cleveland, Ohio. She was admitted to the Pennsylvania Bar and the U.S District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania in 2010. While at Case Western, Ronk was a member of the Health Law Clinic at the Milton Kramer Law Clinic, representing clients in Social Security disability cases.

money, even though they were near capacity,” Barry J. Centini, airport director, said. Increased passenger traffic at Avoca, at a time other airports are struggling, was a major selling point, as were figures that show more than 30 people are flying out of Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton each day heading to

ARTS

Delta flights to Atlanta returning to Avoca airport

beques and at church; of new facades on homes and businesses; of a farmers’ market and children’s garden in Connors Park; of a major redevelopment project on Cedar Avenue; of youth participating in graffiti removal and neighborhood clean-ups; and of new friendships that are developing over the sharing of culture and language. Stories like these give us the strength and hope necessary to keep moving forward as a community. Even though there is still much to be done, families, business-owners, youth and seniors are all pitching in to build the kind of community that we can be proud of. Crime, blight and abandonment need to be addressed, and we are grateful for the city’s police force and housing inspectors who work in this community every day, but we must also do our part at the neighborhood level. All it takes is volunteering at a neighborhood clean-up, mowing your neighbor’s grass or getting to know the family next door. Through small steps like these, we can re-build South Side one step at a time. If everyone does their part, we’ll have plenty of stories to be proud of. To get involved in the Elm Street Program, please contact UNC at (570) 346-0759.

NEWS

Allied Services recognizes national nursing assistants week, June 13-17

South Side has another story to tell With all of the recent events at Finn McCool’s and the Sun Hotel, many residents of South Scranton are deeply concerned about the future of their neighborhood, and rightfully so. These types of incidents are enough to make any community feel on edge. We here at United Neighborhood Center of Northeastern Pennsylvania’s (UNC) Elm Street Program are trying to do our part by continuing to work in partnership with the District Attorney’s Office, the South Scranton Resident’s Association, the City Housing Inspectors and the Scranton Police Department to address crime and blight in our neighborhood. But addressing these issues takes time, so it is important not to let cynicism and fear get the best of us, even when it seems like things are never going to get better. Additionally, an unfortunate side effect of events like these can sometimes be the labeling of an entire neighborhood as “dangerous” and “unsafe.” While South Scranton does face many obstacles in the path towards creating a safer, healthier community, there is also another story to tell. There is a story of residents who are getting involved for the very first time; of neighbors that look out for each other and who spend time together over bar-


16

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MINOOKA NEWS

Continued from page 10

challenge the rezoning as discriminatory against low-income residents, as Worgan had charged during the caucus. Finnerty, who pointed out that plans for the development have not even been officially submitted to the city yet, denied this claim. “Anybody can sue anybody. It’s that simple,” Hughes responded. Council President Janet Evans said that the city’s law office “refused” to draft the zoning legislation when they requested it, so Hughes worked with city planner Don King to develop the legislation for Tuesday.

RENDA

SPORTS

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Continued from page 10

his appointments and selected Andy Sbaraglia, a member of the Scranton/Lackawanna County Taxpayers Association, and Giovanni Piccolino, owner of Buona Pizza in Scranton, instead, citing a lack of cooperation between the authorities and council. While council solicitor Boyd Hughes felt that council was within their legal rights to do so, the mayor, the authorities, and their solicitors refused to recognize council’s appointments, saying they were in violation of the Home Rule Charter and several other laws that grant this power solely to the mayor. Doherty’s appointments, Timlin and Matyjevich, took their respective seats in April of 2010. Renda and council had also clashed during his term as business administrator, usually relating to the management of city finances. On Tuesday, Council President Janet Evans said that Renda had already been appointed to the Scranton Sewer Authority before the legislation even came before council. She added that council would not be challenging the appointment this time. “We received the legislation, apparently, after the fact…Because there are so many

Sunday, June 19, 2011 She also requested that Hughes write legislation for next week’s agenda to transfer funds from the city’s Urban Development Action Grant account to pay for lifeguards at the Novembrino pool in West Scranton, which Mayor Chris Doherty said in a January interview would be closed to allow construction on a new splash park to begin. Evans said that the rehiring of four Department of Public Works foremen by Doherty following their elimination in the 2011 budget prevented the pool from opening. “It isn’t right that hundreds of children must lose free swimming this summer to pay for political appointments,” Evans said. Worgan did not return a request for comment at press time. issues on council’s plate and 99 percent of these issues are very great, very important to all the people of the city, I think it becomes important to choose your battles,” Evans said. “I don’t think it’s the battle that, in this case, you want to undertake because there are far more serious situations that require our immediate consideration.” Councilman Frank Joyce gave a hint, however, that relations between council and the administration are improving. He said that he and Evans met with several city officials over the weekend to discuss the current financial situation of city, though details of the conversation will be “kept confidential until further notice.” While council would have preferred a public caucus with city administration, Joyce said he agreed to meet in private as an “amicable gesture” and “to signify that council is willing to work with the administration.” “The challenges that Scranton faces today cannot be solved by the same level of thinking and processes that were instituted when they were first created years ago,” Joyce said. “Public meetings between the administration and council have never occurred in the past. A change in this pattern is necessary to initiate true progress and overall fiscal health.”

North Scranton church block party set Holy Rosary Church, West Market Street and Wayne Avenue, North Scranton, is planning their annual block party for June 23-25. For the first time, Shiloh Baptist Church will join the festivities with a special booth. Pictured are, from left, first row, Alice McDermott, Fr. Cyril Edwards, Olivia Zehel, Tara Lynott, Kathleen Connor, and Mary Claire Boylan. Second row, Rene Zehel, Margaret Hynosky, Saraellen Lynott, and Tony Connor. Third row, Shawn Zehel, Bob Hynosky, and Karl Lynott. Fourth row, Dave Jenkins, Beth Jenkins, Bob McLaughlin, Bonnie Hessmiller, and Carl Kupchunas. Fifth row, Marie Hastie and Jerry McCormack.

Allergy center opens in Dickson City The physicians of Northeast Ear, Nose, and Throat Center in Scranton recently announced the opening of The Allergy Center, Lackawanna County’s first center started by a team of board certified ear, nose, and throat physicians and a team of allergy nurses. The Allergy Center is located at 503 Sunset Dr., Dickson City. The Allergy Center is the first office in the county to offer qualified patients the option of sublingual drops immunotherapy (SLIT), an alternative to injection therapy that is administered through oral dosing by the patients in their own homes. For more information about the center, call (570) 346-7900. Shown at the opening are, from left, Mark Frattali, MD, and Keith Pritchyk, MD; Louis DeGennaro, MD, Dr. Michael Freiman, MD, Anthony Brutico, MD, and Pat Bilardi, practice administrator.


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Brush up on skills with free classes Each class is capped at seven adult patrons, so space is limited and pre-registration with a valid Lackawanna County Library Card is required for all classes. The library has been a crucial resource for helping people find and keep jobs by upgrading their computer skills. With today’s highly competitive job market, you need every advantage you can get, and training and experience in MS Word and Excel 2007 is essential for almost any job you apply for.

Classes currently offered include: • Introduction to Computers & Internet Basics: These classes are designed for computer beginners who need to learn the basics of using a computer and the Internet. Skills taught include basic computer skills, using a software application, computer terminology and file management. The Internet classes include performing searches, downloading security software, and using e-mail. • Résumé Writing and Online Job Search: These classes

are designed for job seekers. Participants will learn how to create a professional-looking résumé and will learn how to search for local, national or international private sector, public service, or government jobs. Basic mouse & keyboarding skills and a basic understanding of Internet use are required for this class. • MS Word 2007: Three Beginning and three Intermediate level classes focused on the word processing program. • Excel 2007: Three Beginning and three Intermediate level classes on the spreadsheet

software. • PowerPoint 2007: Three Beginning and three Intermediate level classes on the slideshow program. To reserve a seat, call (570) 348-3000, ext. 3038, or email rmaloney@albright.org. All of these classes are available to the community, free of charge. If you don’t have a library card, come in and sign up for one today! ‘501 Vine’ focuses on library system services and events. The column appears bi-weekly in Go Lackawanna.

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While nearly three-quarters of the population have experience with computers, many regular users do not have knowledge of more advanced computer programs, such as Microsoft Word and Excel. Knowledge of how to use these programs is important for those who are seeking employment and even for those who wish to bring organization to their daily lives. If you do not know how to use these programs, or do not know how to use a computer at all, the Albright Memorial Library is here for you. Professionally taught, free computer classes are offered at the Albright Memorial Library’s Computer Learning Lab. Rick Maloney, a certified teacher with over 20 years experience is the Computer Lab Coordinator and teaches all classes.

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artin Luther King, Jr. Pope John Paul II. John F. Kennedy. Winston Churchill. The computer. At first glance, this list seems to have an oddball amongst it’s midst. Upon further research, one would realize that all of those listed on the list have been named “Person of the Year” by Time Magazine -or, in the case of “The Computer,” a “Machine of the Year.” Time Magazine correctly foretold the future, where virtually everyone uses a computer in their daily lives. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the percentage of adults over the age of 18 who use a computer at least occasionally rose from 65 percent in 2000 to 77 percent in 2010.

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eople are often confused when hearing the words “stacking coupons.” Prior to learning about couponing, I was not aware of this money saving strategy, either. Stacking coupons refers to using one store coupon and one manufacture coupon, so actually stacking the coupons on top of each for a greater savings on the product.

There are many stores that offer store coupons, but you have to be aware their coupon policy before trying to stack the coupons together. However, most stores will allow at least one store coupon and one manufacture coupon per product. Price Chopper also allows stacking coupons, and their store coupons are found

DEAL DETECTIVE JENNA URBAN online at www.pricechopper.com or www.facebook.com/ pricechopper. Additional coupons can be found in the Sunday insert. There have been a ton of great cereal coupons lately, like one offering four General Mills cereals for $6 with an instore coupon. This in-store coupon can be stacked with multiple manufacture coupons to purchase cereal as low as $1 per box. Target is one of my favorite stores to “stack coupons” since they often send out Target Coupons or you can print them on www.target.com. If the coupon prints as a “Target Store Coupon” that means that you can use a

TOP DEALS THIS WEEK CVS Colgate Total Gum Defense, Enamel Strength, Max or 360 Toothbrush: $2.79, get $2 in Extra Care Bucks and use $.75 off of one Colgate Toothpaste Smart Source coupon from June 5 for a final price of 4 cents. Hershey’s Bliss Bags: $5.99, get $5.99 in Extra Care Bucks and use $1 off of one from the May 1 Smart Source coupons for a free bag plus $1 moneymaker.

Rite Aid Colgate Toothpaste: $2.99, get $2.99 Up Reward and use $.75 off of one Smart Source coupon from June 5 for free toothpaste and a 75 cent moneymaker.

Target Coppertone Sport SPF50: On sale for $7. Use the $2 off of one Target web coupon and the $1 off of one Red Plum coupon from May 22 for a final price of $4.

manufacture coupon as well. An example of this is with A-1 steak sauce. There is a $1 off of one A-1 Steak Sauce Target Store Coupon at www.target.com that can be

used with a June 5 Smart Source coupon for $1 off of one A-1 Steak sauce. Using those coupons together, you can snag the sauce for around $1. Drug stores also allow stacking coupons. Rite Aid, CVS, and Walgreens all allow coupon stacking. Rite Aid store coupons can be found on http://riteaid.adperk.com or in the weekly circular. Walgreens store coupons can be found in the weekly circular or the monthly coupon booklets found at the front of the store. And CVS store coupons can be found scanning your Extra Care Cards at the coupon machine and on www.cvs.com. Although most stores do allow coupon stacking, it’s a good idea to read over their coupon policy before heading out shopping. Coupon stacking is worth investing the time in learning your store’s coupon policy to plan your shopping trip in advance and get the most “stack” for your money. Most policies can be found on store websites.

Blake lauds vote banning bath salts State Sen. John P. Blake applauded a Senate concurrence vote taken Wednesday on House amendments to Senate Bill 1006, banning the production, use, sale and possession of bath salts and synthetic marijuana in Pennsylvania. “I commend my colleagues in both chambers of the legislature for their swift action to ban these substances, which have become an enormous threat to public safety,” Blake said. “This issue was of particular concern to my Senate district. The preventative actions taken by the mayor and by law enforcement officials in the City of Scranton in April evidenced an urgency for action by the General Assembly.” Concentrated bath salts contain a chemical known as MDPV, which can mimic the effects of cocaine and methamphetamine. Senate Bill 1006 also bans salvia divinorum and prohibits the sale of synthetic marijuana. The ban contained in Senate Bill 1006 now goes to Gov. Tom Corbett for enactment.

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Detectives offer investigative lesson

ARTS RICH HOWELLS PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Detectives Jeff Gilroy and Joe Lafferty discuss the detective’s division in the fourth week of the Citizen’s Police Academy.

simple…There’s many factors in investigating,” Lafferty said. In cases like the fatal shooting at Finn McCool’s in May, officers may only have nicknames or false names of possible suspects. It could take a series of interviews to discover actual identities. “You’re lucky if you get a nickname,” Lafferty added. The McCool’s case involved interviews with bartenders, the research of credit card receipts, and the documentation of finger prints on every glass in the bar, he said. That helped police identify where certain people may have been sitting at the time of the incident that left Harrisburg native Malik Carter dead. Four people were charged as co-conspirators in that

UP NEXT Class members will be educated on crime scenes and auto theft prevention in class on June 22.

homicide. The extraction of DNA and other crucial evidence can take between three months and two years, which is why some cases take longer than others to solve. Each detective has their own favored ways of gathering the data they need to close a case. “My biggest thing is talking to people because everything sees everything. You have to somehow get it out of that person,” Lafferty said. Many of the crimes investigated come back to drugs, whether they’re home bur-

Citizen police class members line up to receive their T-shirts during the June 15 session.

glaries, assaults or even credit card thefts, according to Lafferty. Class members got firsthand lessons on drug enforcement during their June 8

class. Class members were also put through small exercises where they had to put pieces of a crime together to come to a likely conclusion.

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SCRANTON – While detective work isn’t as glamorous as television shows often depict it to be, the work is crucial to solving violent crimes or simple thefts, members of the Scranton Police Department’s Citizen’s Police Academy learned on June 15. Detectives Joe Lafferty and Jeff Gilroy lead the week four lesson on the detective’s division. “Everyone watches “CSI” and all of these shows on TV, but it’s really not like that,” Lafferty said. But the department does have some tools at its disposal that can feel like the prime trime crime dramas. JNET, for example, is a catalog of photographs managed by the Pennsylvania State Police. It involves driver’s license and arrest photos and can be used to identify possible suspects. In order for some suspects to be recognized using JNET photos against surveillance footage, “the situation has to be perfect,” Gilroy said, “but it’s better than it was 10 years ago… As we keep progressing technologically, it’s going to get better.” The work can be laborious, but it’s often very rewarding. “One of the reasons I came to the Scranton Police Department was because I wanted to do this,” Gilroy, who was promoted to the department last year, told the men an women enrolled in the academy. Lafferty said detectives often use surveillance footage, witness clues and more to piece together cases of credit card theft, burglary and more. In assault cases, victim interviews are crucial to finding alleged criminals. Finding the most information from the most sources help ensure that false charges aren’t filed. “These cases, they’re never

NEWS

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com


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By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – Another sign that residents are becoming part of the solution against crime in the city was revealed Wednesday night at a meeting of community leaders inside police headquarters. Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy joined leaders from the United Neighborhood Center of Northeastern Pennsylvania, West Scranton-Hyde Park Neighborhood Watch, Keyser Valley Association, Plot Neighborhood Association, North Scranton Neighborhood Association and Tripp Park Neighborhood Association as he showcased the new crime watch signs. The idea for new crime watch signs was first discussed in February during a similar meeting at Widmer Signs, and it is a continuation of the chief’s proactive, positive approach to fighting crime that has included bumper stickers, the foundation of a West Side precinct at the Jackson Street skate park, and the first Citizen’s Police Academy in several years. “I believe it has been working. I believe there’s more involvement, more interest,” he said. “It’s my goal to keep moving forward with this and keep building relationships.” The success of the police, Duffy said, doesn’t depend solely on the size of the de-

Chief Dan Duffy discusses some of the elements of the new crime watch signs on Wednesday.

