Page 1


2

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011 ON THE COVER: JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

3 NEWS

J. MICHAEL SCHIRRA PHOTO/ FOR GO LACKAWANNA

NEWS

Page 4-5 – Commissioner candidates debate

North Pocono’s Mo Bruckner and Valley View’s Tyler Chesko share a laugh after a grueling tiebreaker in the pole vault on Monday. STORY: Page 35

Page 6 – Nearbid.com opens for business Page 9 – bin Laden’s death a turning point Page 10– Plato’s Closet location opening Page 15 – Duffy introduces West Side precinct

16 ARTS Page 16 – CLICK: Ted Leo rocks Vintage Theater Page 18 – Scranton native funding album online Page 20– A trip down Highway 81

35 SPORTS Page 35– Track titles intact Page 36– Rally too little to push NP past Redeemer Page 38– College roundup Page 39 – AH grad expected to play big role in ’12

ARTS

OUR TEAM GO Lackawanna Editor Christopher J. Hughes -558-0113 chughes@golackawanna.com Reporter/Photographer Rich Howells — 558-0843 rhowells@golackawanna.com General Manager Paul Andrews - 558-0845 pandrews@golackawanna.com

Obituaries — 558-0113 News Tips — 558-0113 news@golackawanna.com Missed Paper — 829-5000 Classified — 1-800-273-7130 Advertising — 829-7101 Subscriptions — 1-800-252-5603 Hours — 9a.m. – 6p.m. 210 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton

SPORTS

Family’s bookworm gets recognition Thursdays are often quiet at our house. The middle of the week has passed, and the weekend is fast approaching. But this Thursday was different. We took a little time to recognize something that isn’t really celebrated that often anymore: the reading skills of children. I’m proud to start this gloating session by reporting that my daughter, Taryn, was chosen as the top reader from her grade level at Frances Willard Elementary School. You may recognize her name, and those of her more than 20 classmates from a photo spread in the pages of Go a few weeks ago about baby chicks in her classroom.

BEHIND THE BYLINES CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES When we learned last month that she was selected to participate in the district’s oral reading contest, my wife and I were thrilled, then slightly horrified. Our daughter is dramatic. That’s being polite. Paper cuts are apparently suffered through swings of axe blades in our house, as they usually come with a steady stream of tears as Taryn flies up the steps to get a bandage. Her speed and often unsteady coordination usually leads to another bump or bruise on the steps in her haste. It’s an all-too-familiar scene.

In addition, she’s often combative with her little brother. That’s no surprise to any sibling, younger or older, but some days are worse than others. The thought of Taryn competing in and not winning a competition frightened my wife and I to the core. Would she burst into tears? Would she run flying out of the doors of the elementary school and be hit by a bus picking up preschool students? Would she spontaneously combust from the pressure? Anything was possible. Throughout the week, we assured Taryn that just going to the contest was an honor. Win or lose, she was still the best reader from her grade at Willard, and that was nothing to be ashamed of. She drew the always dreaded number 13 as her turn in the

contest but luckily isn’t superstitious enough to worry about numbers. One by one, the 12 students ahead of her had their turn. I, meanwhile, was busy escorting our son, John, through the halls of John G. Whittier Elementary so he didn’t disturb the other readers. A wise but tiring choice. Taryn’s turn came. John, in true brotherly fashion, was boisterous during her recitation of a story on what snowmen do at night, but she was not phased. In the end, she didn’t bring home a trophy, but we also didn’t drag a sobbing mess of 7-year-old drama queen to the car. So everybody won. Including her classmates who asked for her autograph at lunch.

Christopher J. Hughes keeps his daughter’s autographed artwork at the office. E-mail him at chughes@golackawanna.com.

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2011-128 Advertising

Newsroom

829-7293 829-7242 kpelleschi@timesleader.com jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

Circulation

Jim McCabe – 829-5000 jmccabe@timesleader.com

Published weekly by: Wilkes-Barre Publishing Company 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA Postmaster: Send address changes to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Delivery Sunday 75¢ per week Mailed Subscriptions Sunday $1.00 per week in PA $3.05 per week outside PA


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

3

SORRY STATE AT WASHBURN CEMETERY

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

ABOVE: A pile of decorations cleaned from graves lies inside the Washburn Street Cemetery. BELOW: The grave of Hugh Rodham, father of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, is among those of historical significance.

“It’s disgusting. People have their loved ones here and there hasn’t been proper care of this cemetery for what seems like decades in some sections. I saw at least 100 headstones that are tipped over, trees and bushes growing out of graves, branches laying every-

See CEMETERY, Page 12

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

Mary Ann Moran-Savakinus, director the Lackawanna County Historical Society, said that the Washburn Street Cemetery contains more history that just Hugh Rodham, father of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. “Any time somebody cleans up the cemetery, that’s good for history, but the cemetery isn’t just significant because of the Rodhams. The Avondale Mine disaster victims were buried there in 1869,” Moran-Savakinus said. “The Clintons are great because they bring the attention, but the whole cemetery has a lot more history to tell – the location of it, the Welsh ancestry, and the miners bur-

ARTS

SCRANTON - Toppled, crooked, and broken tombstones. Graves sunk into the ground so far that they can no longer be identified. A towering dead tree that slowly splintering onto the ground below. Piles of old tires, mattresses, shingles, lawn care equipment, and Christmas decorations dumped in a heap. When Scranton City Council Vice President Pat Rogan assessed the Washburn Street Cemetery for himself on Thursday afternoon, he found its condition even worse than what neighbors had described. For months, Rogan said he has received complaints from dozens of citizens asking that something be done about the condition of the almost 150 year old cemetery, but after letters to the owner and the city’s department of Licensing, Inspections, and Permits went without a response, he decided to see the alleged years of neglect for himself.

where, huge sections of overgrown grass, and you can see in back that it’s a big party area for kids. It’s just a mess,” Rogan said. A wooded area in the back corner of the cemetery, littered with beer cans and garbage, has crept into the graveyard itself, engulfing graves with weeds and poison ivy. A dumping ground lies next to this area, filled with shingles, concrete slabs, and Christmas decorations cleaned from the graves. On the opposite end, a pile of used mattresses sits next to a shack with a fence that surrounds tires, broken vacuums, riding mowers, and more. There are no front gates, and holes can be seen throughout the surrounding fences. Only a few links of a broken chain to block the entranceway at night remain, leaving the cemetery open at all hours. Six vehicles are consistently parked near the entrance, but no em-

Cemetery has historical, personal significance

NEWS

Neighbors say years of neglect have plagued the final resting place

See HISTORY, Page 12

SPORTS


4

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011

NEWS

LACKAWANNA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS DEBATES

ARTS

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Democrats seeking the office of Lackawanna County Commissioner are, from left, Jeanette Acciare-Mariani, Tox Fox, Brian Jeffers, Tom McHugh, Corey O’Brien, Elizabeth Randol, and Jim Wansacz.

