Page 1


2

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 29, 2011 COVER PHOTO: GO LACKAWANNA FILE

RICH HOWELLS PHOTO / FOR GO LACAKWANNA

3 NEWS NEWS

Page 5 – Bambera discusses national abuse report

The Scranton Zine Fest, organized by Jess Meoni, comes to town on June 11. STORY: Page 14.

Page 6 – Police academy in session Page 7 – City’s insurance plan debated Page 9 – Four charged in Finn McCool’s homicide

14 ARTS

Page 15 – OPINION: Keep history relevant Page 17 – First Friday features documentary on area animal sanctuary Page 20 – June 4 show reunites natives

32 SPORTS

Page 32 – Keystone in NCAA World Series

Page 34 – Ellsworth grabs two state track medals Page 36 – Abington advances out of districts

ARTS

OUR TEAM GO Lackawanna Editor Christopher J. Hughes – 558-0113 chughes@golackawanna.com Reporter/Photographer Rich Howells – 558-0843 rhowells@golackawanna.com General Manager Paul Andrews – 558-0845 pandrews@golackawanna.com

Obituaries – 558-0113 News Tips – 558-0113 news@golackawanna.com Missed Paper – 829-5000 Classified – 1-800-273-7130 Advertising – 829-7101 Subscriptions – 1-800-252-5603 Hours – 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. 210 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton

SPORTS

Blame TV for kids’ lack of life skills It’s easy to take for granted the lessons television and movies teach us. Take, for instance, critical examples on how to fake out a parent on whether or not you may be sick. Judging by Taryn’s behavior on Wednesday, my wife and I had assumed that she was. Her demeanor at first light on Thursday morning made us believe we were right to plan on keeping her home from school. That quickly changed as she and her brother batted a balloon around the first floor of our home at about 8:30 a.m. It seems no one ever taught her the secret to faking sick was to lick your palms while you were bent over moaning and wailing.

BEHIND THE BYLINES CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES (Bueller? Bueller?) If you’re going to be “sick,” at least make sure the people around that might nail you to the wall for faking aren’t standing on the stairs. Maybe we had better examples on how to pretend to be ill. I, for one, vividly recall an episode of Nickelodeon’s “The Adventures of Pete and Pete” where the younger Pete smuggles a label from an expired can of tapioca pudding into the house to fake food poisoning. The dreaded “moan/groan” summons Mom to his room. When he’s told that he’s staying home from school, he utters

words any parent would love to hear. “But Mom, we’re doing compound fractions.” A pat of the head sent Pete back to bed, and when Mom runs errands it leaves him to explore his home and surrounding community in a way he’d never seen it before. Then again, Chris Elliot isn’t our meterman, Bebe Neuwirth isn’t our mail carrier, Iggy Pop and Michelle Trachtenberg aren’t our neighbors, and Adam West and LL Cool J aren’t the principal and teacher of Taryn’s school. As ridiculous as that Hollywood lineup might be, at least “Pete and Pete” taught kids like me to build a back story for a sick day. Granted Taryn hasn’t been absent nine times, and she wouldn’t be able to drive the car at all let alone backwards to remove whatever miles she had

put on it with her manic-depressive best friend who isn’t dying but can’t think of anything better to do, but the proof should be in the pudding – or tapioca. Today’s movies and television programs are too busy providing lessons about building rocketships during summer vacation or how to have fun with your twin brother while you live in a hotel together run by your family to touch on real lessons. Our shows taught us that an extension ladder could be used to climb through a friend’s window like Clarissa Darling’s friend, Sam; that you could hide salami inside a football like Ronnie Pinsky instead of attempting to put mustard on the football like Eddie “Donkeylips” Gelfen; or that a vacuum cleaner called the Suck-OMatic could actually devour an

entire town. I miss the good old days. Christopher J. Hughes thinks life moves by pretty fast. E-mail him at chughes@golackawanna.com

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2011-149 Advertising

Newsroom

829-7293 829-7242 kpelleschi@timesleader.com jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

Circulation

Jim McCabe – 829-5000 jmccabe@timesleader.com

Published weekly by: Wilkes-Barre Publishing Company 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA Postmaster: Send address changes to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Delivery Sunday 75¢ per week Mailed Subscriptions Sunday $1.00 per week in PA $3.05 per week outside PA


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

3

NEWS ARTS

City founded on iron furnaces, though many don’t know it By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

S ABOVE: Keystone College Studio Technician Pat McGowan skims iron slag form a transfer ladle during a Keystone Iron Works demonstration that preceded the 2010 Arts on Fire Festival. Live iron pours are one of the highlights of the industrial arts celebration. TOP: Archived images provided by the Lackawanna Historical Society capture some of the faces that worked at the Scranton Iron Furnaces from its foundation in 1841 until its closing in 1902.

WHAT: Arts on Fire Festival. WHERE: Scranton Iron Furnaces, 159 Cedar Ave., Scranton WHEN: “Fire at the Furnace” fundraising event, Friday, June 3, 8 to 11 p.m. Saturday events from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. COST: Friday night, $10 in advance or $15 at gates. Satuday, free. INFO: www.artsonfirefestival.com

weekend to recognize the significance of the site along Cedar Avenue and make history relevant, according to festival program chair Bob Savakinus. The festival has grown to inSee ORIGINS, Page 4

SPORTS

GO LACKAWANNA FILE PHOTO

CRANTON – An industrial arts festival set for June 3 and 4 doesn’t just pay homage to an often overlooked historical site in Scranton. It also clarifies which industrial resource the city owes its roots to. While the region’s history in anthracite coal mining is often cited as the city’s success, its foundation was forged in iron. “Scranton was founded as an iron making community,” Lackawanna Heritage Valley Authority Executive Director Dan Perry said. “Had it not been for that, there would be no city here.” The Arts on Fire Festival, founded last year, returns this

IF YOU GO


4

GOLackawanna

ORIGINS

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Continued from page 3

clude a “Fire at the Furnace” fundraising event benefiting the iron furnaces and Anthracite Heritage Museum. Friday’s festivities begin at 8 p.m. and include a fire parade from Lackawanna Avenue to the iron furnaces, a nighttime iron pour, live music from the Coal Town Rounders, food from Hillside Farms and Chicano’s, and more. Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 Friday night. Saturday’s events, set between 11 a.m. and 7 p.m., are free to the public. “I often like to say that the Scranton Iron Furnaces are probably one of the finest examples of the worst place an iron furnace was ever built,” Perry said. “Yet, it happens to be one of the greatest business success stories in American history.” Forging a city The furnaces were founded in 1841 with only one of the three necessary ingredients for making iron readily available: a fuel source, and an experimental one at best. For years, charcoal was used to create iron and anthracite coal had almost not been considered. “When people started noodling around with anthracite in the early1900s, it was a pretty big leap forward,” Perry said. “The problem was that anthracite, of course, is a pain in the neck to ignite.” Iron master William Henry was “a bit of an entrepreneur,” Perry said. He saw an open vein of coal “butabiscuit’stoss”fromthefront of the furnaces, a natural Cliffside, and remnants of a bloomery forge used to make rod iron at the site along Roaring Brook. While a vision took hold, the furnaces made several false starts. A financier died days before a down payment on the property was due. Henry turned to his sonin-law, Selden Scranton, and his

Sunday, May 29, 2011 brother, George W. Scranton. With the help of other partners, they purchased the 503 acres known as Parson’s Lot that now servesasdowntownScrantonand portions of South Side. But things still weren’t working smoothly. “They started building the first furnace stack, which was an utter and complete failure,” Perry said. They tried and failed three times to start the furnace. With a fuel source in place, the Scrantons still needed iron ore, which was of poor quality locally, and limestone, which couldn’t be found in the area. The location of “good enough” iron ore in the area of Lake Scranton led to the purchase of an additional 5,000 adjoining acres, Perry said, and limestone was imported from Columbia County by wagon. The poor iron ore produced terrible “pig iron” and brittle nails, but it made perfect railroad rails. As the New York and Erie Railroad planned a line from the Hudson River to Binghamton, the Scrantons convinced the railroad director that they could make the rails they needed. A $75,000 deal was made for 12,000 tons of rail. The Scranton brothers succeeded with three days to spare and in time the furnaces became the second largest iron furnace complex in America. At one point, one-sixth of all rail made in America was made in Scranton. As remarkable as the experimental success was, it was proof positive that raw resources used in industrial manufacturing could be transported to a site rather than simply mined there. Often overlooked Thousands of cars pass the Cedar Avenue site each day, but few travelers recognize its importance. “A lot of people in Scranton don’t even know they exist,” Jill Murrin, Pennsylvania Conservation Core crew leader at the Anthracite Heritage Museum, said. “This is the structure that de-

’...I consider your Refined Bar to be THE SUPERIOR of any I know of for uniformity in quality, and for toughness and great tensile strength. As compared directly with “Burden’s” and “Ulster,” I give yours a decided preference.’ Robert McKenna Testimonial of the superintendent of the car department for Delaware, Lackawanna and Western R.R. Co., Dec. 1, 1879.

COURTESY LACKAWANNA HISTORICAL SOCIETY / CHRIS BALTON

More than 500 people turned out to the inaugural Arts on Fire Festival in 2010.

fines Scranton.” Trolley rides once dropped riders off at the site, but many didn’t know why. Some continue to disrespect the area by tossing aluminum cans and other garbage into the furnaces. But the site included on the National Registry of Historic Places is the only structure of its type in the world. “You didn’t build a furnace and keep adding on furnaces to the end,” Perry said. “Architecturally, it’s very distinctive.” Making history relevant Perry said conducting an arts festival at the site and a family fun day that also began last year offers a “painless history” lesson for residents. “We are pushing that history into the forefront where is hasn’t been for a long time,” Mary Ann Moran Savakinus, executive director of the Lackawanna Historical Society, said. Recognizing that the site was underutilized, Savakinus said history advocates sought the cooperation of the arts community in Lackawanna County to bring the past to life with small iron pours beginning at noon, live music and more. “We have such a great arts program in Lackawanna County, so what a perfect marriage this could be between history, the arts, culture and tourism,” Savakinus said. The festival includes live performances from Jim Cullen and

COURTESY LACKAWANNA HISTORICAL SOCIETY / CHRIS BALTON

Saturday’s event includes blacksmithing displays, art exhibits and more.

Friends with Dani-elle, Rogue Chimp, and The Village Idiots; demonstrationsandexhibitsfrom more than 30 ceramists, glass blowers and blacksmiths including Perry and his sons, Joshua and

Sam; and a recognition of the first of three major industries that Scranton owes its roots to. “It’s part of a trilogy. It’s iron, coal and railroads, in that order,” Moran Savakinus said.


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

Shining light on dark topic Bambera discusses national report on abuse

SCRANTON – A new national report puts much of the blame for decades of sex abuse by Catholic priests on the cultural upheaval of the 1960s and 1970s, coupled with the Church’s own past failure to properly train seminarians in matters of “human formation.” Diocese of Scranton Bishop Joseph Bambera can speak firsthand to the shifting social norms and evolving seminary education, having graduated

high school in 1974 and entered seminary in 1978. While he believes the report makes an effective argument, he stresses it cannot be held up as excuse or apology. “This is a very powerful reminder to me to keep this issue on the front burner,” Bambera said. In a lengthy interview focused on one of the Catholic Church’s most sensitive topics, Bambera spoke of changes he has made in the training of priests, his decision to revise diocesan policy for the hand-

ling of abuse allegations, and the extensive, continuous training required of all priests, including himself, to avoid a repeat of the scandal that has shaken the Church. The report was commissioned and paid for in large part by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. The official title is “the causes and context of sexual abuse of minors by Catholic Priests and Deacons in the United States (1950-2010),” and the research and conclusions were done by the John

Reams of data The report cites reams of data that include the number of priests who faced allegations, the number of those allegations that were substantiated, the number of victims abused, and more nuanced issues such as the years the abusers attended seminary in relation to the year the abuses See ABUSE, Page 11

District: Audubon numbers due June 8 School board members recognized the following students and groups at their May 23 meeting: • Scranton High School valedictorian and Northeast Educational Intermediate Unit #19 Scholar of the Year Avery Baumann. • Scranton High School salutatorian Michell Reap. • West Scranton High School NEIU #19 Scholar of the Year Maria Genello. • Keystone College Annual Computer Fair winners Bhavin Patel, Hanskamel Patel and Nidhi Patel, all from Scranton High School. • Robert Morris Elementary School Student Council founders President Awnshae Smith, First Vice President Krystal Shipp, Second Vice President Alyvia Svetovich, Secretary Olivia Paccione, Treasurer Noah Leety, Safety Patrol Advisors Brandon Karp and Holly Thomas, School Activities Chair Julianne Dunay, and members Ireland Gattens, Julia Loury, Jacob Campbell, Dylan Campbell, Franklin Thomas and Jason Ardan. Among several projects, students raised $450 for Parents Loving Children Through Autism, created a self-confidence campaign and have plans to build a community garden.

proved a rental agreement for St. Mary of Assumption school with the Diocese of Scranton for the 2011-12 school year for $44,500, effectively paving the way for students from Audubon to be housed there for another year. They have held classes there since January,

and the 2011-12 rental agreement is more than $8,000 paid during the 2010-11 school year. They also approved invoices to the Palumbo Group for $13,089; Peters Design Group for $25,868.25; and Palumbo Construction Management for $8,590 for work already completed at Audubon. At its May 23 meeting, board members voted on the following motions: • Approved the hire of Ted Anderson as athletic director of Scranton High School. • Approved 2011-12 calendar. School begins on Wednesday, Sept. 7, and ends Tuesday, June 19, 2012. The calendar has five snow days built in. • Approved a food service contract with ARAMARK Corporation that guarantees a return of $175,000 to the district in the $3.8 million budget and raises paid lunch prices by 5 cents for better equity in pricing. • Approved the resignation of 79 administrators, teachers, paraprofessionals and more with over 2,000 years of combined experience, including South Scranton Intermediate Principal Barbara Dixon and West Scranton Intermediate Principal Dr. Charlotte Slocum, and Scranton High School English teacher Janet Evans, the president of Scranton City Council. Almost all teacher resignations are effective June 13. • Approved five art supply bids totaling $11,585.05, four lumber bids totaling $12,185.22, eight sports equipment bids totaling $48,546.41, three music supply bids totaling $8,666.13, eight general supply bids totaling $93,881.15, nine janitorial supply bids totaling $100,817.13, and two paint and paint supply bids totaling $43,422.15. • Approved a construction management agreement with Palumbo.

SCRANTON – The complaint filed by the city’s police union against the city of Scranton has been dismissed by the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board, according to a May 18 letter from board secretary Jennifer Kreider. The complaint centered around the March 20 arrest of John J. Duffy McHugh for possession of marijuana by Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy. The union contended that a Dec. 27, 2002, order excluded the department superintendent from the collective bargaining unit, removing Duffy’s ability to conduct off-duty arrests. In the May 18 letter, Kreider writes that “no complaint will be issued and your charge is dismissed,” adding earlier that “Chief Duffy, as a police officer, was required to make an off duty arrest when he witnessed a crime being committed.” The original complaint, filed April 18, was immediately dismissed by Duffy and followed by public outcry from the community against the union and even resulted in bumper stickers printed locally with the slogan “We Love Chief Duffy.” Duffy said he was happy that the complaint was dismissed and expressed his desire to move forward. “I want to move on now as an agency. I don’t want to worry about this. As far as I’m concerned, this is in the past, and that’s where it should stay,” Duffy said. Throughout the process, Duffy contended that the initial complaint would not stop his style of leadership of the department or his proactive policing policy, which he reiterated on Tuesday. Police Union President Detective Sgt. Bob Martin, and union attorney Thomas Jennings did not i return requests for comment.

SPORTS

SCRANTON – Despite a closed meeting held Wednesday with Palumbo Construction Management, its construction firm, no new numbers were provided this week by Scranton School District officials on the approximate costs associated with either rebuilding or repairing John Audubon School. The elementary school closed in October due to high levels of mold. In a buildings and grounds committee meeting held in February, members were given a $4.4 million estimate to rehabilitate the building’s water damage and other infrastructure problems. Reached Friday, Superintendent William King said a full presentation by Palumbo before the board is expected at its June 8 work session. The meeting will take place at 7:30 p.m. at the administration building, 425 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. “They’re still working on some things for us,” King said. Options, according to the superintendent, include a “complete overhaul of the building” including air conditioning, windows and room restructuring; repairing issues only in the roof and foundation; or demolishing the building and placing a new structure at the current site. Buildings and Grounds Committee Chair Bob Sheridan said Friday that he had not yet received any communication from the district on Wednesday’s meeting. On Monday, board members ap-

RECOGNITION

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

ARTS

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

At issue was Chief Duffy’s March 20 off-duty arrest of drug suspect

NEWS

By MARK GUYDISH Times Leader staff writer

Jay College of Criminal Justice of the City University of New York. John Jay had done a 2004 report on “the nature and scope” of the priest abuse issue.

Police union complaint vs. city dismissed

5


GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 29, 2011

ARTS

NEWS

6

First civilian police academy since 2005 begins By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SPORTS

S

CRANTON –Chris Galdieri transferred out of West Scranton High School when a classmate was implicated in a gang-related murder in 2009. Scranton High School senior Brandon Votaw said the district prohibits students from wearing matching pants and shirts to deter gang colors in the school environment.

The two young men – Galdieri,17, a junior, and 18year-old Votaw, a senior, – are two of the 32 area residents enrolled in the Scranton Police Department’s Citizen’s Police Academy, which began May 25. It’s the first time in six years thatthecourseshavebeenoffered,according to Chief Dan Duffy. The 11-week course concludes at a National Night Out celebration on August 3 at Nay Aug Park and includes education on topics like drug enforcement and auto theft prevention along with demonstrations from

UP NEXT Students meet June 1 at police headquarters. Expected topics of discussion include being a good witness, training division and crime prevention, patrol division procedures, crisis intervention training, and more.

the city’s Special Operations Group, bomb unit and more. Both Galdieri and Votaw said police work is among their possible career choices. Galdieri’s father, Frank, is a former member of the Scranton Police Department and current dispatcher in

Jessup. “Growing up, I always heard stories about how his job was and I always had an interest in it,” Galdieri said. Votaw, who graduates next month from Scranton, said he’s had an interest in working in a police department for years. He recognized that it’s not allcarchasesandarrests.Thejobalso comes with a lot of paperwork. “As long as it’s helping people, I don’t mind the paperwork,” Votaw said with a laugh. Wednesday’s introductory class, which was led by Duffy, Lt. Leonard Namiotka and Sgt. Pat Gerrity, ofSee CADETS, Page 11

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy speaks at the first Citizen’s Police Academy class on May 25.


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

SCRANTON CITY COUNCIL

7

LACKAWANNA COUNTY COMMISIONERS

Insurance legislation questioned County renews lease has to be some research done and some due diligence. What I saw when I looked at the policies was some errors on the coverages, and that has to be corrected.” Councilman Bob McGoff later asked about the status of the proposed park on Perry Avenue, which was awarded a $50,000 grant by the state Department of Community and Economic Development last month. “I kept it off the agenda because I thought it was a project, certainly, that is worth the consideration of city council. Because of this outstanding and significant problem we’re facing with the broker of records and city insurances and the fact that some things are, as was noted, insured inappropriately, I don’t think we want to add anything to that list right now,” Evans replied. When reached for comment on Friday, Doherty said what he rescinded was an addendum that came down to him just the previous week. The city’s insurance has already been paid for the year, he explained, as had been done in prior years. The contract will be put out to bid by the end of the year. “The new insurance should go out to bid in October or November,” Doherty said.

Defaulted loan could cost city $1.56M By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

vember repeal of the penalty, interest, and fee schedule for collection of delinquent taxes, eliminating fees that they deemed “exorbitant and unnecessary” to taxpayers. “Part of the problem is that council removed the fees from the collection agency (hired by the authority). These collection agencies want to make fees, and they removed all the fees they can make, so what is the impetus for the collection agency to collect your money if they’re not going to make money?” Doherty asked. The mayor said that the city is discussing options with Pennstar now and will likely make plans for partial payments this year, working full repayment it into budget next year. “It will be paid back,” he said.

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

MOOSIC – During an evening meeting in the Moosic Borough Building, 715 Main St., Lackawanna County Commissioners renewed a five-year lease agreement on Wednesday for a building on North Washington Avenue rather than entertaining the option of constructing a new facility. The four-story building at 130 N. Washington Ave., Scranton, holds the county coroner’s office, adult probation/parole office, and drug treatment court. Until recently, the first floor also housed Brixx Grille & Tavern. The lease agreement with ATR Properties, LLC, covers approximately 19,500 square feet at a price of $11.55 per square foot. The last five-year lease ran from 2006 until March of 2011. After Commissioner A.J. Munchak corrected a slight error in the legislation’s dates, the commissioners unanimously agreed to renew the lease for anoth-

er five years, which expires February 20, 2016. “I think it’s a good deal for the taxpayers, and I think it’s something that we should do. It’s to avoid any kind of moving cost, and it’s going to give us the knowledge of what it’s going to cost us for the next five years to house those functions in that building,” Commissioner Mike Washo said. While he previously wanted to see county build its own facility, Washo said he doesn’t believe the county has the excess money to spend at this time. “The county is not in any position to anticipate building a facility to house county offices that are now in rented space any time, in my view, within at least the next five years from our standpoint of our ability to borrow and our ability to pay back. We just cannot take on that burden, so that’s why I’m going to vote for this lease,” Washo explained. “We would be hard pressed if we had to move.”

Bipartisan plan may help small biz U.S. Senators Bob Casey (D-PA) and Mike Enzi (RWY) are pushing bipartisan legislation that would make it easier for small businesses to do business with the federal government and to in turn save the federal government money. “I have heard from Pennsylvania small business owners about how current law negatively impacts their companies,” said Casey. “This commonsense change will benefit small businesses in Pennsylvania and across the country while also saving taxpayer money and increasing efficiency.” Enzi and Casey introduced S. 1110, the Small Business Fairness Act, that would

change the Small Business Act to allow agencies to count qualified purchases through small business pools toward their minority and disadvantaged contracting goals. This would encourage small businesses to pool together as regional marketing associations to help secure large government procurement contracts. Currently federal agencies have statutory requirements they must meet for the percentage of purchases they make from small businesses owned by women, service-disabled veterans, Native Americans, socially disadvantaged individuals, or businesses within qualified Historically Underutilized Business (HUB) Zones.

SPORTS

SCRANTON – City Council Finance Chairman Frank Joyce said the city is “in hot water” on Tuesday after the Scranton Development Authority defaulted on a $1.56 million loan from Pennstar Bank. The authority purchased the city’s delinquent taxes from 2004, 2005, and 2005 with a lineof-credit loan on Dec. 20, 2007, and the city is now responsible for the debt, which Joyce said was $1,560,398.80. In a letter from Harrisburgbased law firm Rhoads & Sinon, LLP, who represent Pennstar, dated May 19, it was explained that the city also owes interest of $227.56 per day through the date of payment. It is due on or

before June 18. “This thing was doomed to failure from day one because it was assumed that there would be a 98 percent collection rate on the delinquent taxes for 2004, ‘05, and ’06,” council solicitor Boyd Hughes said. “I don’t see how the city can come up with the money.” Hughes, who said he only learned of the issue in March, estimated that with the city’s already growing budget hole, “the best case scenario” would be a $6.5 million minimum deficit in 2011. While council has continued to push the blame on city administration for the deficit, Mayor Chris Doherty said when reached for comment on Friday that one of the issues that led to this loan default was council’s No-

for Brixx building

ARTS

SCRANTON – The first piece of legislation City Council passed in 2011 is being revisited, but not in the way that they had expected. In January, council passed a contract with Knowles Associates, LLC, for the city’s insurance brokerage services, but amended the contract to expire on June 30, 2011 instead of January 1, 2012 to allow the city to draft a request for proposals. On Tuesday, council placed the legislation back on the agenda after Mayor Chris Doherty crossed out his signature on the legislation and wrote “rescinded” next to it on May19, according to council. Council solicitor Boyd Hughes said that while he had never seen this type of action before, he assumed this was meant to be taken as a veto, and the mayor only has 10 days to veto legislation. Believing this to be in violation of the city’s Administrative Code and Home Rule Charter, Hughes recommended that council place the contract back on agenda for a veto override. It was overridden unanimously. “Such an act would set a precedent, allowing any mayor, including Mayor Doherty himself, to re-

scind all or any of the signatures on all or any pieces of legislation at any time. Throughout my eight years of public service as a councilwoman, such an act has never been performed. Mayor Doherty’s action appears to grant himself powers that are not provided to him by law,” Council President Janet Evans said. “The broker of record has never been put out to bid, thereby eliminating any possibility of competitive bids and saving throughout a 10-year period.” Councilman Jack Loscombe, who works as an insurance agent and real estate appraiser, said that after studying the contract and corresponding documents, he found several city properties to be under- and over-insured. He said that the coverage should be reviewed and put out to bid every three to five years, saving the “cash-strapped” city money on premium reductions. “The reason for bidding this coverage out is not solely to reduce the premium, but rather to have a chance to review the coverages for accuracy,” he said. “All we’ve asked for was a request for proposals, and I’m not picking on the current broker – they may the best broker in this area. I have no clue. I just think there

NEWS

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com


Spruc e St.