RICH HOWELLS PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Community leaders gather at Scranton Police headquarters on June 15 for the unveiling of new crime watch signs. Fifty signs were ordered to be distributed throughout the city, and Chief Dan Duffy said more will be ordered in 2012.

partment. “It’s a matter of getting people involved and not being afraid to get involved,” he said. “It’s our city, and it’s your police department.” Previous crime watch signs depicting an unsavory, silhouetted suspect, have become faded and are often passed by. “People probably don’t even know what they mean anymore,” Duffy said. The new signs, emblazoned with blue, yellow, white and black text carry information on ways to report crime – by calling 911; sending texts to a special-

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ized, anonymous system; calling the police department’s non-emergency line; or by visiting www.crimere-

ports.com. “We want the criminals to know that the residents in our communities are going

to report crime,” he added. Fifty signs to be distributed evenly throughout the city were created this year, and Duffy intends to have more made in 2012. Neighborhood leaders will decide whether to place them in the most visible areas, like near public schools, or in areas known for their high crime rates. Leaders said they would discuss the signs and conduct phone calls to fellow leaders within the next month, and Department of Public Works employees will likely be responsible for hanging the signs.

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INFINITE IMPROBABILITY RICH HOWELLS Comic cons, for example, used to center around writers and artists who, while worshipped by fans, remained relatively unknown to the general public, but now big-name movie stars and major studios have made these events a whole new ballgame, attracting millions of people to cities on both the east and west coasts. Whether it’s E3 in Los Angles or San Diego Comic-Con, it’s clear that things will never again be like they once were.

Both bloggers and the mainstream media bombard you with every minutia of information that comes out of them, telling you about the latest and greatest in just about every form of entertainment outside of sports. It’s become an annual ritual now, and like its athletic counterpart, it’s a marathon that tests the endurance of all its participants, whether it be its big brands or small players. This has been both good and bad for fans. On the positive side, geeks are finally seeing their interests legitimized in the eyes of the public. Successful movies have allowed their beloved characters some longoverdue exposure, and even the term “geek” has gone from a

bully’s taunt to a badge of honor. With the backing of some of the largest multi-media companies in the world, our interests are not only here to stay, but they’re quickly becoming preferred pastimes. On the flip side, some fans may not want to share. Many liked it when the adventures of Captain America were their best-kept secret, and who wants to play games that practically play themselves just so anyone, regardless of skill level, can play right through? Maybe they’d rather meet a humble artist over an arrogant movie star, and wasn’t it great when you didn’t have to wait in a line all day See HOWELLS, Page 23 RICH HOWELLS PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

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or some, it’s vacation. For others, it’s blockbuster movies. For others still, it’s outdoor activities. For hardcore geeks, the summer primarily means convention season. The meaning of this has undoubtedly changed over the years. Sure, they existed when my parents were growing up on “Star Trek” and the like, but in my lifetime, I’ve seen them transform from small niche gatherings to multi-million dollar extravaganzas.

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Horror fans chat with guests at the Saturday Nightmares convention.

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By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

dam Carolla has a lot to be happy about these days, but that doesn’t mean he’s ready to give up ranting just yet. The radio personality and stand-up comedian will perform at Gypsies Lounge & Nightclub at Mt. Airy Casino Resort on Saturday, June 25, at 8 p.m.

First introduced to many as the co-host of the call-in advice radio show Loveline from 1995 until 2005, Carolla said that host Dr. Drew Pinsky was a fan of a character he was portraying on another program on the same station and asked him to appear on the show. The transition from traditional comedian to radio host was an easy one, he said. “For me, it was exactly what the doctor ordered, pardon the pun. I always liked comedy, but I like sort of reality comedy a lot more than joke-based stuff,” Carolla said. His fame grew when he co-created two successful shows for Comedy Central “The Man Show” in 1999 and “Crank Yankers” in 2002. Creatively, Carolla said he experienced “both extremes” in television when it IF YOU GO came to creative control. WHAT: Comedian “It really runs the gambit Adam Carolla from pretty much autonomy, WHERE: Gypsies which is doing ‘Crank Yankers’ Lounge & Nightclub for Comedy Central where at Mt. Airy Casino they pretty much sat back and Resort cut you a check and leave you WHEN: Saturday, June 25, doors at 8 alone, versus doing a sitcom pip.m., show at 9 p.m. lot for CBS where they’re just up COST: $25-$40 your butt, arguing about what color the curtains should be over the sink in your fake kitchen and unnecessarily scrutinizing and basically micromanaging every creative fiber that was once in this project and just killing it eventually,” he recalled. “It’s always a horrible experience creatively. They never make the product any better; they always hurt the product.” In 2007, he released “The Hammer,” a semi-autobiographical independent film that he co-wrote and starred in. Loosely based on his early life as a construction worker and boxer, the comedy was praised as one of the best sports movies of the year. Despite receiving positive reviews, Carolla doubts he will be making another movie any time soon, saying that the only scripts they are truly interested in making have big names like Adam Sandler attached. “As far as me just heading over to Hollywood and going, ‘Hey, I’ve got an awesome idea for a movie,’ that’s not going to happen,” he said. See CAROLLA, Page 31

Sunday, June 19, 2011


Sunday, June 19, 2011

HOWELLS Continued from page 21

ard World Philadelphia Comic Con this weekend, where I’ll hobnob with the likes of Lou Ferrigno, Bruce Campbell, Pam Grier, and Billy Dee Williams, I’ll never forget where it all started for me. Scranton held its own comic con this past weekend at Johnson College, and with a simple three dollar entry fee and about $30 in my pocket, I was able to walk away with two bags full of comics and a little nostalgia. I didn’t need to spend my life savings to talk to the talented writers and artists who were more than willing to sign comics

for free that were being sold for much less than their respective cover prices, and I found those same deals from friendly vendors that built up my collection in the first place. So what am I trying to say with this column full of mixed messages? Please, if you have even a feigning interest in geekery, do yourself a favor and hit at least one of the major conventions, such as the various Wizard World cons. You will have an overwhelmingly fun experience no matter how much you’re willing to spend. You’ll leave with

a hundred stories and maybe even some new friends. But, at the same time, be sure to also support those smaller cons held throughout the country year-round. Not only will you probably find the coolest Wolverine T-shirt you ever saw in your life, you’ll also walk away with a lot of love for an ever-growing, yet still intensely personal, culture. Rich Howells writes about pop culture and more in ‘Infinite Improbability.’ Read it each week in Go Lackawanna.

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experiences with them. As an adult, however, I became more and more cognizant of the increasing costs of such epic weekends. As the guests get bigger at these events, so do the costs. By the time organizers pay the celebrities, the hotel, the staff, and factor in the promotion and production costs, there probably isn’t much left for them, so now they not only charge you per autograph at these things, but they even hit you up for money to take a picture with a guest on your own camera. By the time you pay for gas, tolls, a hotel room, and entry fees, you’re already broke, yet they expect you to also have enough to blow on personalized merchandise? You better have a stable job to return to on Monday because you’re definitely putting a major dent in your bank account. Convention season, for me, kicked off with Saturday Nightmares, a classic horror movie con held in East Rutherford, N.J., from June 3-5. In addition to meeting film legends like Martin Landau, Bruce Dern, and Tippi Hedren, I was able to interview Doug Bradley of “Hellraiser” fame, watch cult-favorite “Martin” with its star John Amplas, listen to Sid Haig tell stories from his 50 years in show business, and talk to a good portion of the cast of the original “Dawn of the Dead” about their favorite memories of the film. Even as I prepare for Wiz-

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just to watch one Q&A panel? One dollar entry fees have now become hundred-dollar weekends, and simple autographs have gone from free bonuses to small investments. And as more and more unrelated events, like “Twilight” sneak peeks, invade our sacred ground and shift its dynamic completely, it becomes harder and harder to even find a vendor selling comics amongst the corporate merchandising overload. For me, it’s all bittersweet. My con experience began at the Days Inn in Scranton, where my father would take me every time they held one to pick up some comics at quiet shows tucked away in a small ballroom. Sure, it was just a few kids playing “Magic: The Gathering” card games and independent shops unloading their overstock, but there was something truly great about sifting through those hundreds of books for that one special stack to take home. As I grew older, I’d still go now and again, but then other conventions began catching my attention. As a movie buff, I was elated to discover horror movie conventions like Monster-Mania in New Jersey, where it wasn’t just about buying things, but about meeting celebrities of all kinds and sharing unique

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By RICK BENTLEY McClatchy Newspapers

he popularity of teen angst in TV and films has resulted in a steady stream of brooding young actors who walk lonely streets in long black coats, trying to emote dark feelings. Often they are so wooden the scenes come across as trite. That’s not the case with “The Art of Getting By.” The film is loaded with teen-angst moments that have a more realistic feel because of superb performances by Freddie Highmore and Emma Roberts. Their acting resonates with such depth that the angst isn’t a dark costume slipped over the actors but a deep feeling consumed and then sweated out through every pore.

Highmore plays George Zinavoy, a What: “The Art of high-school senior Getting By” who sees homeStarring: Freddie work as a trivial anHighmore, Emma noyance when comRoberts, Blair pared with the Underwood, Rita Wilson larger concerns of Directed by: Gavin living. He’s so conWiesen sumed with the Running time: 84 topics of life and minutes death that he’s creRated: PG-13 for ated a social bubble sexual content, around himself. drinking ★★★ 1/2 Sally Howe (Roberts) provides the first reason for George to look beyond his emotional barricades. Teen-angst films often are comical, as with “Charlie Bartlett,” or melodramatic, as with “Twilight.” “The Art of Getting By” is more heartfelt. Newcomer director/writer Gavin Wiesen shows great maturity by having his actors play the angst in a realistic tone. That’s what makes the deep emotional moments so strong. Everyone is so confident of the strength of the performances, they don’t hesitate to enter areas usually considered taboo for the genre. When Highmore cries, it’s a nice contrast to the usual depictions of intense physical explosions or long passages of silence. It’s refreshing to see such a natural reaction. The film has a few script problems, especially a secondary story about George’s parents. But when it focuses on the sweet, confusing, frustrating and truthful relationship between the central characters, “The Art of Getting By” shows that even a well-worn genre can be given new life.

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REVIEW What: “The Green Lantern” Starring: Ryan Reynolds, Blake Lively, Peter Sarsgaard, Tim Robbins, Mark Strong, Temuera Morrison. Directed by: Martin Campbell Running time: 104 minutes Rated: PG-13 for mild vulgar language ★

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McClatchy Newspapers

o there are these aliens, you see, who have divided the universe into 3,000 or so sectors and have chosen one being from each planet — someone absolutely fearless — to wear a green ring that brings superpowers and helps the group maintain peace and order. On Earth, that person is Hal Jordan (Ryan Reynolds), a hot-shot fighterjet pilot given his ring by a dying alien who crash-lands on our planet.

gaard) and his disapproving senator father (Tim Robbins) give the story some drama and pathos to balance Hal’s happy-golucky demeanor. He remains remarkably unfazed even when the aliens (led by Mark Strong) draft him to their far-flung headquarters, a journey that provides an opportunity for loads of CGI effects. The tone is all over the place, which makes the movie difficult to take either seriously or as popcorn fluff. Reynolds has grown into a charismatic actor, and he gives the character his best shot, See LANTERN, Page 31

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By RENE RODRIGUEZ

The ring comes with a lantern that is used to charge it when its batteries run low. The lantern kind of resembles a funky bong, and if you were to make use of one before seeing “Green Lantern,” the film would be a lot more fun. What the ring cannot do, alas, is create a good movie. “Green Lantern” feels like the ultimate cut-and-paste job designed to appeal to every possible viewer. Funny, likable Hal is always cracking wise until he has to get serious and save the world. Fellow jet pilot Carol (Blake Lively) provides the requisite love interest. Scientist Hector (Peter Sars-


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he Scranton Comic Book Convention was held at Johnson College on Sunday, June 12. The event, now in its third year, is run by America’s Most Wanted Collectibles in Williamsport. More than a dozen writers and artists behind comics on Sonic the Hedgehog, Batman, Captain America and more were in attendance alongside vendors offering toys, collectible cards and other memorabilia.

RICH HOWELLS PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

1. Artist Gerry Stankiewicz stands beside some of his work on display. 2. The Mandalorian Mercs are a ’Star Wars’ costume club that creates customized armor as worn by character Boba Fett. 3. Artist Dan Parent sketches while onlookers watch.

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4. Artist Ken Haeser draws at his table while comic fans browse through the thousands of comics on sale. 5. Comics of all kinds were sold at the convention. 6. Writer Scott Beatty was also in attendance.


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NEWS RICH HOWELLS PHOTOS /FOR GO LACKAWANNA

ARTS

Rory Colarossi browses for a used book.

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cranton’s first festival celebrating the zine – a self-published literary magazine – was held Saturday, June 11, along Center Street. The convention was created to honor the literary art form that has survived serious advancements in technology. Nearly two dozen vendors, authors and artists participated with some traveling from as far as North Carolina. Festival organizer Jessica Meoni, a contributor to Go Lackawanna, said she was inspired to build the event in her hometown after attending a Philadelphia zine convention.

2. Amy Lynn Wyman and David Wyman are pictured. 3. Alena Vauter holds up her artwork in the “Nepatized” zine. Artists from several different states were in attendance. Artwork by Chris Francz was on display at the Zine Fest. Center Street was filled with vendors who traveled from several states.

4. David Lambert, right, plays while David Jordan reads a zine.

SPORTS

1. Charlene Kuon and Timothy Jones are pictured at Zine Fest. More than 100 people attended the first ever fest on Center Street in downtown Scranton, according to event co-organizer Jessica Meoni.


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By COLIN COVERT Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

H

him from his ex-wife and two kids. He adores them and maintains both households in mega-affluent style, but where nonfinancial obligations are concerned he hasn’t a clue. When he tries to advise his teen daughter on the school-dance snub that threatens to ruin her whole entire life forever, she is thoroughly mortified at his meddling. He’s really not to blame, though. His own dad was an explorer forever off adventuring throughout Tom’s See PENGUINS, Page 31

ARTS

aving done Ebenezer Scrooge and the Grinch, Jim Carrey once again plays a cynical old grouch taken on a journey of salvation by cute tykes. This time, with penguins!

Purists may be disappointed that “Mr. Popper’s Penguins” has ditched the performing-birds storyline of the children’s favorite in favor of the familiar “workaholic dad drifting away from his kids” template. The film is just another slice off a stale loaf, but it’s earnest and benign, even funny and has no ingredients that are bad for you, unless you are allergic to sap. Carrey’s Tom Popper is a fast-rising New York City real-estate wheeler-dealer one promotion away from the corner office. His climb to the top has distanced

REVIEW

SPORTS

What: “Mr. Popper’s Penguins” Starring: Jim Carrey, Carla Gugino, Angela Lansbury Directed by: Mark Waters Running time: 95 minutes Rated: PG for mild rude humor and some Language ★★


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‘RULER OF THE RIBS’ NEWS COURTESY PHOTO

It might take a powerful ring like the one given to Hal Jordan to save ’Green Lantern.’