Dems paint dire picture of finances

Seven candidates agree: County is broke

SPORTS

S

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

CRANTON – The seven Democrats vying for the office of Lackawanna County Commissioner met Wednesday for a debate presented by the League of Women Voters of Lackawanna County. Moderated by LWV President Andrea Mulrine, the round-robin question-and-answer session allowed between one- and two-minute responses on topics like social services, fiscal stability, promises to voters and more.

Each candidate expressed their concerns over the county’s fiscal health while the only sitting commissioner in the race made it clear that the county is out of cash and some proposed financial plans are nothing but misinformation. “Anybody up here who says they’re going to lower taxes is either lying to you or they’re absolutely clueless. Taxes are not going down in Lackawanna Coun-

ty anytime soon,” Commissioner Corey O’Brien, of Moosic, said, as he blamed the “crippled” finances on debt that more than doubled during the Robert Cordaro-A.J. Munchak administration. O’Brien is running in the primary with Blakely Mayor Jeanette Acciare-Mariani, of Peckville. Former State Rep. Jim Wansacz, of Old Forge, and Scranton

School Director Brian Jeffers, of Scranton, the endorsed candidates in the race, have built a campaign on job creation as the primary way to inject new revenue into the county. “We have empty warehousing in Covington and Dunmore. We can bring in more jobs. We’re going to have to do it through tax incentives and grant programs,” Jeffers said. Both Jeffers and Scranton resident Elizabeth Randol, the former county chief of staff and policy director for the Pennsylvania Treasury, criticized the current administration for filling budget gaps with the sale of county assets. “We currently are carrying a $5.1 million structural deficit that this year was plugged with the $2.1 million in revenue from the sale of the nursing home,” Randol said of the one-time revenue solutions. “Clearly, we’re all in agreement that the coun-

IMPORTANT DATES Friday, May 13, is the last day for the county’s Board of Elective to receive voted civilian absentee ballots. Tuesday, May 17, is the municipal primary election.

ty’s budget and the fiscal stability of the county is in serious jeopardy.” On reassessment, Pennsylvania State Cooperative Extension Educator Tom McHugh, of South Abington Township, cited the “wildly fluctuating” assessments that were completed in Luzerne County as a reason to cautiously approach the effort. Wansacz and Jeffers said something should be done to complete the process after it has “gone nowhere” after $5 million was spent to start it. Saying the issue is not unique to Lackawanna County, Wansacz suggested that “the answer (to reassessment) has got to come from the state government.” O’Brien agreed, saying that

the more than $8 million needed to complete the process is not in the county’s coffers. Foxko Real Estate co-owner Tom Fox, of South Abington Township, said, “I worry about the elderly, and I worry about those on fixed income. I think we can come up with an abatement on their taxes until the house is sold or transferred.” McHugh said he would work with the County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania to seek a moratorium on Marcellus Shale drilling for natural gas in the county. Wansacz and Jeffers hope funds from a proposed impact fee could be used to train conservation officers to protect the county’s watersheds. “We have to learn our lesson from the coal days and the Industrial Revolution or we’re bound to repeat those same mistakes,” O’Brien said of the scars that anthracite coal mining left on the region’s landscape. Fox said he outright opposes shale drilling. “If we can’t stop it, it should be heavily regulated,” he said.


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

GOP candidates clarify previous positions By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – Two candidates for the office of commissioner were quick to dismiss what they felt was an ill-conceived connection between their record of service and a pair of former majority commissioners at a League of Women Voters of Lackawanna County debate on Thursday.

William T. Jones II, South Abington Township resident and auditor, mentioned perceived ties between opposing candidates Patrick O’Malley and Bruce Smallacombe and the former administration headed by Robert Cordaro and A.J. Munchak in answers to several questions. In closing remarks following an hour-long debate, both

Chicken BBQ aids Taylor fire department Taylor Fire Department, Ladder Company 95, will host its semi-annual chicken barbecue on Saturday, May 14, from noon to 5 p.m. The dinner is $8 per person and will be held in the fire company hall, 614 Union St., Taylor. Tickets will be available at the door and can also be obtained by either calling John Tigue (570) 878-1466 or another member of Ladder 95.

Other menus items include homemade baked beans, potato salad, dessert and beverages. The department will display Ladder 95, Brush 95, Tanker 95, and Command 95. Residents and children are encouraged to explore them during the BBQ. In addition, Ladder 95 will be selling $10 and $15 T-shirts and $5 mugs at the door. Scholarship announced Two $250 scholarships are being offered by Buona Pizza. Anyone who has graduated high school is eligible. Interested parties should send a letter

met Mr. Cordaro once.” “I worked for three administrations. I’ve been through three sets of majority commissioners,” said O’Malley, a banquet manager for Fiorelli’s, Scranton School Board vice president, and former corrections officer. That clarification aside, each See GOP, Page 7

or resume to Buona Pizza, 504 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton, Pa., 18503. Call (570) 342-4032 for more details. Scranton Tomorrow sets ‘City Pride’ events The city’s non-profit economic development group has set a variety of events for this week in honor of its “Main Steet City Pride” project, which encourages business beautification initatives. From May 9 to 16, Mulberry Bush will offer a 15 percent discount to businesses in the Main Street footprint. On May 11, from 4 to 8 p.m., The Col-

onnade, 401 Jefferson Ave., Scranton, will host a gold recycling fundraiser co-sponsored by Pennstar Bank. A portion of the total cash paid supports the programs of Scranton Tomorrow. A $10 donation is requested. On May 14, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Fidelity Deposit and Discount Bank, 338 N. Washington Ave., Scranton, in conjunction with EarthBox will host an EarthBox program for children and families. The event includes flower planting, face painting, sidewalk art, and more. For more information on these programs, call (570) 963-5901.

SPORTS

COMMUNITY BRIEFS

aimed to clear the air. “I was hired because during the flood of 2003, we had a massive flood. I dredged the creek from the Lackawanna River to the top of the borough,” Smallacombe, the three-term mayor of Jermyn and former director of the county’s Roads and Bridges Department said. “I did not know Mr. Munchak before I was hired, and I had only

ARTS

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Republicans William T. Jones II, Patrick O’Malley and Bruce Smallacombe met Thursday for a League of Women Voters debate.