Spruce Street Trio This locally run family winery currently has 2 locations:

www.nimblehill.com

Tunkhannock Tasting Room 3971 SR6 570.836.WINE

Scranton Winery Sales 400 Spruce Street 570.558.9463

chocolate creations

specializes in delicious chocolate, favors, gifts and specialty items for all occasions. Your Party, Our Priority!

www.chocolatecreations.us

1520 Pennsylvania Ave Peckville • 383.9931

400 Spruce Street Scranton • 207.4044

FROM FRESHLY MADE SUBS TO HOMEMADE DESSERTS TO CHEESES CANGIANO’S ITALIAN SPECIALTIES HAS THAT AND MORE. CLARKS SUMMIT 715 NORTH STATE STREET 586-4896

SCRANTON 400 SPRUCE STREET 207-2667


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

CRANTON – After being led on a “wild goose chase” by one of the individuals involved, members of the Lackawanna County District Attorney’s Office and the Scranton Police Department jointly announced charges against four people connected to the murder of 28year-old Harrisburg native Malik Carter inside Finn McCool’s, 1608 Cedar Ave., Scranton, on May 16.

RICH HOWELLS PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Lackawanna County Assistant District Attorney Gene Talerico discusses the charges against Derrick Phillips, Kyle Mason, Sunny Pompey and Fahim Allen during a May 23 press conference.

Pompey’s home several weeks ago that Carter may have had a role in. Phillips and Mason entered the bathroom at Finn McCool’s, and Mason handed Phillips his .380 handgun. Mason told police that Phillips “opened the bathroom door and the next thing he heard was a gunshot.” The bar cleared out and Mason got into his vehicle with Latesha Jacobs. As he was driving on Pear Avenue off of Cedar Avenue, he again encountered Phillips and gave him a ride to Valley View Apartments. Phillips is charged with criminal homicide, prohibited possession of a firearm, carrying a firearm without a license, possessing an instrument of crime, aggravated assault and reckless endangerment for his alleged role in the incident. Mason is charged with conspiring to commit criminal homicide, aggravated assault and reckless endangerment; carrying a firearm without a license, possession of a weapon, and transfer of a firearm. Pompey is charged with hindering apprehension and prosecution, providing false reports, and providing written false statements. She falsified re-

ports to police claiming her sole responsibility for the murder, leading detectives to uncover surveillance footage from a local fast food restaurant and search her vehicle. She originally told police that she arrived at Finn McCool’s after 9 p.m. and left after 11 p.m. to get food at the McDonald’s on South Washington Avenue and to purchase the Dutch Masters cigars for Phillips and Mason. When police left her inside an interview room, Pompey was allegedly banging on the walls, pounding the table and screaming. When Scranton Detective James Pappas reentered the room, Pompey allegedly shouted “I lied about everything, I did it, and I killed that (expletive), not Omar. I shot him, I shot him, and I’d do it again, (expletive) that (expletive)!” Surveillance video from McDonald’s obtained the evening of her May 18 arrest placed Pompey at the restaurant during the time of the shooting. She denied being pictured in the surveillance footage and allegedly told police, “I’m giving you a (expletive) murder, I’m confessing to it, isn’t that what you want?” Pappas told her that, “We

SPORTS

difficult to find the truth, but at the end of the day, the truth was found.” Phillips and Carter had a history of physical violence, but on May 16, “It’s clear that the aggressor that evening was Omar,” Talerico said. According to affidavits: Police were called to Finn McCool’s at 11:17 p.m. on May 16 for a reported shooting. An autopsy later revealed that a gunshot to the face killed Carter. In an interview with police following his drug arrest, Mason allegedly told officers that he and Phillips were watching a basketball game at the bar and decided to get some marijuana. Phillips told Pompey to leave and buy Dutch Masters cigars so the two could smoke later that night. While she was gone, Carter, also known at “Mdot,” entered the bar, prompting Phillips to make a phone call. Mason told police that Phillips removed a knife from his pocket and “said that something might go down.” Mason alleged that Carter and Phillips had a history, including a home invasion and armed robbery at Phillips’ and

ARTS

Police identified Derrick “Omar” Phillips, 40, of Stafford Ave., Scranton, as the alleged gunman who killed Carter with a single gunshot to the face last week. Phillips allegedly received the gun from 22-year-old Kyle “YG” Mason, of Green Place, Scranton, inside the bathroom of the South Scranton bar. Phillips’ girlfriend, Sunni Pompey, 23, of Stafford Ave., Scranton, allegedly lied to police about her role in the murder, and a fourth individual, 42year-old Fahim Allen, of Margaret Ave., Scranton, is charged with tampering with evidence at the scene. Phillips, Mason and Pompey were arrested on drug-related charges for the delivery and possession of heroin through the District Attorney’s office on May 18, according to First Assistant District Attorney Gene Talerico. According to Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy, Detective Jamie Barrett apprehended Allen after 7 p.m. Monday evening while acting on information that he was in the area of Bangor Heights Apartments. En route, Barrett spotted Allen near Holy Rosary Church on William Street in North Scranton and took him into custody without incident. Talerico said Scranton detectives spent “hundreds of hours of work over the course of a week’s time… to literally chase down wild goose chases…The folks in this case made it very

didn’t want a false confession and we certainly are not in the business of arresting someone Phillips for a homicide that did not do it.” Phillips, Mason and Pompey were each arraigned on charges before Pompey District Judge Robert Russell inside the roll call room at police headquarters on Monday afternoon. PomMason pey’s bail is set at $100,000, and no bail is set for either Phillips or Mason. Preliminary hearings are tentatively set for June 2. Allen allegedly entered the bar with Carter on May 16. Carter was his niece’s brother-inlaw, he told police. After Carter was shot while walking to the bathroom, Allen took a .22 handgun out of the deceased man’s waistband. He is charged with carrying a firearm without a license, prohibited possession of a firearm, theft by unlawful taking, receiving stolen property, abuse of a corpse, tampering with evidence, and providing false identification to law enforcement. The case, according to Talerico, shows the importance of collaboration between police and the District Attorney’s office along with the serious nature of lying to police. “It needs to be said crystal clear: If you’re going to cooperate with police or police ask you a question and you don’t tell the truth, this case should be proof positive for each and every one of those folks that we’re not going to take that lightly,” Talerico said. “Sunny Pompey is charged because what she told police was an out-and-out fabrication. “We will not lay down when people continue to lie to the police when you’re dealing with serious, violent crime such as this.”

NEWS

Four arrested for roles in McCool’s homicide S

9


10

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 29, 2011

At its monthly meeting on May 16, Council President Anthony Pero explained that the decision, announced on May 6, was frustrating, especially since the recreation project that the funds would be used for is currently underway. “We originally thought and believed that we would receive a $160,000 grant from the Monroe gaming funds,” Pero said. “We were designated as a number one priority and when the grant awards came out subsequently, somehow we were passed over for the second time. It makes it extremely frustrating when you have a project under way and you are told you are number one and then things change.” Overall, 34 projects in Monroe, Lackawanna, Carbon, Pike, Northampton and Wayne Counties were awarded $9.7 million in grants through the local share assessment on Mount Airy Resort and Casino. Old Forge planned to use the grant to further develop the $2 million Old Forge Recreation Park on Marion Street. Under Pennsylvania’s gaming law, licensed gambling facilities are assessed a fee to support and enhance their host communities to mitigate the impact of gaming. Monroe County’s local share assessment is divided into two funds; one for Monroe County and the other for projects in

In these tough economic times, everyone is trying to cut corners and get more for their money. Two free applications for Windows will help protect your computer from viruses and malicious software. The first application is called Microsoft Security Essentials or MSE. MSE is a free antivirus software created by Microsoft. It provides protection against different types of malicious software like computer viruses, spyware, and phony programs that pretend to be useful applications but really steal your personal information. The MSE motto is “You can’t put a price on protection. So we didn’t”. The only system requirement needed to download, install, and run this software is a genuine version of Windows. Most store bought computers have a legal versions of Windows pre-installed, so this should not be a problem for the general public. MSE will not work if you are using an illegal version of Windows. If you paid for your system thinking it had legal software and MSE says it is not a legal version, it’s time to get your money back. At this time, MSE is available for computers that are running Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7. To download this free antivirus

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS WANTED

TECH ED

EDGAR BARRANCO application visit www.microsoft.com/security_essentials. If you already paid for antivirus software, I would continue to use it. Nevertheless, if you don’t have protection for your computer or your antivirus protection plan is about to expire, know that there is at least one free option out there. The second application is called MalwareBytes. Let’s say that you’ve been experiencing an increase in pop-up advertisements, your computer is acting slower than usual, or your homepage has changed. In addition, you have noticed that your searches no longer bring results from your favorite search engine, and there are more “tool bars” being displayed on your web browser. These are classic signs of a malware infection. Malware is a combination of the words malicious software. Malicious software comes in many disguises and is sometimes hard to remove from your computer. Malwarebytes Anti-Malware (MBAM) can assist you by getting rid of all of those annoying issues. The

free version of the Malwarebytes Corporation’s software scans for malware and removes it when the user chooses to run the program. There is also a paid version available called “MBAM Pro” which provides scheduled scans and real-time protection. MBAM can be downloaded at www.malwarebytes.org. Edgar Barranco is a systems engineer who has been involved with computers and electronics for decades. E-mail him at tech_edu@yahoo.com. ‘Tech Ed’ appears each week in Go Lackawanna.

Golf School at Wilkes-Barre G.C. DATE: Starting Monday June 6, 2011 - June 27 TIME: 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM For 4 consecutive Mondays COST: $125 per person SIGN UP: Contact Wilkes-Barre Golf Club Pro Shop at 472-3590 INSTRUCTORS: Fred Klein Head Golf Coach for LCCC, Judd Carr Class A PGA Professional, and Chris Mathews Head Golf Professional at Wilkes-Barre G.C. and PGA Apprentice 1001 Fairway Drive Wilkes-Barre • 472-3590

Ask about bridal party specials!

Free Removal. Call Anytime. Highest Price Paid In Cash!

V&G 570-574-1275

UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON BOYS’ BASKETBALL DAY CAMPS

SPECIAL PRICES: 1 Session $49.99 Buy 3 Get 1 FREE $134.99 Buy 5 Get 3 FREE $199.99 Buy 7 Get 5 FREE $249.99

Ages 8-15 • Long Center

Session I: Monday, June 20 - Friday, June 24 Session II: Monday, Aug. 15-Fri., Aug. 19 8:30 am - 3:00 pm $185 Includes Camp T-shirt, Basketball & Lunch Daily Visit www.scranton.edu, click on athletics, then icon for Summer Camps for more information or to register on line or contact Carl Danzig at 941-7252

Chronic Pain Relief GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE!

BY APPOINTMENT ONLY CALL BETTY

DURYEA 289380

O

LD FORGE - Borough officials expressed their disappointment at being overlooked for a $160,000 grant awarded by the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development as part of the local share assessment on the Mount Airy Resort and Casino in Mt. Pocono, Monroe County.

contiguous counties, such as Lackawanna County. “It certainly has us scrambling to either scale down the project or look for other resources in other ways,” Pero said. “Somehow it sometimes seems like another example of Old Forge being underserved. I know the county has helped out recently, and hopefully the state will recognize that we are a community that needs resources and grants. Hopefully in the next round we may be back to the number one priority.” In other news, council voted 4-2 to open proposals to other engineering firms to provide services to the borough. Pasonick Engineering, which had served Old Forge Borough for a number of years, recently found itself the subject of scrutiny because of Michael Pasonick’s alleged bribe of over $1,000 to a Luzerne County school board member. Pasonick signed a plea agreement with the U.S. Attorney’s office regarding the bribe in April. Borough engineer Harold Ash, who works with Pasonick Engineering, said Michael Pasonick was no longer involved with the company and a letter was sent out to council members to this effect before the meeting. According to the letter, Michael L. Amato, Daryl Pawlush, Andrew Pasonick and Paul Pasonick had become principals in the firm as of January of this year. Council also voted to accept the resignation of Bill Toman from the borough’s planning commission and appointed David Chromey to finish the rest of Toman’s term.

278727

By STEPHANIE LONGO For Go Lackawanna

280059

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Old Forge frustrated by Computer security doesn’t lack of gaming funds have to break the bank


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

11

NEWS CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Chief Dan Duffy speaks with Citizen’s Police Academy students Brandon Votaw, left, and Chris Galdieri.

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Bishop Joseph C. Bambera speaks Tuesday afternoon inside his Wyoming Avenue office.

ABUSE Continued from page 5

® H E AT I N G & A I R C O N D I T I O N I N G

Service - Installation AJS Mechanical Services, LLC. Dalton, PA 570-468-0190 We service all brands! Please call for Spring cleaning specials.

Continued from page 6

fered a lighthearted, often humorous approach. “If you walk out, I’ll take your license plate and follow you,” Duffy joked at one point and later quipped that anyone who showed up late to class would be forced to do push-ups. It continues a serious approach to improving the private-public partnership Duffy has worked to build with private citizens and

FORMULA FOR R 1 STEEL AND CERAMIC

BOCCARDO JEWELERS, INC. DOWNTOWN SCRANTON www.boccardojewelers.com

SPORTS

Diocese data Data the diocese provided the John Jay researchers showed that, from 1950 to 2002, the diocese had allegations of abuse leveled at 25 priests, 15 of which were substantiated, Bambera said. There were 36 victims, which means at least some of those 15 were repeat offenders. The diocese had a total of 873 priests in that time frame, so “the percentage of priests with founded allegations was 1.7 percent,” Bambera noted. “But one case is one too many for the victim, and the Church has to acknowledge that. “For a victim, they don’t want to hear all the good things I’m doing. They want to hear, and need to hear and be reassured, that their needs are being met, and that we are tak-

ing steps to keep other people safe.” The John Jay report keeps that need in focus. It is a reminder that the problem is not resolved. “The saddest part for me is that we have to have this conversation,” Bambera said. “What gives me hope is that this is another opportunity to retool and refocus our efforts to eradicate this problem.”

ARTS

occurred. Some of the key conclusions: • “No single cause” of sexual abuse of minors by priests is identified by the research, but “Social and cultural changes in the 1960s and 1970s manifested in increased levels of deviant behavior in the general society and also among priests of the Catholic Church in the United States.” • Factors specific to the Church – changes in seminary training, as well as in screening – “contributed to the decline” of abuse cases from the mid 1980s on. • Priests who acknowledged they were homosexual were no more likely to abuse minors than other priests. Bambera acknowledge discussion of the topic is difficult. “The main thing is that this is a reminder to me and the peo-

ple I work with that we constantly have to reassess what we are doing for the victims, and to communicate to the public what we are doing. “This is a priority for me.”

CADETS

groups like the West ScrantonHyde Park Neighborhood Watch. “I want people to have that feeling, that sense of pride in the police department and in the community,” he said. Classes will not allow citizens toactaspoliceofficersandwillnot serve as an Act 120 certification which all officers in the state are required to pass. But it does share the department’s love of the job with the people it serves. “I want to attract as many people as possible to this profession just because of the feeling I have in following this profession,” Duffy said.


12

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 29, 2011

RICH HOWELLS PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

ARTS

NEWS

Bill Black stands in the recently remodeled Pages & Places at Anthology.

Rebranding of Anthology brings new goals

SPORTS

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON - Yearly cultural events like the Pages & Places Book Festival and The Gathering Literary Conference have brought people from all walks of life to Scranton to learn and share ideas, making attendees wish that experiences like these could be held year-round. Anthology New and Used Books, 515 Center St., Scranton, is now making that a reality, teaming up with Pages & Places to become Pages & Places at Anthology in May. In a business where even large chains like Borders are declaring bankruptcy, the small, independent bookstore located above Outrageous Café & Boutique found itself grasping for financial stability. That’s

when owner Paul Nardone reached out to Pages & Places directors Bill Black and Liz Randol for help. Clearing out most of their inventory and redesigning the space with gatherings in mind, the store now focuses on holding regular literary events and taking special orders for books via Amazon.com. The “active, co-creative enterprise” has only been open for two weeks, but they’ve already held well-received programs with an author, a poet, and the dean of Marywood University’s School of Architecture. “(Nardone) didn’t want to give up what was clearly an urban amenity. It was good for the city, but he couldn’t sustain the business, so he called me in the winter, just kicking ideas around, and asked if there was some sort of synergy between Pages & Places and the bookstore. It seemed

a natural fit, to use the brand and reinvent the model, so eventually, this is what we came up with,” Black explained. Black said he has found that organizing these programs was much easier than putting together the annual festival because they rely on local artists, writers, and cultural groups such as The Gathering to help plan events and, in some cases, assume a weekend or a month of programming. “Pages & Places’ overarching mission has two components. The book festival is sort of its key activity, but the mission is really to leverage culture toward urban livability, which is jargon for making the city more fun, interesting, and accessible. The second is to somehow foster coordination between other providers of cultural programming. This space really

gives us the ability to do both,” he said. “You would drop $25 to $50 to encounter these kinds of events in New York.” From the feedback received from patrons who have come from as far as Rochester, N.Y., Black believes that they have achieved a familiar, comfortable vibe with the rebranded shop, offering everyone a chance to feel like they are part of something intelligent, engaging, and unique. “The key words (from attendees) have been ‘exciting,’ ‘necessary,’ ‘intimate,’ and ‘warm.’ All the feedback includes or implies those terms, and that’s exactly what we hoped for…It’s hitting the sweet spot. People have left feeling really good, getting a high-quality experience in a comfortable setting.”


Sunday, May 29, 2011

13

GOLackawanna

MARRIAGES

ARTS

JESSUP – Seventeen men and women representing eight local agencies became the second graduating class of the Scranton Area Crisis Intervention Team, just one day prior to the two-year anniversary of the events that inspired it. Mayor Chris Doherty created the team in response to the fatal shooting of city resident Brenda Williams on May 28, 2009. Williams, 52, allegedly approached an officer inside her home while holding a knife. While the shooting was deemed justified by the Lackawanna County District Attorney’s office, the death of the woman diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic showed the need for better training for officers and other professionals to deal with mental health patients. “The importance of this in some ways we’ll never really know because you’ll prevent it so much,” Doherty said. “We’re very proud of the graduating class and the officers making a commitment…You mad a choice to be trained at a higher level.” In order to graduate Crisis Intervention Training, class members – Scranton Ptlm. Anthony Shields, Ptlm. Francis McClain, Ptlm. James Weaver, Ptlm. Gary McPhillips, Ptlm. Ronald Alongi, Ptlm. John Megivern, Ptlm. Jason Hyler, Ptlm. Derek Anderson, Ptlm. Nancy Bauman; Archbald Ptlm. Jaime Nolan; Dickson City Ptlm. Stacey Lemoncelli, Lackawanna County Det. Nicholas DeSando; Pennsylvania State Police Trooper First Class Sharon Palmer; Allyson Simpson of Allied Services; Jeanna Sebastianelli of NHS Human Services; and Todd Ferretti and Kevin Gownley of Lackawanna County Probation and Parole – completed 40 hours of curriculum- and experience-based training this week. Above, Scranton Ptlm. Ronald Alongi is congratulated by Mayor Chris Doherty on completing CIT training as Sgt. Rob Celuck looks on.

NEWS

Grads lauded for seeking specialized training

The following marriage license applications were filed in the Lackawanna County Marriage License Bureau between May 20 and 26, 2011: • Jill Ann Andzulis, Scott Twp., and Scott David Suda, Huntersville, N.C. • Allison Christene Kaub and Theodore Baird, both of Scranton. • Amy Tais Banner and Barry Eric Wolborsky, both of Scranton. • Brooke Marie Beitler and Derek Bruce Gilpin, both of Clarks Green. • Jaime Bellucci and John Figueroa, both of Scranton. • Helen Marie Gagner and Robert Patrick Black, both of Moscow. • Lisa Ann Sutton and Ronnie Lynn Bourne, Jr., both of Scranton. • Martha Theresa Kazanes and Alan William Carliano, both of

Lake Ariel. • Mary Theresa Marie Grecco and Damien Sylvio Carlo, both of Carbondale. • Yyonne Marie Rizzo and Christian Louis Cavalieri, both of West Pittston. • Mindy Sue Holland and John Francis Chandler, both of Jermyn. • Carla Ann Chiamp and Matthew James Davis, both of Moosic. • Elise Capozza Clifford and Ryan Charles Collins, both of Scranton. • Robin Ann Colon, Blakely, and Wilson Esteban Leon, Jamaica, N.Y. • Dianna Condida and Robert Alan Murphy, both of Archbald. • Jane Elizabeth Grendel, Scranton, and Gerald Stephen Connolly, Moosic. • Kimberly Ann Lowe and Michael John Dietzer, both of Olyphant. For more notices, including divorce filings, visit www.golackawanna.com/people.

-Christopher J. Hughes

SPORTS

From the Venetian Island of Murano ...Murano Glass Beads

405 Spruce St. • Scranton 570-347-8700

262972

JEWELERS INC.


NEWS

14

GOLackawanna

Scranton resident crafts event around do-it-yourself magazines By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

ARTS

J

SPORTS

Sunday, May 29, 2011

essica Meoni believes she was born in the wrong era, but that hasn’t stopped her from trying to make 2011 feel like 1981. Meoni, of West Scranton, is the co-coordinator and creative mind behind the Scranton Zine Festival set for Saturday, June11 along Center Street. The city’s first convention celebrates a literary art form that has survived current waves of technology.

The festival is followed by a poetry reading at the adjacent Outrageous Café & Boutique. As of Tuesday, Meoni, who is also a contributor to Go Lackawanna, had confirmed 20 zinesters from as far away as North Carolina, along with four artists and other vendors such as soap and candle company Fanciful Fox. Her greatest task as an organizer, however, was just getting people to understand what a zine actually is. “It’s really hard to explain to someone because it’s a very broad and vague term,” Meoni said. A zine is essentially a self-published literary magazine. Its origins can be traced back to the increasing popularity of science fiction in the 1930s through the ’60s, where fans traded stories and ideas through mailing lists and handmade publications. The zine as it is remembered today came about in the ‘70s and ‘80s, when punk rock and hardcore music fans wrote about their favorite bands through do-it-yourself zines that RICH HOWELLS PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Jessica Meoni is the founder of Ruthless Zine and the creator of the Scranton Zine Festival.

were photocopied and stapled for distribution at venues. “It became a way to freely express themselves without going through any kind of editor. It allowed people to just speak their minds without any hesitation,” she explained. “But with the spring of the internet, it kind of turned into blogs and things like that. People do e-zines too, which I guess are similar, but I’m a traditionalist in that sense because I like the real thing.” Meoni is the creator of Ruthless Zine, which began in 2008 and recently published its12th issue. While researching a paper for a class at Marywood University about the three waves of feminism, she came across the ‘90s “riot grrrl” movement, which utilized zines to convey beliefs that had not been published otherwise. Most zines are either free, like her own, or a few dollars each. The movement has always been more about trading ideas than monetary compensation. “It’s definitely not for the money. It’s all focused on expressing yourself…To know that someone is picking that up and responding to it, knowing all the hard work that went into it, it makes it worthwhile. It’s rewarding that way,” she said. Meoni said a Philadelphia zine convention inspired her to create on in her hometown. Along with Dana Marie Bloom, she organized a music and culture festival called Ladyfest in the city in 2009. Now 21, she feels that she learned a lot from the experience, including how to secure funding

through Lackawanna County. While she admits that print may be a dying medium in the information age, she hopes to introduce the area to a new, unique tool for expression. “If anything, it’s going to finally show them what a zine is, maybe showing them that there are cooler things to do with your time than go on Facebook,” she said with a laugh.

IF YOU GO What: Scranton Zine Festival Where: Center Street, downtown Scranton When: 12 p.m. – 3 p.m. Cost: Free. A free poetry reading from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. will be held directly after, hosted by local poet Brian Fanelli at Outrageous Café & Boutique, 515 Center Street.


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

15

Keeping the historical fire burning MINING HISTORY BOB SAVAKINUS

Through the years since it has been designated as a state historical site, different attempts have been made to promote its significance and draw public participation. In 1991, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In September of that year, an iron pour was conducted at the site as part of the city-wide celebration to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Scranton’s Industrial Founding. Still, the site remained a mystery to many local residents, and very few people recognized its tremendous significance to our local history and to our national industrial heritage. In 2010, the local arts and cultural community joined forces to create an event to spotlight the Scranton Iron Furnaces. The plan was to develop an industrial arts festival that would celebrate local heritage and promote its significance in a new and exciting way. The first festival, Arts on Fire was held on June 19, 2010, and more than 500 people came to

the furnaces to experience a live iron pour, see and buy local art, and enjoy a variety of entertainment. In September 2010, a “Family Fun Day at the Furnaces” was held to further promote the site. The Anthracite Heritage Museum and Iron Furnaces Associates were greatly encouraged by the success of these events. Arts on Fire promises to be even bigger than last year with the addition of a special Friday evening fundraising event called “Fire at the Furnaces,” and plans have already begun to host a second Family Fun Day in the fall. Because of the cooperation and support of more than a dozen community partners, the Iron Furnaces have now become recognized as a lasting reminder of how Scranton was founded and the site has been rediscovered as the perfect venue for the community to gather to celebrate our shared heritage. Bob Savakinus is the president of the Anthracite Museum and Iron Furnaces Associates

ARTS

N.Y. All that remained were four massive stone furnace stacks, a lasting remainder of Scranton’s industrial heritage. For the next six decades, the property sat virtually untouched. Then in 1965, a plan was proposed to convert the historic property into a small park. A letter dated May 13, 1965, on file at the Lackawanna Historical Society written by Society President John MacLean, M.D., commends Dr. Maurice K. Goddard, state secretary of forests and waters, for his department’s work in preparing plans for the park. On behalf of the Lackawanna Historical society, Dr. MacLean states that “nothing could be more timely to mark the centennial of the city in 1966 than this project.” The project missed the centennial milestone but did officially commence in 1969 when approximately four acres of the

old iron works were designated by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as a historical site to commemorate the significant role that the Lackawanna Iron and Coal Company played in the development of the region and the growth of the nation’s railroads. The state legislature, under the leadership of Governor William Scranton - a direct descendant of Joseph Hand Scranton, cousin of the iron forcing brothers and major early investor in the iron works - invested $400,000 to clean up the property, install interpretive signage, create parking facilities, build an observation platform and design display models. On September 19, 1971, the iron furnace site was officially dedicated as part of the Anthracite Heritage Museum Complex Unfortunately, due to ever decreasing state museum funding and lack of staffing to promote and interpret the site, the Scranton Iron Furnaces have continued to be one of the Lackawanna Valley’s best kept secrets.