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BRADLEY LANPEAR PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

CAROLLA Continued from page 22

Continued from page 27

ABOVE: Lt. Shayne Young chows down. TOP: Left to Right: Lt. Shayne Young, Edward Kalinowski, Guy Salerno, Corey Fabricatore, Danny Willis, Chris Dubas.

whatever they had to buy off of Amazon. We made so much money that month just from them doing that that it really said to me, ‘Wow, people are listening and they’re motivated. Let’s keep the pirate ship steaming forward,’ he said. The show went on to break the Guinness World Record for the most downloaded podcast ever, receiving over 59 million unique downloads. This prompted him to turn down a three-year, multimillion-dollar national radio syndication deal, feeling comfortable that his fans would support him. “Whether you do a late-night show or a sitcom or a terrestrial radio show or a satellite radio show or a podcast or you own a dirigible, it doesn’t really much matter. It’s how many ears and eyeballs you can get, and if you can get those ears and you can get those eyeballs, then it’s a business. If you can’t, then you can be

on NBC in primetime and be out of business. It’s really just about that.” The now 47-year-old comedian is sure to continue to entertain audiences with his relatable humor and quick wit during Saturday’s performance. “My bedroom has turned into my kids’ bedroom. It’s filled with plastic castles and ponies and trinkets and crap everywhere, and I thought, ‘Would this have worked with our parents?’ Could you imagine taking your big wheel and your Stratego game and just spreading it out all over your parents’ bedroom? It would be unthinkable, right?” Carolla observed. “I don’t know really what’s going on, but I do know that there are more of my kids’ toys in my bedroom than I owned, toy-wise, my entire life outside of my parents’ bedroom, and that is a sad state of affairs.”

but Hal remains a wholly unbelievable creation — someone who accepts these mindblowing discoveries with a shrug and goes with the flow. The 3-D in “Green Lantern” is particularly good, but there are big stretches during which you can tell Reynolds is standing alone on a green screen, interacting with objects and creatures not really there. The villain is a gigantic, planet-devouring mon-

PENGUINS Continued from page 30

childhood. When cartons of penguins arrive at his penthouse door, a bequest from his late father, the famously loyal birds set Popper on a path to redemption that’s approximately 200 pratfalls and sentimental moments long. Popper learns Big Life Lessons as he watches the birds bond and breed. His kids delight in his waddling sidekicks and clamor to do overnights at his penthouse apartment, and it’s not long before Popper’s ex (Carla Gugino) jumps atop him at an ice rink as if it were mating season in the Antarctic. In this film, saying “I love

you” solves every problem short of global warming. Carrey is at his best in early scenes with a wicked glint in his eye. He works his crafty, fast-talking ways to bilk property owners out of their buildings and con his partners into offering him a seat on the board, provided he can scoop up Central Park’s landmark restaurant, Tavern on the Green. As the plot gears begin to grind and he’s softened by his squawking, belly-flopping aviary’s antics, the film loses its steam. Angela Lansbury plays the Tavern’s owner, who will only sell to a new owner with solid family values. You shouldn’t need a diagram to know how things will work out.

SPORTS

“Everyone who’s reading this has exactly the same chance of making my next movie. I’m serious. I might be one kick above the person reading this in that I could probably get a meeting.” This didn’t impede his success in other mediums, however. His 2010 book, “In Fifty Years We’ll All Be Chicks,” made the New York Times Best Seller List, and after his morning radio show was cancelled, he founded his own podcast, The Adam Carolla Show, and offered it for free on his website. “The podcast became a business. It started making money. It started getting advertisers. It was a big thing when people were doing this thing where they would go to adamcarolla.com and click on the Amazon banner and buy

LANTERN

ARTS

exas Roadhouse, 4011 Commerce Blvd., Dickson City, hosted a “Ruler of the Ribs” competitive eating contest between the Dickson City Fire Department, Truck 23, and the Wilson Fire Company, Truck 20, on Wednesday, June 15. Both departments displayed their ladder trucks outside of the area steakhouse. The contest coincided with Texas Roadhouse’s annual “Ribfest.” The Dickson City Fire Department won the competition by eating 81 ribs, and the Wilson company trailed with 57 bones, according to Brittney Bernoski, store marketer. The evening raised a total of $780 for a local charity.

ster going around killing Green Lanterns by feeding on their supposedly non-existent fear. The climactic battle between the eponymous hero and the huge octopus thing is well done but lasts only a few minutes. In fact, for a comic-book movie, “Green Lantern” is surprisingly light on action and fun and heavy on talk. I never read the comics, so I have no idea how faithful any of this is to the source material. But judging by the movie, I now understand why the character never caught on in a big way. Some superheroes just aren’t meant for movies.


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Spelling champ returns to AHMS

SPORTS

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NEWS

By DON McGLYNN For Go Lackawanna

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ukanya Roy, winner of the 84th Scripps National Spelling Bee, returned to Abington Heights Middle School June 13. A 14-year-old eighth grade student at Abington Heights Middle School and a three-time winner of the Times Leader/Scripps NEPA Regional Spelling Bee, Roy competed at the event for the third consecutive year near Washington, D.C. on June 2.

She was transported by limousine and escorted by the South Abington Police Department Monday, paid a visit to Abington Heights High School, the district’s elementary schools and administration building before returning to the middle school . Roy, accompanied by her parents, Abhi and Mousumi Roy, was greeted by her classmates, who lined the sidewalks with signs congratulating her on her achievement. “It was really amazing. I couldn’t believe that everyone was out here supporting me and cheering me on,” said Roy. “It was really great to be back because I really did miss Abington Heights Middle School in the two weeks I was away. So it was so great to… see all these familiar faces and see the school again.” An assembly was held in the school auditorium with a video highlighting Roy’s journey, from winning the spelling bee to her appearances on CNN, “Live! With Regis and Kelly,” “Jimmy Kimmel Live ” and her meeting in the Oval Office with President Barack Obama. “The one word I think we all know how to spell is pride, and that’s what this all about today – pride,” said Lackawanna County Commissioner Corey O’Brien. O’Brien and Lackawanna County Commissioner Michael Washo were two of the special guests in attendance at the assembly. They congratulated

DON MCGLYNN PHOTO

Sukanya Roy’s friends Jesse Sablah, center, and Casey Schlosser welcome the National Spelling Bee champ back to Abington Heights Middle School on Monday with a bouquet of roses.

Roy, and Washo presented her with a proclamation from the Lackawanna County Commissioners, O’Brien, Washo and A.J. Munchak, that declared Monday, June 13, 2011, as Sukanya Roy Day in Lackawanna County. Other special guests in attendance Monday were Abington Heights Superintendent Michael Mahon and State Senator John Blake’s Regional Director Lawrence D. West. On June 8, Blake introduced a Senate Resolution honoring Roy for winning the Scripps National Spelling Bee. West extended an invitation to Roy and her family to receive the resolution on the Senate floor in Harrisburg some time this week. Lieutenant Governor Jim Cawley and Governor Tom Corbett each sent proclamations congratulating Roy on her achievement. Mahon encouraged students in attendance to look at Roy’s achievement as an inspiration to fuel their own success. “Perhaps through one of the students in this room is a worldclass novel, or perhaps there will

S. JOHN WILKIN PHOTO

Prashant Shitut, president of Impressions Media, the company that owns Go Lackawanna and several other multimedia businesses in northeastern Pennsylvania, presented framed copies of pages of the paper to Sukanya Roy of South Abington Township. Roy was the 2009, 2010 and 2011 winner of The Times Leader/Scripps NEPA Regional Spelling Bee and the 2011 winner of the Scripps National Spelling Bee. Her gift - a framed copy of the news coverage she earned with her national victory - was presented at PNC Field, home of the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees, at The Times Leader’s “Newspapers In Education Night.” Roy also threw out the ceremonial first pitch prior to the game.

be an extraordinary piece of music produced in this room. Perhaps someone who is working

so hard in our robotics program will develop something that will change the lives of thousands of

people,” said Mahon. “Maybe that will happen, because we know that it can.”


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PIAA CLASS AAA BASEBALL CHAMPIONSHIP

NEWS

Tunkhannock falls in state title game

ARTS PETE G. WILCOX PHOTO

Tunkhannock baseball coach Gary Custer, left, embraces his star pitcher Mike Healey at the conclusion of Friday’s PIAA AAA Championship game at Medlar Field at Lubrano Park in State College. By DEREK LEVARSE Times Leader

See TUNKHANNOCK, Page 36

SPORTS

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TATE COLLEGE – It was one inning. One string of mistakes. One pitch that missed the mark. And that was all it took. Brief lapses like this were rare for Tunkhannock this season. Consistent play had carried the Tigers into the team’s first state title game appearance. But what unfolded in the bottom of the fourth inning on Friday stopped them from claiming the crown.

Tunkhannock surrendered six runs on five hits in the fourth while struggling in the field and giving up a grand slam to seal the team’s fate. Joe Tuschak’s pivotal home run broke a tie and lifted Northern York to a 6-3 win and the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association Class AAA baseball championship at Penn State’s Medlar Field. “We’ve had innings like that before,” Tigers senior Mike Papi said. “But this was the state championship game.” Things unraveled suddenly for

Tunkhannock High School baseball team is shown with the runner-up trophy at the conclusion of Friday’s PIAA AAA Championship game.


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West Scranton team leads Legion midway through season WestScrantonranoffastreakof sixwinsinsevendays,fromJune7 to June13, to arrive at the midway point in the District 11 American Legion season two full games ahead of second-place Abington VFW. West Scranton went 8-0 while Abington VFW was 6-2 and South Scranton was 5-3 at the midway point in the season. Carbondale/ Lakeland and Valley View each got off to 4-3 starts. Green Ridge, Dunmore, DicksonCityandMoscowmakeupthe rest of the league, which is down to nine teams after Taylor droppedoutfollowingthe2010season. West Scranton started its tear June 7 with a 15-5 rout of Carbon-

dale/Lakeland and edged Green Ridge, 4-3, the next day. Following its only day off in a week, West Scranton came back to beat Abington, 8-2; Valley View, 7-4; Dunmore, 6-1, and South Scranton 10-2. Right fielder Josh Schroeder, in his fifth year with the team, and catcher Steve Sunday, in his fourth year, have been the offensive leaders along with first baseman Tom Richards and left fielder Dan Repshis. “Josh has the best arm on the fieldjustabouteverytimehetakes thefield,”WestScrantonmanager George Roskos said of Schroeder, who is committed to Bloomsburg University, along with Richards. Sunday is coming off a strong finish to his first college season

whenhemadethetournamentallstar team while helping Sullivan County Community College (N.Y.) to its region title. James Dunning and Mick Grogan have been handling the bulk of West Scranton’s pitching. The loss of the Taylor franchise led to the league switching from

two divisions to one group with every team playing each opponent twice. Players from north of Union Street in Taylor will now be part of the West Scranton program while players from south of Union Street will be eligible to play for South Scranton. The league has reduced its reg-

ular-season schedule, which is set to end June 30. Theleagueisobligatedtodetermine its representative for the Region5TournamentbyJuly14.The Region 5 Tournament is scheduled July 16-20 in Bloomsburg. See LEGION, Page 41

ARTS

NEWS

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

AND THE CORAL REEFER BAND! Get started today, just visit referafriend.thewilkesbarredeal.com or scan this QR code on your mobile device to enter!

SPORTS

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Sunday, June 19, 2011

GOLackawanna

35

NEWS ARTS

GO LACKAWANNA FILE PHOTOS

LEFT: West Scranton’s Dave Morgan will have his second professional bout on June 24.

J

oel Roberts and Scott Heckman put on a show against each other in the main event of Cage Fight 7. The two Mixed Martial Arts fighters will be back, along with local favorite Dave Morgan, Friday night when Cage Fight 8 is held at the Ice Box Sports Complex in Scranton.

“Joel holds the (state) belt at 145 because of that fight, but since that fight he has moved down to 135,” promoter Maury Nehme said. “That was an upset, but Scott bounced back well and won a fight four weeks ago.” Heckman appeared to have Roberts in trouble for much of the March 26 bout before Roberts landed a big right hand that changed the match, leading to a victory by rear naked chokehold at 2:12 of the second round in their Pennsylvania See FIGHT, Page 41

ABOVE: Marty Flynn fights Eddie Hardison during a previous came fight event in Scranton.

SPORTS

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna


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TUNKHANNOCK

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Continued from page 33

the Tigers (19-3), who held a 2-0 lead after Papi and Mike Healey came through with back-to-back RBI singles in the top of the third. That inning ended with runners stranded on second and third, however, and there was a sense that the Tigers missed a chance to take control of the game. So when Northern (23-5) led off the bottom of the fourth with a pair of singles against Healey, Tunkhannock’s starter, the tension on the field rose. A sacrifice bunt was mishandled in the field and the Tigers were charged with two errors on the play, pushing across a run to make it 2-1. Two more infield singles tied the game up with no outs and the bases still loaded. “I sensed a little panic,” Tigers coach Gary Custer said. “That’s why I went out there (to try and calm them down).” Healey struck out the next batter, but that brought up Tuschak. The Polar Bears ’ leadoff hitter was selected in the sixth round by the New York Mets in last week’s Major League Baseball Draft. He quickly displayed his pedigree, keying on an 0-1fastball that stayed up in the zone, blasting it just beyond the fence in right-center for the grand slam. “I was just hoping he was going to make a mistake, and he did,” Tuschak said. Given that the ball was headed out near the deepest part of the park, Tuschak said he was worried his shot would be tracked down right in front of the wall. But there was enough juice to clear the stadium and give the Polar Bears a 6-2 lead. Healey responded immediately with a pair of strikeouts, but the damage had been done. “We got the hits we needed and got the breaks,” Northern coach Brian Robison said. Tunkhannock cut the deficit to 6-3 after just two batters in the top of the fifth, as Ty Saylor doubled home Kyle Custer, who led all batters with three hits in the game. Northern ace Vince Apicella shut things down from there, however, retiring the next three Tigers he faced to blunt Tunkhannock’s momentum. The junior lefty finished with eight strikeouts and no walks in

PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS

Fans spell their support for the Tunkhannock Tigers.

the complete-game victory. “He was right there all game,” Gary Custer said of Apicella, who has an offer to Division I Coastal Carolina. “He mixed in his offspeed stuff well and I think it threw us off guard.” Apicella did not allow another hit after Saylor’s double in the fifth, as the Tigers had just one baserunner for the rest of the game, thanks to a Northern error. The Polar Bears committed four errors in the game, including one by each outfielder after the first three innings. “I guess it was probably a little bit of the nerves kicking in,” Tuschak said. Healey echoed that sentiment, saying everyone in the Tigers dugout had their share of nervous energy early on in the day. The energy turned to disappointment by game’s end, as the team received its silver while being cheered on by the large contingent of orange-clad fans who made the trip from Tunkhannock. The loss caps off a two-year run that saw the Tigers win consecutive district and division titles, going 24-4 in the regular season and 12-2 in the postseason. Tunkhannock beat West Scranton in the District 2 championship game and became the final team alive

Former Tunkhannock High School baseball player Louis Sick, facing camera, wishes his old teammates Ian Robinson, left, and Kyle Custer luck before the start of Friday’s game

from District 2 in any sport this school year after the Valley View softball team lost Monday in the state semifinals. “The past two years were amazing,” said Papi, who will head to the University of Virginia in the coming weeks for some summer classes while preparing to play for the Cavaliers. “These guys were great. Every game, even the guys on the bench were cheering for us the whole time. “Last year and this year were phenomenal for us.”

Tunkhannock first baseman Rich Condeelis backhands a grounder in the fourth inning.


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Team leaders among area’s ’10 MLB picks Aces of the Pacific Coast League. Like many other second-year players, Groff has been waiting to get started this season. He returns to Missoula, which opens the season Monday in Helena. Relief pitcher Victor Lara remains a teammate of Groff’s. They played together at Keystone and in Missoula last year after Lara was drafted in the 34th round. Lara will return to Missoula after struggling there in 2010. He went1-5 with one save and an 8.02 earned run average in 17 games. In 21 1/3 innings, Lara allowed 27 hits and 17 walks while striking out 22. Sean Murphy, the other Keystone player selected last year, started his season June 12 with a strong pitching performance to lead the Stockton Ports to a California League victory in Bakersfield. Murphy went six innings and gave up just one run on six hits and a walk while striking out five while earning the win. The victory improved Murphy to 4-0 as a professional. He was 3-0 with two saves and a 2.57 ERA in 14 games as a reliever last year. In 21 innings, he yielded just 15 hits and eight walks while striking out 32.

Dan Winnie, a Lackawanna College player selected by the Atlanta Braves in the 16th round, is returning to Danville, Va. of the Appalachian League after finishing the season there in 2010. Winnie pitched two scoreless innings in his only appearance with Danville. He started out with the Braves team in the Gulf Coast League where he was 4-2 with a 5.79 ERA in 14 games, including 10 starts. In 42 innings, Winnie gave up 52 hits and 15 walks while striking out 35. Lackawanna Trail graduate Jacke Healey was selected by the Houston Astros out of Youngstown State in the 27th round last season. Healey batted .170 with five homers and 21 RBI in 44 games with the Tri-City Valley Cats, a New York-Penn League team based in Troy, N.Y. After going 0-for-1 in one appearance with the parent Astros in a Major League spring training game, Healey had not played this season prior to Friday’s start of the New York-Penn League season. He was again listed on the Valley Cats roster.