DUNMORE – A 20-year-old man faces charges after allegedly punching and hitting a Scranton woman with a baseball bat and attempting to choke her on May 3. Stevin Alin Ermil, of Farber Ct., Dunmore, faces three counts of simple assault, two counts of aggravated assault and one count each of reckless endangerment and unlawful restraint for the alleged incident. According to an affidavit: Scranton police responded to a reported assault on Pittston Avenue at 11:30 p.m., but later determined that the assault occurred at Ermil’s Dunmore home where he had already been detained. In an interview with Dunmore Police Capt. William Springer, police learned that Ermil and the victim, Mindy Jo Felker, allegedly got into an argument “over her cheating on him and lying about it.” Ermil said he “lost control of himself and the arguement (sic) turned violent.” He told police he hit her in the side and back with an aluminum baseball bat, punched her in the back of the head several times and tried to suffocate her by covering her nose and mouth with his hands. Ermil was arraigned May 3 and held for $20,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for May 10.

NEWS

Woman choked, beaten with baseball bat

LACKAWANNA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS DEBATES

5


6

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011

ARTS

NEWS

Social networking meets e-commerce in new site

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Ted Brunelle, Nearbid.com’s chief technology officer, and CEO Alex Brunelle discuss the site’s launch and the importance of local e-commerce on Thursday morning.

A new bid to stimulate local biz

SPORTS

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – Deemed a “social commerce” Web site by its creators, Scranton residents Alex, 27, and Ted Brunelle, 32, publicly unveiled their new business, Nearbid.com, on Thursday morning. The auction marketplace, which is currently in beta, will facilitate the creation of jobs in northeastern Pennsylvania, according to Chief Technology Officer Ted Brunelle. “We are to the services marketplace what eBay is to the products marketplace,” he said. The site offers registered users the ability to post “jobs” and seek competitive bids from local business owners to have their work completed, from music lessons to

car repairs. Jobs are targeted by category including travel, legal services and entertainment that are broken into subcategories to consolidate searches and results. Users need a free account to post a new job but not to search for existing work. They can post text and photos or use an internal messaging service to connect with prospective bidders about their job. “It doesn’t cost a penny to bid, it doesn’t cost a penny to post,” Chief Executive Officer Alex Brunelle said. “It’s the responsibility of the buyer and the seller… to interact and have their transaction completed. Our fees are zero.” The owners plan to earn revenue through advertising.

Alex Brunelle said programmers Neil Opet, Craig Simko and Amandeep Chorpa put in thousands of hours to make the site a success. “I owe the credit of the functionality of the system to them.” The site, the Brunelles said, was born out of needs that they encountered as business and rental property owners. “We had a problem, and there was no service to fulfill our requirements. This is built through the mother of necessity,” Ted Brunelle said. The brothers hope to have one million local “jobs” created before Dec. 31, 2012. “We think it’s going to be very successful, and it’s going to be a paradigm in the marketplace of

creating jobs,” Ted Brunelle said. Local elected officials in attendance lauded the idea and the impact it could have on area business. “It’s people like Alex and Ted who create jobs and who help build our economy,” Lackawanna County Commissioner Corey O’Brien said. The site will rely on promotion through search engine optimization and a strong social networking presence. “This is effectively a merger of e-commerce and social networking to create almost a social commerce,” Alex Brunelle said. Nearbid.com has offices in the Scranton Enterprise Center, 201 Lackawanna Ave. For more information, call (570) 309-3999 or visit www.nearbid.com.


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

SCRANTON CITY COUNCIL

Council seeks to install new signals SCRANTON – City Council unanimously approved the final passage of several pieces of legislation on Tuesday that will lead to the installation and operation of new traffic signals. The legislation allows the city to make applications to the state Department of Transportation, or PennDOT, for permits to install and operate these traffic signals, which are to be placed along Keyser Avenue at Oak Street, the Keyser Village

Driveway, the Scranton Expressway, the Morgan Highway, and Ferdinand Street. Council also unanimously approved a motion made by Councilman Jack Loscombe to schedule a public hearing regarding a zoning reclassification on June 7 before the regularly scheduled council meeting. A request was made by the Minooka Neighborhood Association to change the zoning classification from CN to R1-A in an area along the 100 block of Da-

GOP Continued from page 5

of bringing the county’s budget in check. “We can’t put the burden on hard working middle class families or small businesses,” O’Malley warned, adding that he would seek assistance from U.S. Reps. Lou Barletta and Tom Marino “to find alternative funds and grants” to complete the county’s reassessment effort. Smallacombe said reassessed taxes on the elderly and the poor should be phased in and the state should provide assistance to counties looking to complete their reassessments while Jones suggested the county should create the funding on its own through sub assessors. Regarding Marcellus Shale drilling for natural gas, all of the Republican candidates said the area’s water and soil must be protected. “We’ve learned from the past and from our scarred landscapes. There were no safeguards back then,” O’Malley said, citing the region’s anthracite coal mining his-

presented by the neighborhood association and then to make a recommendation on that to City Council,” Council President Janet Evans explained. Loscombe said he met with the Minooka Neighborhood Association to “get the ball rolling” on the project. Additionally, council tabled legislation that would approve the installation of 10 bike racks in the city, as Evans said she would like to discuss their placement further before approving the resolution.

tory. “We cannot leave a scarred environment in Lackawanna County.” Smallacombe said that, for a time, crews were “ruining roads” in Dimock and that the county must monitor its infrastructure. Jones said the “billion dollar” industry provides an opportunity for residents to obtain high-paying jobs, but only if the county partners with area schools to provide training. Regionalization is also widely supported among the GOP, but in different ways. O’Malley said he hopes to better provide services to smaller, underserved municipalites; Smallacombe will seek intergovernmental cooperation efforts but not a “total regionalization”; and Jones suggested reaching outside the county walls to possibly build a tri-county plan and reduce some administrative positions.

Scranton Cultural Center director Flynn dies Go Lackawanna staff

many people who never were able to connect the activities we have here saw the building in a new light.” A Scranton native, Flynn had spent 11 years on the Board of Directors for the Scranton Cultural Center and had been serving as Executive Director for the past three-and-a-half years. On the Monday before his passing, he was honored as a Paul Harris Fellow by the Rotary Club of Scranton. “Matt would always tell you that the greatest honors in his life were his family first, and this building second,” Cardoni said of Flynn. “This was his dream job. “We’ll never fill his shoes. I was honored

to be his friend, his coworker, and fellow Mason.” Flynn is survived by his wife of 32 years, the former Catherine Kerrigan, and their three children. A Mass of Christian Burial for Flynn will take place on Tuesday at 10 a.m. from St. Paul’s Church, 1510 Penn Ave., Scranton. Friends may call from 4 to 8 p.m., Sunday and Monday, at the Eugene A. Cusick Funeral Home, 217 Jefferson Ave., Scranton. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that memorial contributions be made to the Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton, Pa., 18503.