NEWS

At the recent Lackawanna Historical Society’s local history quiz show, the question was asked: “What was Scranton’s first industry?” The contestant answered “coal.” Incorrect. Few people who live in the Lackawanna Valley realize that the city’s first major industry was iron production, when Scranton brothers came to the small rural village of Slocum Hollow to establish the Lackawanna Iron and Coal Company, the first company in the United States to successfully mass produce iron rail. The company thrived for more than 50 years, and the city of Scranton blossomed from a virtual wilderness into an industrial center named in honor of the brothers who built the iron works. But when the boom times ended and competition from Western Pennsylvania iron mills increased, the company decided to move the entire operation to Buffalo, N.Y. In 1902, all supporting equipment, structures, and supplies were dismantled and shipped north to a place that would later be named Lackawanna,

You can smoke at:

STEAMTOWN CIGAR CLUB 407 Spruce St. (downtown) Scranton, Pa (570) 344-1188 • Hours: Mon. - Sat. 11am - 8pm

Handmade from the rarest vintage tobaccos, Ashton® offers excellent balance and rich flavor. Savor a premium Ashton, and you’ll come to the same conclusion.

ANNIVERSARY TENT PARTY JUNE 3 • 3-11 PM

SPORTS

Draw your own conclusion.


GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 29, 2011

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

16

If there’s one thing that could brighten up a long work week, I figured it would be a beer and a movie called “Hobo with a Shotgun.” I probably should have just stuck with the booze. I love some very bad movies, so I knew what I was getting into. Directors Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez also love bad movies, so when they released “Grindhouse” in 2007, a two-part tribute to those cheesy exploitation films of those bygone B-movie days, I was all over it. In theaters, both segments played together as a double bill, and they even had fake trailers play in between them for

INFINITE IMPROBABILITY RICH HOWELLS other lurid films in the same vein. This, of course, led to real, featurelength spin-offs from these trailers, beginning with last year’s “Machete.” “Hobo with a Shotgun” won a “make your own grindhouse-style trailer” contest held by Rodriguez and was included in some screenings of “Grindhouse” along with the other trailers. It was only a matter of time before these small-time filmmakers See HOBO, Page 17


Sunday, May 29, 2011

Animals focus of film By TYLER MILES Go Lackawanna intern

IF YOU GO

lished as a non-profit organization in 2007, the sanctuary currently houses nearly120 animals including dogs, cats, pigs, goats and a peacock. Lahiri’s goal is to provide a lifelong, safe sanctuary for all types of animals. For some time, Lahiri hoped to inform more people about the work being done at Indraloka, and friends suggested she work with Braz on the upcoming documentary. “Tucked in off the beaten path, in this age of video it was a logical progression for them to come to the realization that a film would be very helpful to raise awareness,” he said. Braz filmed nearly1,000 hours of footage and spent six months editing it into the 50 minute documentary. Along the way he said he was surprised at how much he began to care about the animals and the “very welcoming environment” Lahiri had built. That connection, she said, is shared by many who come to Indraloka.

Vac–Way

launched an hour-and-a-half version to capitalize on the hype. Sadly, that’s essentially all they do. The talented Rutger Hauer plays the titular hero in our aptly-named film, a homeless man who wanders into the ironically-named “Hope Town” hoping to scrounge enough change to buy a lawnmower to start a lawn care business. The city, which is comically overridden with crime, is run by The Drake, a ruthless psychopath who rules through violence and fear perpetuated with the help of his two sons. After saving several people, including Abby, a prostitute, from lawless scumbags, the hobo decides to clean up the streets armed with nothing but his trusty shotgun – the perfect premise for a silly throwback movie. Its execution, if you’ll pardon the pun, isn’t as flawless. One of the things that made “Grindhouse” work was the fact that you had two gifted directors and two amazing casts going out of their way to make bad cinema,

See HOBO, Page 19

APPLIANCE & SERVICE INC.

LARGE SELECTION OF

SPORTS

Includes: Sharpening blade, oil change, spark plug, adjust carburetor, electrical check, lube and clean.

Continued from page 16

MOWERS IN STOCK! LAWN MOWER TUNE-UP

6995

$

Also carrying “Premium Super Recyclers” with 5 year warranty

601 Cedar Ave. • Scranton • 343-1121

304 N. Main St. • Moscow • 842-4668

290553

Some Models Higher • Pick-up & Delivery Available • Expires 7/29/11 595 Market St. • Kingston • 288-4508

ARTS

It premieres this Friday at the Electric Theatre Company, 326 Spruce St., Scranton. A cocktail hour is set for 6 p.m., and the film will be shown at 7:30 p.m. Donations are accepted. The film was shot in late 2010 and early 2011 and is considered by Braz to be his pilot project to more short films about IAS. Sanctuary founder Dr. Indra Lahiri, 41 of Mehoopany, said the need for an all-species sanctuary goes beyond northeastern Pennsylvania, but she was drawn to the area’s quiet, natural beauty. “The sanctuary supports rescue groups everywhere – anywhere in the country, really anywhere in the world,” Lahiri said. “I saw that rescue groups had nowhere to turn with certain animals that were either too old or too sick or had behavioral problems that made them dangerous.” Founded in 2005 and estab-

WHAT: Premiere screening of “Peace, Love & Animals.” WHERE: Electric Theatre Company, 326 Spruce St., Scranton . WHEN: Friday, June 3. Cocktail hour at 6 p.m. film begins at 7:30 p.m. COST: Free, but donations are accepted. MORE INFO: www.Indraloka.org GET INVOLVED: Interested volunteers can gather information at www.Indraloka.org. Monetary donations and wish list items are also accepted.

“What we have found is that visitors to the sanctuary and volunteers at the sanctuary feel what they describe as a palpable sense of peace and joy when they’re there,” Lahiri said. “I think that’s because the animals are so happy.” Braz said previous work in film, including work done on Clint Eastwood’s “Flags of Our Fathers” and Steven Spielberg’s “War of the Worlds,” eventually led him to documentaries like “Peace, Love & Animals.” He currently operates as a “one man band” – shooting, editing, and sometimes creating music for his films. Local violinist Mark Woodyatt served as musical supervisor for this documentary. Both hope that audience members leave Friday’s screening with a knowledge of the sanctuary and a deeper respect for all animals. “Even if you save one animal, it’s a start, it’s a message, it’s a metaphor, and if affects the entire web of the planet. If you believe in that, then you believe in the whole mission,” Braz said.

HOBO

hence making it quite good. You could tell each performance was tongue-in-cheek, but it also celebrated what film fans love about exploitation flicks by playing up those strengths well. “Hobo,” however, left me wondering if the cast was purposely bad or just plain awful. Hauer, thankfully, is the exception to this. He plays the bum with surprising sincerity, and his varied experience in both cult and mainstream films shines through an often banal script. The three main villains offer charisma and little else. Their over-the-top overacting just becomes boring after a while. The seriousness in which they deliver some of these intentionally awful lines is occasionally funny, but never inspired more than a slight guffaw. Newcomer Molly Dunsworth as Abby doesn’t have much to offer here either, so Hauer is left to fend for himself, and not just in the mean streets. He’s left to carry the burden of the entire film on his shoulders. By the middle of its running time, you realize it’s all dead weight. “Hobo” was predictable in almost every scene. Just because it’s a tribute to third-rate movies

NEWS

S

CRANTON – The importance of all animal life is the focus of a locally filmed documentary that will premiere at First Friday Scranton on June 3. “Peace, Love & Animals,” a film by Johnny Braz, 46, of Clarks Green, takes a look at the Mehoopany-based Indraloka Animal Sanctuary.

LAWN MOWER OR SNOW BLOWER TUNE-UP

17

GOLackawanna


SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

18

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 29, 2011

Local scribe’s works may hit Hollywood

By TYLER MILES Go Lackawanna intern

S

CRANTON – The work of a local author may soon be coming to the big screen. Suzanne Fisher Staples, 65, of Nicholson, recently had three of her books optioned by Equilibrium Entertainment. Funding for the films is being secured by Equilibrium, and Staples is currently at work writing the screenplays.

“Nobody knows whether a movie deal will actually happen. So far things are moving forward, so until they stop moving forward, that’s good news,” Staples said. She was in Scranton on Thursday, May 26, to promote her lat-

est book, “Under the Persimmon Tree,” at Pages and Places at Anthology, 515 Center Street. There Fisher Staples she discussed how living overseas in such places as Afghanistan, Pakistan and India has changed the way she views the world. The book is set in Afghanistan following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Its follows families and villagers who live there and are caught in the middle when the United States begins its retaliation attacks on the Taliban and al-Qaida. The tone of the book aims to show readers that those living in the Middle East are very similar to Americans. “They have families they

When your child gets their driver’s license you can’t be with them 24/7... Or can you?

Florey Insurance Agency, Inc. can show you how to monitor yyour children’s driving habits without being in the car. Call Florey Insurance Agency, Inc. to find out more about the Save the Young Adults Program.

570.587.2615

See SCRIBE, Page 22

W ISH ES TO TH AN K YO U FO R YO UR CO N TIN UED SUPPO RT! Rem em ber C orky’s G arden Path G reenhouse for the BestQ uality, BestSelection and BestPrices! 729 Justus Blvd. • ScottTw p., PA 18411-8837 (570) 586-9563 Telephone • (570) 587-1439 Fax w w w .corkysgardenpath.com


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

HOBO Continued from page 17

The Ekal Vidyalaya Foundation is anon-profit service organization dedicated to bringing education and village development in rural India. It is the largest, grassroots, non-government education movement in India. For more information, contact Neela Patel at (570) 696-0976.

CRYSTAL

THE NEW HOME OF THE

VISION CENTER www.crystalvisioncenter.com 69

$

129

$

Deluxe Complete Package

SAVE $176.00

SAVE $196.00

SAVE $216.00

Includes Eye Exam & 2 Pairs of Eyeglasses *2 Frames Up to $49 each or $49 Off Any Frame *2 Pairs SV Plastic Lenses --FT28 Bifocals Add $29 per pair---Progressives Add $89 per pair-*2 Hard Shell Case *Eye Exam-Refraction, Glaucoma Test, Cataract Screening, Color Test, Depth Perception Eye Health (Dilation if necessary)

Includes Eye Exam & 2 Pairs of Eyeglasses *2 Frames Up to $89 each or $89 Off Any Frame *2 Pairs SV Plastic Lenses --FT28 Bifocals Add $29 per pair---Progressives Add $89 per pair-*2 Hard Shell Case *Eye Exam-Refraction, Glaucoma Test, Cataract Screening, Color Test, Depth Perception Eye Health (Dilation if necessary)

Includes Eye Exam & 2 Pairs of Eyeglasses *2 Frames Up to $129 each or $129Off Any Frame *2 Pairs SV Plastic Lenses --FT28 Bifocals Add $29 per pair---Progressives Add $89 per pair-*2 Hard Shell Case *Eye Exam-Refraction, Glaucoma Test, Cataract Screening, Color Test, Depth Perception Eye Health (Dilation if necessary)

$

*1 Frame Up to $49 or $49 off any frame *1 pair of SV Plastic Lenses --FT28 Bifocals Add $29 per pair---Progressives Add $89 per pair-*1 Hard Shell Case

29

Outside prescriptions are accepted and guaranteed – a Crystal Vision Center Exclusive

SCRANTON Dr. Marc Pensak, Dr. Megan Wesnak & Associates Keyser Ave. (Across from Keyser Oak Plaza) 961-1400

Includes: Eye Exam, Fitting, Follow-up, 2 Boxes Contacts (B&L 38), Sunglasses (plano), Care Kit & Hard Case

Varilux Comfort Progressive $ Lenses Premium No Line Bifocals Add per pair to any package, includes plastic lenses

WILKESBARRE Dr. Shelley Eskin, Dr. Frank Gazda & Associates 602 Carey Ave. 826-1700

We Accept Most Vision Insurances and All Optical Discount Programs. Now Accepting Care Credit

169

upgrade to packages

WYOMING Dr. Lew Lisses Midway Shopping Center 288-7471

129

159

$

$

Includes: Eye Exam, Fitting, Follow-up, 2 Boxes Contacts (B&L 38), 1 Complete Pair of Eyeglasses

(Frame up to $49 or $49 off any frame & Single Vision plastic lenses),

Sunglasses (plano)

Brand

Includes: Eye Exam, Fitting, Follow-up, 4 Boxes Contacts (B&L 38), 1 Complete Pair of Eyeglasses

(Frame up to $49 or $49 off any frame & Single Vision plastic lenses),

Sunglasses (plano), Care Kit & Hard Case

Price per box Add per box to package

B & L Soflens 38 Acuvue Oasys Ciba Air Optix Ciba O2 Optix Encore Premium Freshlook Colors Acuvue Colors Avaira Purevision B & L daily disposable (90 pack)

12.50 30.00 $ 35.00 $ 25.00 $ 21.50 $ 35.00 $ 35.00 $ 27.00 $ 39.00 $ 35.00 $ $

No Charge $ 17.50 $ 22.50 $ 12.50 $ 7.50 $ 22.50 $ 22.50 $ 11.50 $ 26.50 $ 22.50

Some restrictions could apply. See an Optician for Details

DALLAS Dr. Megan Wesnak Rt. 309 Country Club Shopping Center 675-8888

TUNKHANNOCK Dr. Megan Wesnak & Dr. Frank Gazda Route 6 Next to Wisnosky Jeweler 836-3700

SPORTS

Premium Complete Package

99

$

189

BASIC Complete Package

Already have a prescription?

ESSILOR

SAFETY EYEGLASS PROGRAMS

NEW! Contacts - Glasses - Eye Exam Packages!

NEW EYEGLASS PACKAGES! $

ARTS

280823

The Ekal Vidyalaya Foundation will conduct a charity concert with Manoj Mishra and Nirupama Dey at the First Presbyterian Church, 97 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, on Sunday, June 5 from 3 to 7 p.m. Admission is $35 for VIP tickets and $25 for all other tickets. Refreshments will be provided.

NEWS

doesn’t mean it has to be just as bad. One of the ways in which “Machete” succeeded was by throwing in a cheesy mixed message and playing it up throughout, trading old black stereotypes from the ‘70s with current stereotypes of Mexicans. The creators of “Hobo” seemed so eager to move the story along that they forgot to leave a story or characters behind, hoping instead that audiences will get caught up in the exaggerated violence.

Foundation sets W-B concert

have taken the same exploitationinspired ideas in recent years and done them better, such as “Black Dynamite.” Maybe it’s just because I had a bad week and I set my expectations a little too high for a movie called “Hobo with a Shotgun.” Either way, if I saw this bum in the street, I’d turn away and keep walking – there are better ways to spend your money. With packs of real grindhouse movies going for as low as $5, why not experience the real thing instead of a cheap imitation?

If you want to see how someone can murder people with manhole covers or bumper cars, then this may be the movie for you. But unlike classic gore-fests like “Dawn of the Dead,” there’s not very much at stake and no one to really care about, save a vagabond who already seems quite content with dying for his cause. Seeing this movie made me feel gypped that the other fake trailers featured four years ago weren’t made into films themselves. Surely Rob Zombie’s “Werewolf Women of the SS” or Eli Roth’s “Thanksgiving” could have carried themselves on concept alone. “Hobo” falls flat, maybe because other films like it

19


NEWS

20

GOLackawanna

June 4 show puts Lewis & Clarke, Mike Quinn together again By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

S

SPORTS

ARTS

CRANTON – Lou Rogai has helped release music and promote performances internationally, but he’s equally excited to perform inside a northeastern Pennsylvania gallery next week. Rogai, of Delaware Water Gap, is the vocalist, guitarist and keyboardist for Lewis & Clarke. He’ll perform with Mike Quinn at the AFA Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton, on Saturday, June 4.

Sunday, May 29, 2011

Doors open at 7 p.m., and performances begin at 8 p.m. A $10 donation is suggested at the door. The name of Rogai’s avant chamber folk music project is a play on the fellowship between authors C.S. Lewis and Arthur C. Clarke and not Pacific Coast expedition leaders Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. The camaraderie between the authors is almost a direct link to the way Rogai has operated the project itself, often changing its members before arriving at its current state: a three-piece outfit with brothers Ian and Shane O’Hara. “It’s been my favorite incarnation so far of Lewis & Clarke,” Rogai said in a phone interview Tuesday, seated in a Delaware

Water Gap laundromat. “It’s stripped down to the basics, and we’re playing with space a lot.” In addition to performing in Lewis & Clarke, Rogai founded the record label La Société Expéditionnaire in 2006, which has released work from Rogai’s project along with acts like Soars, Dragon Turtle and Strand of Oaks. While he has shows booked June 1 and 2 in Philadelphia and Brookyln, N.Y., with labelmates Daniel Knox and Judson Claiborne, he’s just as anxious to play in Scranton. “I’m so happy to return to the AFA Gallery. Mike Quinn and I played shows in our old bands there probably 15 years ago,” Rogai said. See REUNION, Page 22

IF YOU GO What: Lewis & Clarke with Mike Quinn Where: AFA Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton When: Saturday, June 4. Doors open at 7 p.m. Quinn performs at 8 p.m., and Lewis & Clarke perform at 9 p.m. Cost: $10 suggested donation. Info: www.artistsforart.org, www.lewisandclarkemusic.com, www.mquinnmusic.com.


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

21

NEWS ARTS SPORTS


22

GOLackawanna

REUNION NEWS

Continued from page 20

Saturday’s show will be the first time the two have shared a performance space since a quiet 2009 show at The Bog. “It’s going to feel like a bit of a reunion of friends for me.” “I met people I’m still friends with - like Lou Rogai - at shows like that at AFA. It’s been many years, so it’s pretty appropriate to play with Lou again,” added Quinn, whose album “Magico” will be released June 7 through Prairie Queen Records. “AFA has been among the few constants for the arts in Scranton in the intervening time. I’m glad we’re getting a chance to perform there again.”

SCRIBE

SPORTS

ARTS

Continued from page 18

love,” said Staples. “I think it’s too easy to read about a place like Afghanistan and if someone is killed accidentally in war we just say, ‘Oh, that’s collateral damage.’ I want it to be more difficult to say people are collateral damage. They’re real human beings who

Sunday, May 29, 2011 Rogai’s willingness to expand and contract his project, not staying beholden to a specific set of members, shatters the stereotypical view of a band. “The traditional band model can work,” he said. “I’m too interested in smashing things that I create to actually keep that kind of relationship going.” Rogai approaches the project as “an evolution of art,” viewing his work in a visual sense as much as an audio sense. “I think people can expect some warmth and some sort of mood, some sort of atmosphere,” he said. “Hopefully, they’ll feel like they ordered the perfect thing on the menu for themselves.” Along with not limiting himself to a specific musical outfit, Rogai views music as much more than a regional commodhave families and lives just like ours.” Meanwhile, Fisher Staples is helping to organize The Gathering, a literature conference held at Keystone College from July 14 to 17. The Gathering includes lectures from guest speakers, writing workshops, and many social events and activities with the goal of sparking imagination and creativity through literature.

ity. “I’ve never been limited to feeling stuck in a region. I feel more universal. We’re so close to

New York and Philadelphia and a lot of other East Coast cities. We’ve brought the music around the world,” he said. “I feel like

that’s a mindset that’s too easy to get into. Once people expand beyond that, they can tap into quite a lot of amazing stuff.”


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

23

NEWS

H

uggable Po gets all touchy-feely in “Kung Fu Panda 2,” a sturdy sequel to the 2009 blockbuster that aims to expand the series both in storytelling terms and visually. It introduces emotionally complex issues and literally adds new scope via 3-D. The payoff is impressive.

IF YOU GO What: “Kung Fu Panda 2” Starring: Jack Black, Gary Oldman, Angelina Jolie, Michelle Yeoh Directed by: Jennifer Yuh Rated: PG for martial-arts action and mild violence. ★★★ 1/2

Jolie’s strong, protective Master Tigress moves to the forefront of Po’s team as Po’s surrogate Tiger Mother, embodying the strict Chinese parenting the immature hero still needs. Her colleagues Jackie Chan, Seth Rogen, David Cross and Lucy Liu get about two lines apiece, but that’s fine because it gives more room to Michelle Yeoh as a soothsaying mountain goat and James Hong as Mr. Ping, Po’s proud papa. The film’s richly textured visuals will leave you breathless. The backgrounds are photorealistic landscapes of National Geographic magnificence, the interi-

ors are fever dreams of Ming Dynasty splendor, and the character animation simply flows. Fireworks are a key element of the story, and the sheer surfeit of visual delights mirrors the climax of a fireworks display. There’s also dizzy slapstick wit to the fighting and big-scale drama. A climactic naval battle puts “Pirates of the Caribbean” to shame as it whittles down an armada of long ships to the consistency of chopsticks. Magical as the slick 3-D scenes are, the antique shadow plays that open the movie are even cooler. Those ancient paper cutouts inspire awestruck wonder. The original left you with a genial sense of good cheer if you are an adult and sheer exuberance if you were a child. This one will give most spectators their weekly dose of escapism while fleshing out a character that could have remained formulaic.

SPORTS

The movie opens with a ravishing replica of traditional Chinese shadow-puppet plays. The prologue introduces the new villain, Lord Shen, a militarist peacock who aims to conquer China by exterminating kung fu. Po, a giant panda who transformed himself from a dumplingshaped layabout to a mighty martial-arts master, leads his Furious Five against Lord Shen’s “unstoppable” new weapon. But pride may be his undoing unless he can find spiritual harmony as his mentor Master Shifu instructs. Haunted by memories of infancy and always a bit at odds with his fussbudget dad — how can a goose sire a panda? — Po lacks inner peace. He will have to subdue his own demons before he can vanquish his foe. The vocal cast is fine, with Jack Black laconic and lunatic as Po and Gary Oldman all silken menace as Lord Shen. Angelina

ARTS

By COLIN COVERT Star Tribune (Minneapolis)


GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 29, 2011

NEWS

24

By CHRISTY LEMIRE AP Movie Critic

SPORTS

ARTS

I

t’s hard to imagine a more half-assed attempt at cashing in a second time than “The Hangover Part II.” It feels like the script was pieced together with the help of Mad Libs, with only slightly different and raunchier details replacing those that helped the original “Hangover” from 2009 become the highestgrossing R-rated comedy of all time.

But so much of the allure of that first film was the novelty of the premise, the unpredictability of the adventures and the sense that we, too, were wandering in a daze, helping solve the mystery of the debauched night before. Despite their throbbing heads and increasing sense of panic, these guys clearly had a blast. They made us wish we could have joined them. That sequence where the motley group of friends wakes up in a fog and surveys the damage in a trashed Las Vegas hotel suite is a brilliant and efficient little piece of storytelling, full of clever details. Director Todd Phillips, who also co-wrote the script this time, apparently thought so, too. That’s just one of many

gags from the first film that are repeated in “The Hangover Part II.” Giving the people what they want is one thing. Making nearly the exact same movie a second time, but shifting the setting to Thailand, is just ... what, lazy? Arrogant? Instead of finding a baby in their hotel room, the guys find a chain-smoking, drug-running capuchin monkey. Instead of waking up with a missing tooth, Ed Helms’ mild-mannered dentist character, Stu, wakes up with a facial tattoo. Instead of bursting into song at the piano to sum up how horrible this is, Stu breaks See HANGOVER, Page 25


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

HANGOVER Continued from page 24

What: “The Hangover, Part II” Starring: Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis, Ed Helms Directed by: Todd Phillips Running time: 110 minutes Rated: R for pervasive language, strong sexual content including graphic nudity, drug use and brief violent images ★ 1/2

Lauren (Jamie Chung) in her parents’ home country. He insists he doesn’t want the kind of crazy bachelor party that resulted when Doug got married, but he gives in and

agrees to have one beer — in a sealed container — on the beach with his friends. Naturally, the guys all wake up in the squalor of a Bangkok hotel, absolutely blanking as to

what they did the previous night. Again. That word appears a lot in the script, as in: “I can’t believe this is happening again!” We can.

NEWS

out an acoustic guitar. And instead of having sex with a hooker with a heart of gold, Stu does it with ... well, we won’t tell you. Suffice it to say, this is Thailand, so it’s not that huge of a shock. Bradley Cooper is also back as the group’s de facto leader, the arrogant Phil, as is Zach Galifianakis as the passive-aggressive man-child Alan. Galifianakis’ dark, off-kilter shtick made him the breakout star of the original film, and while he gets many of the best lines here, he’s also even more infuriating. Justin Bartha is along, too, but just barely; as Doug, the groom in the first film, he was

IF YOU GO

25

missing the entire time. In the sequel, he remains safely ensconced at the group’s luxury seaside resort, so he misses out on yet another wild night. While there’s less of him, there’s also more of Ken Jeong’s character, the obnoxious, effeminate gangster, Mr. Chow. He was the weakest part of the first “Hangover” and gets even more face time here, with no improvement. They’re all there for the wedding of Stu and the beautiful

ARTS

Starting at

$8,310

PHONE 570-295-3203 EK’S STRUCTURES LLC Wegman’s

Circle Drive-In

Scranton-Carbondale Hwy.