Yazy Arbello will start for the Eastern Division Tuesday in the Midwest League All-Star Game. Arbelo, a first baseman from Keystone College, is leading the league in home runs while playing for the South Bend Silver Hawks. His efforts represent the most promising start among six players with county college or high school ties that were selected in the 2010 Major League Baseball Draft. All six immediately started their professional careers last summer. Arbelo was the first of four Keystone players selected in the draft and the first of three to be taken by the Arizona Diamondbacks organization. Following his selection in the 26th round, Arbelo excelled with the Yakima Bears, making the Northwest League’s year-end, all-star team. Arbelo batted .285 in 68 games with Yakima. He had 13 doubles and 14 homers while driving in 55 runs and was selected as the league’s Player of the Week Aug. 9.

No. 10 picks have historically played great

SPORTS

NEWS

This season has resulted in another Player of the Week award and another allstar selection for Arbelo, who has moved up to a higher-level Class A league. Arbelo was named the Midwest League’s Player of the Week May 23. No other player in the league had more than 11 home runs through Tuesday when Arbelo was leading the way with16. He also led the league in runs batting in (51) and slugging percentage (.592) while ranking fourth in doubles (20). Arbelo was hitting .280 through 63 games. Third baseman Eric Groff also put up some impressive numbers at the plate last season after Arizona selected him in the 34th round last season. Groff tied a Missoula Osprey record by hitting three home runs in a Pioneer League game less than a month into his career. The 44th-round pick finished second on the team in homers (eight) and RBI (40) while hitting .281 in 63 games. That earned Groff a promotion all the way to Class AAA for the final five games of the season when he batted .091 for the Reno

ARTS

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Past performances by other players selected with the 10th overall pick in the MLB Draft point to a strong chance of Abington Heights graduate Cory Spangenberg eventually ending up as a Major League Baseball player. Spangenberg has done everything he can to get that process moving as fastas possible, including driving in the winning run in his professional debut Friday night. The 20-year-old from Clarks Summit was the first player from the first round of this year’s draft to sign a contract. Spangenberg followed through on plans first reported on golackawanna.com when he signed his contract June 10 in San Diego. He agreed to a $1.86-million offer from the Padres, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune, and took batting and infield practice before San Diego’s game that night. After a training camp stop in Arizona, Spangenberg reported to the Eugene Emeralds in time for their short-season Class A Northwest League opener. Spangenberg batted second,

played second base and helped the Emeralds complete a rally from a three-run deficit by drawing a bases-loaded walk with two outs in the bottom of the eighth to force in the final run in a 5-4 win over the Boise Hawks. “We showed some tenacity right there,” Spangenberg said, according to the University of Oregon’s Daily Emerald. “ … We stayed with it, had some positive at-bats.” Friday’s game began the process of climbing through the ranks of Minor League Baseball for Spangenberg, who went on from leading Abington Heights to the 2009 state Class AAA championship to have awardwinning college seasons at Virginia Military Academy and Indian River State College in Florida. Every 10th pick from 2001 to 2009 ultimately made it to the Major Leagues, including twotime Cy Young Award winner Tim Lincecum of the San Francisco Giants. That streak could still be extended if Joe Torres, a pitcher drafted out of Gateway High School in Kissimmee, Fla. in 2000 ultimately makes it to the

Majors. Torres is 72-50 with a 4.67 earned run average in 11 minor league seasons, but is having perhaps his best season at age 28. Torres is 1-1 with a 2.66 ERA and 26 strikeouts in 23 2/3 innings at Tulsa, Colorado’s team in the Texas League at Class AA, the highest level he has reached to date. Former Scranton/WilkesBarre Red Baron Kevin Garner topped out at Class AAA after being selected in 1987, but every other 10th pick besides Torres through 2009 made it, with varying levels of success. Michael Choice, a center fielder from Texas-Arlington who was selected by the Oakland Athletics last season, is working his way through the minors. Choice has 14 home runs and is 7-for-8 stealing bases but is hitting just .245 in 63 games at Stockton of the Class A California League. The list of the last 25 number-10 picks starts with Garner, who was drafted by the Padres out of the University of Texas as a pitcher, but became a full-time position player a year later. Garner played 887 games in the minors, including 98 over three sea-

sons at Class AAA. He hit 14 homers, drove in 39 runs and batted .267 as a first baseman for the 1994 Red Barons in 54 games. Three of the pitchers picked 10th in that time – Lincecum, Ben Sheets and Jon Garland – went on to strike out more than 1,000 batters in the Major Leagues. Barely more than two years after being selected out of Stanford, Drew Storen has already saved 21 games and won eight for the Washington Nationals. First baseman Carlos Pena, picked by Texas in 1998, has 240 career homers, including 46 in 2007 when he also drove in 121 runs and batted .282 for Tampa Bay in the best season of his career. Pena averaged 36 homers and102 RBI for the Rays over the past four seasons before moving to the Cubs where he has 10 homers while batting .218 this season. Robin Ventura, Pena, Carl Everett, Eric Chavez, Charles Johnson and Michael Tucker all went on to hit more than 100 homers in their careers. Ventura won six Gold Gloves and was a two-time all-star in a career that included 294 homers

NUMBER 10 PICKS Players listed by projected position and organization at time of selection 2011 – Cory Spangenberg, 2B, San Diego ’10 – Michael Choice, CF, Oakland ’09 – Drew Storen, P, Washington ’08 – Jason Castro, C, Houston ’07 – Madison Bumgarner, SP, San Francisco ’06 – Tim Lincecum, SP, San Francisco ’05 – Cameron Maybin, OF, Detroit ’04 – Thomas Diamond, P, Texas ’03 – Ian Stewart, 3B, Colorado ’02 – Drew Meyer, SS, Texas ’01 – Chris Burke, SS, Houston ’00 – Joe Torres, P, Anaheim ’99 – Ben Sheets, P, Milwaukee ’98 – Carlos Pena, 1B, Texas ’97 – Jon Garland, P, Chicago Cubs ’96 – Eric Chavez, 3B, Oakland ’95 – Chad Hermanson, SS, Pittsburgh ’94 – Jaret Wright, P, Cleveland ’93 – Brooks Kieschnick, OF, Chicago Cubs ’92 – Michael Tucker, SS, Kansas City ’91 – Tyler Green, P, Philadelphia ’90 – Carl Everett, OF, New York Yankees ’89 – Charles Johnson, C, Montreal ’88 – Robin Ventura, 3B, Chicago White Sox ’87 – Kevin Garner, P, San Diego

and 1182 RBI. Tucker also stole 114 bases.


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

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PAGE 40

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Sunday, June 19, 2011

GOLackawanna

LEGION Continued from page 34

NEWS

Jeff Kovaleski has taken over for Roskos as league president. Kovaleski said the league will conduct a four-team playoff to determine its regional representative. The best-of-three semifinal series are set to begin July 5, followed by the best-of-three final, beginning July 9. Two of the league’s four new field managers have their teams in contention.

Wally Sanderson has replaced Tom Arthur as Carbondale/Lakeland manager and Rob Judge has taken over for Tim Buckley as South Scranton manager. CharlieTerreryhastakenover for Mike “Sid” Hallinan in Dunmore and John Musyt has replaced Kovaleski as Dickson City’s field manager. On the state level, the scouts all-star series has been eliminated following budget cuts. TheDistrict11leaguewillstill hold a Scouts Day Showcase at Connell Park with workouts scheduled for 10 a.m. and a simulated game at11:30.

41

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Richie Gates, bottom, battles his opponent, Chris Stone, during a previous cage fighting event at the Ice Box Sports Complex in Scranton

FIGHT Continued from page 35

Cage Fight Series featherweight title bout. “It was a matter of staying out of trouble and weathering the storm,” Roberts said of absorbing several punches from Heckman. Roberts, from Slatington, is 5-3 as a pro. He will meet Bret Thomas (5-4) in the main event. Morgan, who won his only professional fight, will face

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Brandon Inskeep (4-5) in another 135-pound bout. The former West Scranton wrestler and NCAA Division III wrestling champion at King’s College missed the last card because of an injury. He was there to see Inskeep post a first-round win to stop a three-match losing

streak. Heckman (7-2) will face Casey Johnson (2-0) in the other professional bout. Heckman, from Bangor, has actually added two wins since the loss to Roberts. The rest of the card will feature amateur bouts with a dozen currently scheduled. Martin Wojnarowski, a 205pounder from Mayfield, will try to improve on his 5-0 record. Jason Colarusso and Adam Bisignani from Moosic along with Steve Wilson and Eric Vazquez from Scranton are among the other amateurs on the card.

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 19, 2011

ARTS

NEWS

42

GO LACKAWANNA FILE PHOTO

Members of the Valley View Lady Cougars softball team gather earlier this season before their District 2 Class AAA championship game against Dallas. The Cougars advanced to the state semifinal game before losing on Monday.

Inconsistent hitting hurts VV run SPORTS

A

LLENTOWN – Valley View did not stop creating the opportunities that made the Cougars the highest-scoring team in the first two rounds of the state softball tournament. Manheim Central, however, had three arms available to keep making sure the hits Valley View produced in each of the seven innings resulted in nothing more than scoring chances.

KEEPING SCORE TOM ROBINSON A championship-level softball game does not often feature 19 baserunners, but pitcher Alexa Campbell, shortstop Samantha Ginder and catcher Katie Van Blargan combined to turn it into just another 1-0 game. That is the score by which Manheim Central ended Valley View’s season in Monday’s Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association Class AAA semifinals at Patriots Park. “The way it was going, it was a one-run game,” Manheim Central coach Steve Ginder said. “We felt

confident from about the third or fourth inning on.” By the time the fourth inning ended, Campbell had posted inning-ending strikeouts with a runner in scoring position twice, Samantha Ginder had gotten her first chance to show her combination of range and arm that would contribute to each of the final three innings and Van Blargan had gunned down runners on Valley View’s only two attempts to steal bases. They were the reasons coach Ginder was able to envision a 1-0 game against a team that had scored 25 runs in just 12 innings in the first two rounds of state play. “We only gave up 10 runs one time all season,” he said. “We weren’t going to give up 10 runs.

“I was confident in that.” A Manheim Central team that had started the season 4-3 came away with its 21st win in 22 games since while Valley View suffered its first loss after 19 straight wins in a season that included Lackawanna League Division 2 and District 2 Class AAA championships. Valley View advanced four runners to second base in the first three innings, but none made it to third base. “Campbell pitched a great game,” Valley View coach E.J. Weston said. “She battled our hitters the entire game. “I thought we hit the ball. I thought we put the ball in play. I See VALLEY, Page 44


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

PAGE 43

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44

GOLackawanna

Sunday, June 19, 2011

VALLEY

ARTS

NEWS

Continued from page 42

just don’t think we strung any along.” Manheim Central did not get a runner into scoring position until it loaded the bases with one out in the bottom of the fourth. Gina Chieffallo got a strikeout and an infield pop-up to second baseman MollyAnn Mecca to end that trouble. The difference, however, ultimately came in Manheim Central stringing its limited chances together. Valley View’s seven hits in seven innings might have worked a little better if they weren’t produced so consistently – one at a time. Manheim Central had four of its seven hits and both of the walks it received in the two innings that the Barons loaded the bases. The second chance in the sixth inning was all that was needed to decide a game where runs were at a premium. Van Blargan singled to get it started and gave way to courtesy runner Meagan Ebersole. Two groundouts moved Ebersole around to third and walks to the bottom two hitters in the order loaded the bases. Shortstop and leadoff hitter Liz Aniska, one of the biggest reasons Valley View was in the state semifinals, backpedaled and went to

reach for an overhead catch as left fielder Gaby Santarelli came charging in. The ball bounced off Aniska’s glove for an error that allowed one run to score. The run ultimately decided a state finalist, but the Cougars did not stop trying to overturn the result. Santarelli, who also contributed a single and double, got to the ball as Aniska tumbled to the ground. Santarelli threw home where catcher Anna McElroy stood her ground in a vicious collision, holding on to the ball for the third out to keep Valley View within a run. Katie Iyoob finished 3-for-3 by singling through the middle with one out in the seventh. The Cougars got the bat on the ball two more times, but Samantha Ginder handled both, including a charging, bobbling play before throwing across the diamond to end Valley View’s season in disappointment. “I’m so proud of Valley View softball and everything it stands for,” Weston said, “and most importantly the girls that represent it.” After falling in the state tournament for the second straight year, Weston had a message similar to a year ago. “We will be back,” he said. “I have kids that are resilient, that have true character and I know that their determination will get us to a position where we bounce back and continue to fight in the future.”

SPORTS BRIEFS Pena called up to NYY Derek Jeter’s injury in New York was felt by the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees. When the New York Yankees placed their shortstop on the 15-day disabled list with a strained right calf Tuesday, infielder Ramiro Pena was recalled from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.

SPORTS

Valley View coach E.J. Weston

Loughnane named U of S assistant soccer coach Matt Pivirotto, head men’s soccer coach at the University of Scranton, has announced the appointment of Andrew Loughnane as a full-time assistant coach. Loughnane, from Harri-

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‘I thought we hit the ball. I thought we put the ball in play. I just don’t think we strung any along.’

son City, is a recent graduate of Caldwell College in New Jersey. He was a fouryear lettermen who started 48 games for the Cougars and twice served as captain. Loughnane was also a member of the men’s tennis team and the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC). The Royals will open their season Sept. 1 against William Paterson at Fitzpatrick Field at 7 p.m.

Pena hit .269 with four homers, 17 RBI and three stolen bases as the shortstop at Class AAA.

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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

FAMILY CIRCUS

PAGE 45

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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

The Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS®, Inc.

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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

MARKETPLACE

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PAGE 47

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570-779-3890 570-829-5596

ad call...829-7130 CHEVROLET ‘06 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

Silver beauty, 1 Owner, Museum quality. 4,900 miles, 6 speed. All possible options including Navigation, Power top. New, paid $62,000 Must sell $45,900 570-299-9370

412 Autos for Sale

FORD ‘05 EXPLORER SPORT TRAC XLT

CHEVY ‘92 CAMARO Only 8,500 miles! V8, 25th Anniversary Edition, t-top, 5 speed and much more. Like new! $17,995 570-829-3929

CHRYSLER `05 SEBRING LX Low mileage, blue, 2 door, automatic. Excellent condition $7,500 (570) 740-7446

CHRYSLER ‘06 300C HEMI

Light green, 18,000 miles, loaded, leather, wood trim, $24,000. 570-222-4960 leave message

FORD `04 MUSTANG Mach I, 40th

ANNIVERSARY EDITION

To place your Call 570-650-0278 ad call...829-7130 To place your CENTRAL CITY MOTORS

412 Autos for Sale

V8, Auto, 1,300 miles, all options, show room condition. Call for info. Asking $24,995 Serious inquiries only. 570-636-3151

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 FORD `07 MUSTANG

63,000 highway miles, silver, runs great, $11,500. negotiable. 570-479-2482

FORD ‘02 FOCUS WAGON

Low mileage, One owner $6,995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG

GTRedCONVERTIBLE with black

top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $18,500 570-760-5833

412 Autos for Sale

KIA ‘08 RIO LX

Sedan, automatic, low miles $11,650

1/2 Ton, 4WD, automatic, V6 $15,992

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 HYUNDAI `04 TIBURON GT

Blue, 5 speed manual, CD, Air, factory alarm, power windows & locks. 38K. $7,500 negotiable. Call 570-540-6236

468

412 Autos for Sale

Auto Parts

To place your ad call...829-7130 412 Autos for Sale

MERCEDES-BENZ `05 240C 4Matic, V6 - Gray,

HYUNDAI ‘03 ELANTRA

4 cylinder, automatic, cd, 1 owner. Economy Car! $4,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

To place your ad call...829-7130

MAZDA `04 RX-8 Hunter Green, 80,000 miles. New brakes & rotors. New alignment. Two new rear tires. No accidents.

77K highway miles, Excellent condition, dealer serviced. Sun roof, heated seats. $15,500. Call 570-288-3916

PRICE REDUCED

To place your ad call...829-7130 468

$8,000 or best offer. For more information, call (570) 332-4213

Auto Parts

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 and Up $125 extra if driven, pulled or pushed in. NOBODY Pays More

570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6am-pm Happy Trails!