SCRANTON – An assistant manager of a local Kentucky Fried Chicken allegedly admitted to police that he stole $3,200 from night deposit bags in the early morning hours of April 19. Olander Clements, 29, of Drakes Lane, Old Forge, is charged with theft by unlawful taking, burglary and receiving stolen property for the incident last month. According to an affidavit: Scranton police met with Kentucky Fried Chicken managers Pat Peluso and Joe Grenevicki and owner Barbara Cocolin at the Keyser Avenue restaurant on April 19. Grenevicki said he closed the store at 11:30 p.m. the night before after he placed two deposit bags containing $3,200 in a safe. When he returned at 8:45 a.m., the bags were found empty on a desk. The store’s alarm company showed that an assistant manager had entered the building using a security code. Peluso allegedly suspected Clements of the crime out of five different assistant managers with similar codes. Olander allegedly left work early Monday and never returned home, Peluso learned from his girlfriend. On April 22, he allegedly contacted Scranton Detective Jennifer Gerrity and admitted to the theft. He indicated to Gerrity that he was willing to pay restitution to the restaurant and planned to set up a repayment plan on April 25. By April 29, he had not returned phone calls to police or to the restaurant and had failed to report to a scheduled appointment at the Scranton Police Department. Clements was arraigned May 2 and held for $10,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for May10.

SPORTS

Matthew Fitzgerald Flynn, executive director of the Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple, passed away at home on May 4, according to the Scranton Cultural Center staff. He was 57 years old. “In everything he did, Matt was a welcoming, embracing person,” said John Cardoni, facility/technical director at the Scranton Cultural Center, and a close friend of Flynn. “Matt really established the ‘open arms policy’ here - which allowed members of the general public to tour and learn about the building - to a level that is not normally found at places like this. “Because of Matt, the rich history of our building was opened to the public, and

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

ARTS

of the Republicans in the May 17 primary offered their often similar plans on a variety of topics Thursday. In addressing the financial needs of the county, Smallacombe said leaders need to get back to basics and “spend on necessities and not on things that we’d just like to have.” Jones suggested a close monitoring of the countywide purchasing program and stated he would take a $10,000 pay cut if elected to “lead by example.” O’Malley said the county must seek to renew a partnership with the federal government to house federal inmates in the county, which would also inject $1.5 to $3 million into the county budget. Each said reassessment is a crucial part

vis Street. The parcel of land would be rezoned from a commercial to a residential neighborhood to allow a proposed housing development to be constructed. The city’s planning commission as well as the Lackawanna County Regional Planning Commission will also be involved. “The reason that the public hearing is scheduled for June 7 is to provide at least 30 days to both planning commissions to review the amendment that’s

NEWS

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

Area KFC manager allegedly stole from safe

7


8

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Death of Osama bin Laden

Justice served for 9/11, says Pa.’s delegation By JONATHAN RISKIND For Go Lackawanna

WASHINGTON – Scranton area members of Congress said Osama bin Laden’s death extracts some measure of justice for the horrific events of Sept. 11, 2001 and they lauded the work of the U.S. intelligence and military forces that hunted the terrorist down. “Let the word go forth that the elimination of this cold-blooded murderer sends a distinct message to the terrorists around the world that the United States of America will track down and eliminate those cowards who think they can create an atmosphere of horror and get away with it,” said Rep. Tom Marino, R-Lycoming Township.

Sen. Bob Casey, D-Scranton, noted that Pennsylvania, along with New York and Washington, was directly impacted by what bin Laden and al-Qaida perpetrated when Flight 93 was downed by heroic passengers over Shanksville, Somerset County. Since then, 68 soldiers from Pennsylvania have been killed in Afghanistan and hundreds others injured, Casey said. “The sacrifice of those families who lost loved ones on Sept. 11th and in the following years can never be made whole, but I hope that the death of bin Laden can help to bring some closure,” Casey said. “While toSee JUSTICE, Page 15

Discover the Art of Deco...

BOCCARDO JEWELERS, INC. THE ULTIMATE WATCH STORE DOWNTOWN SCRANTON www.boccardojewelers.com

W ISH ES TO TH AN K YO U FO R YO UR CO N TIN UED SUPPO RT! Rem em ber C orky’s G arden Path G reenhouse for the BestQ uality, BestSelection and BestPrices! 729 Justus Blvd. • ScottTw p., PA 18411-8837 (570) 586-9563 Telephone • (570) 587-1439 Fax w w w .corkysgardenpath.com


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

9

Death of Osama bin Laden

End of Osama bin Laden does not mean end of war on terror, expert says.

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

ALEXANDRIA, VA – The death of Osama bin Laden, the former head of international terrorism group al-Qaida, on May 1 could significantly impact the work of an area native to increase religious freedoms around the globe. Joseph K. Grieboski, 36, a Scott Township native and resident of Alexandria, Va., founded the Institute on Religion and Public Policy in 1999. It is an inter-religious non-profit, Nobel Peace Prize-nominated organization dedicated to ensuring freedom of religion as the foundation for security and democracy. He said the death of bin Laden will mark a significant change in how he works to build those relations. “They (al-Qaida) made the advancement of religious liberty

very difficult in many ways, especially as an American with an American-based organization. Any time I started talking Grieboski about religious liberty issues, certain leaders of Muslim countries would feel that ‘This is just a part of the anti-Muslim sentiment coming from the United States,’” Grieboski said Tuesday. “The reality is Osama bin Laden killed far more Muslims than he ever killed non-Muslims in his decades-long execution of terrorism and the use of violence. We have a common enemy, and that common enemy has now been dealt with.” Grieboski said the death of bin Laden marks as much of a

See GRIEBOSKI, Page 14

ARTS

Like many Americans, Chris Carney watched the news reports about Osama bin Laden’s death Sunday night with a sense of pride. Unlike many Americans, he is able to reflect on his personal role in the war on terror. A former 10th District congressman from Dimock Township, Carney’s resume boasts experience as a senior terrorism and intelligence adviser at the Pentagon, a commander in the U.S. Navy Reserve and a special intelligence liaison with the Defense Intelligence Agency. “It was a pretty big night,” Carney said. “I was thrilled.” He said as the news reports constantly updated viewers about the killing of the nation’s Public Enemy No. 1, he began thinking about his involvement in the hunt for bin Laden. Carney was keeping an eye on bin Laden before the terrorism attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 and was involved in multiple counterterrorism operations since bin Laden directed attacks that killed thousands in New York, Washington and a field in western Pennsylvania. Watching the television at his Susquehanna County home Sunday night, Carney said when he got word that the pres-

ident had planned to address Americans at 11 p.m. Sunday, he knew the news was big and likely had to do with bin Laden. News organizations soon confirmed reports that bin Laden had been killed by CIA-directed Navy SEALs at a fortified compound in Abbottabad, a town northeast of Pakistan’s capital and home to Pakistan’s national military academy. That location, and how bin Laden was able to hide out in a sprawling compound so close to the Pakistani president’s complex, caused Carney to scratch his head. “Pakistan has some explaining to do,” Carney said. “To find out he was basically in Pakistan’s equivalent of our West Point, there are some questions that need answered. “How does the most wanted man in the world live within a mile of Kakul (The Pakistan Military Academy)?” Carney said. But asking questions and sorting out the hows and whys See CARNEY, Page 15

ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS WANTED

Free Removal. Call Anytime. Highest Price Paid In Cash!