EK Structures

1 mile from the Circle Drive-In 1990 Scranton-Carbondale Hwy. Blakely, PA

Financing Available No Credit Check

158 Memorial Hwy. • Shavertown • 1.800.49.SHOES

SPORTS

BACK TO BASIC - Prices Starting at $818 FREE DELIVERY ANYWHERE!

Come and check out all the beautiful Brighton handbags & accessories for this summer season.


26

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 29, 2011

G

iven my experience in journalism, one might think that I am a bold, brazen and outgoing person. They’d be wrong. I am actually shy despite being required to talk to so many people on a regular basis. But common fears of those who, like me, are shy quickly came to the forefront when I recently visited Anna Maria’s Restaurant, 984 E. Drinker St., Dunmore.

How will this interview go? What dish will they offer me? What if I blank and can’t think of any questions? By the end of the night those concerns seemed thousands of miles away. As if the atmosphere itself wasn’t warm and inviting enough, the staff, including the owner, bartender, general manager and waitresses, made me feel not like I was about to sit down to work, but that I was going to sit down at a family dinner. Anna Maria’s has been in business since November 1, 1985. General Manager Tucker Sileo, of Dunmore, said that in 1978 his uncle, Angelo Pace, bought a restaurant named Anna Maria’s in Washington,

TASTE THE TOWN T’SHAIYA STEPHENSON D.C., after the owner was going to sell it. “My parents Jack and Mary decided in 1985 to endeavor in a new challenge and had the opportunity to buy this restaurant, taking over November 1, 1985.” When Mary Angela Sileo, who is the co-owner of Anna Maria’s along with her husband Jack Sileo, first bought the restaurant in 1985 she said they called her brother, Angelo, and also called the former owner of the restaurant and asked them for permission to call their restaurant Anna Maria’s. After that, the restaurant opened for business. Anna Maria’s has different daily lunch specials, handles on- and off-site catering, has a private party room to hold events in and has a wide variety of items on their menu ranging anywhere from a hamburger with fries to classic Italian cuisine. They also have nightly dinner specials, and all of their sauces are made on site. Mary Angela attributes their food and repeat customers to the many years the restaurant has been open. I turned 24 on May 15, and as a new year started I thought of different things I wanted to achieve before I was a quarter of a century old.

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

An adventure at Anna Maria’s Restaurant

T’SHAIYA STEPHENSON PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Anna Maria’s veal marchini is a perfect pairing of veal with crab meat, spinach, mozzarella and marinara.

I’m not just shy, I’m mildmannered, so I decided to hang up my cardigan and pearls and start living life more on the edge. I decided a good place to start was to try something new. Anna Maria’s specialty is veal, Tucker Sileo told me, suggesting the veal marchini veal with crab meat, spinach, mozzarella and marinara sauce. Thinking about what veal actually is always made me shy away from eating it, but the whole new T’Shaiya stepped up to the challenge. I chatted with Tucker and Mrs. Sileo. When I finally sat in front of the dish, I mentally prepared myself to try something new. The first bite was delicious, and the second was even better. The tender veal paired nicely with the crab meat and the spinach. Mrs. Sileo informed me, after she shared a section of a different veal dish that she was having, that they cut the veal at the restaurant themselves. After sitting with her for more than 30 minutes over dinner, I decided that Anna Maria’s was a rare find - the

family restaurant that’s truly run by a family and that has the atmosphere that can make

someone, even a timid journalist turned life adventurer, feel right at home.

NORTH AMERICAN Exit 1 off Rt. 380 1000 DUNHAM DR. DUNMORE, PA www.nawarhorse.com (570) 346-2453

WARHORSE


28

GOLackawanna

draw P

atrick McLane’s students at Old Forge Junior/Senior High School are often encouraged to prove themselves wrong. “Beginning my career as the art teacher at Old Forge Jr./Sr. High School, the comment I heard most from students in the beginning of the year was, ‘I can’t draw!’ Each time I hear it my response is always the same: ‘Just try,’” McLane said in a release about the “I Can’t/Can Draw” exhibit at New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton. An reception for students who learned that they could indeed draw as well as paint and sculpt was held Friday, May 27, at the gallery. The reception included live music, poetry reading and more to complement the nearly 100 exhibited works from the students in grades seven to 12. New Visions opens its “Family Ties” show on Friday, June 3, from 6 to 9 p.m. For more information, visit www.newvisionsstudio.com.

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

PROVING STUDENTS CAN

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

1. Student works included books, drawings, paintings and much more. 2. Sam Nardelli, Archbald and Megan Swairbinski, Fleetville. 3. Lizzy Goduski of Old Forge performs. 4. Kristen and Helen Pietryka of Old Forge look over works at New Visions Studio.

Sunday, May 29, 2011


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

29

Stephanie Hopkins and and teacher Pat McLane.

NEWS Renee and Courtney Woolaver with Courtney’s work.

ARTS

Shari Maciejewski and Megan Eisele.

SPORTS

Shayn Collins and Colleen Heckman.


We want you to know that you can feel good about the future of healthcare in Scranton and Northeast Pennsylvania – because the future is brighter for you, your family and our community.

quality care in the community, but also keep jobs right here at home. In fact, our local hospitals and economy will benefit from at least $68 million for upgrading services and facilities over the next five years.

Mercy Scranton, Mercy Tyler and Mercy Special Care are now affiliated with Community Health Systems, Inc, one of the nation's leading operators of acute care hospitals. As part of this relationship these facilities join a broad network of 11 other hospitals in Pennsylvania. One change you'll notice today is the renaming of the hospitals to Regional Hospital of Scranton, Tyler Memorial Hospital, and Special Care Hospital. While the names have changed the spirit of compassion established by the Sisters of Mercy will continue.

The employees, physicians, and volunteers throughout the Scranton, Tunkhannock and Nanticoke areas now have the opportunity to learn what more than 80,000 other healthcare professionals across the country already know – they are part of a national organization dedicated to creating great places for people to work, physicians to practice medicine, and patients to receive care.

This new relationship will allow us not only to continue providing

www.RegionalHospitalofScranton.net

Looking to the future, we will work diligently to continue to earn your trust and support. The outlook for healthcare really is brighter for our communities, so let’s all take a minute to smile together.

www.TylerMemorialHospital.net

www.SpecialCareHospital.net


BLUE RIDGE MOTORS

S AV I N G S ! ! DON’T PAY MORE!

100% CREDIT APPROVAL

All Payments Come With National Extended Warranty*

V6, 6 Speed

9,975

$

2005 FORD EXPLORER 6 Cyl, Auto, 4x4

9,975

$

2006 DODGE RAM 1500 REG CAB 4X4 Hemi, Step Rails, Bedliner

11,950

$

Automatic

10,900

$

05 FORD EXPLORER Auto, 4x4, 6 Cyl

08 FORD F-150 EXT CAB 4x4, V8, Auto

17,900

$

with a NATIONAL COMPANY!

2008 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX

11,900

$

Auto, V6

$

Auto, 4x4, 6 Cyl

00 FORD TAURUS

Auto, Moonroof

$

V6, Auto

06 CHEVY HHR

06 CHRYSLER 07 CHEVY 2005 CHEVY EQUINOX 4X4 TRAILBLAZER PACIFICA FWD V6, Auto, 3rd Row Seat V6, Auto, 4x4 V6, Auto

10,500 12,950 $

$

5 Speed, Loaded!

7,900

5,900

$

Auto, Loaded!

8,900

$

12,900

$

8,950

9,450

$

V6, Auto, Loaded!

05 PONTIAC G6 GT

V-6, Auto

2005 CHEVY MALIBU

07 FORD ESCAPE

11,550

2006 BUICK RENDEZVOUS FWD

9,900

$

FINANCE

2007 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4

2007 SATURN VUE AWD

2005 KIA SORENTO

Don’t Overpay Due To Credit!

9,450

$

$

06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER 4X4, V6, Auto

11,900

$

*See Salesperson for details. • All Prices + Tax & Tags.

NOW AT: 4150 Birney Ave., Moosic, PA (Next to Grande Pizza)

PH: 570-871-4299 75 VEHICLES ONLINE AT: blueridgecars.net

C A R S

-

V A N S

-

S U V S


GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 29, 2011

ARTS

NEWS

32

SPORTS

Team has attracted talent Keystone Junior College, in the LaPlume institution’s days as a two-year school, was an option for many talented athletes who were unable to pull off the transition from high school directly into a highlevel, four-year college athletic program. Those days are in the past. Keystone College, as it now operates, is a four-year college, which has established itself as being able to compete on the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III level. In baseball, the Giants do far more than just compete.

KEEPING SCORE TOM ROBINSON This weekend, they are fighting for a national championship in just the fourth year as a full NCAA member. The Giants, who have made the NCAA Division III Baseball Tournament in all four of those years, flew from Philadelphia to Appleton, Wisc., this week with a talented lineup ready to play in its first Division III World Series. Instead of getting players trying to transition to Division I or a professionSee ROBINSON, Page 38

Giants advance in NCAA World Series By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Jeff Frost went the distance without walking a batter and Keystone College produced two runs in the sixth inning Friday night to open play in the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III Baseball World Series with a 2-1 victory over Western New England College in Appleton, Wisc. Keystone (37-10) was one of four teams in the winners’ bracket of the eight-team field heading into its Saturday night game against Buena Vista University. Frost gave up 11 hits, but just one run while striking out nine. Brian Del Rosso had three of the eight hits for Keystone. One

of his hits was a double. Esteban Meletiche had a pair of hits. He drove in one of the runs and Robert Santana drove in the other. Matt Rogers struck out 10 in 7 2/3 innings for Western New England. Western New England scored in the second inning after the first two men reached base. The Golden Bears had leadoff runners on in three of the first five innings, but Frost worked out of trouble. Del Rosso led off the Keystone sixth with a double and scored on a single by Meletiche, who was named second-team AllSee GIANTS, Page 38


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

33

NEWS

ON CAMPUS BILL ARSENAULT

T

McMYNE EYEING PRO BALL The Villanova baseball team finished its season with a 20-32 overall mark and a 7-20 record in the See ARSENAULT, Page 38 COURTESY PHOTO

Sam Pientack led Bloomsburg in triples on the Huskies softball team.

SPORTS

Pientack played third base and had eight errors in 169 chances (.953). “Sam had a strong season both offensively and defensively,” coach Susan Kocher said. “She is a very talented athlete who brings power to our hitting lineup and plays with passion and great enthusiasm. Those qualities are infectious among her teammates.” Bloomsburg finished with a 33-9 record and captured the NCAA Division II Eastern Regionals. The team saw its season end with 3-2 and 2-1 losses to Indiana (PA) in the Super Regionals. “Sam will be one of just two seniors on next year’s team and we expect her to be a strong leader,” Kocher said. Two other area players were on the Bloomsburg squad. Jolee Youngblood (North Pocono) played in13 games while Chrissy Belko (Old Forge) played in 10. Both are freshmen.

ARTS

he Bloomsburg University softball team had a great run this season, and junior Sam Pientack was a big reason why. Pientack (Valley View) hit .394 (54for-137) with 11 doubles, four triples and eight home runs for the Huskies. Her triples were tops on the team, her doubles tied her for the team lead and her homers were second. She led the team in runs scored (35) and was second in RBI (31). She finished with a .708 slugging percentage and a .439 on-base average.


34

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 29, 2011

BILL TARUTIS PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

SPORTS

ARTS

North Pocono second baseman Val Suriano, left, tags Wyoming Area’s Kody Nowicki on an attempted steal.

Old Forge and Valley View advanced teams in District 2 tournament play in both baseball and softball. Old Forge reached the final in Class A. Valley View is in the semifinals in Class AAA. Scranton (AAAA) and Lackawanna Trail (A) are also in the finals in baseball. West Scranton (AAA), Abington

HIGH SCHOOL NOTEBOOK Heights (AAA) and Dunmore (AA) are alive in the baseball semifinals. Riverside is in the Class AA softball semifinals. DISTRICT 2 BASEBALL Four-time defending champion

Old Forge returned to the Class A final by dominating two opponents. The Blue Devils crushed Forest City, 18-3, then shut out Blue Ridge, 9-0, in Thursday’s semifinals. Winning pitcher Tony Goodall’s three-run homer capped a five-run second inning against Blue Ridge. Dave Argust and Gary Puckett singled in runs before Goodall’s

homer. Goodall threw a three-hitter with a walk and eight strikeouts. Dave Argust and Gary Puckett each drove in all three runs in bases-loaded situations during the romp over Forest City. Argust drove the runs in with a triple in the second inning and Puckett got the job done with a See ROUNDUP, Page 35


Sunday, May 29, 2011

GOLackawanna

35

PIAA TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

ROUNDUP Continued from page 34

member Williamsport in Tuesday’s final at PNC Field at 7 p.m. Kyle Booth went 2-for-2 with a triple and two RBI for the Knights. Joe McCarthy also drove in two runs while John Pizur also had two hits. “We don’t blow anybody out,” Scranton coach Jamie Higgins told the Times Leader. “We have 14 wins, but in 12 of those, we were (trailing). So we’ve been in close games before, and we’re starting to come together.” Pitching and defense carried West Scranton into the semifinals while offense led the way for Abington Heights. Both teams won twice while topseeded Valley View joined them in the semifinals with a bye and one win.

DON CAREY PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Lauren Ellsworth of Lackawanna Trail competes in the 100 meter dash at the state track meet in Shippensburg. She captured to PIAA medals on Saturday.

West Scranton beat Honesdale, 12-2, and Berwick, 4-1. Abington Heights downed Coughlin, 10-6, and third-seeded Pittston Area, 10-7. The Comets trailed Pittston Area, 5-0, after four innings and was still down until scoring five times in the seventh inning. Mike Umerich had three hits while Kevin Elwell, Dan Pisanchyn and Justin Klingman had two each. Pisanchyn and Klingman both drove in two runs. Valley View beat Wyoming Area, 6-2. Cameron Damski threw a sixhitter with five strikeouts and did not walk a batter. West Scranton plays at Valley View and Abington Heights is at Tunkhannock Tuesday. Dunmore defeated Montrose, 6-3, and Mountain View, 16-6, to

reach Tuesday’s semifinal at Holy Redeemer. Riverside and Mid Valley each won once before losing and being eliminated in the quarterfinals.

like a different pitcher,” West Scranton coach Paul McGloin said. “He had us off balance.” D.J. Navoczynski hit a tworun homer and Kyle Booth a solo shot for the Knights.

LACKAWANNA LEAGUE BASEBALL Scranton dropped two of its last three regular-season games, after starting 11-0, then recovered to take the Lackawanna League Division 1 title with a 6-0 win over West Scranton in a playoff game Monday. Joe McCarthy threw a threehit shutout at Battaglia Field against a West Scranton team that had scored 17 runs in two previous meetings with Scranton. “We saw him earlier in the year, but (Monday), he looked

DISTRICT 2 SOFTBALL Old Forge, which has won the last three titles, reached its sixth straight final when it knocked off top-seeded Northwest, 4-1, Friday. Winning pitcher Nicole Marianelli singled twice and drove in two runs to lead the Lady Devils into Wednesday’s final against Blue Ridge. Two freshmen made big contributions to the win. Lauren Carey singled, doubled, stole two bases and scored a run. TaySee ROUNDUP, Page 38

SPORTS

double in the third inning. Mario Martinelli scored four times. Old Forge will play top-seeded Lackawanna Trail Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. at PNC Field for the championship. Lackawanna Trail reached the final with Friday’s 5-2 victory over Freeland MMI. Tanner Holmes threw a three-hitter and Pete Murazzi drove in three runs. Scranton technically became the District 2 Class AAAA champion with a 7-5 win over Hazleton Area in the semifinals of the District 2-4 tournament. The Knights will play District 4

See PIAA, Page 42

ARTS

SHIPPENSBURG – Lauren Ellsworth’s shoe rubbed her the wrong way as she fell back in the first 150 meters. Ellsworth shook off the distraction and finished with a blistering pace that allowed her to pass four runners in the final 150 meters on the way to a silver medal in the Class AA 400-meter dash in the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association Track and Field Championships Saturday at Shippensburg University. By the time the race was over, Ellsworth’s slow start and strong finish looked like a strategy that almost produced a state championship, but the Lackawanna Trail senior assured that the approach was unplanned. “I had a blister taped and I was trying to figure out if my shoe was coming off or not,” she said. “It was definitely not part of a plan. “I tried to forget it. I felt like I had a lot of energy left. I thought I was going to catch up in the last 100.” Ellsworth started having trouble with a blister during Friday’s qualifying rounds. She had the blister popped right before qualifying second in the 400. She taped it over and felt good until it bothered her again following a fifth-place finish in the 100-meter dash final. “I went from thinking that I was never going to be a 100-meter runner to getting a fifth-place finish in the state,” said Ellsworth, who entered the weekend as the

second seed after a District 2 record-setting effort last week. Despite the sluggish start, Ellsworth’s third straight state medal in the 400 was produced in a time of 56.16 that lowered the school record she set in qualifying Friday. Ellsworth was the only Lackawanna County athlete to win two medals. Five others picked up one each, including Riverside’s Vanessa Munley. Like Ellsworth, Munley capped three years of state medals in her best event by taking the silver medal. She finished second in the Class AA pole vault Friday. Munley, who tied for third as a sophomore and fifth as a junior, was alone in second place by clearing 11-6 and having the least misses among the three who finished at that height. She came close on her first attempt at 12-0, but eventually missed all three tries there. “I was going for first,” Munley said. “That’s what I really, really wanted. “But I’m happy I did a lot better than last year and went a foot higher.” The other four county medalists were all in throwing events. Holy Cross junior Emily Hughes took fourth in the Class AA javelin Saturday with 135-0. North Pocono had two medalists in Class AAA Saturday. Sophomore Jenn Slagus was fifth in the girls’ discus with 122-1. Pete Calderone closed out his career by finishing

NEWS

Ellsworth earns two


36

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 29, 2011 DISTRICT 2 BOYS’ VOLLEYBALL ROUNDUP

ARTS

NEWS

AH advances to PIAA play

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Abington Heights’ Andy McClain saves a ball as Eric Wasser and James Connolly look on during Thursday’s third-place District 2 championship series game. By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

SPORTS

S

CRANTON – Abington Heights was seeking the District 2 boys’ volleyball championship, just like the other seven teams that begin pursuit of a championship Monday. The Comets, however, also had some important secondary goals.

Abington Heights lost its title shot with a semifinal defeat Tuesday, but met two other goals Thursday when it defeated Crestwood, 25-18, 25-21, 15-25, 25-22, for third place in the district and a spot in the state Class AA tournament. “Obviously, we had our eyes set on a district title,” Abington Heights coach Dan Phillips said, “but, we’ve never made it out of the quarterfinals.” Phillips has coached the

Comets for 16 seasons, the last 15 of which have seen District 2 run an eight-team tournament since the old District 12 of the PIAA was dissolved. His Comets had yet to advance to the district semifinal round or qualify for a state appearance. It was a subject with which the Abington Heights team was well acquainted. “They’ve known all season,” Phillips said. Abington Heights needed a comeback to get past Western Wayne Monday night at Holy Redeemer. The Comets then were dropped into the third-place game with a loss to unbeaten top-seed Holy Redeemer Tuesday. Abington Heights was too much for Crestwood early in the opener of a doubleheader at Marywood Thursday. “Blocking was very good for us, especially in Games One and Two,” Phillips said. “And, our serves were pretty good overall.”

Crestwood responded by winning Game Three and rallying from a 12-5 deficit in Game Four before Abington Heights closed out the victory. Andy McLane had four kills, two blocks, 15 points, two aces and six digs in the Crestwood match. Eric Wasser had 18 assists, three kills and 12 points. Drew Shumaker had eight kills and eight digs while Jake Roba had six kills and three blocks. QUARTERFINALS RECAP Abington Heights scored the match’s last seven points to erase its final deficit and defeat Western Wayne, 25-16, 11-25, 2325, 25-10, 15-9. McLane had four of his13 kills in the closing flurry. He also had three blocks and seven service points. Wasser had 34 assists, five blocks, two aces and 15 points for Abington Heights. Drew Shoemaker had nine kills while

Dustin Ganz added 21 digs and three kills. Kevin Botjer had 11 assists for Western Wayne. Forest City, North Pocono and Lackawanna Trail were all knocked out with first-round losses. Holy Redeemer stopped Forest City, 25-23, 25-10, 25-13, after the Foresters scored five straight points to force a 23-23 tie late in Game One. Pete Alexis had 17 kills and three blocks for the Royals, the state’s eighth-ranked team. Dylan Walsh led Forest City with seven kills and four blocks. Chad Paulin added five assists and three kills. Coughlin ended North Pocono’s four-year run as district champion and Crestwood eliminated Lackawanna League champion Lackawanna Trail in a doubleheader at Lackawanna Trail. Michael Shmakov had18 kills, 10 service points and five aces to

lead Coughlin, the sixth seed, to a 25-21, 25-22, 25-12 sweep of third-seeded North Pocono. Crestwood squeezed past Lackawanna Trail, 16-25, 25-19, 25-21, 22-25, 15-13. SEMIFINALS RECAP Holy Redeemer swept Abington Heights, 25-23, 25-19, 25-11, in the semifinals. Alexis had 18 kills for Holy Redeemer. McLane led Abington Heights with six kills and three aces. Wasser had 13 assists. LOOKING AHEAD Abington Heights advances to Tuesday’s first round of state play against the District 3 champion at Wilson West Lawn at 5. Defending state champion Northeastern was one of the possible opponents after reaching the district semifinals. Jay Monahan also contributed to this report.


38

GOLackawanna

ARSENAULT

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Continued from page 33

Big East. Junior Kyle McMyne started for the Wildcats and posted a 4-8 record. McMyne (Old Forge) made 14 starts and had a 6.12 earned run average. In 77.2 innings, the 6foot, 212-pound right-hander gave up 77 hits and 50 runs, 41 earned. He walked 49 and struck out a team-high 94 batters. The other fulltime starter for Villanova was 1-9. Coach Joseph Godri doesn’t expect to have McMyne around for his senior season. Godri, McMyne and McMyne’s family have their eyes on D Day (June 6), which is also the first day of the Major League Draft. “Kyle has a plus fastball and a major league slider,” Godri said. “Villanova was able to develop Kyle as a starting pitcher though his future may be as a closer or a set-up pitcher when he gets to the higher level of pro ball.” Godri, however, feels that being a starter helped McMyne. “Kyle developed his change up and endurance to go six to eight innings every time out,” the coach said. “We are all looking forward to the first day of the major league draft. It’s an exciting time and I truly hope the McMyne family, myself and Villanova baseball will be able to enjoy the experience.” MONAHAN WRAPS IT UP Senior Caitlin Monahan (Abington Heights) had another standout season pitching for the East Stroudsburg softball team. The right-hander posted an 8-9 record on a team that finished just 13-22 on the season Monahan had a 3.62 earned run average. She worked100.2 innings and gave up 131 hits and 78 runs, 52 earned. She walked 30 and struck out 61. Her best effort was a seven-inning two-hit shutout in a 4-0 triumph over Seton Hill. She walked two and struck out five. She also went the distance, giving up five hits and two unearned runs while walking four and striking out seven in a 3-2 victory over West Chester. And, she had a season-high 11 strikeouts in a 4-3 loss to Kutztown. “Cat was an integral part of our team for the past two seasons, especially her senior year.” coach Jill Fuduric said. “She has left her

Sunday, May 29, 2011 mark on the ESU softball program.” Monahan, a transfer from the University of Vermont, was 8-14 with two saves with a team-high 94 strikeouts last year as a junior. GOOD FINISH FOR SCINICO Senior Maria Scinico (Bishop Hannan) wrapped up her career with the Duquesne women’s rowing team by helping her Varsity 4 boat finish fourth in the recent Dad Vail Regatta in Philadelphia. The boat finished second in the first round and second in the semifinals but had to settle for fourth in the finals. The second place finish in the semis was the first time a Duquesne boat has ever made it that far at the Dad Vail. “From the first day that Maria joined the team, it was clear that she had the unique combination of both physical talent and mental prowess that would enable her to be one of our best rowers,” coach Joe Setting said. “Maria altered the landscape for our team in terms of accomplishing higher end performance measure such as her ergometer time, which stands as one of the best historically on our team. She could really push herself to accomplish anything she set out to do.” Scinico also did well in the class room. An international relations major, she earned a spot on the Duquesne Director of Athletics honor roll (3.00 or better grade point average). DOGGETT PITCHES IN Sophomore Pete Doggett (Abington Heights) was a member of the Misericordia baseball team. A 6-foot-3 right-handed pitcher, he posted a 4-3 record and a save for the Cougars, who finished 30-16 but was beaten 3-1 by Alvernia and 3-1by Kean in the NCAA Division III East Regionals. Doggett sported a 6.43 ERA. In 13 games and four starts, he worked 35 innings and gave up 46 hits and 35 runs, 25 earned. He walked nine and struck out 30. Doggett saw action in the Alvernia game, working 2.1 innings in relief and giving up three hits and two runs, one earned. He didn’t walk a batter and struck out three. Two other area players were on the squad. Freshman Frank Santarsiero (Dunmore) saw limited action and hit .333 (4-for-12). Freshman Shane McGraw (Scranton Prep), a left-hander, pitched in seven games in relief and didn’t have a record.