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

MERCEDES `97 SL320 4 year

ANNIVERSARY EDITION Convertible, blue metallic with gray leather interior, automatic, power windows & locks, CD changer, alloy wheels & more! $11,995. Trades Welcome. 570-829-3929

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

We Buy Scrap Metal $$$$ ALL KINDS $$$$

PIPE - ROD - SHEET - BAR - TUBING - TURNINGS - BEAMS PUNCHINGS - OLD CARS -TRUCKS MACHINERY - FARM EQUIPMENT - METAL ROOFING ENGINES - TRANSMISSIONS -EXHAUST SYSTEM PARTS APPLIANCES - ANY AND ALL SCRAP METAL FREE CONTAINER SERVICE Small quantities to 1,000’s of tons accepted HIGHEST PRICES PAID FAST SETTLEMENTS CALL DMS SHREDDING, INC

570-346-7673 570-819-3339

Your Scrap Metal is worth $$$

Call Today!


PAGE 48 412 Autos for Sale

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011 412 Autos for Sale

CROSSROAD MOTORS 570-825-7988

700 Sans Souci Highway WE SELL FOR LESS!! 10 DODGE CARAVAN SXT 32K, Power sliding doors, Factory warranty! $18,899 09 DODGE NITRO SLT 24K, Factory Warranty! $19,099 09 CHRYSLER SEBRING CONVERTIBLE TOURING, 6 cylinder, 38K $13,899 09 DODGE CALIBER SXT 2.0, automatic, 24K, Factory Warranty! $14,399 08 HONDA RIDGELINE RTL 32K, Leather, Sunroof, Factory Warranty! $24,899 08 C HEVY I MPALA LS, 4 dr., Only 37K 5 year/100K Factory Warranty! $13,999 08 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4 34K, Red $16,799 07 C HEVY I MPALA LS, 4 dr., Only 45K 5 year/100K Factory Warranty! $11,899 07 CHEVY MALIBU LS, 4 cylinder, 48K Factory Warranty! $9,439 07 JEEP COMMANDER 4X4 3rd seat, 33K $15,599 03 FORD EXPLORER 4X4, XLS, 4 door, Only 44K $8,199 01 LINCOLN TOWN CAR, Executive, 74K $7,399 TITLE TAGS FULL NOTARY SERVICE 6 M ONTH WARRANTY

MERCEDES-BENZ `95 SL 500 Convertible, with removable hard top, dark Blue, camel interior, Summer Driving Only, Garage Kept. Very Good Condition, No Accidents. Classy Car. Price Reduced! $13,995 or trade for SUV or other. 570-388-6669

NISSAN `02 SENTRA SE-R SPEC V Red. 87,000 miles,

manual, sun roof, tinted windows, $5,600. 570-954-0115

PONTIAC `07 GRAND PRIX GTP 140000 miles, auto-

matic, front wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, all power, CD player, tinted windows, new breaks, tires. $5,500. 570-582-7514

412 Autos for Sale

TOYOTA ‘07 CAMRY LE 4 cylinder sedan, automatic $16,855

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

PONTIAC ‘03 VIBE GT 4 cylinder, 6-speed, cd, sunroof, 1 owner. Sharp Sharp Car! $5,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

To place your ad call...829-7130

PONTIAC ‘07 VIBE Automatic moonroof $11,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

PONTIAC ‘69 FIREBIRD 400 CONVERTIBLE Blue/white top & white interior. Recent documented frame-off restoration. Over $31,000 invested. will sell $21,500. 570-335-3127

PORSCHE `02 BOXSTER S Great convertible,

black top, 6 speed manual transmission, carbon fiber dash, leather interior, front & rear trunk, fast & agile. $18,000 or best offer. Call 570-262-2478

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

SATURN ‘05 ION 4 cylinder,

automatic, cd, 1 owner. Extra Clean! $4,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

SUZUKI ‘10 SX4 5 door hatchback,

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

To place your ad call...829-7130 VOLVO `01 XC70

All wheel drive, 46,000 miles, burgundy with tan leather, complete dealer service history, 1 owner, detailed, garage kept, estate. $9,100. 570-840-3981

412 Autos for Sale

TOYOTA ‘09 SCION TC

Automatic, moon roof, low miles. $17,945

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 VOLKSWAGEN `04 BEETLE CONVERTIBLE

Blue. AM/FM cassette. Air. Automatic. Power roof, windows, locks & doors. Boot cover for top. 22k. Excellent condition. Garage kept. Reduced $14,000 570-822-1976 Leave Message

VOLVO ‘04 XC70

Cross Country, All Wheel Drive $11,880

Only 8,600 miles $15,892

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

TOYOTA `93 MR2

T-top, 5 speed. AM/FM/CD, AC, power antenna. New tires. No rust. Great condition.

$5,000

(570) 708-0269 after 6:00PM

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CADILLAC `80 COUPE DEVILLE Excellent condition, $3,000 located in Hazleton. 570-454-1945 or 561-573-4114

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVROLET `72

CORVETTES WANTED 1953-1972

FORD SALEEN ‘04 281 SC Coupe

CHEVELLE Two door hard top.

307 Motor. Needs work. Comes with additional 400 small block & many parts. $3,500. Serious inquires only. (570) 836-2574

To place your ad call...829-7130

CHEVROLET `76 PICKUP Very Good Condition! Low miles! $7500. FIRM 570-905-7389 Ask for Lee

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Any Condition! Courteous, Fast Professional Buyer. Licensed & Bonded corvettebuyer.com 1-800-850-3656

To place your ad call...829-7130 FORD `66 Mustang Coupe. Pearl white, pony interior. Pristine condition. 26K miles. $17,000 or best offer. (570) 817-6768

542

Logistics/ Transportation

1,000 miles document. #380 Highly collectable. $28,500 570-472-1854

To place your ad call...829-7130

miles, garage kept, triple black, leather interior, carriage roof, factory wire wheels, loaded, excellent condition. $5,500. Call Mike 570-237-7660

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Hiring Experienced Forklift Operator’s $12.25 hourly. ***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT. (12 hour shifts. ave. 42 hours per week.) ***Night shift pay differential offered. ***Pay increase based on skill development. Take charge...LEARN AND EARN! XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is seeking experienced forklift operators & Inexperienced candidates with great employment history to work at their Mehoopany, PA location. The following skills are necessary for these positions: • High School Diploma/GED • Computer Skills • Valid Driver’s License • Criminal Background Check • Pass Pre-employment Drug Screen & Physical

Interested Applicants can Apply Online! www.XLCServices.com or Call 888-382-4078

JOB FAIRS! Every Tuesday & Thursday in June 9:00 am - 3:30pm at the Dept. of Agriculture Building Rt. 92 South, Tunkhannock

Growth Creates Opportunity... Start A New Career! ***BECOMEAQUALIFIEDFORKLIFTOPERATOR$11.00hourly. ($11.50 at 90 days, $12.25 hourly after 1 year.)

NOEXPERIENCENEEDED. . WILLTRAINcandidateswithgreatemploymenthistory.

****STRAIGHTDAYSHIFTORNIGHTSHIFT(12hourshifts.ave42hoursperweek.) ****Nightshiftpaydifferentialoffered. ****Payincreasesafter1styearbasedonskilldevelopment.Takecharge.. . LEARNANDEARN!

XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is seeking candidates with great employment history to start a new career path as a qualified Forklift Operator. We will train and certify competent hires to be Forklift Operators at our Mehoopany, PA location. The following skills are necessary for these positions. • High School Diploma/GED • Computer Skills • Valid Driver’s License • Criminal Background Check • Pass Pre-employment Drug Screen & Physical All full-time positions come with the following benefits: medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after 1 year, and paid vacation. Pay increases based on skill development.

1949 DESOTO CUTOM 4 DOOR SEDAN

LINCOLN `88 TOWN CAR 61,000 original

Growth Creates Opportunity...Start A New Career!

All full-time positions come with the following benefits: medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after 1 year, and paid vacation. Pay increase based on skill development.

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

JOB FAIRS!

Every Tuesday & Thursday in June

9:00 am-3:30 pm at the Dept. of Agriculture Building Rt. 92 South, Interested Applicants can Apply Online or Attend Job Fair! Tunkhannock www.XLCServices.com or Call 888-382-4078

3 on the tree with fluid drive. This All American Classic Icon runs like a top at 55MPH. Kin to Chrysler, Dodge, Plymouth, Imperial Desoto, built in the American Midwest, after WWII, in a plant that once produced B29 Bombers. In it’s original antiquity condition, with original shop & parts manuals, she’s beautifully detailed and ready for auction in Sin City. Spent her whole life in Arizona and New Mexico, never saw a day of rain or rust. Only $19,995. To test drive, by appointment only, Contact Tony at 570-899-2121 or penntech84th@ gmail.com

To place your ad call...829-7130 MAZDA `88 RX-7

CONVERTIBLE 1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $8,900. Call 570-237-5119

554

Production/ Operations

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

MERCEDES BENZ `74 450 SE

SOLID CAR! Interior perfect, exterior very good. Runs great! New tires, 68K original miles. $5,500 FIRM. 570-905-7389 Ask for Lee

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. $31,000. Call 825-6272

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT DRASTICALLY

REDUCED!! This model only produced in 1967 & 1968. All original 45,000 miles, Color Burgundy, cloth & vinyl interior, 350 rocket engine, 2nd owner. Fender skirts, always garaged. Trophy winner at shows. Serious inquiries only, $7,500. 570-690-0727

554

Production/ Operations

PRODUCTION

L

KING...

for FULL TIME work with great BENEFITS? MACHINE OPERATORS needed for busy plastic manufacturing plant. $9.00/hr. to start. 60-90 day evaluation with $ increase $ based on YOUR performance, attendance etc. 12 hour shifts on alternating 3 & 4 day work weeks. Every other weekend a must. Previous mfg. experience preferred. Some heavy lifting. Promotion from within opportunities. Benefit Pkg. includes: Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Ins., Vacation, Holiday pay PLUS Applicants may apply between: 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Mon – Fri.

AEP INDUSTRIES, INC.

20 Elmwood Avenue Crestwood Industrial Park Mountaintop, PA 18707 EOE We are a drug free workplace.


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011 421

Boats & Marinas

439

Motorcycles

PRICE REDUCED! $2,400 NEGOTIABLE

570-417-3940 Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

FORD ‘99 E350 BUCKET VAN Triton V8. 2 speed

boom; 92,000miles; $9999 or best price. Great condition. Call 570-675-3384 or 570574-7002 LADDER RACKS: Two (2). One fits 8’ Box $475, One fits 6’ Box $400. Both Excellent Condition. 570-510-2585

439

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘10 SPORTSTER 1200

A MUST SEE! Custom Paint. Only driven under 10 miles!! Comes with remaining warranty. Asking $8,600 or best offer. For info, call 570-864-2543 or 215-379-1375

HSoft ARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80 riding FLH. King of the Highway! Mint original antique show winner. Factory spot lights, wide white tires, biggest Harley built. Only 28,000 original miles! Never needs inspection, permanent registration. $8,500 570-905-9348

Q-LINK LEGACY `09

250 automatic. Gun metal gray. MP3 player. $3,000. Great first motorcycle. 570-696-1156

442 RVs & Campers

EQUIPMENT/BOBCAT TRAILER

CUSTOM CREST 15’

Fiberglass boat with trailer. Outboard propulsion. Includes: 2 motors Erinmade, “Lark II series”

PAGE 49

Kawasaki` 93 ZX11D NINJA LIKE NEW 8900 Original

miles. Original owner. V@H Exhaust and Computer. New tires. $4,500. 570-574-3584

SUZUKI `07 C50T CRUISER EXCELLENT CONDITION Windshield, Bags,

Floorboards,V&H Pipes, White walls,Garage Kept. 6K Miles $5,200 (570) 430-0357

YAMAHA `04 V-STAR

1100 Custom. 5800 miles, light bar, cobra exhaust, windshield, many extras, must sell. $4,900. Call 570-301-3433

YAMAHA `97 VIRAGO

750cc. 8,000 miles, saddlebags, windshield, back rest, Black & Pearl, Excellent Condition. Must See. Asking $2,499. Call after 4. 570-823-9376

YAMAHA ‘07 650 V-STAR

Matted black finish. Mint condition. New tires, inspected, fully serviced & ready to ride. Windshield & sissy bar. Low miles & garage kept. $4800. or best offer. 570-762-5158

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

442 RVs & Campers

SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS

Travel Trailer. 29’, mint condition, 1 slide out a/c-heat. Stove, microwave, fridge, shower inside & out. Many more extras. Reduced. $13,500. Call 570-842-6735

SUNLITE CAMPER

22 ft. 3 rear bunks, center bathroom, kitchen, sofa bed. Air, Fully self contained. Sleeps 6. New tires, fridge awning. $4500. 215-322-9845

Brand new 2010 tandem axle, 4 wheel electric brakes, 20’ long total, 7 x 16 wood deck, fold up ramps with knees, removable fenders for oversized loads, powder coat paint for rust protection, 2 5/16 hitch coupler, tongue jack, side pockets, brake away switch, battery, 7 pole RV plugs, title & more!! Priced for quick sale. $2,995 386-334-7448 Wilkes-Barre

TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft

Rear queen master bedroom, Walk thru bathroom. Center kitchen + dinette bed. Front extra large living room + sofa bed. Big View windows. Air, awning, sleeps 6, very clean, will deliver. Located in Benton, Pa. $4,900. 215-694-7497

To place your ad call...829-7130 451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

BUICK `05 RENDEZVOUS CX HARD TO FIND!!

AWD, Fully loaded, 1 owner, 20,000 miles. Small 6 cylinder. New tires. Like new, inside & out. $14,900. Call (570) 540-0975

CHEVR0LET`02 EXPRESS

CONVERSION VAN Loaded. Low miles. Excellent condition.

$18,900

570-674-3901

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVROLET `05 TRAILBLAZER LT Black/Grey. 18,000

miles. Well equipped. Includes On-Star, tow package, roof rack, running boards, remote starter, extended warranty. $16,000 (570) 825-7251

INTERNATIONAL ‘95 DUMP TRUCK

Refurbished, rebuilt engine, transmission replaced. Rear-end removed and relubed. Brand new 10’ dump. PA state inspected. $12,900/best offer. 570-594-1496

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVROLET `09 EQUINOXmileage, LS Low

16,000 miles, automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, cruise control, AM/FM radio, Sirius radio, On-Star, cassette player, CD player, keyless entry, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, tinted windows. REDUCED PRICE $16,500. (570) 954-9333 Call after 9:00 a.m.

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘00 ASTRO CARGO VAN Automatic, V6

1 owner Clean Work Van! $3,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHEVY `05 EQUINOX

LT (premium package), 3.4L, 47,000 miles. All wheel drive, power moonroof, windows, locks & seats. Leather interior, 6 cd changer, rear folding seats, keyless entry, onstar, roof rack, running boards, garage kept. $14,750. 570-362-1910

CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR

Custom Van. 67K miles. Interior has oak wood trim, carpeting, storage areas, TV, rear seat convertible to double bed, curtains. Seats 7. Power windows & seats. Custom lighting on ceiling. New exhaust system. New rear tires. Recently inspected. Excellent condition. $4,200 or best offer. Call 570-655-0530

CHEVY ‘03 TRAILBLAZER LTZ

4WD, V6, leather, auto, moonroof $13,620

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

TRUCKS FOR SALE Ford, GMC,

International-Prices starting at $2,295. Box Truck, Cab & Chassis available. Call U-haul 570-822-5536

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVY ‘04 SUBURBAN LT

4WD, automatic, Z-71 package, leather, moonroof, rear ent, 3rd seat $15,990

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

CHEVY ‘07 TRAILBLAZER LT

On-Star, Leather. Satellite Radio. $14,990

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHRYSLER ‘00 TOWN & COUNTRY

Automatic, V6 CD, Leather Very Nice Van! $3,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA QUAD CAB SLT 4X4 Automatic, CD

Tool Box Like New! $8,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORDAutomatic, ‘97 F-150 4X4

4.2L V6, AC Economical Work Truck! $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

FORD `03 EXPLORER Low mileage,

63,500 miles, automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, anti-lock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, power seats, all power, cruise control, AM/FM radio, CD changer, keyless entry, leather interior, sun/ moon roof, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, tinted windows. $12,500. (570) 362-0938

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

FORD `04 FREESTAR Automatic, front

wheel drive, 4 door, anti-lock brakes, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, power seats, cruise control, AM/FM radio, CD player, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, tinted windows, new starter, just inspected, $3,900. 570-594-4992. Call after 4:30 p.m.

FORD `06 EXPLORER 78,400 miles, auto-

matic, four wheel drive, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, power seats, cruise control, AM/ FM radio, CD changer, DVD player, keyless entry, leather interior, moon roof, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper. $16,000 (570) 954-5462 Call after 9 a.m.