V&G 570-574-1275

278727

By ANDREW M. SEDER For Go Lackawanna

turning point for the nation as the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, that he orchestrated did. “9/11 came, and our entire national psyche changed. Everything about us changed, all because of the mission, the purpose, the desires, the interests and the goals of this one man who was the global embodiment, the face of terror,” he said. The loss of a single leader to al-Qaida’s “global network of loosely affiliated organizations” brings about new challenges in the war on terror. “The one binding force around that network was Osama bin Laden. With his death, we now do not have one al-Qaida. We have hundreds of al-Qaidas, all with now their own small leaders, their own missions, their own goals,” he said. “Each and every one of these networks is now livid over the death of their leader, their symbol, their model.”

NEWS

For Carney, news Terrorist’s death ‘cathartic’ for U.S. evokes pride in U.S.

...Murano Glass Beads

JEWELERS INC. 405 Spruce St. • Scranton 570-347-8700

SPORTS

From the Venetian Island of Murano


10

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011

T

By ANDREW M. SEDER For Go Lackawanna

he Winmark Corporation, parent company of resale stores such as Play It Again Sports and Music Go Round, is eyeing Northeastern Pennsylvania for entrepreneurs interested in opening up to five additional company brand stores. The rights for one franchise — Plato’s Closet — has been sold to Ryan and Julie Simmons of Vestal, N.Y. The couple opened the store at 1029 Commerce Boulevard in Dickson City last week and will buy merchandise strictly from the community in anticipation of the store’s grand opening in late June.

Plato’s Closet buys and sells teens and twenty-somethings brand name apparel, shoes and accessories. There are more than 280 franchised stores in the United States and Canada. The Simmons already operate a franchise in their hometown. Winmark, based in Minneapolis, Minn. and publicly traded on the NASDAQ, is also looking at locations and franchisees for its Play It Again Sports, Once Upon A Child and Music Go Round brands locally. According to company spokeswoman Jayne Levy, Winmark sees the market as “a great opportunity for one store of each brand. The demographics (Winmark looks) for — young families, children under age 13, junior/senior high enrollment and college enrollments — all meet or exceed (Winmark’s) goals for a market of this size. The real estate is affordable and fits well into their business plans.” In fact, Pete First, director of franchise development of Winmark Corporation, said the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre market could be the first of its size in the nation with at least one of each franchise. He said the region’s low real estate costs and penchant for good deals makes it an ideal target market for growth. According to Levy, the company has already selected municipalities for the brands. • Once Upon A Child, which buys used children’s clothing, toys and equipment and resells them, is looking to locate in both Wilkes-Bare and Scranton. The chain currently has nearly

240 franchised stores in the U.S. and 24 in Canada. Currently the closest franchise in is Harrisburg. • Play It Again Sports buys and sells sports equipment and gear. The chain currently has a location in Plains Township among its more than 330 franchised stores in the United States and Canada. The company is looking to bring a location to Scranton. • Music Go Round buys, sells, and trades used and new music gear such as guitars, drums, keyboards, sound equipment and accessories. The chain currently has a location in Wilkes-Barre Township among its 35 franchised stores in the United States. The company is looking to open a store in Dunmore. Harry McDonnell, of Shavertown, has owned the only Music Go Round franchise in Northeast Pennsylvania since 1999 with his wife Linda. He said he welcomes the potential for a second Music Go Round in the region. “I think the market can support it,” said McDonnell, who moved his store to the WilkesBarre Township Commons from the East End Center in 2004. He said he draws from the Poconos, Hazleton and Clarks Summit regions now. Added visibility of the brand’s name and a potential to share advertising costs with the new franchisee would be benefits. In addition to affordable items for the community and a chance for people to make money selling their items to the

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES / FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Plato’s Closet store Manager Katie Tracy, 23, of Tioga, N.Y., left, and co-owner Julie Simmons, 46, of Vestal, N.Y., stand with some of the clothes recently collected at the new Dickson City store.

stores, the businesses also bring jobs, Levy said. Depending on the brand each store can employ two to three full-time employees along with

eight to15 part- time workers. First said that quality resale shops have seen growth as the economy has struggled, with people looking to stretch their

dollars without sacrificing fashion or love of music. “This economy is kind of the perfect storm for what we do,” First said.

ECONOMY OIL COMPANY Wholesaler Distributor of Gulf Gasoline

PREMIUM HEATING OIL

NO ONE BEATS OUR PRICE OR SERVICE

If you find someone cheaper, call. We will beat any competitor by 3 cents per gallon.

100 gallon minimum (prices subject to change)

ACCEPTING NEW CUSTOMERS

CALL TODAY 570-341-3348 SERVING SCRANTON, CLARKS SUMMIT, MID VALLEY AND SURROUNDING AREAS

264451

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Winmark branches out


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

11

NEWS ARTS JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

1. Jim Siperko, Dallas; Ed Buratti, Hanover Township; Scott Oley, Plymouth; and Mike Gavlick, WilkesBarre. 2. Mikayla Reynolds, Dallas; and Kathrine Reynolds, Moosic. 3. Amanda Kornutiak, Chapman Lake; Abbi Westgate, Thompson; and Sam Linko, Throop. 4. David Lord of Clarks Summit finishes the 32-mile ride. 5. Luke Johns, Brian Reynolds and Bill Reynolds, all of Moosic.

SPORTS

Hundreds of cyclists rode through the region for the eighth annual Tour de Scranton, held Sunday, May 1. The event featured five different routes including a route along the Lackawanna County Heritage Trail that was open to walkers for the first time in the tour’s history. Tour de Scranton raises funds for the Erin Jessica Moreken Drug and Alcohol Treatment Fund which was founded in 2002 after the death of the 28-year-old Scranton native. Since the first ride in 2004, more than $100,000 has been raised.