ROBINSON Continued from page 32

al career, the Giants are thriving with players capable of doing both. Rob Rogers, Andrew Siano, Adam Krebs, Edwin Rohena and Blaine O’Brien are all Division I baseball players, who just happen to be more happy these days playing on one of eight teams left competing for the Division III title. Rogers was second in pitching appearances at Binghamton University, which went 3120 last year, including 21-3 in the America East Conference. Siano batted .319 last season at Hartford University, but seldom won. Krebs was on a team that won 22 games last year, but only got to pitch in one of them for Monmouth University. Rohena was at LaSalle. O’Brien, a 6-foot-7 pitcher who has already been drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies organization, had a baseball scholarship at the University of Maryland before plans fell apart when he had the adequate grades but was ineligible because he had not graduated his junior college. He was eligible to play immediately on the Division III level. Jeremy Beeching, a Valley View graduate who had been playing at Tennessee Wesleyan

ROUNDUP Continued from page 35

lor Nemetz singled twice and scored two runs. The win was the first time this season that Old Forge put victories together back-toback. The first of the two straight wins came in the quarterfinals with a 6-1 victory over MMI Prep. Sarah Fish and Andi Alsalahat had three hits each in the quarterfinals. Lindsay Regan had a single and double. Valley View shut out West Scranton, 10-0, in the quarterfinals. The top-seeded Cougars will host Berwick in Tuesday’s Class AAA semifinals. West Scranton and Scranton Prep each won once before los-

GIANTS Continued from page 32

American Thursday night. Andrew Siano’s sacrifice moved Meletiche into scoring position and Roberto Santana ripped a triple into left-center field for the winning run. Western New England got its leadoff man on one more time in the sixth, but a double play ground ball erased that threat. In Friday’s other openers: Buena Vista edged Wisconsin-Whitewater, 5-4; Chapman downed Kean, 9-4; and Marietta shut out Salisbury, 8-0. Buena Vista won on Michael Hoffman’s RBI single in the bottom of the ninth inning. Marietta won its 19th straight as Brian Gasser allowed just three hits and struck out four in six innings. College, returned to the area to play for the Giants. He also has been drafted, by the Seattle Mariners. The Giants have the twopast draft picks on the roster and three – two-time Colonial States Athletic Conference Player of the Year Esteban Meletiche, O’Brien and catcher ing. Riverside pounded Meyers, 15-0, then defeated third-seeded Hanover Area, 5-2. The Lady Vikes moved into Tuesday’s Class AA semifinals at defending state champion Nanticoke. Morgann Haduck had three hits against Hanover Area. “Morgann set the tone with big hits early,” Riverside coach Joe Helcoski told the Times Leader. Heather Derenick pitched a five-hitter with no walks and nine strikeouts and drove in two runs. Abington Heights beat Delaware Valley, 12-6, in the Class AAAA quarterfinals before losing to Wallenpaupack, 5-1, in the semifinals. PIAA BOYS’ TENNIS Abington Heights senior

Brian Henry – who could be picked in the 2011 draft next month. A year ago, Keystone had four players selected in the Major League Baseball draft and three others sign professional contracts with independent teams. With all that talent leaving, the Giants needed help. They found it right away in players ready to move from the colleges they were at. “It was a big recruiting year for us,” coach Jamie Shevchik said. “Keystone College doesn’t really jump out to a lot of high school seniors, but it does jump out to transfers. “With the type of talent we’re recruiting, when they’re high school seniors they still have a lot of options with junior college, Division II and Division III. We don’t always get them at that point. Junior college and transfers have been our bread and butter the last few years.” When players go looking for a new college choice, Keystone’s credentials with multiple league titles and NCAA berths and its ability to get players drafted draw more attention. “Years ago, it used to be Division I or bust,” Shevchik said. “That’s what every kid says he wants. “But the trend is starting to change. More kids want to be part of winning.” That is something Keystone has done very well. Josh Palmer won the first set, but was unable to get out of the first round of the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association Class AAA boys’ tennis singles tournament Friday at the Hershey Racquet Club. District 10 champion Alex Brzozowski from Erie Cathedral Prep outlasted Palmer in the third-set tiebreaker for a 5-7, 6-2, 7-6 (9-7) win. DISTRICT 2 GIRLS’ SOCCER Top-seeded Coughlin held North Pocono without a shot or a corner kick Monday while eliminating the Lady Trojans from the District 2 tournament, 4-0. Ivy Nulton scored two goals 5:05 apart in the first half. Meghan Utter made 10 saves for North Pocono, which finished the season 8-5-1.


A m e ric r ic a’s a ’s N e w C a ar r A lte lte r n a ativ tiv e 2 M ER ED ITH S TR EET • C A R B O N D A L E, P A • C A L L 2 8 2 - 10 0 0

U N D ER $ 10 ,0 0 0

U N D ER $ 15 ,0 0 0

10 ,9 9 3 * 20 0 9 H YU N D AI ACCEN T S D N $ 10 ,9 9 9 * $ 20 0 8 CH EVY H H R CAR GO P AN EL 11,8 75 * $ 20 10 H YU N D AI ACCEN T S D N 11,9 9 8 * $ 20 10 K IA R IO S ED AN 11,9 9 9 * 20 0 6 JEEP L IB ER TY S P OR T 4X 4 $ 12 ,75 0 * 20 0 6 CH EVR OL ET TR AIL B L AZER LT $ 12 ,9 79 * 20 0 3 FOR D EX P L OR ER S P OR T TR AC 4X 4 $ 13 ,5 9 9 * 20 0 8 N IS S AN ALTIM A S ED AN $ 13 ,779 * 20 0 4 D OD GE D AK OTA QU AD CAB $ 13 ,79 5 * 20 0 8 D OD GE N ITR O 4X 4 S U V $ 13 ,9 9 7* 20 10 CH R YS L ER S EB R IN G TOU R IN G S ED AN $ 13 ,9 9 9 * 20 10 D OD GE AVEN GER S X T S ED AN $ 14 ,5 5 0 * 20 0 7 K IA S P OR TAGE 4X 4 $ 14 ,8 5 0 * 20 0 8 CH EVY M AL IB U LT S ED AN $ 14 ,9 3 9 * 20 0 6 JEEP COM M AN D ER 4X 4 S U V $ 14 ,9 9 9 * 20 0 8 H YU N D AI EL AN TR A S D N

P o w erW indo w s/Lo c ks, C D,A/C , ST K #N W 0 0 5 5 2 A

$

G LS P kg,Auto m atic , 4 C yl, G as Sav er!, ST K #N W 0 5 4 5

20 0 2 CH EVR OL ET EX P R ES S CAR GO 250 0 VAN ST K #N W 0 5 4 6 A, LadderRac ks, C argo B in P kg, Auto m atic , 5 .7 L V 8

$

5 ,9 9 0

2 0 0 3 S U ZU K I G R AN D VITAR A 4 X 4 S U V

P o w erW indo w s/Lo c ks, K eyless Entry, C D, Allo yW heels, Auto m atic , Freshly Serv ic ed, O nly 8 0 K M iles!

$

*

7,6 8 8

*

G LS P kg,Auto m atic , 4 C yl, G as Sav er!, ST K #N W 0 5 16

U N D ER $ 2 0 ,0 0 0 20 0 7 S U ZU K I X L 7 AW D

Full P o w er, Allo y W heels, K eyless Entry, Sunro o f, 3 rd Ro w Seating, C arfax 1-O w ner

$

Ro o fRac ks, P o w erW indo w s/Lo c ks, C D C ruise, ST K #N W 0 5 4 9 A

LX P kg,Auto m atic , 4 C yl, G as Sav er!, ST K #N W 0 5 4 7

Allo yW heels,Auto , P o w erW indo w s/Lo c ks, ST K #N W 0 5 4 8

20 0 7 JEEP GR AN D CH ER OK EE 4X 4

P o w erW indo w s & Lo c ks, K eyless Entry, Allo y W heels, Lo w M iles!

15 ,9 9 3 *

$

15 ,4 5 5 *

Full P o w er, Allo yW heels, C D, K eyless Entry, O nStar, Sunro o f

Leather, Sunro o f, X LT P kg, P o w erW indo w s/Lo c ks, ST K #N W 0 5 5 6 Auto m atic , C D, P o w erW indo w s/Lo c ks, ST K #N W 0 5 13 A

20 0 8 JEEP L IB ER TY 4X 4

20 0 9 D OD GE N ITR O S E 4X 4

Full P o w er, Allo y W heels, C D, C arfax , 1-O w ner, K eyless Entry, Skyro o f

$

16 ,3 70

Allo y W heels, K eyless Entry, C D, Lo w M iles, Sunro o f!

*

$

V 6 , Auto , Bedliner, C ruise C o ntro l, Lo w M iles, ST K #N W 0 5 4 2

20 0 8 JEEP L IB ER TY 4X 4 Full P o w er, Allo y W heels, C D, C arfax , 1-O w ner, K eyless Entry, Skyro o f

16 ,8 4 5 *

$

16 ,3 70

*

Auto m atic , C D, P o w erW indo w s/Lo c ks, ST K # N W 0 9 9 9 A

P o w erW indo w s/Lo c ks, C D, Auto , 4 C yl, 2 T o C ho o se Fro m

U N D ER $ 2 5 ,0 0 0

C D P layer, A/C , P o w erW indo w s/Lo c ks, K eyless Entry

LX P kg, Auto , V 6 , P o w erW indo w s/Lo c ks, ST K #N W 0 5 4 4

P o werW indo w s/Lo c ks, K eyless Entry, C hro m e W heels, Rem o te Start, O nly 2 3 K M iles

20 0 9 CH EVY S ILVER AD O EX T CAB 4X 4

20 0 8 TOYOTA FJ CR U IS ER 4X 4

20 0 8 CH EVY S ILVER AD O CR EW CAB LT 4X 4

P o w erLo c ks, C D, C ruise C o ntro l, V 8 , C arfax 1-O w ner, O nly 15 K M iles

Full P o w er, 6 Sp eed, O ffRo ad M ud T ires, Allo y W heels, Blac k O n Blac k!

Allo y W heels, Full P o w er, 6 .0 L V 8 ,T o w P kg, Bedliner, Lo ng Bed!

$

2 0 ,9 8 8

W H Y B U Y N E EWW ?

W

*

$

W

2 4 ,9 4 7

*

$

2 4 ,9 79

W .N ATIO N W

*

Full P o wer, 4 .7 L V 8 ,Allo ys, Sunro o f, P o werSeats, Heated LeatherSeats, 3 rd Ro w !

ID EC A R S A L ES .N ET

B U Y N AATIO T I O N W ID ID E A N D S AV AV E TH TH O U S A N D S !

*ALL SALES PLUS TAX, TAGS, AND FEES. ARTWORK IS FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. THIS IS A COMBINED OFFER. MAKE YOUR BEST DEAL ON A PACKAGE PRICE **VEHICLE IS PRE-OWNED.


TO ADVERTISE IN THE DINING GUIDE CALL:

Paul Andrews - 558.0845 • T’Shaiya Stephenson - 558-0845 • Karen Fiscus - 829.7291

Specializing In Italian American Cuisine

1/2 OFF Entree

Catering is available in private • Receive a FREE dinner on your birthday (call for details.) party room. Call today for Buy one entree at regular price, get second entree of equal or pricing and details. • Hours are flexible to lesser value, for 1/2 off with this coupon. On and Off-site catering accomodate private parties. Not valid with other offers. Coupon must be presented prior to ordering. for all occasions. Accepts: Expires: 6-30-11

984 E. Drinker Street • Dunmore • 570.348.0188 Open 7 Days a Week Mon-Thurs 11am - 10pm Fri & Sat 11am - 11pm Sunday 3pm - 9pm


Grille THEOS METRO Ipanema Brazilian Churrascaria Greek American Cusine

Full Menu Available: Steak, Seafood, Fish, Chops, Pastas, Burgers & more

2 for Tuesdays Mondays $ 95 2 Can Eat for $22 12 oz. Lobster Tail Dinner 24 Thursdays - Lamb Night Wednesdays - Greek Night $ 00 2 off any Greek Specialty Entree Dinners Starting At $1295

Sundays - FREE Kids Meal With Each Adult Entree (under 10) BAR HOURS: 11:00AM-2:00AM 7 DAYS A WEEK

596 Mercer Ave. Kingston 283-2050

For A Complete Menu & Coupon Visit www.theosmetrorestaurant.com

JOIN US AT OUR SCRANTON LOCATION THURSDAYS FROM 5PM TO ? FOR HAPPY HOUR. $1.00 OFF ANY SANDWICH 715 N. STATE STREET, CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.MYCANGIANOS.COM 570-586-4896 FAX: 586-0573 400 SPRUCE STREET, SCRANTON • 570-207-2667

CREEK SIDE GROVE

WWW.MYCANGIANOSCREEKSIDEGROVE.COM CATERING • GIFT BASKETS • GOURMET ITALIAN SPECIALITIES • DINNERS • DELI • DESSERTS • PASTRIES & MORE!

Special Deal!!! FREE Dessert on Your Birthday!

Tues, Wed, Thurs, & Sun 5-9pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm

Specializing in Brazilian Cuisine! Best Sangria in Scranton! 1911 N. Main Ave. Scranton, PA 18508 Phone: 570-558-0742 Fax: 570-558-0743 Offers not valid on holidays

www.ipanemagrille.com

The Real Deal...

FREE Regular Size Fry

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Sunday-Thursday 11am-10pm Friday & Saturday 11am-Midnight

with purchase of steak & soda

532 MOOSIC STREET, SCRANTON, PA

570-341-5100

Lunch Served Mon.-Sat. 11am-4pm Dinner Served 7 Days a Week

Daily Lunch Specials Starting at $8.50 Catering and Party Platters Available for All Events FREE Delivery BYOB GERRITY’S SHOPPING CENTER | CLARKS SUMMIT

570.585.1250

w w w. a t a m i s u s h i . c o m

Specializing In Italian American Cuisine Catering is available • Receive a FREE in private party dinner on your Buy one entree at regular price, birthday (call for room. Call today for get second entree of equal or details.) lesser value, for 1/2 off with pricing and details. this coupon. • Hours are flexible On and Off-site Not valid with other offers. Coupon to accomodate must be presented prior to ordering. catering for all Expires: 6-30-11 private parties. occasions.

1/2 OFF Entree

984 E. Drinker Street • Dunmore 570.348.0188 Open 7 Days a Week Mon-Thurs 11am - 10pm Fri & Sat 11am - 11pm Sunday 3pm - 9pm Accepts:

Your Party - Our Priority


42

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 29, 2011

seventh in the boys’ shot put with 52-3 ½. Mid Valley’s Tom DeBlasio, a senior first-year track athlete, took eighth place in the Class AA boys’ javelin Friday. DeBlasio launched what was

by-far his longest throw on the first attempt at the state meet and, when he could not surpass it, the 179-foot effort held up for a medal. “Even getting here was a big accomplishment,” said DeBlasio, who thanked assistant coach Bob Grandinetti for suggesting he try the javelin. DeBlasio set a school record with his medal-winning throw. Coughlin standout Shelley

SPORTS BRIEFS

the Falcons in each of the losses.

Yankees snap losing streak The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees used two strong pitching performances in less than 24 hours to break out of a sixgame overall and a seven-game home losing streak. David Phelps started Monday night’s 2-1 win over the Indianapolis Indians and Adam Warren came back in Tuesday’s 5-1 win, each working into the eighth inning while allowing just one run. Phelps gave up eight hits and a walk while striking out four in 7 1/3 innings. Warren gave up just three hits and a walk while striking out four in eight full innings.

Group honors five area athletes Keystone College senior catcher Bryan Henry and junior second baseman Esteban Meletiche were first-team All-Mid Atlantic Region baseball selections by the College Sports Information Directors of America (coSIDA). Keystone placed junior pitcher Rob Rogers and senior outfielder Andy Vega on the second team. University of Scranton senior first baseman David Giglio was named to the first team.

PIAA

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Continued from page 35

Falcons fall in NJCAA title run Lackawanna College came up one win short of the National Junior College Athletic Association Division II Baseball World Series. The Falcons won the first game of the best-of-three Northeast District championship series in North East, Md. before losing two straight games to Cecil College, 9-4 and 5-4, May 21. Sam Parente had two hits for

Seven lacrosse players recognized Marywood University had seven women’s lacrosse players honored when USA College Lacrosse, Inc. announced its NCAA Division III All-America teams. Taylor McKeown and Stephanie Naro were both named to the second team. Mary-Christine Vignola made the third team. Allie Sodl and Sarah Caughy received honorable mention. Kimberly Commisso and Diana D’Achille were chosen as Rookie All-Americans.

Black gave District 2 its only gold medal when she repeated her title in the Class AAA 100 hurdles. Black was unable to repeat in the 300 hurdles, instead falling to the state record-setting effort of Abington’s Leah Nugent in a showdown between former state champions. GAR’s Quieterra Gross joined Black, Ellsworth and Munley as silver medalists. Gross was second in Class AA 100 hurdles.

Nickolette McCloe of Holy Cross competes in the 100 meter dash at the state track meet in Shippensburg.

DON CAREY PHOTO

COCCIA

ANNOUNCEMENT Coccia Ford, Lincoln, 577 East Main Street in Plains, is pleased to announce that Mike Hallock has joined our sales team. Mike is following the tradition of his father, Walter Hallock by selling Ford vehicles. Like his father, Mike has a warm, friendly, honest approach to selling. Mike promises to deliver the same high level of customer satisfaction that Hallock senior provided for over 35 years. Come by and see for yourself!

Mike Hallock

You can reach Mike Hallock at 570-823-8888.

Open Tuesday - Saturday for Lunch & Dinner Now Open Later 11 am - 8 pm

GREAT FOOD. GAME DAY AND EVERYDAY.™ CASUAL, COMFORTABLE DINING KIDS EAT FREE ALL DAY WEDNESDAY LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEXT TO THE RAMADA

BUY ONE DINNER ENTREE Damon’s Grill Clarks Summit 820 Northern Blvd. (Next to the Ramada Plaza) www.damonsclarksummit.com • (570) 585-3737

GET ONE FREE

With the purchase of two beverages, Get one dinner entree free with the purchase of a second dinner entree of equal or lesser value. Up to a $8.00 value. Tax and gratuity not included. Dine-in Only. Not valid on holidays. Not valid with any other promotions. EXP. 7/31/11

FORD LINCOLN

Stop in and try our new expanded menu! Catering Available • edenavegancafe Present this coupon for a FREE drink with any food purchase. must present coupon. expires 6/30/11

344 Adams Ave • 570.969.1606 • eden-cafe.com


290215


Ken Pollock

SAVE NOW!

DRIVE NOW!

A TOP 10 IN THE NATION SUZUKI SALES VOLUME DEALER.**

500

$

OPEN

Memorial Day

Monday

Bonus Discounts On all new Vehicles In Stock. Thru 5/31 Only!

9am to 2pm

HERE!

BEFORE YOU BUY! Joe G. from White Haven

2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI S Stk# S1500

UP TO 34 MPG

Power Windows/Locks, CD, Keyless Entry, Tilt, 6 Speed

Lillian G. from White Haven

ARE YOU A MEMBER...

Michael H. and Barbara H. from Jenkins Township

2011 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER Power Windows/Locks, Keyless Entry, CD, Tilt, 5 Speed

Stk# S1548

UP TO 36 MPG

OF THE

20,711* 19,499* $

$

MSRP w/ Add Ons $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

- 1,000* - 1,000***

Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty

SALE PRICE

$

17,499* - 500

Memorial Day Bonus Discount

$

SCAN THIS QR CODE FOR MORE ON OUR KIZASHI

$

16,999*

2011 SUZUKI GRAND UP TO VITARA 4WD 27 MPG Stk#S1559

SCAN THIS QR CODE FOR MORE ON OUR GRAND VITARA

y I love m suzukib! car clu

Premium Package, Navigation, Power Windows/Locks, Auto

23,749* 22,249* $

$

SALE PRICE

$

20,499* - 500

$

$

19,999*

SALE PRICE

$

$

- 1,000* - $ 500***

15,449* - 500 $

14,949*

2011 SUZUKI EQUATOR 2011 SUZUKI SX4 SEDAN EXT CAB 4x4 UP TO LE ANNIVERSARY EDITION 26 MPG

Stk#S1430

Stk#S1569

Automatic, V6, AM/FM/CD, Power Windows/Locks

26,899* 24,999* $

$

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

- 1,250* - $ 500***

Memorial Day Bonus Discount

Manufacturer Rebate Suzuki Owner Loyalty

Memorial Day Bonus Discount

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price Manufacturer Rebate Suzuki Owner Loyalty

17,999* 16,949* $

$

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price

Manufacturer Rebate Suzuki Owner Loyalty

SALE PRICE

$

- 2,000* - $ 500***

22,499* - 500 $

Memorial Day Bonus Discount

$

21,999*

Auto, Power Windows/Locks, CD, Alloys

18,099* 16,549* - 1,250* - 500*** $

MSRP $ Ken Pollock Sale Price $ Manufacturer Rebate $ Suzuki Owner Loyalty Rebate

SALE PRICE

$

15,299* - 500

Memorial Day Bonus Discount

$

$

14,799*

* ALL PRICES + TAX & REGISTRATION. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ALL REBATES AND DISCOUNTS INCLUDED. **BASED ON SUZUKI NATIONAL SALES VOLUME REPORTS FOR 2010. THIS IS A COMBINED OFFER. MAKE YOUR BEST DEAL ON A PACKAGE PRICE. ***OWNER LOYALTY REBATE, MUST HAVE OR OWN SUZUKI VEHICLE IN HOUSEHOLD.

EXIT 175

81 INTERSTATE

ROUTE 315 ROUTE 315

KEN POLLOCK SUZUKI

CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE! WE’RE EASY TO FIND!

JUST OFF EXIT 175 RTE I-81 • PITTSTON


FAMILY CIRCUS

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

STONE SOUP

THE ARGYLE SWEATER DRABBLE

CLASSIC PEANUTS


S W E W AN T A YOUR L TRA DE ! E $TOP DOL L A R$ 2010 CHE V Y HHR 2008 P ON TIA C G6 GT

U .9% SE sa les driv e D 2011 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 2006 CHE V Y COBA L T S S

SPRIN G

A sL ow A s

1

the

S UP E RCHA RGE D CP E

4W D RE G CA B

PA N EL LS L OW M IL E S

ON LY

1400 MILES

#11430A

21,999

ON LY

* 4467

$

B L OW OU T P R ICE !

32 M P G

#Z2381

B L OW OU T P R ICE !

MILES

(HW Y)

20,875

$

*

5 B L OW OU T A VA ILA B LE P R ICE !

15,850

$

ON L Y 24K M IL E S

#Z2380

S ta rtin g A t

#Z2438

CON V E RTIBL E

3.9L

*

Sport B L OW OU T P a c ka ge P R ICE !

21,495*

$

2006 P ON TIA C S OL S TICE 2008 S A TURN V UE 2006CHE V Y TRA IL BL A ZE R 2008 S A TURN A URA XE 2010 CHE V Y M A L IBU CON V E RTIBL E

P ow er P ackage

B LOW OU T 45K M iles P R ICE !

#Z2379

#Z2444

16,888

$

AW D

*

B LOW OU T

ON LY 24K M iles P R ICE!

19,999*

08 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 1500 RE G CA B $ #Z2440,O nly 29K M iles.................................

06 P ON TIA C G6 GT

19,875

$

14,999*

$

#11537A ,39K M iles ......................................

15,995* $ 08 CHE V Y A V E O H/B 9,999* 08 CHE V Y E QUIN OX L TZ A W D $ 20,999*

08 CHE V Y M A L IBU L T

$

#11458A ,24K M iles......................................

#Z2063,22K M iles............................................

#11634A ,34K M iles......................................

V IS IT U S 07 JE E P W RA N GL E R X

06 GM C S IE RRA DUM P TRUCK

#Z2373,29K M iles ........................................

07 HYUN DA I S ON A TA

#11611A ,Low M iles ......................................

12

L OW M IL E S

#Z2227

14,999

lbla zer’s B LOW OU T $ * TraiToChoose P R ICE! From

S ta rtin g A t

07 BUICK L A CROS S E CX

8

#Z2429

A ura’s * ToChoose

B LOW OU T From P R ICE!

13,999* $ 33,998* $ 25,999* $ 16,999* $ 16,999*

$

#Z2281A ,38K M iles ......................................

06 CHE V Y CORV E TTE CP E

#11692A ,O nly 21K M iles ................................

07 S A TURN OUTL OOK XE

#Z2328,A W D ,31K........................................

07 CHE V Y COL ORA DO W /T

LT •LTZ

L OW A P R A V A IL A BL E

S ta rtin g A t

14,877

$

*

Low B LOW OU T Miles P R ICE!

S ta rtin g A t

17,999

$

#Z2316,17K M iles.......................................

34,900*

10 CHE V Y IM P A L A L T

19,388* $ 16,999* $ 12,999* $

#Z2387,13K M iles .......................................

06 P ON TIA C TORRE N T S UV

#Z2323,49K M iles ........................................