FORD `99 E250

Wheelchair Van 78,250 miles. Fully serviced, new battery, tires & rods. Seats 6 or 3 wheelchairs. Braun Millennium lift with remote. Walk up door. Front & rear A/C. Power locks & windows. Excellent condition. $7,500. 570-237-6375

GMC `99 SUBURBAN

Champagne exterior, leather interior, power windows & locks, 4 wheel drive. $3,685. Call 570-362-4080

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

GMC `04 YUKON DENALI

Immaculate Condition In & Out! White, all wheel drive. Garage kept. Fully loaded with sunroof, Bose stereo, 5 disc cd, XM, dvd player, 22” Rozzi switch chrome wheels with brand new Toyo tires. Also includes original rims with new tires. Serviced meticulously. 103K adult driven miles. Just detailed and ready for a new home! Call for more details. Serious inquiries only. $14,395 (570) 466-6499

MAZDA ‘08 TRIBUTE Utility, 4WD $18,655

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

GMC `99 TRUCK SLE PACKAGE

2 wheel drive 84,000 original miles $5,900. or best offer 570824-3096

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

HONDA `10 ODYSSEY

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

HYUNDAI `05 TUCSON 61,000 miles, auto-

matic, four wheel drive, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, cruise control, AM/FM radio, cassette player, CD player, keyless entry, sun/ moon roof, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, new towing package, auto start. $10,000 (570) 762-4543

To place your ad call...829-7130 1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

JEEP ‘99 GRAND CHEROKEE 6 cylinder,

automatic, sunroof, CD Excellent runner! $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

JEEP `02 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

Triple black, economical 6 cylinder. 4x4 select drive. CD, remote door opener, power windows & locks, cruise, tilt wheel. 108k highway miles. Garage kept. Super clean inside and out. No rust. Sale price $6,895. Scranton. 570-466-2771

JEEP `07 WRANGLER X 4x4, stick shift, soft

top. Red exterior, well maintained, garage kept. 11,500 miles, one owner. AC, CD player, cruise control. Tow package with cargo carrier. Excellent condition. $18,700 Call 570-822-9680

JEEP ‘05 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4WD, automatic, V6, Low Miles $14,880

Special Edition. Maroon, Fully loaded. Leather seats. TV/DVD, navigation, sun roof plus many other extras. 3rd seat . Only 1,900 Miles. Brand New. Asking $37,000 (570) 328-0850

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924


PAGE 50 451

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

SATURN ‘09 VUE XE 4WD, automatic Moon Roof $17,875

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

MAZDA ‘04 TRIBUTE LX

Automatic, V6 Sunroof, CD 1 owner Extra Clean! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

MERCEDES BENZ ‘06 R350 CLASS WAGON

4Matic, 3rd row, power tailgate $21,960

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

MERCURY ‘09 MILAN 4 cylinder, automatic, Only 9,800 miles $18,875,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

SUZUKI `07 XL-7 56,000 miles,

automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, all power, CD player, leather interior, tinted windows, custom wheels, $13,000 Call 570-829-8753 Before 5:00 p.m.

TOYOTA `06

TACOMA Automatic, V6, TRD, Sport Package, 4x4, 45K miles, Excellent condition. $18,900 (973) 906-9311

TOYOTA ‘08 MATRIX 1 Owner $13,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924 Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

MINI ‘08 COOPER

2 door, automatic, leather, sky roof, boost cd, fogs $19,945

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

MITSUBISHI `95 MONTERO SR 4WD 177,102 miles, auto-

matic, four wheel drive, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, power seats, cruise control, AM/FM radio, cassette player, CD changer, leather interior, sun roof, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, new Passed inspection, new battery. $2,500 (570) 868-1100 Call after 2:00 p.m.

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! TRACTOR TRAILERS

FREIGHTLINER ’97 MIDROOF 475 CAT & 10 speed transmission. $12,000 FREIGHTLINER ’99 CONDO 430 Detroit, Super 10 transmission. Asking $15,000. ‘88 FRUEHAUF 45’ with sides. All aluminum, spread axle. $6,500. 2 storage trailers. 570-814-4790

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 468

Auto Parts

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

509

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

CARPENTER

Experienced Vinyl Window Installer Salary based on experience Call Northeast Window, Inc. 570-654-4220 For Interview

To place your ad call...829-7130 CARPENTERS Framing contractor looking for Carpenters with at least 5 years experience in framing. Must have own transportation & hand tools. You may apply in person on job site. Call 570-430-1539

518 Customer Support/Client Care

TELEPHONE TROUBLESHOOTER/ CSR

Do you have digital, telephone, or modem experience? RFM is looking for someone with the ability to prioritize and organize requests. Selfmotivated individual with a dedicated sense of follow through. Call center or help desk experience is necessary. Must have computer knowledge & possess good people skills. Competitive starting rate. Pleasant office environment. Must be dependable. Company offers a voluntary health benefits package and 401k plan. Call 1-888-514-8883 for details, ask for Theresa. Fax resume to: 570-517-5003

518 Customer Support/Client Care

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE

Full Time. Hand Tossed Experience a MUST.

Immediate opening for full time position with an expanding company in the Hazleton area. Responsibilities include processing orders, handling and resolving customer inquiries and problems. College degree or at least three years experience in customer service a must, preferably in manufacturing/distribution environment. Strong communication, organizational skills, good attendance and the ability to multi task and handle a very fast paced environment a must. Knowledge of word, excel, lotus notes. sap experience a plus. Only team players need to apply. Benefits and competitive salary based on qualifications. Please send resume and salary requirements to: ATTN: HR Dept. Box 667 Hazleton, PA 18201 Fax-570-450-0231 email:donna.reimold @forbo.com

522

Education/ Training

MIDDLE SCHOOL ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL Applications are being accepted for two (2) Middle School Assistant Principal positions in the Hazleton Area School District. The positions are fulltime, 12 month permanent positions in grades K to 8. Pennsylvania Elementary or Principal K – 12 certification is required, along with 10 years of successful teaching experience. Candidates must have knowledge of PA Academic Standards and datadriven instruction, teacher supervision and evaluation, student assessment and discipline and strong interpersonal skills. Experience working with a diverse student population is preferred. Applicants should send a letter of interest, resume, standard application, copies of certificate and Act 34, 151 and 114 clearances along with three (3) recommendation letters to Mr. Samuel A. Marolo, Superintendent, Hazleton Area School District, 1515 West 23rd Street, Hazleton, PA 18202. Deadline for applications is Friday, June 24, 2011. HASD is an EOE

PIZZA BAKER

COUNTER PERSON Part Time SHORTPart ORDER COOK Time Apply in person Frank’s Pizza Penn Plaza Wilkes-Barre

To place your ad call...829-7130 536

IT/Software Development

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

536

IT/Software Development

SQL PROGRAMMER

Well established, local manufacturer of Home Health Care is accepting resumes for SQL, VB Programmer. Must be proficient in SQL Programming & prior experience in Access, Visual Basic and Crystal Reports would be helpful. Familiarity with a manufacturing environment, & ERP systems is preferred. Previous project management experience in software deployments and installations is desirable. Must be able to work independently and with staff & software VARs to provide solutions and resolve issues. We offer competitive rates and benefits and are located only 15 minutes from Wilkes-Barre or Scranton. Send resume or apply in person to: Jobs@goldentech.com

401 Bridge Street, Old Forge, PA 18518 An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/ Drug Free Workplace Employer

TITLE PROCESSOR United One Resources is seeking candidates for full-time Real Estate Title Processors. The successful candidate must be able to work independently, have excellent organizational and communication skills, and an eagerness to excel. At least two years experience in real estate, insurance, banking, or customer service is preferred. We offer a competitive salary and comprehensive benefit package. Please forward your resume and salary requirements to: iwanttowork@unitedoneresources.com

United One Resources, Inc. 270 North Sherman Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 EOE M/F/D/V

REAL ESTATE APPRAISER United One Resources is seeking candidates for an on-staff Certified Residential Appraiser to cover Luzerne, Lackawanna, Monroe, Wayne, and Pike counties. The successful candidate must have excellent organizational & communication skills, the ability to meet a weekly quota with a commitment to providing exceptional quality and service. A minimum three years experience in appraising residential real estate is required. We offer a competitive salary, mileage reimbursement and a comprehensive benefit package. Please forward your resume & salary requirements to: iwanttowork@unitedoneresources.com

United One Resources, Inc. 270 North Sherman Street Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18702 EOE M/F/D/V

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

EXPERIENCED GARAGE DOOR INSTALLER

Residential, commercial and rolling steel. Polite, honest, customer & quality oriented. Self disciplined team player. Benefits, paid holidays. Competitive salary. Steady work. Contact Rowe Door Sales 570-655-7701

TRUCK MECHANIC

Opening for Experienced Full time Truck MechanicThird Shift. Must Have Own Tools/PA Class 8 Inspection License a Plus. We Offer Top Wages & Benefits Package. Call For Interview and Ask for Jon: Falzone Towing Service, Inc. 271 N. Sherman St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 570-823-2100

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

OWNER OPERATOR WANTED

Northeast Regional Home Most NightsWeekends Available Minimum 5 years experience No Phone Calls Please Apply Within: Dupont Motor Line 105 North Keyser Avenue., Old Forge, PA 18518

TRACTOR TRAILER DRIVERS

Company drivers needed with CDL-A Regional/ OTR opportunities available. 2 years verifiable experience. Flatbed experience. Earn $60,000 and be home weekends. Benefit package includes meals, safety bonus and 401-K. Contact Sherrie at Liedtka Trucking at 800257-9174 ext 229.

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Dedicated Account Drivers $62K Annually, $2K Sign-On Bonus Affordable Medical Plan options with Eligibility First Day of Employment. Co-Driver Positions Home Weekly and Every Weekend Automotive Industry Gouldsboro PA (Scranton Metro)

TeamOne a National Logistics Organization is currently recruiting for dedicated account Team Drivers for their new facility that will begin operation in mid June 2011. These fully benefited positions are well compensated. The route drivers will be delivering auto parts to dealerships throughout the Eastern portion of the US. Qualified candidates should be 23 years of age and possess a valid CDL A drivers licenses with a minimum of two years OTR verifiable experience. Candidates must possess an acceptable BI and MVR. Drivers must possess doubles and Haz Mat endorsements. TeamOne offer a competitive salary and affordable benefits inclosing choice of medical plans, dental, vision, 401K, etc. Interested candidates can call 866-851-9902 to set up an interview. TeamOne is an equal opportunity Employer M/F/H/V

548 Medical/Health

548 Medical/Health

PROVIDENCE PLACE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY OF HAZLETON IS SEEKING A PCH ADMINISTRATOR. We are a premier provider of residential care and specialized dementia services. We seek an experienced professional with exceptional leadership, management, and communication skills. Strong ties to the local area, working knowledge of PA-PCH regulations required. Nursing management background considered a plus. Salary based on experience. Attractive benefit package. EOE. Send resume and salary history and requirements to: Jesse Achenbach, President 2401 Mahantongo Street Pottsville, PA 17901 jachenbach@prov-place.com Fax: 570-581-8686


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011 542

Logistics/ Transportation

DRIVERS

548 Medical/Health Needed for local JCAHO certified home health agency. 3-5 years home health experience preferred. Knowledge of medicare regulations & handling of outside insurances necessary. Must be able to multi-task. Competitive salary, health insurance, pleasant working conditions. Call Superior Health Services @ 570-883-9581 for interview.

548 Medical/Health

Full Time Days

Now Hiring: Registered Nurses, Physical Therapists, Occupational Therapists, & Speech Therapists. Full Time, Part Time, Per Diem. Monroe, Luzerne & Columbia Counties. Resumes to rjacobs@caregivers america.com or 570-585-4624.

COMMUNITY HOME WORKER Various jobs are

available for working with individuals with developmental disabilities in the Luzerne County area. Experience is helpful, paid training is provided. Valid drivers license is required. For information or application, call IMPACT SYSTEMS, Inc. at (570) 829-3671. Drug free workplace EOE

DENTAL ASSISTANT Full time in busy

Wilkes-Barre office. Experience preferred in all aspects of general dentistry. Good benefits package available. Send resumes to: c/o The Times Leader Box 2585 15 N. Main Street. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

DENTAL ASSISTANT

Part Time Orthodontic Chairside Assistant in busy Mt. Top office. Pay based on experience. Email resumes to zieglerortho@gmail. com or fax to 570-474-9353

708

DOPS

Fanelli Brothers Trucking has established new and increased driver pay package and an increased sign on bonus. Due to additional business, Fanelli Bros. Trucking Co. is adding both regional and local drivers to our Pottsville, PA terminal operation. Drivers are home most nights throughout the week. Drivers must have 2-3 years of OTR experience, acceptable MVR and pass a criminal background check. The new pay package offers: • .38 cpm for qualified drivers • $1,500 sign on bonus • Paid vacations and holidays • Health/Dental/ Vision Insurance • 401K Plan Contact Gary Potter at 570-544-3140 Ext 156 or visit us at 1298 Keystone Blvd., Pottsville, PA

CAREGIVERS AMERICA HOME HEALTH

PAGE 51

PART TIME

Overnight in home aid. Send resume and references to: c/o The Times Leader Box 2580 15 N. Main St Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

RN SUPERVISOR 7-3

CNA’S

Full Time 2-10, 10-6 and Per Diem

COOK COOK

Part Time Competitive Salary & Benefits Package Golden Living Center Summit 50 N. Pennsylvania Avenue Fax 570-825-9423 or pamela.smith2@ goldenliving.com EOE M/F/D/V

RNS

Needed immediately. Full time, part time and per diem positions. Competitive salary, mileage reimbursement. Pleasant working conditions. Call Superior Health Services at 570-883-9581

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554

Production/ Operations

PRODUCTION HELP

Manufacturing plant in Pittston. Full/PartTime. No Benefits. Monday-Friday. Apply in Person 9am-4pm Barhill Mfg. Corp 396 S. Township Blvd., Pittston, PA

SHIPPING & RECEIVING

Manual laborer oriented. Self disciplined, attention to detail, adaptable, neat & organized. Valid drivers license. Carpentry skills a plus. Benefits, paid holidays, and steady work. Contact Rowe Door Sales Call 570-655-7701

600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

BREAD ROUTE

NJ’s fastest growing bread company. Anthony & Son’s Bakery. Two routes available. One in Wilkes-Barre Area and one in the Leigh Area. Both excellent routes. Earning net $1,600/week. Trucks included at $99K each. Pick up in the Mt Pocono Area. Call Phil at 973-625-2323 x236

BUSINESS FOR SALE! Location: NEPA Gross: $194,667.00 Net: $90,000.00 Selling Price: $250,000.00 17 year old operation with existing client base. We provide specially made products to order. Serious inquires only. Send letter of interest to: PO Box 1271, Kingston PA 18704

630 Money To Loan “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 700 MERCHANDISE 706

Arts/Crafts/ Hobbies

CRAFTS: Pillow Panels & polifill $1.00 and $1.50. Also batting. About 15 items. 570-823-4941

Antiques & Collectibles

FOOTBALL CARDS: 1963 Mike Ditka Football card-Great Shape $45.00 1972 Topps Len Dawson Football card-Great Shape $20.00 1972 Topps John Unitas Football card-Great Shape $20.00 2011 1oz. Copper Silver Eagle $10.00. 570-824-1180 YEARBOOKS: Coughlin H.S.: 1926, 1928, 1932, 1934, 1943, 1944, 1949, 1961, 1963; GAR H.S.: 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1945, 1946, 1955, 1956, 1961, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1984, 1980, 2005, 2006; Meyers H.S.: 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1950, 1957, 1960, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977; Old Forge H.S.: 1966, 1972, 1974; Kingston H.S.: 1938, 1939, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1949, 1962, 1964; Plymouth H.S.: 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1938, 1960; Hanover H.S.: 1951, 1952, 1954; Berwick H.S.: 1952, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1967, 1968, 1969; Lehman H.S.: 1973, 1974, 1976, 1978, 1980; Dallas H.S.: 1966, 1967, 1968; Westmoreland High School: 1952, 1953, 1954; Nanticoke Area H.S.: 1976, 2008; Luzerne H.S.: 1951, 1952, 1956, 1957; West Pittston H.S. Annual: 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1931, 1932, 1959, 1960, 1954; Bishop Hoban H.S.: 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975; West Side Central Catholic H.S. 1965, 1975, 1980, 1981, 1984; Pittston H.S.: 1963; Hazleton H.S.: 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1945, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964; Hazle Twp. Senior H.S.: 1951, 1952. Call 570-825-4721