12

GOLackawanna

HISTORY

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Continued from page 3

ied there.” The remains of 61 of the 110 victims of the Sept. 6, 1869, Avondale Mine disaster in Plymouth Township were buried in the cemetery on Sept. 9, 1869. Most were of Welsh decent and were recently remembered with a plaque in 2009 on the 140th anniversary of their interment. There are not even 61 tombstones to remember each person individually, and those that remain were largely cracked, fallen, or sunk into the ground. One stone still remains missing to this day. Linda Scott of Clarks Summit collected donations and raised thousands of dollars for the 2009 rededication plaque and to repair the largely ignored plot where the remains of the miners rest. As an advocate of local history, she said she was “disgusted” by the lack of respect the graves had been afforded and decided to take matters into her own hands, using the money to pay for new footers and other necessary repairs, including piecing some back together. “I just wanted to honor their memory. A poor mother lost a husband and three sons that day. Willie Hatton wasn’t working that day, but he was in that mine with his dad to watch him work. He never got a chance to grow up,” Scott explained when visiting the site on Friday. “It seems strange to say, but when those guys were down here in the July heat lifting these tombstones back up, I kept telling the miners, ‘This is for you. We’re doing it for you.’ They’re not here

Sunday, May 8, 2011 anymore, but their souls are here.” Scott also intended to visit the grave of her grandfather in another section of the cemetery, but could not locate it because of weeds and overgrowth. As she searched, she pointed out that many stones were just thrown into piles near an adjacent fence, leaving many graves completely unmarked. “I had somebody call me a couple months ago from out of state. He was looking for his great grandfather and the Historical Society couldn’t help him. They spent hours walking through the cemetery looking for this man’s tombstone and never found it. A lot of them are down and a lot of them are broke,” Scott added. “With Memorial Day coming up, you’ll see a lot of people here with their own lawnmowers and weed cutters doing their own sites because Chick Rader won’t do it. He should be paying for this. It’s just sickening. It gets me every time I come down here.” Past calls to Rader and State Rep. Kevin Murphy, she said, have been ignored. As she prepared to leave on Friday, she found an elderly couple digging out their family’s headstones. The stones have been buried so deeply that a layer of dirt and grass covers them completely, and they are only visible when they use a hoe and shovel they brought from home to dig them out. Bob and Dolores Morlang, both in their late 70s, drove two hours from their home in Stony Point, N.Y., just to maintain the grave, knowing that no one else will do it. “I wonder what other people do. After me, there is nobody left to take care of them. I’m the last of the Morlangs,” Bob Morlang commented.

CEMETERY Continued from page 3

ployees could be located. Charles Newcomb, Sr. has lived within walking distance of the cemetery for more than 10 years. He visits deceased family members two to three times a week. His son, Charles Newcomb, Jr., said he has complained but never received a response from the owner, and he often brings his own lawnmower and weed trimmer to clear the section where his grandparents are buried. “This has been going on for a very long time, but we noticed it more when my grandmother passed away two years ago, being there more frequently,” Newcomb, Jr. said. “This didn’t happen overnight. It progressively just got worse and worse,” fellow neighbor Frank Stefko agreed when contacted Friday. “It’s in my backyard. It’s disrespectful and it’s unsightly.” History of neglect West Scranton residents said the issues have been ongoing, at least since the Washburn Street Cemetery was owned by John Rogan - no relation to Councilman Pat Rogan - over two decades ago. John Rogan plead guilty to theft charges in 1992 for embezzling perpetual care funds for years, serving16 months in Lackawanna County Prison, fined $10,000, and ordered to pay back the over $200,000 he stole. With this money not being invested into the cemetery, it fell into a perpetual state of disrepair that it appears to never have recovered from. Charles “Chick” Rader, owner of Charles J. Rader Insurance in Scranton, purchased the property, along with Abington Hills Cemetery in South Abington Township for

Many different sizes & options available - call for a FREE quote Like us on Facebook

$750,000. He also owns the Shady Lane Cemetery in South Abington Township. Despite the change in ownership, neighbors say that little has changed since Rader took over. “He probably figures, ‘Why should I clean this up or fix anything if no one is coming to see these people?’ But that’s not the point. What about the people that are coming there that have to look at that? I’ve never seen a cemetery where they needed ‘No Dumping’ signs posted in the front entrance. What would give someone the idea to dump there unless it looked like a dumping area?” Stefko asked. One section of the cemetery did appear to be recently mowed on Thursday. Another section that neighbors say is usually maintained is the resting place of the father of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. Hugh Ellsworth Rodham died at the age of 82 and was laid to rest there in April 1993 following a massive clean-up effort spearheaded by over 200 volunteers and several city employees, using taxpayer money to temporarily maintain the private property. Former Mayor Jim Connors said at the time that it was a public safety emergency because of exposed electrical wires, toppled headstones, overgrowth, garage, and pothole-laden roads. Several of these problems still remain today, however, and at least six inches of grass and weeds surrounded the Rodham tombstone on Thursday. Few answers or solutions Greg Graziano, the cemetery’s listed caretaker, could not be reached for comment, but a voice message said he could not answer due to “medical circumstances” and asked that all questions and concerns be directed to Rader. When contacted on Friday, Rader provided few answers. “The Washburn Street Cemetery will be ready for Memorial

Day, but if you recall, during the month of April, we had one day without rain, just one, and there’s nothing I can do with a cemetery when it’s raining,” Rader said. “Every three years, someone calls and complains about something. I don’t have anything to say about it.” Rader declined further comment. Council President Janet Evans said on Tuesday that there is “no acceptable excuse” for the “deplorable, inexcusable condition” of the cemetery. “For years, I have asked the LIPs department to go there and cite the owner, and here we are a year again later – still no citations and the situation grows more and more unacceptable, and that’s a disgrace not only to those who are buried in that sacred land, but to their families who visit them faithfully,” Evans said. Scranton Director of Licensing, Inspections, and Permits Mark Seitzinger said that he received a letter from council on Friday about their concerns over the condition of the cemetery. Seitzinger said that Don McKeon, the West Scranton inspector, would conduct an assessment of the cemetery between Friday and Monday, May 9. Whether fined or not, millions of dollars and thousands of hours of manpower would likely be needed to restore the property to a state acceptable to neighbors. “The next question’s going to be, ‘Where’s the money going to come from?’ But I’ll tell you what – if he maintained the property and kept kids out of there, it wouldn’t be like this,” Stefko said. “When my grandfather died in 1977 and my grandmother bought the plot, they paid a fee to maintain the cemetery,” Newcomb, Jr. said. “It’s in your contract when you purchase the plot. You pay for perpetual care – what happened to that perpetual care money? That’s what I want to know.”


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

13

NEWS ARTS JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

SPORTS

1. A fallen tree lies near graves inside the Washburn Street Cemetery. 2. Graffiti and other types of damage to headstones is common. 3. Some stones have sunken into the ground over time. 4. Grass and weeds conceal many headstones throughout the cemetery 5. Stones are broken in half and often toppled over. 6. A ’No Dumping’ sign sits inside the cemetery, but garbage lies around the perimeter.


SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

14

GOLackawanna

Barletta bill eyes illegal immigration turn over illegal immigrants to federal authorities based solely on their immigration WASHINGTON – Focusing status. his first solo legislative effort San Francisco, for instance, on an issue that gained him adopted a policy in 1989 that and Hazleton national attention, Republican U.S. Rep. Lou illegal immigrants arrested on Barletta said on Wednesday he non-felony charges would not will introduce a bill seeking to be reported to federal immigration authorities. strip all federal funding from Immigration law overhaul “sanctuary” cities that fail to efforts have been stalled for enforce federal immigration several years in Congress. laws. President Barack Obama The former Hazleton mayor and freshman member of Con- said recently that his adminisgress also said he is forming an tration will try again to get “Immigration Reform Caucus” Congress to pass the DREAM Act, which would create a that he hopes other freshmen pathway to citizenship for the lawmakers will join. Barletta said at a Capitol Hill children of illegal immigrants who were brought to this news conference that his bill, country at a young age. That which he expects to formally proposal stalled last year in introduce within a few weeks, the Senate. will be designed to “crack Bob Dane, spokesman for down on cities whose elected the Federation for American officials have willfully chosen Immigration Reform, or FAIR, not to enforce immigration policy by withholding all feder- which favors stricter immigraal funding from them as long as tion policies, said Barletta’s proposal is a “common sense” their sanctuary policies are in way to address the issue of place.” communities that have either Saying that there are more “don’t tell” policies involving than 100 “sanctuary” cities nationwide, Barletta added, “I shielding illegal immigrants from federal authorities or want to know how much they “don’t ask” policies involving get from the American taxnot demanding citizenship payer.” documentation. Barletta said he still hopes the U.S. Supreme Court will Immigrant group reacts take up a Hazleton law called But Grisella Martinez, the Illegal Immigration Relief director of policy and legislaAct and uphold its constitutive affairs for the National tionality after being ruled against in a federal district and Immigration Forum, which calls itself an organization federal appeals court. that advocates on behalf of the He said he is tentatively value of immigrants and imtitling his federal legislation migration to the United the “Mobilizing Against SancStates, said the term “sanctutuary Cities Act.” ary cities” is a misnomer. Research under way Martinez, who predicted Barletta’s legislation will not He said he has asked the go very far in Congress this Congressional Research Service to compile a list of sanctu- year, said what many communities have in place are “smart ary cities and estimate how community policing policies.” much in federal taxpayer dolSuch policies don’t harbor lars each receives. illegal immigrants who comSanctuary cities is a term mit crimes, but, rather, inthat refers to places that, to varying degrees, choose to not volve not demanding proof of immigration status from focus their law enforcement crime victims or witnesses, efforts on tracking and arresting illegal immigrants or don’t Martinez said. By JONATHAN RISKIND For Go Lackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011

Police: Woman gave vodka, Xanax to teens By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

CARBONDALE – A city woman faces a series of charges following allegations that she gave vodka and Xanax to two 14-year-old girls. Nayda Aquino, 34, of 8th Avenue, Carbondale, allegedly gave the prescription drugs and alcohol to the teens inside her home and was taken into custody after police discovered her unresponsive with her three children, ages 4 to 14, standing around her on April 28. According to an affidavit: Carbondale Patrolmen Brian Rock and Dominick Andidora responded to a report of juveniles drinking and taking pills at a home on Canaan Street at about 8:45 p.m. A parent at the resident said her

GRIEBOSKI Continued from page 9

But it also marks a loss of bin Laden’s organization, finances and widespread network. “As evil as he was and as horrible as he was, he was very good at what he did. That’s what made him so dangerous.” Grieboski, who learned of the announcement while watching CNN on Sunday evening at his home across the river from the nation’s capital, said the dialogue surrounding his death is very different in national and international circles. “A lot of the people I’m talking to here in Washington are very happy he’s gone,” he said. “At the same time, there’s that lingering fear of, ‘Okay, we’ve got him, but now we have to worry.’” In contrast, Grieboski’s said that his foreign colleagues have reversed the argument, reacting first to the changes in the global war on terror while bin Laden’s death is almost an afterthought. The moment should be recognized, but not celebrated, he said. “It is a cathartic moment for us as a nation. We shouldn’t be celebrating the death of anyone, but we can celebrate the

daughter allegedly received Valium from another girl who lived there. A second parent called her daughter and ordered her home. When she arrived home after 9 p.m., she was “visibly intoxicated.” Police had her transported to Marian Community Hospital. Shortly after that, police located the second teen along Oak Avenue. She also appeared intoxicated and was treated at Marian Community Hospital. Inside the emergency room, the girls said they would not “snitch” on their friend “Pablo’s mother,” referring to Aquino. When they arrived at Aquino’s home, her 14-year-old son told officers that she was sleeping, that he could not wake her up and that she had relief that comes from knowing that Public Enemy No. 1 is no longer Public Enemy No. 1,” Grieboski said. “At the same time, we can’t let the jubilation of this moment cloud the reality that the war on terror isn’t over. It’s just changed.” And bin Laden’s death seems to raise just as many questions as it answers. “What do we do now? Are we finished in Afghanistan? If the point of going into Afghanistan was to find Osama bin Laden and to punish those who committed the acts of 9/11, is the mission in Afghanistan then still legitimate?” he said. “What do we do about Guantanamo Bay? Let’s be perfectly honest: It was intelligence gathered through the detention of people in Guantanamo Bay that helped us to find Osama bin Laden.” While those answers are still unclear, Grieboski, echoing President Barack Obama’s own words on May 1, said that one thing continues to be clear. “This is not about Islam being right or wrong or good or bad,” Grieboski said. “This is about the motivations of people who are using violence to bring about their political goals. This isn’t about theology; this is about politics.”

blood around her month. When they went upstairs, they found her other three children, ages 4 to 8, surrounding her, asleep. In an interview with her oldest sons, police learned the boys returned from playing basketball at about 7:30 p.m. and said their mother was “acting wierd (sic) and appeared drunk.” Children and Youth Services were contacted, and the children’s father, Jose Alvarez, took custody. In all, Aquino faces five counts of endangering the welfare of children, four counts of reckless endangerment, and two counts of corruption of minors. She was arraigned April 29 and held for 10 percent of $20,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for May 9.

Fight breaks out in WSHS hallway By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – A fight between at least eight students broke out at about 10 a.m. Monday, May 2, inside West Scranton High School after one student allegedly threw a pencil, hitting another’s girlfriend, according to Scranton School District Superintendent William King. King said the district will pursue disciplinary action including suspension against some of the students involved and added that an investigation by Scranton police is continuing. “We consider fighting to be a very serious issue,” King said Tuesday afternoon. He added that school officials will try to meet with the students involved for mediation to discover any underlying issues that may have ultimately led to the fight. The school did not undergo a lockdown as school officials broke up the incident. No charges have been filed with the Scranton Police Department as of Friday.