10 CHE V Y COBA L T COUP E

#Z2320,O nly 32K M iles ..................................

#Z2081A ,7K M iles ........................................

05 GM C S A V A N A CA RGO V A N

06 CHE V Y M ON TE CA RL O L T $

#Z2415,38K M iles ........................................

07 FORD M US TA N G CP E

17,999* $ 16,999* $ 13,999* $

#10549D ,O nly 18K M iles ................................

07 FORD E DGE S E L

#11592A ,Low M iles ......................................

05 CA DIL L A C DE V IL L E 4DR

#Z2424A ,O nly 46K M iles ................................

*

10 BUICK E N CL A V E CXL A W D $

#Z2342,36K M iles........................................

24/7 W W W .V A L L E YCH E V RO L E T.CO M

18,999* $ 23,999* $ 12,900* $

#11770A ,Low M iles ......................................

L OW M IL E S

07 HUM M E R H3

14,995*

19,999* 07-08 CA DIL L A C S RX A W D $ * S ta rtin g A t 25,999 $ 07 DODGE CA L IBE R R/T 15,999*

#11079C ,6 To C hoose From ...............S

$

ta rtin g A t

#Z2213,Low M iles..........................

#11544A ,O nly 27K M iles................................

*Tax & Tags additional. Low APR to qualified customers. See dealer for details. Select vehicles may not be GM Certified. Photos may not represent actual vehicle. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors. w w w .v alleyc hev ro let.c o m K EN W AL L ACE’S

V AL L EY CH EV R OL ET The Bes t P rices In The V a lley!

601 KIDDER STREET, W ILKES-BA RRE, PA

821- 2772 • 1- 800- 444- 7172

M O N .-THUR S. 8 :3 0 -8 :0 0 pm ; FR I. 8 :3 0 -7:0 0 pm ; SAT. 8 :3 0 -5 :0 0 pm

N E W S E RV ICE HOURS OPEN SATUR D AY 8 AM -12 N OON M ON . -FR I. 8 AM -6 :3 0 PM

THE B EST COV ER AG E IN AM ER ICA. 100,000-M IL E 5 Y EA R PO W ER TR A IN LIM ITED W A R R A N TY

100,000-M IL E S

5 Y EA R S O F C O U R TESY TR A N SPO R TA TIO N

100,000-M IL E S

5 Y EA R S O F R O A D SID E A SSISTA N C E

W hic hev er c om es firs t.See dealer for lim ited w arranty details .

EX IT 170 B O FF I-8 1TO EX IT 1. B EAR R IG HT O N B USIN ESS R O UTE 3 0 9 TO SIX TH LIG HT. JUST B ELOW W YO M IN G V A LLEY M ALL.

2 2 1Co nyngha m Ave.,W ilk es -B a rre

5 70 .8 2 1.2 778


The Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS®, Inc.

Open House Directory 1-2:30PM

$115,000

1-2:30PM

$129,000

SUNDAY, MAY 29 2207 Jackson St., Scranton Prudential Preferred Properties

Dir: Main to Jackson, go to end. MLS#11-676

1-2:30PM

$61,900

601 Union Street, Taylor

1-3PM

$139,900

Lewith & Freeman Real Estate

700 Morgan St., Dickson City

Dir: From Main or Keyser Avenue, turn on Union Street to 600 block. Property is on corner of Union and Harrison Streets. MLS#10-4100

Dir: I81 to Main Ave. exit. Turn right onto Main. Right onto Hallstead. House at end of Hallstead on Morgan. MLS#11-1647

Coldwell Banker Town & Country

47 Lincoln Ave., West Wyoming Prudential Preferred Properties

Dir: Wyoming Ave to Wyoming, R on Dennison, go over tracks, R at cemetery, L of Washington, R on Watson, L of Lincoln. MLS#11-190

1-2:30PM

$195,000

709 Linden St., Clarks Summit Prudential Preferred Properties

Dir: Through Clarks Summit, up South State St, Turn right onto E Grove St, take first right onto Linden St, past high school stadium, house is on left. MLS#11-972

Visit timesleader.com & Click “Buy A Home” to see the most up to date list of Open Houses


MARKETPLACE 100 Announcements 200 Auctions

golackawanna.com

300 Personal Services 400 Automotive

500 Employment 600 Financial

700 Merchandise 800 Pets & Animals

900 Real Estate 1000 Service Directory

To place a Classified ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@golackawanna.com 409

CHEVY ‘00 CAVALIER LS

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 150 Special Notices

ADOPT Adoring couple

longs to share our lives and give your newborn secure, endless love. Expenses paid Mindy and Rob 888-736-7567 ADOPT: Adoring Mom, Dad, Big Brother would like to share a lifetime of hugs & kisses in our loving home with a newborn. Please Call Lynda & Dennis 888-688-1422 Expenses Paid Adoption is a choice you’ve made out of love. We dream of giving your newborn a safe, secure lifetime of love. Please call Theresa & Steve @ 1-877-801-7256 or visit TheresaAndSteve .shutterfly.com

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! PAMINIMUM YING $500 DRIVEN IN

Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm

Autos under $5000

310

Attorney Services

DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

FREE CONSULTATION

for all legal matters Attorney Ron Wilson 570-822-2345

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY Free Consultation. Contact Atty. Sherry Dalessandro 570-823-9006

Autos under $5000

CADILLAC `94 DEVILLE SEDAN

94,000 miles, automatic, front wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, air bags, all power, cruise control, leather interior, $3,300. 570-394-9004

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

BMW ‘02 M3

4 doors, Runs great, 98,000 miles. $3,995

CENTRAL CITY MOTORS 319 W. Main St. Plymouth, PA 570-779-3890 570-829-5596

DODGE `95 NEON Nicely Equipped!

Automatic, white 2 door. Only $999 (570) 301-7221 advertisinguy @gmail.com

412 Autos for Sale

ACURA `08 RDX Good Condition. 53,000 miles. AWD, Full Power, AM/FM, CD Changer, Blue Tooth, XM Radio, Leather Interior & Sunroof $20,000 (570) 814-8398

Call after 9:30 a.m.

BMW `07 328xi

409

412 Autos for Sale

Black with black interior. Heated seats. Back up & navigation systems. New tires & brakes. Sunroof. Garage kept. Many extras! 46,000 Miles. Asking $19,500. 570-825-8888 or 626-297-0155 Call Anytime!

BMW `93 325 IC Convertible,

Metallic Green Exterior & Tan Interior, 5 Speed Transmission, Heated Seats. 2nd Owner, 66k Miles. Excellent Condition, Garage Kept, Excellent Gas Mileage. Carfax available. Price reduced $7,995 or trade for SUV or other. Beautiful / Fun Car. 570-388-6669

FORD `07 MUSTANG

63,000 highway miles, silver, runs great, $11,500. negotiable. 570-479-2482

Convertible. SMG equipped. Brand new wheels & tires. All service records. Navigation, Harmon Kardon, 6 disc changer, back up sensors, xenons, heated seats, Only 77,000 miles, Fully Loaded $19,999 (570) 301-7221 advertisinguy @gmail.com

CADILLAC ‘06 STS

AWD, 6 cylinder, Silver, 52,600 miles, sunroof, heated seats, Bose sound system, 6 CD changer, satellite radio, Onstar, parking assist, remote keyless entry, electronic keyless ignition, & more! $17,000 570-881-2775

CHEVROLET ‘06 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

Silver beauty, 1 Owner, Museum quality. 4,900 miles, 6 speed. All possible options including Navigation, Power top. New, paid $62,000 Must sell $45,900 570-299-9370

CHEVY ‘00 CAVALIER 2 door, 4 cylinder wing, low miles. $4,390

MARSH MOTORS 1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

To place your ad call...829-7130

CHEVY ‘04 CLASSIC 4 door sedan, all power options Great on gas! $4,490

MARSH MOTORS 1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

CHRYSLER `02 MERCEDES-BENZ `01 PT CRUISER C-240 Inferno Red, flame Loaded, automatic,

design. Chrome wheels. 47,000 miles, one owner. Looks and runs great. New inspection. $5,800 Call (570) 472-1854

CHRYSLER ‘06 300C HEMI

Light green, 18,000 miles, loaded, leather, wood trim, $24,000. 570-222-4960 leave message Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

FORD `04 MUSTANG Mach I, 40th

ANNIVERSARY EDITION V8, Auto, 1,300 miles, all options, show room condition. Call for info. Asking $24,995 Serious inquiries only. 570-636-3151

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG GT CONVERTIBLE Red with black top.

6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $18,500 570-760-5833

HYUNDAI `04 TIBURON GT

Blue, 5 speed manual, CD, Air, factory alarm, power windows & locks. 38K. $7,500 negotiable. Call 570-540-6236

INFINITI `05 G35

Sports Coupe. Black with slate leather. Original owner. 69K miles. Fully equipped with navigation, sunroof, etc. Always maintained by Infiniti dealer. Very nice. $15,750. 570-339-1552 After 4pm

MAZDA `04 RX-8 Hunter Green, 80,000 miles. New brakes & rotors. New alignment. Two new rear tires. No accidents.

PRICE REDUCED $8,000 or best offer. For more information, call (570) 332-4213

AC, heated leather seats, 4 door. $4,700 Call 570-388-6535

MERCEDES-BENZ `05 240C 4Matic, V6 - Gray,

77K highway miles, Excellent condition, dealer serviced. Sun roof, heated seats. $15,500. Call 570-288-3916

MERCEDES-BENZ `95 SL 500 Convertible, with removable hard top, dark Blue, camel interior, Summer Driving Only, Garage Kept. Very Good Condition, No Accidents. Classy Car. Price Reduced! $13,995 or trade for SUV or other. 570-388-6669

412 Autos for Sale

MINI COOPER `08

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

412 Autos for Sale

PONTIAC ‘02 SUNFIRE 2 door, 4 cylinder sunroof, low miles. $4,490

MARSH MOTORS 1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

To place your ad call...829-7130

MERCURY ‘03 SABLE V6, automatic,

PONTIAC ‘69 FIREBIRD 400 CONVERTIBLE

1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

Chrome wheels Sunroof, auto $5,390

MARSH MOTORS 1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

PORSCHE `02 BOXSTER S Great convertible,

black top, 6 speed manual transmission, carbon fiber dash, leather interior, front & rear trunk, fast & agile. $18,000 or best offer. Call 570-262-2478

To place your ad call...829-7130 SATURN ‘06 ION

4 cylinder, auto, low miles, all power options $6,990

MARSH MOTORS 1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

412 Autos for Sale

Blue/white top & white interior. Recent documented frame-off restoration. Over $31,000 invested. will sell $21,500. 570-335-3127

MARSH MOTORS

PONTIAC ‘04 GRAND AM 4 door sedan,

Clubman. Black & White. Sunroof. 30K miles. Leather interior, fully loaded. 6 speed. Excellent condition. 40 MPG. $19,950. Or best offer. Call 570-262-8811

To place your ad call...829-7130

59,000 miles, All power options $5,990

412 Autos for Sale

TOYOTA `93 MR2 T-top, 5 speed.

AM/FM/CD, AC, power antenna. New tires. No rust. Great condition.

$5,000

To place your ad call...829-7130

(570) 708-0269 after 6:00PM

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

We Buy Scrap Metal $$$$ ALL KINDS $$$$

PIPE - ROD - SHEET - BAR - TUBING - TURNINGS BEAMS - PUNCHINGS - OLD CARS -TRUCKS MACHINERY - FARM EQUIPMENT - METAL ROOFING ENGINES - TRANSMISSIONS -EXHAUST SYSTEM PARTS - APPLIANCES - ANY AND ALL SCRAP METAL

FREE CONTAINER SERVICE Small quantities to 1,000’s of tons accepted HIGHEST PRICES PAID FAST SETTLEMENTS CALL DMS SHREDDING, INC

570-346-7673 570-819-3339

Your Scrap Metal is worth $$$

Call Today!


412 Autos for Sale

VOLVO `01 XC70

All wheel drive, 46,000 miles, burgundy with tan leather, complete dealer service history, 1 owner, detailed, garage kept, estate. $9,100. 570-840-3981

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

MERCEDES BENZ `74 450 SE

SOLID CAR! Interior perfect, exterior very good. Runs great! New tires, 68K original miles. $5,500 FIRM. 570-905-7389 Ask for Lee

CADILLAC `80 MERCEDES-BENZ `73 COUPE DEVILLE 450SL with Excellent condition, Convertible $3,000 located in Hazleton. 570-454-1945 or 561-573-4114

CHEVROLET `72

CHEVELLE Two door hard top.

307 Motor. Needs work. Comes with additional 400 small block & many parts. $3,500. Serious inquires only. (570) 836-2574

CHEVROLET `76 PICKUP Very Good Condition! Low miles! $7500. FIRM 570-905-7389 Ask for Lee

CORVETTES WANTED 1953-1972

Any Condition! Courteous, Fast Professional Buyer. Licensed & Bonded corvettebuyer.com 1-800-850-3656

FORD `52 COUNTRY SEDAN CUSTOM LINE

STATION WAGON V8, automatic, 8 passenger, 3rd seat, good condition, 2nd owner. $9,500. 570-579-3517

FORD `66

Mustang Coupe. Pearl white, pony interior. Pristine condition. 26K miles. $17,000 or best offer. (570) 817-6768

LINCOLN `88 TOWN CAR 61,000 original

miles, garage kept, triple black, leather interior, carriage roof, factory wire wheels, loaded, excellent condition. $5,500. Call Mike 570-237-7660 Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $8,900. Call 570-237-5119

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. $31,000. Call 825-6272

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT DRASTICALLY

REDUCED!! This model only produced in 1967 & 1968. All original 45,000 miles, Color Burgundy, cloth & vinyl interior, 350 rocket engine, 2nd owner. Fender skirts, always garaged. Trophy winner at shows. Serious inquiries only, $7,500. 570-690-0727

421

Boats & Marinas

ALUMACRAFT DEEP V, 12’, dilly trailer, 2 trolling motors, marine battery, oars, vests, boat cover, anchors. $800. 825-3955

CUSTOM CREST 15’

Fiberglass boat with trailer. Outboard propulsion. Includes: 2 motors Erinmade, “Lark II series”

PRICE REDUCED! $2,400 NEGOTIABLE

570-417-3940

To place your ad call...829-7130 427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

FORD ‘99 E350 BUCKET VAN Triton V8. 2 speed

boom; 92,000miles; $9999 or best price. Great condition. Call 570-675-3384 or 570574-7002

To place your ad call...829-7130 439

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘10 SPORTSTER 1200

A MUST SEE! Custom Paint. Only driven under 10 miles!! Comes with remaining warranty. Asking $8,600 or best offer. For info, call 570-864-2543 or 215-379-1375

439

Motorcycles

HSoft ARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80 riding FLH. King of the Highway! Mint original unrestored antique show winner. Factory spot lights, wide white tires, biggest Harley built. Only 28,000 original miles! Never needs inspection, permanent registration. $8,500 570-905-9348

Q-LINK LEGACY `09

250 automatic. Gun metal gray. MP3 player. $3,000. Great first motorcycle. 570-696-1156

SUZUKI `07 C50T CRUISER EXCELLENT CONDITION Windshield, Bags,

Floorboards,V&H Pipes, White walls,Garage Kept. 6K Miles $5,200 (570) 430-0357

YAMAHA `04 V-STAR 1100 Custom. 5800

miles, light bar, cobra exhaust, windshield, many extras, must sell. $4,900. Call 570-301-3433

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

YAMAHA `97 VIRAGO

750cc. 8,000 miles, saddlebags, windshield, back rest, Black & Pearl, Excellent Condition. Must See. Asking $2,499. Call after 4. 570-823-9376

439

Motorcycles

YAMAHA ‘07 650 V-STAR

Matted black finish. Mint condition. New tires, inspected, fully serviced & ready to ride. Windshield & sissy bar. Low miles & garage kept. $4800. or best offer. 570-762-5158

YAMAHA` 08 R1 BEAUTIFUL BIKE Perfect condition.

3700 miles, new rear tire, undertail kit, cover. Price negotiable $7,600 570-852-9072

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

BUICK `05 RENDEZVOUS CX HARD TO FIND!!

AWD, Fully loaded, 1 owner, 20,000 miles. Small 6 cylinder. New tires. Like new, inside & out. $14,900. Call (570) 540-0975

CHEVR0LET`02 EXPRESS

442 RVs & Campers

CONVERSION VAN

EQUIPMENT/BOBCAT TRAILER

570-674-3901

Brand new 2010 tandem axle, 4 wheel electric brakes, 20’ long total, 7 x 16 wood deck, fold up ramps with knees, removable fenders for oversized loads, powder coat paint for rust protection, 2 5/16 hitch coupler, tongue jack, side pockets, brake away switch, battery, 7 pole RV plugs, title & more!! Priced for quick sale. $2,995 386-334-7448 Wilkes-Barre

To place your ad call...829-7130

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, water purifier, awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, raised panel fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS

Travel Trailer. 29’, mint condition, 1 slide out a/c-heat. Stove, microwave, fridge, shower inside & out. Many more extras. Reduced. $13,500. Call 570-842-6735

SUNLITE CAMPER

22 ft. 3 rear bunks, center bathroom, kitchen, sofa bed. Air, Fully self contained. Sleeps 6. New tires, fridge awning. $4500. 215-322-9845

TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft

Rear queen master bedroom, Walk thru bathroom. Center kitchen + dinette bed. Front extra large living room + sofa bed. Big View windows. Air, awning, sleeps 6, very clean, will deliver. Located in Benton, Pa. $4,900. 215-694-7497

Loaded. Low miles. Excellent condition.

$18,900

CHEVROLET `05 TRAILBLAZER LT Black/Grey. 18,000

miles. Well equipped. Includes On-Star, tow package, roof rack, running boards, remote starter, extended warranty. $16,000 (570) 825-7251

CHEVROLET `09 EQUINOX LS Low mileage, 15000

miles, automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, anti-lock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, cruise control, AM/FM radio, cassette player, CD player, keyless entry, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, tinted windows. $17,500. (570) 954-9333 Call after 9:00 a.m.

CHEVY `05 EQUINOX

LT (premium package), 3.4L, 47,000 miles. All wheel drive, power moonroof, windows, locks & seats. Leather interior, 6 cd changer, rear folding seats, keyless entry, onstar, roof rack, running boards, garage kept. $14,750. 570-362-1910

CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR

Custom Van. 67K miles. Interior has oak wood trim, carpeting, storage areas, TV, rear seat convertible to double bed, curtains. Seats 7. Power windows & seats. Custom lighting on ceiling. New exhaust system. New rear tires. Recently inspected. Excellent condition. $4,200 or best offer. Call 570-655-0530

DODGE `05 GRAND CARAVAN Tan 54,000 miles,

excellent condition. $7,999. 570-817-9644t

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVY ‘03 BLAZER LS 4 door, 4WD

clean, low miles. $6,290

MARSH MOTORS 1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

To place your ad call...829-7130

DODGE `94 DAKOTA with cap. 1 owner,

garage kept, very good condition. Many extras including lift & back seat. 29 MPG gas. $4,000 or best offer (570) 868-0944

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVY ‘05 EQUINOX Low miles,

front wheel drive, all power options $7,690

MARSH MOTORS 1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

DODGE `10 GRAND CARAVAN Only 17k miles. Fully loaded. Excellent condition. Factory & extended warranty. $17,995 (570) 690-2806

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

FORD `04 FREESTAR

Automatic, front wheel drive, 4 door, anti-lock brakes, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, power seats, cruise control, AM/FM radio, CD player, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, tinted windows, new starter, just inspected, $3,900. 570-594-4992. Call after 4:30 p.m.

To place your ad call...829-7130

FORD `06 EXPLORER 78,400 miles, auto-

matic, four wheel drive, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, power seats, cruise control, AM/ FM radio, CD changer, DVD player, keyless entry, leather interior, moon roof, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper. $16,000 (570) 954-5462 Call after 9 a.m.

FORD `99 E250

Wheelchair Van 78,250 miles. Fully serviced, new battery, tires & rods. Seats 6 or 3 wheelchairs. Braun Millennium lift with remote. Walk up door. Front & rear A/C. Power locks & windows. Excellent condition. $7,500. 570-237-6375

INTERNATIONAL ‘95 DUMP TRUCK

DODGE `97 RAM

1500 LARAMIE MARK 3 82,000 miles, automatic, chrome step up and mirrors & leather interior. Good Condition. Drums Area. $4,500 401-524-9763

To place your ad call...829-7130 FORD `03 EXPLORER Low mileage,

63,500 miles, automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, anti-lock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, power seats, all power, cruise control, AM/FM radio, CD changer, keyless entry, leather interior, sun/ moon roof, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, tinted windows. $12,500. (570) 362-0938

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

FORD ‘05 RANGER Extended cab,

6 cylinder. Automatic, RWD $5,990

MARSH MOTORS 1218 Main St. Swoyersville, PA 570-718-6992 Buy-Sell-Trade

GMC `99 SUBURBAN

Champagne exterior, leather interior, power windows & locks, 4 wheel drive. $4,850. Call for condition and known issues. 570-362-4080

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

HONDA `10 ODYSSEY

Refurbished, rebuilt engine, transmission replaced. Rear-end removed and relubed. Brand new 10’ dump. PA state inspected. $12,900/best offer. 570-594-1496

Special Edition. Maroon, Fully loaded. Leather seats. TV/DVD, navigation, sun roof plus many other extras. 3rd seat . Only 1,900 Miles. Brand New. Asking $37,000 (570) 328-0850

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

AUTOMOTIVE SALES CONSULTANTS Valley Chevrolet is seeking individuals who are self-starters, team-oriented and driven. (No experience necessary)

We Offer: • Salary & Commission • Benefits • 401k Plan • 5 Day Work Week • Huge New & Used Inventory Apply in person to: Blake Gagliardi, Sales Manager Rick Merrick, Sales Manager

601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre


451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

515 Creative/Design

INTERIOR DESIGN

TOYOTA `06

Scranton based design Firm seeks part to full-time Interior Designer.

TACOMA

HYUNDAI `05 TUCSON 61,000 miles, auto-

matic, four wheel drive, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, cruise control, AM/FM radio, cassette player, CD player, keyless entry, sun/ moon roof, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, new towing package, auto start. $10,000 (570) 762-4543

JEEP `02 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

Automatic, V6, TRD, Sport Package, 4x4, 45K miles, Excellent condition. $18,900 (973) 906-9311

FREIGHTLINER ’99 CONDO 430 Detroit, Super 10 transmission. Asking $15,000. ‘88 FRUEHAUF 45’ with sides. All aluminum, spread axle. $6,500. 2 storage trailers. 570-814-4790

TRUCKS FOR SALE Ford, GMC,

Triple black, economical 6 cylinder. 4x4 select drive. CD, remote door opener, power windows & locks, cruise, tilt wheel. 108k highway miles. Garage kept. Super clean inside and out. No rust. Sale price $6,895. Scranton. 570-466-2771

JEEP `07 WRANGLER X 4x4, stick shift, soft

top. Red exterior, well maintained, garage kept. 11,500 miles, one owner. AC, CD player, cruise control. Tow package with cargo carrier. Excellent condition. $18,700 Call 570-822-9680

MITSUBISHI `95 MONTERO SR 4WD 177,102 miles, auto-

matic, four wheel drive, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, power seats, cruise control, AM/FM radio, cassette player, CD changer, leather interior, sun roof, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, new Passed inspection, new battery. $2,500 (570) 868-1100 Call after 2:00 p.m.

SUZUKI `07 XL-7 56,000 miles,

automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, all power, CD player, leather interior, tinted windows, custom wheels, $13,000 Call 570-829-8753 Before 5:00 p.m.

503

TRACTOR TRAILERS

FREIGHTLINER ’97 MIDROOF 475 CAT & 10 speed transmission. $12,000

International-Prices starting at $2,295. Box Truck, Cab & Chassis available. Call U-haul 570-822-5536

Find a newcar online at

timesleader.com

ONLY ONL NLY L ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 462

Auto Accessories

WHEEL COVERS `70’S spoked stainless steel wheel covers. Set of four 14” from Chrysler. excellent condition $60. set. 868-6327

468

Auto Parts

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

542

Accounting/ Finance

OFFICE POSITION Nardone Brothers Bakery is currently accepting resumes for our office located in the Hanover Industrial Park for General Office help specifically in the

Candidates must have Bachelors degree, 5+ years experience with commercial projects, CAD and drawing capabilities and have proficient computer skills. Competitive salary based on experience, healthcare, 401K and paid vacation. Resumes: ddriscoll@ facilitydesignltd.com

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLES AREA

The successful candidate should have experience in working in a fast paced office setting. The candidate should be able to multi task and have experience in all phases of the accounts receivable process. In addition to this the candidate should also have experience in processing transactions, handling incoming phone calls, and interacting with our customers on a daily basis. Experience using Microsoft applications such as Excel and Word are necessary. This is a permanent full time position with the starting salary beginning at $10.00 per hour. Benefit package also sup plied. For immediate consideration please forward a current resume to: John Surdy Controller Nardone Brothers Bakery Inc. 420 New Commerce Blvd Wilkes Barre, PA 18706

509

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

HEAVY MACHINE OPERATOR Full time. Hourly.

Salary based on experience. Must be able to work flexible schedule. Serious inquiries only. Call 570-822-6282 to schedule interview.