710

Appliances

CHEST FREEZER Kenmore 3 years old 48” x 28” excellent condition. $225. 570-388-4242 DISHWASHER Whirlpool under counter, white, 6 months old, many features, like new $250. MICROWAVE Frigidaire, above range, white, uses standard outlet. $50. REFRIGERATOR Amana, almond color, good for second fridge $50. 570-690-5145 REFRIGERATOR like new, white $45. Amana micro wave oven: $30. call between 9am-9pm 570-824-7807 or 570-545-7006 STOVE Sunbeam, electric, white, good shape $100. 570-693-3604

710

Appliances

720

Cemetery Plots/Lots

MEMORIAL SHRINE CEMETERY 6 Plots Available

GENE’S RECONDITIONED APPLIANCES 60 Day Warranty Monday-Friday 8:00PM-5:00PM Saturday 8:00AM-11:00AM Gateway Shopping Center Kingston, PA

(570) 819-1966 REFRIGERATOR: GE Profile side by side refrigerator almond with ice & water in door $100. 570-388-4242 STOVE. Kenmore electric. Ceramic flat top surface, black front, cream color. Very good. $150 570-457-7854

712

Baby Items

SWING, Newborn $50. CLOTHING, Girl newborn-12 mos. New. $5 each. 570-825-0569

714

Bridal Items

WEDDING GOWN, stunning, white, off the shoulder wedding gown. Short sleeve, fits size 2-4. Bodice is satin with beading & skirt is all tulle. Tulle train and veil included. From boutique in Philly excellent condition. Pictures can be emailed. $100. 570-474-5966

716

Building Materials

BATHROOM SINK SET: Gerber white porcelain bathroom sink with mirror and medicine cabinet. Matching set. $80. 570-331-8183 DOOR. 36”x80” solid wood, 6 panel. Exterior or interior. Natural oak finish, right or left with hardware. $200. SINK, stainless steel, $50 Call 570-735-8730 or 570-332-8094

KITCHEN CABINETS & GRANITE COUNTERTOPS 10 ft.x10 ft., 1 year old, Maple kitchen. Premium Quality cabinets, undermount sink. Granite tops. Total cost over $12,000. Asking $3,890 570-239-9840 LIGHTING: recessed 6” progress lighting fixtures total of 3 new all for $8. 570-735-6638 TUB New. Cast iron, still in crate. Cream, slight chip in paint. $60. 570-817-8981

May be Separated Rose Lawn Section $450 each 570-654-1596 ST. NICHOLAS’ CEMETERY, SHAVERTOWN 6 Plots. Can be divided. Near Entrance. $550 each. Call 570-675-9991

To place your ad call...829-7130 726

Clothing

CLOTHING: Junior girls size 7/8 genuine leather jacket, brown $10. Prom dresses: size 9 light blue halter; size 13/14 gold halter; size 11 black and silver strapless; $25 each. Tea-length, size 13/14 light green dress with matching purse $15. Semi-formal dress, pink, size M & purple size L - $5 each. First Holy Communion Dress - size 10, $10. Young men sweatshirts 7 Large; 4 Medium - $3 each or all for $25. 570-829-2382 CLOTHING: Ladies and girls, assorted sizes, 50 cents each. Good condition, 50 items. Call 823-4941 NURSING UNIFORMS: Misercordia, Polo top, blue, small; scrub top white, medium; scrub top blue $8 each; Lab coat, size 34-$12., dress pants better quality, size 10/33L$15 or take all for $40. Brand new or slight use. 570-407-2638

730

Computer Equipment & Software

COMPUTER, includes tower, monitor, mouse & keyboard. Excellent Condition. $80. 570-824-7354 DESK. Computer Desk $50. Call 7358730 or 332-8094 LAPTOP IBM T40 refurbished, XP PRO3, ofc7, antivirus +more.1.5 p4M CENTRINO,40gb,51 2, cdrw & dvd, WIFI, new battery, bag, ac.=, warranty/free delivery. $150.call 570-862-2236

732

Exercise Equipment

AB SCISSOR Body by Jake $10. 570-829-2382 AERO PILATES PEFORMER 298 barely used, included are cardio rebounder, cardio workout dvd , level 1 workout dvd, exercise chart, owners manual, $150. 570-288-3634

732

Exercise Equipment

BOWFLEX SPORT: All accessories. Extra 100 lbs of power rods. Great condition. $350.00 570-574-3584 HOME GYM Image 4.0, new condition. $25 570-655-8056

736

Firewood

FIREWOOD, WilkesBarre, Free. 570-826-0066

742

Furnaces & Heaters

FURNACE, Hot air, Beckett Oil Gun, duct work, tank. $500 firm. 570-540-6794 FURNACE. Hot air propane. heats 6 room house. $200. Stove pipe, 9” $6 each, 12”, $8 each. 570-735-8730 or 570-332-8094

744

Furniture & Accessories

AIR MATTRESS, queen size with electric pump. $30. MATTRESS, single, great for futon, cot, very clean. $25. 570-696-2008. BEDROOM SET 4 piece $250. Wheel chair L&W $150. Oak table 28” square, 10” side extension $75. Lawn mower (Deer) $50. Grill $25. Glider $35. Ceiling fan $10. 570-829-4363 CHEST OF DRAWERS, solid wood. Very Nice! $125. 675-3328 COFFEE TABLE, brass & glass. 26” x 54”. Very good condition. $75. 570-474-5643

744

Furniture & Accessories

FURNITURE: Dark Pine. 2-piece lighted china hutch $100. Bedroom dresser with mirrored hutch $100. Bedroom chest $50. 570-788-3282. FURNITURE: TV Stand, black, 7 open storage compartments, 35”W X 21”H X 22”D. $40.00. Call 570-814-9845. GUN CABINET. Oak, etched Deer design on glass. Holds 10 guns. $250. Excellent. 570-457-7854 KITCHEN SET, Dark Pine Formica Top Table 40x58 with 4 solid wood matching chairs. Very good. $125. 570-823-6829 KITCHEN SET. Oak 42” round. Sunburst top, 4 solid oak hoop back chairs. Very Good. $100 570-451-0313 LIFT RECLINER: Mauve, good condition. $125.00. 570-446-8672 LIVING ROOM SET. Couch. plaid, grey, brown, gold, easy chair, 2 end tables. $250 all. 570-427-4479 570-751-6622 LOVE SEAT & ottoman sand colored, excellent condition: $165. call between 9am-9pm 570-824-7807 or 570-545-7006 PATIO SET. Square table, 4 highback chairs with cushions. Green and blue. $85. 570-457-7854 PRAYER KNEELERS. (2) $100 each. 570-735-8730 or 570-332-8094

DESK: Excellent condition. Dark brown wood with 2 drawers. $40. 570-472-1646

RECLINING SOFA: And love seat multi color good condition $150.00. 570-466-6043

DESK: Wood & glass components, $55. COFFEE TABLE, vintage 50’s blonde wood, $30. BOMBAY CARVED ACCENT TABLE, light stained wood, $35. VICTORIAN STYLE MIRROR, 30” X 38” all excellent condition call (570) 709- 3146 in Laflin

TABLE: 48” oblong, light wood console table with decorative hardware on front, $40. Custom made cushions for high back rocking chair, light brown with mallard ducks on fabric $20. Child 2 seater wood bench with cut out hearts on back & sides, $15. Chrome coat tree, $5. Wood expandable wall clothes hanging rack, $2. 2 4X6 tan area rugs, $5. each. 2 country wall shelves, $5. each. Green toaster, $2. Green metal corner floor standing three tier shelf, $10. 570 868-5275 570-301 8515

DINETTE SETS. (1) 9 piece plus china. (1) solid wood. $120. 570-200-5410 DINNING ROOM SET. Oak. Excellent condition. Lighted china hutch 50”x Lx80”Hx18”W. Table with 2 leaves 58”Lx42”W with leaves: 18”L ea (94”L). 6 chairs (2 arm 4 side) $800. 570-693-0512 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, oak, 1 large side holds dvd’s. Also bottom and side storage. $40. 570-829-2382 HEADBOARD, Twin Oak. $75. Night side Oak. $75. 570-825-0569

752 Landscaping & Gardening CONCRETE PAVERS: Red/grey Most blocks are 6 1/8” x 6 1/8” x 2 1/2” - At least 225 sq. ft. available. Removed from backyard patio for pool. $375.00. 570-474-9766


PAGE 52

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

752 Landscaping & Gardening

758 Miscellaneous

LAWN MOWER. Yard Machine self propelled. 4.5 hp. New blade and oil. $85. 570-878-2849

BARREL, wooden. 53 gallon. Excellent condition $195. 570-876-3830

LAWNMOWER, Craftsman, electric start 875 Series. 21” cut. EZ walk, vary speed, asking $175. 570-855-8764 RIDING MOWER Scott’s 42” cut, 17hp, engine runs but needs work. Bagger & mulch kit included. $300 or best offer. 570-855-0390 TRIMMER/EDGER, 18v-2 in 1; BLOWER, air 18v; HEDGE TRIMMER, cordless 18v. (2) 18v batteries with charger. New Must sell. $175 570-823-2893 WEED WACKER Echo GT 200R. Runs at idle. Needs some TLC. $40 570-823-2893

756

Medical Equipment

HOSPITAL BED, electric, complete, $200. 947-1451 POTTY CHAIR: Good condition, $5. Call 570-823-4941 WHEELCHAIR Rolls Invacare, perfect condition. $200. 570-735-8730 or 332-8094

758 Miscellaneous ART WORK: Framed 8 x 10 copies of old Pittston scenes of horse buggy days. Each $10. Framed picture an original of the St. Cecelia;s Church complex Wyoming Ave. Exeter and framed copy of the front page of the Sunday Dispatch depicting the fire that destroyed the St. Cecelia's complex. This is a collectors item $40. for both Collectors item: Beta Max video cassettes. L500 -7 tapes L-750-7 tapes. L830-9 tapes. MoviesSports - Blanks all $15. Jim 655-9474 BLANK KEYS: Schlage new brass blank keys total of 93 all for $10.00 . 570-735-6638

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER ITEMS High chair, antique wooden w/cushion, $10, Treadmill, DP Health Trac, $10, Chandelier, brass, $10 Sofa, 1930 antique, $200, Quad, Suzuki battery operated, $20, Bike, girls 10 speed, $10, Paint ball gun, $50, Car, Cadillac Escalade, girls, battery operated, $50. X-Box 360 games, various prices. 570-406-6141 GIRL’S BICYCLES: 2 16” $17.00. Girl’s bicycle 20” $22.00. 570-457-3879 GLASS DOOR. 4 way glass door for bath tub. $25 570-331-8183 MISCELLANEOUS: Four barrel carb from running Chevy motor. $50. Call after 5pm. 740-1246 PENNY ROLLS: Uncirculated penny 50 coin rolls of 1 each. 1975d, 1 each. 1971s, 1each. 1974s all 3 rolls for $6.00. 570-735-6638 POWER SCOOTER electric chair, used only once, excellent condition $150. 570-510-7763

To place your ad call...829-7130 ROTISSERIE, George Foreman, like new, all accessories and owner’s manual, $30. DENTURE CLEANING SYSTEM, new in box, Electro Sonic Denta Plus, $15. BLACK & DECKER “MOUSE” SANDER/POLISHER, inc. accessories, storage case & user guide, in original box, $25. (570) 709-3146

SUITCASES. Three (3) in excellent shape. $40. Call after 5pm. 740-1246 TRAILER HITCH. Fits Chevrolet. Light assembly. 1 year old. like new. $75 570-823-2893

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

570-735-1487 WE PAY THE MOST IN CASH

BUYING 10am to 6pm

758 Miscellaneous ROTISSERIE: George Foreman, like new, all accessories and owner’s manual, $30. DENTURE CLEANING SYSTEM: New in box, Electro Sonic Denta Plus, $15. BLACK & DECKER “MOUSE” SANDER/ POLISHER, includes accessories, storage case & user guide, in original box, $25. Call 570-709-3146

Restaurant Equipment

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT

Bev Air 2 door refrigerator/ sandwich prep table, Model SP48-12, $1300. For details

Call 570-498-3616 RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT

SOMERSET TURN OVER MACHINE Model # SPM45, $500; ALSO, Bunn Pour Over Coffee Machine, Model # STF15, $225 For more info, call

570-498-3616

Upholstery Shop Liquidation Sale

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT

Stripping Tanks, Industrial Sewing Machines, Material & much more.

Somerset Dough Sheeter, Model CAR-100. Only 1 available. $1,500 Call for more info

Call for Appointment 570-909-7334

776 Sporting Goods

A LARGE VARIETY OF ITEMS!!

VACUUM portable Pronto 2 in 1 Electrolux with charger & stand $20. 570735-8730 or 570332-8094

To place your ad call...829-7130 VA C U U M : H o o v e r upright vacuum cleaners (2 each) in very good working condition. Both for $15. 570-735-6638

762

Musical Instruments

GUITAR: Fender accoustic guitar, new with case &d instructional material $175.l 655-9472 ORGAN Kimball Swinger 500. Entertainer #2 with music stand & seat, rhythm & beats $700 negotiable. 570-779-3230

768

Personal Electronics

POLICE SCANNER: Radio Shack. 200 channel police scanner $50. 570-540-5761

772

Pools & Spas

JACUZZI 11/2HP & sand filter with extras. $150 or best offer. Approximately 3 years old. Excellent condition. 570-704-8500 POOL 21’ round x 56” deep, new liner, new cover, new pump, new filter complete with deck. $975. or best offer. 570-328-6767 SOLAR COVER: 20x 40 16mil clear solar cover for in ground pool. New this season, wrong size. $125. 836-6885

774

39 Prospect St • Nanticoke

774

Restaurant Equipment

GREASE TRAP 8# 4GPM with extra fittings 6 months old $100. 388-4242

570-498-3616

BASKETBALL HOOP; Great condition, asking $90. Call 570-331-8183 BICYCLE, Diamond Back Unisex Octane 6 speed, cool blue, 20” wheels. Excellent condition. Originally $300, asking, $125. 570-466-4564 BICYCLE, Girls Trek Purple, 21 speed, MT 220. Excellent condition. Originally $300, asking, $125. 570-466-4564 BOW: Hoyt Havotec compound with all accessories & arrows $100. Golf clubs: Calloway Diablo 5 iron $35. Nike IC putter with oversize grip $35. Srixon 56 deg. wedge $35. Call 655-9472 GOLF CLUBS. Jack Nicklaus. Woods and irons in good condition. $50 570-693-0212 GOLF: RH Taylor Made 360Ti driver with cover; Loft 9.5 Bubble Ultralite R80 Graphite Shaft very good condition. $60. 740-7495 WEIGHTS & weight bench with curl & straight bars. approximate. 800 lbs. of weights complete $300. 570-606-4353 570-299-0487

To place your ad call...829-7130 778

Stereos/ Accessories

CASSETTE TAPES 1970’S & 1980’S. Rock & Roll, etc. $30 for all. 570-655-8056

780

Televisions/ Accessories

TV/VCR COMBO Zenith, 26” color tv/vcr combo. $50. 570-829-2382 TVS 2 Symphonic 13” personal TV sets, tue type, good condition. $50. for both. 570-262-1559

782

Tickets

TICKETS (2) for the Mormon Tabernacle Choir at the Mann Center in Philadelphia, PA. Thursday June 23rd at 8:00PM. Great Seats! Selling both tickets for $68 for face value). 570-836-7259

784

Tools

FLASHLIGHT/DRILL Ryobi 18 volt cordless drill/ flashlight combo with charger. Excellent condition. $50. 655-9472

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

Cats Meooow

New store for cat lovers. Seeking consigned merchandise to sell. All merchandise must be cat related, in good condition and priced to sell. Call Sam and leave message at 570-655-2443 or after 3pm at 570-644-8124