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

Logistics/ Transportation

TRUCK DRIVER

Full time, able to drive a 20’ truck, 7 year clean driving record, able to do physical work and lift 60 lbs., PA driver medical card, motor vehicle report, flexible hours, $9/hour plus incentive on pounds collected. Apply at: U’SAgain Recycling 486 S. Empire St. Wilkes-Barre 570-270-2670

MECHANIC

538

Janitorial/ Cleaning

HOUSEKEEPER

1-2 days per week. Duties include cleaning, errands, & laundry in our Plains home. Experienced. References required Send resume to PO Box 1676 Plains, PA 18705

542

Logistics/ Transportation

CDL-A DRIVER Gas field/landscape

drivers plus some hands on labor required. Operate dump trucks and load equipment on lowboy. Deliver to job site. Must operate skid steer excavator, hydro-seed truck, etc. Will plow in winter. Must have clean driving record and pass drug test. Call Harvis Interview Service @ 542-5330. Leave message. Will send an application. Or forward resume: varsity.harvis@ gmail.com Employer is Varsity, Inc. No walk-ins. EOE

TRUCK DRIVER

Looking for Class-B Driver with dump truck experience. Competitive wages offered with health benefit contributions. Plenty of work available. Call for more details. 570-237-0425

We’ll run your ad until the vehicle iss sold.

Find the perfect friend.

Call Classified fied 829-71300

The Classified section at timesleader.com

Now Hiring the following position: Full time. Must have own tools and have inspection license. 100% pre-employment drug testing. Competitive wages. Health, dental, vision, and 401k. Send resume to: Franchelli Enterprises, Inc. 78 Second St. Wilke-Barre, PA 18702 or call 570-829-5385 E.O.E.

Selling Your Car?

548 Medical/Health

548 Medical/Health

548 Medical/Health

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

548 Medical/Health

RNs

Golden Care Home Health, seeking per diem nurses. Excellent rates and paid mileage. Agency will orient. Home care experience a plus (Agency 26 years, Top 500, JCAHO). Call 570-654-2883 (EOE)

566

Sales/Retail/ Business Development

HAZLETON/ LUZERNE COUNTY SALES REPRESENTATIVE NEPA’s largest circulated print publication is looking for an experienced Sales Representative to work in Hazleton and Luzerne County. Qualified individual will have at least two years outside business to business sales experience, will call on existing customers as well as securing new business. A sales assistant will assist in securing confirmed appointments but COLD CALLING IS REQUIRED! Position is $1,000.00 per month salary plus 20% commission. Benefits include health insurance, fitness membership & paid vacation. Please submit your resume to: prminc14@aol.com

LPN SUPERVISOR

Oakwood Terrace a licensed personal care community specializing in all types of memory care is seeking a caring individual with leadership abilities to fill the position of LPN Supervisor. Position is Full Time in the evening. Hours are 2:30pm-11:00pm. Duties include administering medication, treatments, supervising resident attendants, and communicating with physicians and families. Must be 21 years of age and have a valid nursing license. Must have updated CPR and First Aid Certification. We offer a competitive starting wage, comprehensive benefit package and attendance bonus after training. Applicants can email cover letter & resume along with salary history to

janines@oakwoodterraceinc.com or call 570-451-3171 ext 102 Please visit out website at www.oakwoodterraceinc.com Oakwood Terrace is an Equal Opportunity Employer

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Growth Creates Opportunity...Start A New Career! HIRING EXPERIENCED FORKLIFT OPERATORS AND PRODUCTION WORKERS ALL SHIFTS XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is seeking experienced forklift operators & Inexperienced candidates with great employment history to work at their Mehoopany, PA location. The following skills are necessary for these positions: • High School Diploma/GED • Computer Skills • Valid Driver’s License • Criminal Background Check • Pass Pre-employment Drug Screen & Physical • Part-time position for experienced driver only. All full-time positions come with the following benefits: medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after 1 year, and paid vacation. Pay increase based on skill development.

Every Tuesday & Thursday in June

at The Dept. Of Agriculture Building Rt. 92 South Tunkhannock from 9am to 3:30pm

Interested Applicants can Apply Online! www.XLCServices.com or Call 888-382-4078


566

Sales/Retail/ Business Development

HONESDALE/ LACKAWANNA COUNTY SALES REPRESENTATIVE NEPA’s largest cir-

culated print publication is looking for an experienced Sales Representative to work in Honesdale and Lackawanna County. Qualified individual will have at least two years outside business to business sales experience, will call on existing customers as well as securing new business. A sales assistant will assist in securing confirmed appointments but COLD CALLING IS REQUIRED! Position is $1,000.00 per month salary plus 20% commission. Benefits include health insurance, fitness membership & paid vacation. Please submit your resume to prminc14@aol.com

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! 600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

JAN-PRO COMMERCIAL CLEANING OF NEPA Be Your Own Boss Work Full or Part time Accounts available NOW throughout Wilkes Barre, Scranton, and Hazleton. We guarantee $5,000 to $200,000 in annual billing. Small investment We’re ready Are you? For more info Call 570-824-5774

Janproofnepa.com

630 Money To Loan “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

700 MERCHANDISE 702

Air Conditioners

AIR CONDITIONER! Haier 8000 BTU. Works perfect! Used for only 2 months last summer. Comes with remote. $125. 570-237-6001 MILK CAN with lid, painted black has decal $30. Glider chairs with cushions set of 2 $45. Presto Electric fry with high lid $15. Sunbeam electric mixer (3 bowls) $25. Dansk pizza baking stone set (brand new in box) $12. 570-288-8689

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! 708

Antiques & Collectibles

COLLECTIBLE Seagram’s Mirror( great condition) 1908 Stanley Cup $50. or best offer. Call Mark at 570-301-3484 or Allison at 631-6635 COMIC BOOKS Gen 13-1, X-files, Spiderman & many others, $1 each. 570-829-2411 NEON SIGN - Electric, Camel sign, 30 years old, $150. 570-829-2411 RECORDS - LP’S, 78’S, 45’S From 40’S, 50’S, 60’S & 70’S. $1 each. (570) 829-2411 RECORDS: a variety of old 78 records albums. $30. or best offer. 570-333-5263 WASHINGTON QUARTERS 1934-D, 1938-P-1940-D $55. 570-287-4135

708

Antiques & Collectibles

YEARBOOKS: Coughlin H.S. 1926, 1928, 1932, 1937, 1940, 1961, 1963, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1949. G.A.R. H.S. 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1945, 1946, 1951, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1961, 1965, 1966, 1970, 1980, 1985, 2005, 2006. Meyers H.S. 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1960, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977. Kingston H.S. 1938, 1939, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1949. Plymouth H.S. 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1938, 1943, 1944, 1959, 1960. Hanover H.S. 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1960. West Pittston H.S. Annual 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1931, 1932, 1959. Luzerne H.S. 1951, 1952, 1956, 1957, 1959. Berwick H.S. 1952, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1967, 1968, 1969 ,1970. Lehman H.S. 1973, 1974, 1976, 1978, 1980. Nanticoke Area H.S. 1976, 2008. Dallas H.S. 1966, 1967, 1968. Bishop Hoban H.S. 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975. West Side Central Catholic H.S. 1965 1974, 1980, 1981. Westmoreland H.S. 1952, 1953 - 1954 G.A.R. H.S. 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976 Pittston H.S. 1936, 1951, 1954, 1963 Pittston Hospital School of Nursing, J.O.Y. of 1957, 1959 West Pittston H.S. 1950, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1960 Hazleton H.S. 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1945, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964 Hazle Twp H.S. 1951, 1952 570-825-4721

710

Appliances

DISHWASHER: Whirlpool built-in. White , 6 months old, like brand new. Many features. $350. Frigidaire microwave oven (above range). White, uses standard outlet. $75. 570-696-4204 DRYER GE 7 cu. ft. electric, brand new, never used $300 call 570-855-5725. leave message GRILL electric ceramic 12”x12” nonstick. Smoke free. New in box. $15. 570-655-2154 REFRIGERATOR: Frigidaire. White. Large. Freezer up top. Very Clean, fairly new, in good working condition. $250 negotiable. Call 570-283-6943 Leave Message WASHER & DRYER in great condition. Whirlpool and GE. Both work great.. $99. Eric 609-433-5660 (Wilkes-Barre)

710

Appliances

716

Building Materials

GUTTERS One 22’, and one 28’ also one 10’ spout, all hardware included paid $220 sell for $180 or best offer. 570-740-6205 GENE’S RECONDITIONED APPLIANCES 60 Day Warranty Monday-Friday 8:00PM-5:00PM Saturday 8:00AM-11:00AM Gateway Shopping Center Kingston, PA

(570) 819-1966 WASHER & electric dryer, Kenmore, less than one year old! Excellent Condition! Moving. Call for details. $400. 570-287-0148

SINK TOP 37”X22”, Opal, NEW $25. 570-675-3328 VANITY TOP 36” cultured marble vanity top beige with nickel faucet $100 call

Wood - Tree house pressure treated wood. $95. 570-817-1094

720

Cemetery Plots/Lots

Baby Items

BABY TOYS, $15. tODDLER TOYS $15. GRACO CAR SEAT $20. 570-868-0481 CRIB Designer. Metal nickel finish. Great for use or children’s shop display. $95/ 570-457-7854 DRESSING TABLE Jenny Lind $10. Baby toys from $1. 570-331-0815 STROLLER excellent condition with basket, hood & cup holder. $15. 570-472-1646

To place your ad call...829-7130 STROLLER: Graco Duo-Glider beige & black $60. Fisher Price Laugh & Learn Home $30. Hasbro Playskool Let’s Play Together Peek ‘N Play Discovery Tent $20. Fisher Price Laugh & Learn learning table $10. Leap Frog LeapStart learning gym $10. Leave a message 570-926-9016

714

Bridal Items

WEDDING GOWN package REDUCED. New, tags on, ivory strapless, size 10, ivory strapless, beautiful bead work, veil beaded to match & slip. Paid $600 asking $100. 570-287-3505

716

Building Materials

BATHROOM SINK SET: Gerber white porcelain bathroom sink with mirror and medicine cabinet. Matching set. $80. 570-331-8183 DOOR. 36”x80” solid wood, 6 panel. Exterior or interior. Natural oak finish, right or left with hardware. $200. Call 570-735-8730 or 570-332-8094

MEMORIAL SHRINE CEMETERY 6 Plots Available

May be Separated Rose Lawn Section $450 each 570-654-1596 ST. NICHOLAS’ CEMETERY, SHAVERTOWN 6 Plots. Can be divided. Near Entrance. $550 each. Call 570-675-9991

726

Clothing

MISSES CLOTHING medium & large 10 pullover sweaters, 10 tops $20. all 570-824-0248 PURSES (2) Vera Bradley assorted purses $15. each. 570-693-2612 VINTAGE SLIPS $1.00 (30) Call 823-4941

728

Commercial/ Industrial Equipment

GENERATOR. Centurion commercial generator w/220 outlet. 5000 watt, used only 2 hours. Paid $650, sell $400 or best offer. 570-606-7382

730

Computer Equipment & Software

DESK. Computer Desk $50. Call 7358730 or 332-8094 DESKTOP SYSTEMS inc. pc/printer/monitor/kyb+ms.IBM/HP p4ht & above. All windows 7, office 10, AV, cdrw-dvd,+ more.$125 & up . LAPTOPS =$150$250, DESKTOP complete systems $125-$175. all refurbished off lease, w7 or xppro, antivirus, wifi, dvd rw+ more! Warranty & free delivery! 570-862-2236

Computer Equipment & Software

SCANNER: Cannon F916000 $25 570-331-0815

732

Exercise Equipment

EXERCISE BENCH: dumbbell exercise bench for sale. Very sturdy and thick all around, like new. $30. Call Eric 609-433-5660 (Wilkes-Barre) PARABODY Serious Steel 400 Total WorkOut Machine, plus floor mat $80. 570-457-4494 WEIGHT BENCH with 80 lbs plastic weights with bar and preacher attachment. $50. 570-371-3367

744

WASHER/GAS DRYER Maytag, very good condition. $275. for both $150. each. 570-814-7485

712

730

Furniture & Accessories

744

Furniture & Accessories

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER solid oak Raymour and Flannigan $40. 570 457 4494 KITCHEN SET. Wood, oval, brown table, good shape. $75. 570-970-6651 LAMPS (2) grey metal & black. $25 each. 570-740-1246 PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs/cushions, like a bronze brownish frame with a nice glass top with a hint of green to the tempered glass. $165. Cash or Paypal. 570-735-2661 RECLINER: Faux leather, black, good condition $40. 570-926-9016 Recliners - Two. Good working condition. Great for a basement area, rec room or cottage. FREE 570-970-0372

ASSORTED FURNITURE: 2 end tables, glass on black metallic frame. $20; Black leather living room chair. Great condition. $20; Kitchen or backyard solit wood table with green metallic frame $15; Futon in decent shape. Can be used as sofa or bed. Can include cushion if wanted $25; Twin size portable bed frame. Folds up and rolls anywhere. $39. Eric 609-433-5660 (Wilkes-Barre)

FREE DIRT FILL WITH ROCK. Just come and pick it up. Hard to find rich black soil. Screen or rake it to make top soil. 1,000’s of triaxial truck loads available. 189 Foote Avenue, Duryea 570-457-6610

BEDROOM SETBroyhill 5 piece oak includes bed, 2 night stands, dresser, armoire + extras! Wilkeswood apts, Wilkes-Barre. $800 570-905-7521

LAWN TRACTOR $550. Craftsman 42” 18 H.P. New blades, excellent condition. 472-3888

CHAIR rocks & swivels, love seat, pink color, good condition. both $50. 570-655-2154 CHAIR small overstuffed parlor or bedroom chair, pink & white stripe, good condition $10. China breakfront, 4 door $400. 3 pink banquet tablecloths 1 white banquet table cloth, 4 matching napkins $5. all. 570-675-0920 COFFEE TABLE, vintage 1950’s/1960’s , blonde wood finish, rectangular, 36”L x 20”W x 16”H, excellent $30. MIRROR, Victoria style, elegant with burnished gold gilding, measures 38” L x 30” W, excellent condition, $40 call 709-3146

To place your ad call...829-7130 DESK brown, very sturdy, 2 drawers, excellent condition, $40. 570-472-1646

DINETTE/KITCHEN SET rattan 5 piece. 42” round tile top table + 4 swivel arm chairs, padded seats. Very well made, excellent condition. Delivery possible asking $125. 868-6327

752 Landscaping & Gardening

LAWN MOWER: Craftsman, rear bag, high rear wheels, excellent condition $135. 570-822-4251

LAWNMOWER, Craftsman, electric start 875 Series. 21” cut EZ walk, vary speed, asking $175. 570-855-8764

To place your ad call...829-7130 RIDING MOWER Scott’s 42” cut, 17hp, engine runs but needs work. $400 or best offer. 570-855-0390 TRIMMER/MOWER 5.5 HP, never used, 12” beaver blade, runs great. $125. Call Bill 735-4773

756

Medical Equipment

POWER CHAIR Jazzy Select, $500 570-829-2411 Wheelchair for child $ 65. (570) 817-1094 WHEELCHAIR Rolls Invacare, perfect condition. $200. 570-735-8730 or 332-8094

758 Miscellaneous BARREL, wooden. 53 gallon. Excellent condition $195. 570-876-3830

758 Miscellaneous BEDLINER: 89 Chevy S10 truck bedliner, standard cab $30. 2000 Chevy Cavalier LS rear trunk spoiler, black $10. Four barrel carb running from Chevy motor $50. 3 suitcases in excellent shape $40. 570-740-1246 BRIDAL ITEMS wedding gown size 14 beaded & sequence bodice & train $65. Wedding candle with tea light insert $3. Size 7 flower girl dress $35 matching accessories $10. 570-331-0815 CANES & WALKING STICKS. NEW BATCH! Different sizes and shapes. Made from the roots of Slippery Maple Trees. Over 20 available at $4 each. 735-2081. CEDAR CHEST, $75, Floor Lamp, $25, Pine shelf $5. Swag, grapes & wine bottles $5. 570-693-2612 CROCKS two 5 gallon for $15. each. 570-824-6770 CURTAINS white lace, Priscilla 64” long $3. pair. Twin yellow bedspread $3. 570-474-5653 DISHES 3 sets, $10 each. CANNING JARS pints & quarts, $1.25 & $1.50 per dozen. About 10 dozens. 823-4941 DVD PLAYER: symponic new in the box never used or opended with remote $30.00 cd player am/fm cassett works great boom box $30.00 Color printer with wires and hook ups works great $20.00 sega system with 6 games one controller all wires and hook ups plays beautiful $30.00 vcr with wires and hook ups 4-head record on screen display and timer $20.00 570-822-8957 FENDER BASSMAN 60 Combo. 15 inch speaker in good condition. $159 Call Rick 283-2552 GLASS DOOR. 4 way glass door for bath tub. $25 570-331-8183

758 Miscellaneous FIREPLACE: electric fireplace with remote. Height 45” Width 48” white in color, not used. $70. 570-655-3512

To place your ad call...829-7130 GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER ITEMS

Power Wheels Dora Jeep 6v battery $30. Baby Einstein and Fisher Price activity mats $5. each. Fisher Price aquarium crib toy $5. Bottle/baby food warmer $5. 570-814-8298


758 Miscellaneous

758 Miscellaneous

GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER ITEMS

TIRES [4] Michilen p-255-60-r19” approximate 25k good condition, no plugs $150. Bumper rear chrome mint condition 88-98 Chevy/GMC full size pickup $175 firm. Tailgate 88-98 Chevy full size pickup, very good condition $75. 570-655-3197

4 new Blizzak snow tires LM25V, 205/ 50R1793V $100 each. GOLF CLUBS assorted, balls, new golf pull cart. 2 Pottery barn pink lamps & decorative shade $35. Picture, medium oak frame 3’x5’ of Botanical garden print $60. Girl’s bleached oak picture frame, young girl on bench, 11/1’x2’ $45. Assorted size Victorian hat boxes, pink, 6 total $3. each. 3 assorted sizes pottery floor jugs, vine & grape, motif $45. Girl’s 10 speed bile $50. IPOD radio/ alarm combo $30. 570-498-0977

GARAGE SALE LEFTOVER ITEMS

Fancy dining room, 8 chairs, hutch, table $400. Oak gun cabinet, holds 6 $50. Marcy weight machine, 205 lb. olympic weights $250. Weight bench 65 lb weights, preacher bar, dumbbells $50. Full size bed complete $150. Onkyo surround sound system, 7 speakers $50. Portable sump pumb. Best offers. 570-868-5311 POLICE SCANNER Radio Shack 200 channel, excellent condition. $75. Firm. 570-371-3367 RELIGIOUS ITEMS Hand made Rosaries, $5. Pope John Paul II Memoriblia. 570-829-2411

To place your ad call...829-7130 THE AVENGERS DVD ‘63 boxed set. 6 Classic Episodes with Patrick MacNee and Honor Blackman. $25 Rick 570-283-2552

TOASTER OVEN white, Hamilton Beach $10. 570-472-1646

TOASTER OVEN/ BREAD MAKER combination by Toastmaster, digital control, like new. Originally. $130. asking $35. 570-868-6327 TRAILER homemade construction trailer converts to boat trailer holds up to 1 ton $175. 570-825-3955 VACUUM Electrolux upright, like new, excellent condition $100. 822-9855 VACUUM portable Pronto 2 in 1 Electrolux with charger & stand $20. 570735-8730 or 570332-8094 WASHER: Whirlpool Duet front load washer. Whirlpool Duet front dryer. Both white, electric. Only 2 years old. Great condition. Water & Energy Saving. $275 Each or both for $550 . or best offer. Call 570-825-7867

To place your ad call...829-7130

762

Musical Instruments

BASS AMPLIFIER. Bass guitar amplifier, 15watts. very portable, barely even used $35. Casio piano keyboard. 76 keys, multiple sounds & tones, $140. Both excellent condition. 570-824-1114

766

Office Equipment

FILE CABINET desktop, 15”x18”, holds hanging folders,$15. 570-655-2154

766

Office Equipment

FILE CABINETS (3) $75 EACH. COPIER, fax, scanner (1) $25. 570-817-1094 PRINTER: Epson workforce 500 printer, new in box 5 features, print/ scan/copy/fax/phot. retail $89 will sell for $35. 819-4951

770

Photo Equipment

CAMERA Minolta XG-M 35 MM SLR with 50 MM F1.7 lens, owners manual, in original box, excellent condition in Wilkes-Barre $45. 607-565-1726 CAMERAS: Kodak Easy Share Camera with yellow case. 3x optical lens, silver, good condition, screen not scratched, takes 2 double A batteries. $25. Sony CyberShot camera. Pink, 7.2 pixels, good condition with battery charger $60. 570-592-1386 DIGITAL CAMERA HP Photosmart 7.2 MegaPixel w/2Gig Memory. Takes stills and video. Used item sold as is. $49 Call Rick 283-2552

772

Pools & Spas

BAQACIL CHEMICALS. 7 gallon Oxidizer, 11 half gal bottles Sanitizer/Algistat. Plains. Worth $450. Will sell for $225. Used ABOVE GROUND POOL, 24’ round, 4’ deep. YOU dismantle & remove. POOL ONLY. Pump/filter NOT available. Plains. New price $100. 823-2958 POOL 21’ round x 56” deep, new liner, new cover, new pump, new filter complete with deck. $975. or best offer. 570-328-6767 POOL LADDER for above ground swimming pool $25. 570-655-6465

772

Pools & Spas

776 Sporting Goods

784

POOL: above ground, 15ft round 4 years old. Hayward filter. $500. 570-592-3862

BIKES: NEXT 21 speed, girls mountain bike 24” $40. NEXT 20” BMX boys bike $40. Huffy 24” boys mountain bike $20. 12” Princess bike BMX $20. 570-829-0217

TOOLS: 2 tin snips, rubber mallet, clunk hammer, cold chisels, plumb bob, chalk lines, 4’ level, 10 & 12” wrenches, 16” metal files, bench mount vise, hammer, float, longhandle pick, axe, circular saw blades, pry bars, square & more $145. for all. 10” radial arm saw $95. 16” scroll saw $95. 5” bench mount grinder $30. 7 1/4 circular saw with laser, never used $45. 570-235-5216

VACUUM Hayward Ultra Pool vacuum. Used one season. New $ 500., asking $ 200. 388-6937

774

Restaurant Equipment

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT

SOMERSET TURN OVER MACHINE model SPM45, $500; ALSO, Bunn Pour Over Coffee Machine, Model # STF15, $225 For more info, call

570-498-3616

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT

Somerset Dough Sheeter, Model CAR-100. Only 1 available. $1,500 Call for more info

570-498-3616

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT

8x12 walk in cooler $2300; 8x8x10 walk in freezer $3800; Pizza oven with stones $2000; Stainless steel kitchen hood $3000; Stainless steel pizza oven hood $4000; bread pan rack $100; 2 soup warmers for $100; 2 door sandwich prep table $500. All equipment is sold as is. For more info, call

570-847-0873

776 Sporting Goods BASKETBALL HOOP; Great condition, asking $90. Call 570-331-8183 BIKE RACKS (2) for car trunks or SUV, Hatchbacks not for roofs or hitches. One holds 3-4 bikes $40. Other holds 23 bikes $25. BASKETBALL SYSTEM backboard, hoop, net, pole & stand $50. 570-235-5216

BOWLING BALL: Ebonite 8 lb. ball with case $25. Girl’s Vintage Schwinn bicycle $70. Sony trinitron 27” color tv $50., Mintekt DVD player $15. 570-829-4776 GOLF CLUBS Ram, 3 woods, 2-Hybrids, 7 irons, putter, bag $60. 570-655-4815 GOLF ITEMS: many items to choose from. Clubs, drivers, balls, hand coat and many more! $100 for all. Call 570-654-4793

778

Stereos/ Accessories

RECORD TURNTABLE Optimus Model Lab1000 semi-automatic belt drive. Little use. $25. cash. 570-868-6327

780

Televisions/ Accessories

TELEVISION: GE. 28” works good, needs remote $90. 570-740-1246 TELEVISIONS: 2 TV’s, color. 19” & 25”. 25” Polaroid works very well, with remote. $20. 609-433-5660 (Wilkes-Barre) TV 19” color with remote, very good $25. Call Bruce 570-655-4815

To place your ad call...829-7130 782

Tickets

TICKET, DMB Caravan at Balder Field, Atlantic City, NJ. June 24th thru June 26th, 2011. 1-ticket $195 (cost) re-entry for all three days. Must Sell. 570-817-6820

Tools

786 Toys & Games BICYCLE: Girl’s Huffy 12” BRAND NEW unassembled in box Cotton Candy blue, ages 3 & up includes training wheels $30. Radio Flyer The Inchworm, like new condition $25. Blue Water Table, no cover $10. 570-926-9016 TOY PONY, beautiful plays HI O SILVER cost $199 sacrifice $40. Overland Express battery operated train, 20 racks $25. Easel chalkboard $5. boys small bike $5. 570-675-3328 XBOX-360. Guitar hero guitar $10. XBOX 360 cordless racing wheel & pedals $20. 570-693-2612

788

Stereo/TV/ Electronics

STEREO SYSTEM. Sharp stereo system in sleek royal blue &d silver. Features a 5 disc CD changer & remote. Comes with 2 speakers & 1 subwoofer. $80. 570-824-1114

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 TV 25” color, remote, good condition. $20 570-472-1646

790

Swimming Pools/Hot Tubs

SWIMMING POOL: Intex Easy Set Swimming Pool 15’ X 42” used 1 season, in box, ladder, skimmer, pump, hoses, filter, cover, tarp, vacuum / poles, algaecide, cartridge, chlorine, PH, $25 firm. 570-709-1915

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

BUYING SPORT CARDS Pay Cash for

baseball, football, basketball, hockey & non-sports. Sets, singles & wax. 570-212-0398

800 PETS & ANIMALS 810

Cats

BEAGLE about 1 year old, black & white, brown face loveable, house trained, not neutered, named Oreo. FREE to good home includes about 1 week of food, kennel, toys & bones. 855-9475

To place your ad call...829-7130 CAT & KITTENS FREE! Homes urgently needed. They love people, animals & kids. Will transport. 570-299-7146 CAT FREE to good home, approximate 3 years old. Grey tiger stripe. 570-450-5647 Cats - Free to good home. Urgent. All colors - very loveable. Good with people & pets. (570) 460-3539 KITTENS FREE to good home, now 4 weeks, ready June 19. 4 females, 1 male. 570-814-7485

810

Cats

HIMALAYAN PERSIAN KITTENS Shots & Wormed Health guarantee Family raised. $450. (570) 922-1706

To place your ad call...829-7130 815

Dogs

PAWS TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130 Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website. DOG: Loving family dog, Frankie, is looking for a new home. 10 year old miniature doberman pincher. (Weighs about 15 lbs). Very friendly. Free to a good home. Call 570-899-1075


815

Dogs

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

HARVEY’S LAKE

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS

AKC shots, wormed www.mountain hauskennels.com

570-746-1689

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

timesleader.com

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS

AKC. Black & Tan Regular & long coat guardianangel shepherds2.com $900 each. Call 570-379-2419

ITALIAN CANE CORSO

Mastiff Puppies Registered and ready to go! Parents on premises. Blue & blue fawn. Vet Checked 570-617-4880

SHIH-TZU PUPPIES & POMERANIAN PUPPIES Parents on premises Shots Current. $500 - Poms $550 - Shih-Tzus 570-401-1838

YORKIE MALE PUPPY With papers. 4 3/4

months old. Very smart & loveable. Shots & warmed. No fleas. Hypoallergenic. Paper/Outside trained. A bundle of joy! $650. 570-436-5083

845

Pet Supplies

BIRD CAGES: small $10. Large $20. 570-288-4852 DOG CRATE, wire, with plastic bottom. tray 24”x18”. $30. Call 570-814-9574

Year Round Home! Spectacular View! Low Taxes!

906 Homes for Sale Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

BEAR CREEK VILLAGE 13 Hedge Road

ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D .

17 ONEONTA HILL FOR SALE BY OWNER

20 year old Contemporary in prime location. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, large kitchen, unfinished basement, hardwood floors 1st floor and attached 2 car garage. Total electric. $265,000 (570) 472-9660

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 DUPONT

Single family home for sale in quiet neighborhoodBeautiful 2400 Sq. Ft. with 6 bedroom, 2 full baths, 2 story home, fully air conditioned, oil & gas heat, renovated kitchen, full unfinished basement, 2 enclosed porches, 15 x 20 deck with power awning cover – generous size lot, off street parking, first floor washer & dryer. All appliances included.

JUST REDUCED $168,000

Call 570-421-0587 or Rodite@enter.net use “Dupont Home” in email subject line.

FORTY FORT Small ranch home. 2

bedroom, full basement, new roof. Large carport. Very low utility bills. 1 mile from Route 81. Asking $40,000. Call Nick 570-702-4077

Lots of off street parking, close to Grotto. Raised ranch with 2 car garage, 3 Bedrooms, 1 bath, living room, kitchen, large porch with lake view & bar. $142,500.

OPEN HOUSE COMING IN JUNE

Directions Left @ Grotto @ Stop sign make left, then quick right onto Oneonta Hill, 3rd House on right. CALL Dave @ 570-417-6661

HARVEYS LAKE Lovely lake living.

Welcome to the best of 2 worlds. #1: The amenities of lakefront properties - fishing, boating and a 2 story boat house (one of only 30 on the lake); #2: The serenity and privacy of tiered stone patios and lush gardens surrounding this classic 3,500 sq ft lake home perched high above Pole 306, Lakeside Drive. The views are spectacular from our 5 bedroom home with 2 stone fireplaces & hardwood floors throughout. Call for an appointment. We also welcome realtors. $799,000 570-639-2423

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! JENKINS TOWNSHIP

Highland Hills. 3 bedroom, 4 bath bilevel. Stainless kitchen with granite countertop. Porcelain tile and laminate throughout. Heated inground pool. Economical heating. $219,900 Call 570-655-8034

MOUNTAINTOP 2982 Blytheburn Rd

OLDER SINGLE HOME FOR SALE BY OWNER 4 bedrooms, over sized living room with fireplace and large picture windows, large finished attic, 1.5 baths, on a 3/4 acre lot, 2 car detached garage & wrap around driveway. Walking distance to lake, golf course close by, 30 minutes to Poconos and easy access to Route 80 & 309. $149,900 Call (570) 371-1492

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

PARDEESVILLE

738 PARDEESVILLE RD CORNER LOT

906 Homes for Sale

WILKES-BARRE Affordable 20-year no-interest mortgage. Must meet Wyoming Valley Habitat for Humanity eligibility requirements. Inquire at 570-820-8002

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 909

Income & Commercial Properties

PITTSTON

5 UNIT MULTI FAMILY 2 Buildings. 4 Car garage. Prime location with over 6,000 sf. 3 New furnaces in last 2 years. New roof in ‘08. Separate utilities. Close to churches, parks & town. Fully rented gross income over $25,000!! $169,000 OBO 570-563-1261

NICELY PRICED $219,900 (570) 233-1993

SWOYERSVILLE

Immaculate 2 story, stone & vinyl. Large lot on cul-de-sac. 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths. Detached oversized 2 car garage with loft. Tile, hardwood, granite, central air. laundry/pantry & large family room with built in bar & fireplace on 1st floor. $276,900. 570-288-3256 570-406-2462

ABSOLUTE NY FARMLAND SALE!

June 4th! 5 to 14 acre parcels - opening price $24,900! Less than 3 hrs NY City! No closing costs! Prime buildable acreage! Call 888-481-1373 NOW for free info!

JENKINS TOWNSHIP

New Section in Highland Hills, Charles Place Open! Four 1+ acre lots available. Call 570-498-9244

NY FARM LIQUIDATION SALE! June 4!

Lender Owned Land/Farm Buildings - $69,900! Less than 3 hrs NY City. Gorgeous setting, views, stonewalls! FREE CLOSING COSTS! 888-793-7762 for free info packet! www.NewYork LandandLakes.com

915 Manufactured Homes

ASHLEY PARK

Laurel Run & San Souci Parks, Like new, several to choose from, Financing &Warranty, facebook.com/ MobileOne.Sales Call (570)250-2890

Apartments/ Unfurnished

KINGSTON

Newly built 3 bedroom home.

912 Lots & Acreage Single family built in 2005. 2.5 baths, two story with attached garage. Oil furnace with central air. 90 x 140 corner lot. Kitchen with center cooking island, dining room, raised ceiling with glass door entry & hardwood floor. Carpeting thru out home. Tiled kitchen and bath. Kitchen appliances included.

941

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

AVOCA

3 rooms, wall to wall carpeting, appliances, coin-op laundry, off street parking, security. No pets. $410/month (570) 655-1606

72 E. W alnut St. 2nd floor, located in quiet neighborhood. Kitchen, living room, dining room, sun room, bathroom. 2 large and 1 small bedrooms, lots of closets, built in linen, built in hutch, hardwood and carpeted floors, fireplace, storage room, yard, w/d hookup and new stove. Heat and hot water incl. Available May 1. 1 yr. lease + security $900/month 570-406-1411

KINGSTON BEAR CREEK

New furnished 3 room apartment Includes water, septic & most of the heat. No smoking & no pets. $750/ month. + security, references. Could be unfurnished. Call (570) 954-1200

To place your ad call...829-7130 AMERICA REALTY

QUALITY COLONIAL FORTY FORT -

FIRST FLOOR DUPLEX. UNIQUE $595 + UTILITIES. Cook’s kitchen with built-ins, formal dining room, front/rear enclosed porches, custom window coverings. TWO YEAR SAME RENT, NO PETS/SMOKING/EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION Managed

AMERICA REALTY 570-288-1422

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

3029 South Main St Very large 1st floor,

Bring Rover or Kitty & move right into your choice of a 1 or 2 bedroom apt. Off street parking, coin laundry, great location. $450$600/mo + security, heat & electric. Call 570-262-1577

KINGSTON

E.Light, WALNUT ST. bright, 1st

floor, 2 bedrooms, elevator, carpeted, Security system. Garage. Extra storage & cable TV included. Laundry facilities. Heat & hot water furnished. Fine neighborhood. Convenient to bus & stores. No pets. References. Security. Lease. No smokers please. $840. 570-287-0900

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 KINGSTON

3 bedrooms, wall to wall carpet, central air, eat in kitchen with appliances. Off street parking. Washer /dryer hookup. Heat & cooking gas included. Tenant pays electric & water. $750 + security. No Pets. Call 570-814-1356

Rutter Ave. 1 bedroom 1st floor, large living room, neutral decor. Gas heat, water included. Off street parking. No pets. $420 plus security & lease. 570-793-6294

HARVEY’S LAKE

No pets. Rents based on income start at $405 & $440. Handicap Accessible. Equal Housing Opportunity. Call 570-474-5010 TTY711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Recently remodeled 2 bedroom, 2 bath. 1st floor. Laundry hookup. Off-street parking. Available now. $625. References & security. 570-793-9072

KINGSTON

EATON TERRACE

317 N. Maple Ave. Large Two story, 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, Central Heat & Air,washer/dryer in unit, parking. $830 + utilities & 1 month security 570-262-6947

MOUNTAIN TOP WOODBRYN 1 & 2 Bedroom.

OLD FORGE

4 rooms. Second floor. Heat and sewer included. Security and references required. $635/month Call (570) 457-7854

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

NANTICOKE

2 bedroom, 2nd floor spacious apartment. Electric range, refrigerator, garbage fee, water & sewer included. Laundry room on premises. Off street parking. Private entrance & back porch. Gas heat & hot water. No dogs. Lease & 1 month security required. $500 / month + gas & electric. Call 570-696-3596

NANTICOKE

Deluxe 1 bedroom, 2nd floor apartment. Large bedroom & living areas, wall to wall carpet. Includes all appliances + washer / dryer. All electric. Must see. $425 + utilities, first/ last. No pets. 570-735-0525

PITTSTON

Efficiency apartment - bedroom, bath & kitchen. No pets. Available 6/15. $425/month + 1 month security. Call 570-655-3314

WILKES-BARRE

1 bedroom apartment. $375/ month + utilities & 1 month security. 139 Sambourne Street. Section 8 okay. No pets. 570-460-6173

WILKES-BARRE NORTH

9 E. Chestnut St. 1 bedroom, wall /wall carpet, fresh paint. Eat-in kitchen, stove & fridge included. Front porch & shared backyard. Heat & hot water included. Tenant pays electric & cooking gas. $500/month + security. Call (570)814-1356

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH SECURE BUILDINGS

1 & 2 bedroom apartments. Laundry facility. Off street parking available. Starting at $440. 570-332-5723

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

WILKES-BARRE

West River St. Large 2, 3, & 4 bedroom apartments. Heat & hot water included. Balcony. Off street parking. Washer dyer hookup. Pets OK. $855 - $950. Call 570-237-0124


Apartments/ Unfurnished

944

Commercial Properties

950

Half Doubles

PLAINS

WILKES-BARRE West River Street

Several 1 bedroom apartments available. Hardwood flooring & appliances included. Heat, water, sewer & trash also included. Walking distance to Wilkes University. Pet Friendly. Available June 1. Starting at $600. 570-969-9268

944

Commercial Properties

Center City WB

AFRAID TO MOVE?

Are you paying too much for your current office, but dread the inconvenience of moving? We can help! We not only offer less expensive rent, but we will also help you move to our modern office space in the Luzerne Bank Building on Public Square. Rents include heat, central air, utilities, trash removal, and nightly cleaning - all without a sneaky CAM charge. Access parking at the the intermodal garage via our covered bridge. 300SF to 5000SF available. We can remodel to suit. Brokers protected. Call Jeff Pyros at 570-822-8577

DOLPHIN PLAZA

Rte. 315 2,000 SF Office / Retail Next to Gymboree 4,500 SF Office Showroom, Warehouse Loading Dock 4 Acres touching I81 will build to suit. Call 570-829-1206

COMMERCIAL SPACE KINGSTON FOR RENT

620 Market St. Newly Renovated Prime Space. 1,250 sq. ft., Near Kingston Corners. Great location for retail or business office. Easy Access and parking. Call Cliff 570-760-3427

To place your ad call...829-7130 WAREHOUSE

WILKES-BARRE/ PLAINS TWP LAIRD STREET COMPLEX, easy interstate access. Lease 132,500 s.,f., 12 loading docks, 30 ft ceilings, sprinkler, acres of parking. Offices available. call 570-655-9732

953 Houses for Rent SINGLE HOME COMPLETELY REMODELED

NANTICOKE

OFFICE FOR LEASE

GREAT LOCATION

414 Front Street available immediately, 1800 square feet, Move in condition. New carpeting. Reception area, conference room, kitchen, and 3 offices, Located on main street in Hanover Section, off-street parking, forced air furnace, central air, or $950/per month Call 570-760-3551 to set an appointment

950

Half Doubles

PLYMOUTH

Nice location. Large 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, lots of storage. Sewer included. $575/mo. 1st & last. Call 570-332-8922

953 Houses for Rent

ASHLEY

“The Patch” 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths. Large private yard. Off street parking, quiet neighborhood, no pets. Washer / dryer hookup. $850 / month + utilities & references. Available Immediately. 978-771-5012

JENKINS 3 bedroom 1/2 dou-

ble, gas heat, washer & dryer included, off-street parking, $700/per month, plus security. Call (570) 299-7103

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

KINGSTON

3 bedrooms, living room, dining room, kitchen, washer/ dryer hook up. No pets, no smoking. Fenced yard & offstreet parking. Excellent location, $700 + utilities, lease & security. Available June 1st 570-283-1180

LARKSVILLE

3 bedroom, 1 bath half double, Freshly cleaned & painted. Tenant pays all utilities including sewer. $550 plus security. Call (570) 332-5723

NANTICOKE

BENTON Charming country

farm house. 3 bedroom, 2 bath on 4.3 acres. Newly remodeled. Full basement and attic. Large barn and out buildings. Horses welcome. $950/month 904-673-6944

AMERICA

REALTY RENTALS BEAUTIFUL HOMES FOR RENT, CHECK AVAILABILITY. ALL NO PETS OR SMOKING. 2 YEAR LEASES, SAME RENT. EMPLOYMENT/APPLICATION REQUIRED, STARTING AT $850 + UTILITIES & UP. 570-288-1422

MOCONAQUA

3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, with partially finished basement & 1-car garage. Ready Now, $795/per month, $750/security deposit. Call (570)441-1132

55 Loomis St 3 bedroom, wall to wall carpet, full basement & attic. Stove, fridge & water & garbage included. No pets. $630+ security 570-814-1356

NANTICOKE

West Green Street, 3 bedroom, semi modern kitchen and bath, w/w carpet, washer/dryer hookup, basement, yard, gas heat. No Pets. $525/month + utilities, security & lease Call 570-256-3461

NANTICOKE Desirable

Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms 2 Free Months With A 2 Year Lease $795 + electric

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

River St. New roof, siding, gutters, windows, kitchen, hardwood floors on first floor, finished basement, laundry facilities, off street parking, single garage. 3 bedrooms, full bath first floor, 1/2 bath second floor. Security deposit required. No Pets. 570-498-8588

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

HARVEY’S LAKE

Lake front apartment & home for rent. Furnished. Weekly rentals. 570-639-5041 for details. ORANGE

HICKORY GROVE CAMPGROUND

Camp sites available! Shaded. Showers, flush toilets, water & electric. Lake fishing, canoeing, biking & golf. 20 minutes from Wilkes-Barre. 570-639-5478 or 570-371-9770

To place your ad call...829-7130

Painting & Wallpaper

A.B.C. Professional Painting 36 Yrs Experience We Specialize In New Construction Residential Repaints Comm./Industrial All Insurance Claims Apartments Interior/Exterior Spray,Brush, Rolls WallpaperRemoval Cabinet Refinishing Drywall/Finishing Power Washing Deck Specialist Handy Man FREE ESTIMATES Larry Neer 570-606-9638

Selling Your Car? We’ll run your ad until the vehicle iss sold.

Call Classified fied 829-71300

Over 47,000 Collect people cite the

The Times Leader as their primary source for shopping information. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today?

Cash. Not Dust.

Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE

Immediate Occupancy!!

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS 61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701

• Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; laundry on site; • Activities! • Curb side Public Transportation

Please call 570-825-8594 TDD/TTY 800-654-5984

NEWPORT TWP. PRIME APARTMENTS STILL AVAILABLE!

ST. STANISLAUS APARTMENTS 141 Old Newport Rd., Newport Twp.

Affordable, Accessible 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments Income Eligibility* Required. Rents: $455-$656 plus electric

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY

(*Maximum Incomes vary according to household size)

1057Construction & Building

GARAGE DOOR

Sales, service, installation & repair. FULLY INSURED HIC# 065008 CALL JOE (570)606-7489 (570)735-8551

1129 Gutter Repair & Cleaning

GUTTER 2 GO, INC.

PA#067136- Fully Licensed & Insured. We install custom seamless rain gutters & leaf protection systems. CALL US TODAY ABOUT OUR 10% OFF WHOLE HOUSE DISCOUNT! 570-561-2328

WILKES-BARRE NORTHEAST FLOORING SYSTEMS, INC MONARCH RENTALS Installing 3 bedrooms,

all appliances provided. Call 570-822-7039

1204

& Refinishing Hardwood floors. We install laminate flooring too! 570-561-2079

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

Call 829-7130 to place an ad.

ONLY ONL NL N L ONE LY N L LEA LE LEADER. E DER D .

ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

timesleader.com

944

Commercial Properties

944

Commercial Properties

WILKES-BARRE

PROVINCIAL TOWER - S. MAIN Great Commercial Store Front, & Inside Suites Available Steps from New Intermodal Hub & Public Parking

Starting at $650

utilities included FREE RENT - Call For Details Today!

570-829-1573

• High Efficiency Heat/Air Conditioning • Newer Appliances • Laundry Rooms • Community Room • Private Parking • Rent Includes Water, Sewer & Refuse For more info or to apply, please call: 570-733-2010 TDD: 800-654-5984 Great, Convenient Location!

Apply Today!

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

289932

941

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

BLACK LAKE, NY NEED A VACATION?

Come relax and enjoy great fishing & tranquility at it’s finest. Housekeeping cottages on the water with all the amenities of home. (315) 375-8962 www.blacklake4fish.com daveroll@blacklakemarine.com


K E N

P OL L OCK

N IS S A N

O P EN M EM O R IA L D AY 9 A M TO 2 P M

S C AN H ERE FO R S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S

TH E NU M BER 1 NI S S AN D EAL ER I N TH E NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGI O N

W E’VE G O T TH E IN VEN TO R Y W E’VE G O T TH E D EAL S

T H E

A N D

**

2011 2 0 11 N NISSAN ISSAN A ALTIMA LT I M A 2 2.5 .5 S SDN DN S SPECIAL PECIAL E EDITION DITION P ER M

M O.

$0 D ow n L e a s e

S TK # N 20139 O D EL# 13111

16 S p e c ia l Ed itio n s A va ila b le !

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, AM / F M / CD , Allo ys , F o g L ight s , S p o iler , All Po w er , F lo o r M a t s & S p la s h G u a rd s !

M

B

SR P

$

T E N T S

U

Y

$ 4 5 0 0 O FF A L L N EW A LTIM A ’S IN S TO C K

$23,890

FO R

2 0 ,79 5

*

$

OR

L EA S

E FO R

239

P ER M O.

*

w / $1250 R ebate or $500 N M A C C as h + TA X & 0% + 60 m os i n l i eu of rebate *39 M o n t h L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $13,617; M u s tb e a p p ro ved t hru N M AC @ T ier 1; $0 ca s h d o w n o r t ra d e eq u it y & regis t ra t io n f ees . $0 L ea s e Reb a t e in clu d ed . $470 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n t h p ym ta n d regis t ra t io n f ees . S a le p rice p lu s t a x& t a gs in clu d es $1250 reb a t e.

** SV 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN F FRONTIER RONTIER V 4X4 4X4 CREW CREW CAB CAB P ER S

** 2011 2 0 11 N NISSAN I S S A N MAXIMA MAXIM 3 . 5 S SEDAN SEDAN P ER A 3.5S S TK # N 19810 M O D EL# 16111 V6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PD L , Allo S ea t, F lo o r M S p la s h Gu a rd

5 M a xim a s @ Th is P ric e !

M O.

$0 D ow n Le a s e

B U Y

M SR P $29,595

FO R

2 7,9 9 5

*

$

OR

w / $1000 R ebate

L EA S E FO R

30 9

B U Y

*P

ER M O.

+

$

TA X

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN R ROGUE OGU SV V w/ w/ SL SL PKG PKG P ERE S

M O.

$0 D ow n Le a s e

15 S L R ogu e s Ava ila b le !

4 Cyl, CVT , L ea ther, Na viga tio n , Ba ck-Up Ca m era , Bo s e S o u n d , Allo ys , S p la s h Gu a rd s & F lo o rM a ts !!

A R E

$

2 6 ,8 9 5

*

$

OR

w / $500 N M A C C as h & 2.9% For 60 M os !

L EA S E FO R

349

2 4 ,6 9 5

NO M O NEY DO W N L EAS ING

DEAL ER! TO P $$$ FO R YO UR TRADE

*P

ER M O.

+

TA X

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN I S S AN CUBE C 1.8 S SL L P ER U B E 1.8 $0 D ow n Le a s e

STK# N 20295 M O D EL# 21211

M O.

U P

$

19 ,4 9 5

P ER M O.

+

TA X

M O.

$0 D ow n Le a s e

25 M u ra n o s Ava ila b le

M SR P $31,540 B U Y FO R

2 7,9 9 5

*

OR

$

L EA S E FO R

349

$

*

P ER M O.

+

TA X

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $17,347; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $750 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $621.00 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d ta g fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $500 Bo n u s Ca s h.

B U

$0 D ow n Le a s e

Y

M O.

FO R

2 5 ,4 9 5 w / $2000 R ebate

*S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $2000 Reb a te.

*S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $0 reb a te.

*

w / $500 R ebate or G et 1.9% + 60 m os or 2.9% + 72 m os in lieu of rebate

M SR P $29,320 FO R

*

V6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

V6, Au to , Va lu e Pkg, A/ C, AM / F M / CD, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & Ca rgo Co ver!

Y

329

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN MURANO MUR “S” AWD AWD P ERANO “S”

STK# N 20189 M O D EL# 24011

M SR P $20,940 U

L EA S E FO R

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN X X-TERRA -T 4X4 X4 P ER ERRA S 4

6 Cu b e s Ava ila b le !

4 CY L , CVT , Allo ys , Preferred Pkg, Na viga tio n , In terio rDes ign , Ba ck-Up Ca m era , All Po w er F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

B

$

OR

STK# N 19771 M O D EL# 23211

$

0% APR AVAIL ABL E**

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $16,629; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $1,000 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $623 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s t m o n th p ym t& ta g fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $500 NM AC Ca s h.

*

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $17,461; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $0 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $562.00 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d ta g fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs In clu d es $3000 Reb a te & $500 Bo n u s Ca s h.

YO UR

M SR P $29,695 B U Y FO R

FO R

inc ludes $3000 R ebate

*39 M o n t h L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $18,826; M u s tb e a p p ro ved t hru N M AC @ T ier 1; $0 ca s h d o w n o r t ra d e eq u it y & regis t ra t io n f ees . $1,000 L ea s e Reb a t e in clu d ed . $581.00 d u e a t d elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n t h p ym ta n d t a g f ees . S a le p rice p lu s t a x& t a gs in clu d es $1000 reb a t e.

STK# N 20275 M O D EL# 22411

10 Fro n tie rs A va ila b le !

V6, Au to , Prem iu m Utility Pkg, PW , PD L , AM / F M / CD , Cru is e, T ilt, Allo y W heels , F lo o r M a ts !

S u n ro o f, ys , Pw r a ts & s !

M SR P $31,910

$

M O.

$0 D ow n Le a s e

S TK # N 20364 M O D EL# 32411

P R I C E S

6 X - Te rra s Ava ila b le

*

A R E D O W N

*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d it io na l. Pr io rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gr a phic a l Er r o r s . A ll Lea s es 12 k M iles PerYea rw / 1s tpa ym ent , t a gs & fees d u e a td elivery. A ll r eb a t es & inc ent ives a pplied . **0 % A PR in lieu o f r eb a t es . As k fo rd et a ils . ***$5 0 0 N M AC C a pt ive C a s h, $5 0 0 C u s t o m erC a s h. M u s tfina nc e t hr u N M AC . O ffer s end M a y 3 1, 2 0 11.

Th

K

e

N

#1 N

E N

is s a

n

De

a

le

rin

P O L L O CK

IS

S

A

N

N

.E.

PA

1- 8 6 6 - 70 4 - 0 6 72

229 M U N DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

w w w .ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om

Go Lackawanna 05-29-2011  

Go Lackawanna 05-29