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

815

SWING SET: Amishbuilt swing set; includes ladder, teetertotter, 2 swings, & rings. $200. 472-9167 TOY PONY, beautiful plays HI O SILVER cost $199 sacrifice $40. Overland Express battery operated train, 20 rails $25. Boys small bike $5. 570-675-3328 TOYS: Toddler’s desk with stool, hard plastic, primary colors, foldup desk top. $5.00. Call 570-814-9845. TRAIN SETS: Lionel Ford Train Set 6-11814 O27G complete...brand new never used $125.00 Lionel Mopar Train Set O27G complete...brand new never used $175.00 Lionel Dodge Ram Train Set 6-11933 O27G complete... brand new never used $125.00 Lionel Dodge Ram Train Set 6-11933 O27G complete...brand new never used $125.00. 570-574-4781

788

Stereo/TV/ Electronics

TV, 36” Zewith console on swivel base. $40. 570-655-8056

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

BUYING SPORT CARDS Pay Cash for

baseball, football, basketball, hockey & non-sports. Sets, singles & wax. 570-212-0398

DACHSHUND PUPPY Chocolate & tan

mini. Male. Vet checked, shots. Family Raised. Registered. $400. Delivery. dapple3@gmail.com 607-775-0546 or 607-206-6697

JUG PUPPIES

House broken & dewormed. Very good with kids & extremely loveable! 3 months old. $300 negotiable. 570-674-1172

LAB PUPPIES

PAWS

Chocolate & yellow. Males & females. 1st shots. Males $200. Females $250. 570-693-3814 or 570-606-6867

TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130 Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

845

Pet Supplies

DOG CAGE, very large. $60. 570-675-3328

Dogs

786 Toys & Games POKER TABLE. Portable Oak. Sits 8 players. $200 570-735-8730 or 570-332-8094

Dogs

IRISH SETTER PUPPIES Hunters Only Price Reduced 610-378-0121 or 610-488-9273

Looking for the right deal 800 PETS & ANIMALS on an automobile? Turn to classified. 810 Cats It’s a showroom in print! FREE KITTENS: All black - pointed Classified’s got faces, females. the directions! Call 570-793-3353

TOOLS. SAW, circular, $25. 570-7358730 or 570-3328094

815

LAB PUPS

AKC. Chocolate & Black. English, stocky, big blocky heads, hips/eyes clear. Ready Now. 570-549-6800

www.emlabradors.com

Olde English Bulldogge Pups, CKC registered, vet checked, parents on premises 4 males & 3 females 570-637-0749

PIT BULL TERRIER Pups. 3 females, 1 male left. Going quickly! Mom is rednose on site, Dad is blue-nose. Pups have beautiful markings. Shots and wormed. $300 each 570-951-2398

DOG CRATE, wire, with plastic tray bottom. 24”x18”. $25. Call 570-814-9574 TURTLE TANK complete with filter & care system. $25 or best offer. 570-825-7867

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 906 Homes for Sale Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

BEAR CREEK VILLAGE 13 Hedge Road

20 year old Contemporary in prime location. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, large kitchen, unfinished basement, hardwood floors 1st floor and attached 2 car garage. Total electric. $265,000 (570) 472-9660

To place your ad call...829-7130

DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT For Sale By Owner

3 bedrooms, 1 3/4 bath, Tudor home. New central air, built in heated pool with new liner, hardwood and tile throughout, new 4 season room. Must see! Asking $249,900 Call 570-696-0695 570-371-8556

YORKIE TEA CUP PUPS

AKC CHOCOLATE LAB PUPPIES Shots & wormed. Ready to go. $350/each (570) 925-2572

To place your ad call...829-7130 CHIHUAHUA PUPS Long haired, Apple Head. 3 males, 1 female. $350 570-256-7477

8 weeks. AKC registered. First shoots and wormed. Black & Gold. 1 male $750. 1 female $900. Pic available. Ready 6/20/11 570-436-5083

To place your ad call...829-7130 845

Pet Supplies

BIRD CAGES: Small $10. Large $20. 570-288-4852

HARDING

Lockville Rd Large split level, 3 bed, 3 bath on 2.8 acres. Needs work. $135,000 (570) 760-0049

PLAINS

For sale by owner. Single family home. 3 bedrooms. Fenced in yard. Off street parking. Flexible Terms. $75,000. 570-829-2123


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

HARVEYS LAKE

Lovely lake living. Welcome to the best of 2 worlds. #1: The amenities of lakefront properties - fishing, boating and a 2 story boat house (one of only 30 on the lake); #2: The serenity and privacy of tiered stone patios and lush gardens surrounding this classic 3,500 sq ft lake home perched high above Pole 306, Lakeside Drive. The views are spectacular from our 5 bedroom home with 2 stone fireplaces & hardwood floors throughout. Call for an appointment. We also welcome realtors. $799,000 570-639-2423

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

KINGSTON

906 Homes for Sale LAFLIN

CAROLEE.O@VERIZON.NET “LOT” In Subject

SUBURBAN OASIS! Two story 4 bed-

rooms with 3.5 baths. Fully finished lower level with home theater. 2 car garage. Central air. Eat-in kitchen. Price: $379,000 Please call (570) 466-8956

SWOYERSVILLE

Avenue, victorian, single family, 5 bedrooms, double car detached garage, eat-in kitchen, dining room, family room, living room, fireplace, 2.5 baths, foyer, wrap around porch, deck, large private fenced in yard, gas heat, stainless steel appliances, granite counter tops, well maintained, approx. 3100 sq. ft., qualified buyers only $274,900 Call 570-287-0690

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

NOXEN

Route 29 14.2 Acres bordering State Game Lands. Wyoming County. Would make a great family homestead or private hunting retreat. $119,500. Please call 570-905-0268

915 Manufactured Homes

ASHLEY PARK

Immaculate 2 story, stone & vinyl. Large lot on cul-de-sac. 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths. Detached oversized 2 car garage with loft. Tile, hardwood, granite, central air. laundry/pantry & large family room with built in bar & fireplace on 1st floor. $276,900. 570-288-3256 570-406-2462

Laurel Run & San Souci Parks, Like new, several to choose from, Financing &Warranty, facebook.com/ MobileOne.Sales Call (570)250-2890

WEST WYOMING

CHARMING BUNGALOW $74,500

650 sq. ft. On corner lot with 2 car garage. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, walk up attic & full heated basement, hardwood floors with three season room. Freshly painted & move in condition. 570-446-3254

WILKES-BARRE Affordable Newly built 3 bedroom home.

Kingston For SALE BY OWNER 153 S. Maple

MOUNTAINTOP ICE LAKES

2.51 Acre Wooded Lot Ice Harvest Drive $115,000

TOY TOWN SECTION 148 Stites Street 621 Gibson Avenue BY OWNER. Brick Cape Cod on a quiet street. 3 bedroom, family room, 2 bath, living room with fireplace, two car garage with loads of storage, partially finished basement. $185,900 Call (570) 333-5212 No Brokers Please.

912 Lots & Acreage

20-year no-interest mortgage. Must meet Wyoming Valley Habitat for Humanity eligibility requirements. Inquire at 570-820-8002

WILKES-BARRE Miners Mills

3 bedroom, 1 bath. Close to casino, off street parking, nice yard. New energy efficient windows. $66,000 570-479-0935

938

Apartments/ Furnished

WILKES-BARRE

FULLY FURNISHED 1 BEDROOM APT.

Short or long term Excellent Neighborhood Priv. Tenant Parking $750 includes all utilities. No pets. (570) 822-9697

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

EXETER

SENIOR APARTMENTS

222 Schooley Ave. Exeter, PA

Accepting applications for 1 bedroom apartments. Quality 1 bedroom apartments for ages 62 and older. Income limits apply. Rent only $437 month. * Utilities Included * Laundry Facilities * On Site Management *Private parking Call for appointment 570-654-5733 Monday - Friday 8am-11am. Equal Housing Opportunity

3 room apartment Includes water, septic & most of the heat. No smoking & no pets. $750/ month. + security, references. Could be unfurnished. Call 570-954-1200

EDWARDSVILLE Spacious 1 & 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. Convenient location. Refrigerator & stove provided, washer /dryer hookup, no pets, $495 & $525/month Section 8 Accepted Call 570-357-3628

PITTSTON

2 bedroom. All appliances included. All utilities paid; electricity by tenant. Everything brand new. Off street parking. $750 + security & references 570-969-9268

Apartments/ Unfurnished

KINGSTON

E.Light, WALNUT ST. bright, 1st

floor, 2 bedrooms, elevator, carpeted, Security system. Garage. Extra storage & cable TV included. Laundry facilities. Heat & hot water furnished. Fine neighborhood. Convenient to bus & stores. No pets. References. Security. Lease. No smokers please. $840. 570-287-0900

LUZERNE

PROFESSIONALLY MANAGED FORTY FORT. 2nd floor. Modern, made beautiful, 5 rooms complete, appliances include built-ins, laundry, colonial kitchen, courtyard, parking 1 car. NO PETS/NO SMOKING. 2 YEAR LEASE $595 + utilities, EMPLOYMENT/ VERIFICATION APPLICATION

AMERICA REALTY 570-288-1422

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

3029 South Main St Very large 1st floor,

3 bedrooms, wall to wall carpet, central air, eat in kitchen with appliances. Off street parking. Washer /dryer hookup. Heat & cooking gas included. Tenant pays electric & water. $750 + security. No Pets. Call 570-814-1356

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

BEAR CREEK New furnished

941

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

KINGSTON

72 E. W alnut St. 2nd floor, located in quiet neighborhood. Kitchen, living room, dining room, sun room, bathroom. 2 large and 1 small bedrooms, lots of closets, built in linen, built in hutch, hardwood and carpeted floors, fireplace, storage room, yard, w/d hookup and new stove. Heat and hot water incl. 1 yr. lease + security $900/month 570-406-1411

PITTSTON Efficiency apart-

ment - bedroom, bath & kitchen. No pets. Available now. $425/month + 1 month security. Call 570-451-1038

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 2, 3 & 4 Bedrooms - Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!!

Cozy 1 bedroom, 2nd floor. Kitchen, living area. New flooring, private entrance, yard access. Off street parking. $440/mo. Water & trash included. Security & 1 year lease. No pets. Call (570) 760-5573

www.mayflower crossing.com

MOUNTAIN TOP WOODBRYN 1 & 2 Bedroom.

Find the perfect friend.

No pets. Rents based on income start at $405 & $440. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. Call 570-474-5010 TTY711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Certain Restrictions Apply*

The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

1-ROOM STUDIO

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH SECURE BUILDINGS 1 & 2 bedroom

apartments. Laundry facility. Off street parking available. Starting at $440. 570-332-5723

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE 61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701

• Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; laundry on site; • Activities! • Curb side Public Transportation

Please call 570-825-8594 TDD/TTY 800-654-5984

NEWPORT TWP. PRIME APARTMENTS STILL AVAILABLE!

ST. STANISLAUS APARTMENTS 141 Old Newport Rd., Newport Twp.

Affordable, Accessible 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments Income Eligibility* Required. Rents: $455-$656 plus electric

(*Maximum Incomes vary according to household size)

ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D .

WILKES-BARRE

in historic building at 281 S. Franklin St. with kitchenette & bath. Heat, water, garbage removal, and parking included in $395 month rent. Call 570-333-5471 with references

Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS

timesleader.com

WILKES-BARRE

Anonymous Tip Line 1-888-796-5519

Immediate Occupancy!!

PLAINS

1 bedroom 2nd floor, stove & refrigerator, washer/ dryer hook up, wall to wall, gas heat, 2 car off street parking, no smoking, no pets. Near casino & I-81. 1 year lease. $400 + utilities, security, 1st & last month, credit & background checks. 570-639-1564

We Need Your Help!

West River St. Beautiful 2 floor townhouse, 2-3 bedroom apartment. All utilities included. Fireplace, parking, yard. Washer dryer hookup. Basement access. 2 bathrooms, hardwood, high ceilings. Dishwasher. $950. Security & References. Pets OK. 570-237-0124

WILKES-BARRE West River Street

Several 1 bedroom apartments available. Hardwood flooring & appliances included. Heat, water, sewer & trash also included. Walking distance to Wilkes University. Pet Friendly. Available June 1. Starting at $600. 570-969-9268

• High Efficiency Heat/Air Conditioning • Newer Appliances • Laundry Rooms • Community Room • Private Parking • Rent Includes Water, Sewer & Refuse For more info or to apply, please call: 570-733-2010 TDD: 800-654-5984 Great, Convenient Location!

Apply Today!

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

293176

906 Homes for Sale

PAGE 53

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

BLACK LAKE, NY NEED A VACATION?

Come relax and enjoy great fishing & tranquility at it’s finest. Housekeeping cottages on the water with all the amenities of home. (315) 375-8962 www.blacklake4fish.com daveroll@blacklakemarine.com

$50 off Promotion Available Now!


PAGE 54 944

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011 Commercial Properties

Center City WB

AFRAID TO MOVE?

Are you paying too much for your current office, but dread the inconvenience of moving? We can help! We not only offer less expensive rent, but we will also help you move to our modern office space in the Luzerne Bank Building on Public Square. Rents include heat, central air, utilities, trash removal, and nightly cleaning - all without a sneaky CAM charge. Access parking at the the intermodal garage via our covered bridge. 300SF to 5000SF available. We can remodel to suit. Brokers protected. Call Jeff Pyros at 570-822-8577

953 Houses for Rent

DICKSON CITY Great neighborhood

very convenient, 2000 sq ft., 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, extra large kitchen, dishwasher, stove, hardwood floors, new carpet, den, living room, dining room,laundry hook up, deck & beautiful yard. Sewer, garbage & lawn maintenance included. Mid-Valley School District. $1,000/month + security, lease & references. 570-237-2545

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1105 Floor Covering Installation

NORTHEAST FLOORING SYSTEMS, INC Installing & Refinishing Hardwood floors. We install laminate flooring too! 570-561-2079

1129 Gutter Repair & Cleaning

GUTTER 2 GO, INC.

PA#067136- Fully Licensed & Insured. We install custom seamless rain gutters & leaf protection systems. CALL US TODAY ABOUT OUR 10% OFF WHOLE HOUSE DISCOUNT! 570-561-2328

Collect Cash. Not Dust. Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

NANTICOKE Desirable

Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms 2 Free Months With A 2 Year Lease $795 + electric

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

WILKES-BARRE MONARCH RENTALS 3 bedrooms,

all appliances provided. Call 570-822-7039

959 Mobile Homes

DALLAS TWP.

Newly remodeled 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Large kitchen with stove Water, sewer & garbage included. $545 + 1st & last. 570-332-8922

Call 829-7130 to place an ad. ONLY ONL NLY L ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

1204

Painting & Wallpaper

A.B.C. Professional Painting 36 Yrs Experience We Specialize In New Construction Residential Repaints Comm./Industrial All Insurance Claims Apartments Interior/Exterior Spray,Brush, Rolls WallpaperRemoval Cabinet Refinishing Drywall/Finishing Power Washing Deck Specialist Handy Man FREE ESTIMATES Larry Neer 570-606-9638

JOB SEEKERS: Post your resume on monster.com. Let employers find you.


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

PAGE 55


PAGE 56

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 2011

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*39 M o n t h L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $16,035; M u s tb e a p p ro ved t hru N M AC @ T ier 1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rt ra d e eq u it y & regis t ra t io n f ees . $1,000 L ea s e Reb a t e in clu d ed . $630 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s t m o n t h p ym t& t a g f ees . S a le p rice p lu s t a x& t a gs in clu d es $500 N M AC Ca s h.

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2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN A ALTIMA LTIMA 2 2.5 .5 S SDN DN S SPECIAL PECIAL E EDITION DITION

M SR P $20,940

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inc ludes $3000 R ebate

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*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $18,940; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $0 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $529 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d regis tra tio n fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs In clu d es $3000 Reb a te.

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2 5 ,9 0 0 w / $3500 R ebate & $1350 V TP Bonus C as h

*S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $3500 Reb a te & $1350 VT P Bo n u s Ca s h.

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C O U N T D O W N S T A R T S N O W !

* Ta x a nd Ta g a d d it io na l. Pr io rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gr a phic a l Er r o r s . A ll Lea s es 12 k M iles PerYea rw / 1s tpa ym ent , t a gs & fees d u e a td elivery. A ll r eb a t es & inc ent ives a pplied . * *0 % A PR in lieu o f r eb a t es . As k fo rd et a ils . * * * $5 0 0 N M AC C a pt ive C a s h, $5 0 0 C u s t o m erC a s h. M u s tfina nc e t hr u N M AC . O ffer s end Ju ne 3 0 , 2 0 11.

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229 M U N DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

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Go Lackawanna 06-19-2011