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

Juvenile office near skate park will welcome K-9 officers

15

JUSTICE Continued from page 8

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

S

In a surprise announcement, he also said that the department’s juvenile office at Jackson Street and North Bromley Avenue will become the city’s West Side precinct and additionally house the K-9 unit. A fifth city K-9 officer will be introduced soon, he said. “We want a uniformed presence in this area, and I want to give our guys another location that they can call home,” Duffy said. “At the same time, we’ll be able to build relationships with the people who come to the skate park here.” At a watch meeting held Wednesday,

“It’s just another enhancement of being part of the solution,” Kelly added, noting the chief’s encouraged public-private partnership between citizens and the police. Duffy did not discuss a location but said another precinct is planned on the east side of the Lackawanna River. He said he’d like to add surveillance cameras to the area of the skate park on Jackson Street but acknowledged that it may not be financially feasible this year. In addition to welcoming the new precinct, the crime watch is planning a twoday event in July where youths will collaborate with local artist Ted Michalowski to create a mural to cover existing graffiti. An existing piece of damaged playground equipment will also be removed in the coming weeks to make way for a future community garden. Neighbors are encouraged to report violations, including use of the park after regular hours, to Scranton police, Duffy told residents on Wednesday. “If you enforce the small stuff, the big stuff goes away,” he said.

CARNEY Continued from page 9

can take place later, Carney said. Right now, this is a time for Americans and other residents of the world to rejoice and feel proud that one mission has been accomplished, he said. “It shows the resolve of the United States. We’re not going to give up,” Carney said, noting that it also sends another message to terrorists who might have doubted the country’s efforts to bring down al-Qaida. “It shows them our tenacity.” One part of the killing of bin Laden that has raised questions, especially in the conspiracy theorists’ community, is why the military conducted a burial at sea instead of keeping his body. Carney said the decision was “a brilliant idea frankly.” He said leaving the body behind or burying it would create a shrine for his followers. By adhering to the Muslim requirements that burial take place within 24 hours and doing it at an undisclosed place where no followers could gather at was the right decision, he said.

SPORTS

CRANTON – Spurred by the concerns of a neighborhood watch group over the late night activity of teens in an area skate park, Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy announced Thursday that police and crime watch members will actively enforce an 8 p.m. closure of the park each night.

neighbors expressed concerns over youths utilizing the park in the late evening hours, destroying park property, using foul language and possibly abusing drugs. Resident Dan Brennan, who moved to West Scranton in December, said that his car was burglarized on Monday and a GPS device was stolen. In motions approved Wednesday, watch members unanimously agreed to keep the park open between noon and 8 p.m. from Monday to Saturday, and from 3 to 8 p.m. on Sunday. Karin Foster, president of the neighborhood watch, said the main goals of a new city ordinance is to establish specific park rules and hours, and to add new accessibility for the general public. She is working with city solicitor Paul Kelly to draft the legislation. “The old story is that kids have no where to go,” Kelly said. “Let’s bring them here, but at the same time let’s respect everybody’s rights in the neighborhood. When we do pass this ordinance, there’s going to be rules.

ARTS

Chief: Officers have new home

NEWS

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy hands West Scranton Hyde Park Neighborhood Watch President Karin Foster the keys to a skate park on Jackson Street. Police and watch members began enforcing new park hours on Thursday.

day’s development does not mean an end to terrorism or the need to remain relentlessly vigilant, the death of bin Laden has enormous significance in American and world history.: Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton, said that, “Like all Americans, I am pleased that, after a manhunt lasting more than a decade, Osama bin Laden is dead. For far too long, bin Laden evaded justice. But now, it seems as if justice has finally been meted out to Osama bin Laden.” Barletta said he hopes the news “brings some measure of solace” to families of victims of 9/11 and other terrorist attacks carried out by al-Qaida. But Barletta also cautioned that bin Laden’s death does not mean the end to al-Qaida and other terrorists who wish the United States harm. Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Zionsville, made stops Monday in Scranton and Wilkes-Barre to address business concerns with members of the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce and Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Business and Industry. He first took a moment to talk about the death of the country’s “Public Enemy No. 1.” “It’s great news for the entire civilized world that Osama bin Laden has been brought to justice.”


16

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011 2

3

ARTS

NEWS

1

4

SPORTS

5

M

ore than 100 fans turned out to the Vintage Theater, 119 Penn Ave., Scranton, to see Ted Leo perform on the fourth of 15 planned solo dates which end May 14 in Washington, D.C. Leo was originally scheduled to open the solo tour in January, but all dates were

postponed. Highlights from the set included Leo’s new song “The Little Smug Supper Club,” a cover of Aimee Mann’s “Freeway,” and a great performance of “Me and Mia,” the lead track from 2004’s “Shake the Sheets” by Ted Leo and the Pharmacists. Opening acts were Eww Yaboo and Langor.

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

1. Elizabeth Davis and Morgan Evans of Scranton. 2. Amy Perdue and Nora Stepanitis, Dallas. 3. Anna Schuck, Del.; with Antony Delliturri and David Burke, Brooklyn, N.Y. 4. Punk/hardcore pioneer Ted Leo performs at The Vintage Theater in downtown Scranton. 5. Cassandra Dyches, Sweet Valley; and April Guse, Scranton.


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

17

NEWS ARTS

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

1. Fans cheer on Avenged Sevenfold during their set on April 29. 2. Three Days Grace performs during the ’Welcome to the Family Tour.’ 3. The lights come down on fans as headliners Avenged Sevenfold perform. 4. M. Shadows leads Avenged Sevenfold through its set in Wilkes-Barre. 5. Three Days Grace singer Adam Gontier.

SPORTS

As part of the “Welcome to the Family Tour,” Sevendust, Three Days Grace and Avenged Sevenfold performed at the Mohegan Sun Arena on Friday, April 29. Playing to a near capacity house, Sevendust predominantly performed tracks from the most recent release, “Cold Day Memory,” along with older favorites such as “Black.” Three Days Grace, who is supporting a new album titled “Life Starts Now,” circled the mosh pit on several occasions and received a raucous response to the song “Riot” from 2006’s “One-X,” at fan’s request. Avenged Sevenfold’s set, with stage elements influenced by their latest album, “Nightmare,” paid tribute to late drummer James “The Rev” Sullivan, including one song where an empty piano sat on stage, signifying his absence.


GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011

NEWS

18

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

Scranton musician using crowd funding Web site to back new album

SPORTS

ARTS

P

HILADELPHIA – Two weeks ago, Chet Williams didn’t have any money for a new album. That changed when he signed up for Kickstarter. Williams, 20, a Scranton native known for his work with So Long, Pluto and Awkward Silence, had no idea about the site until a friend introduced him to the concept.

Kickstarter, www.kickstarter.com, allows individuals to begin a project and use “crowd funding,” or public financial support, to bring it to life. According to the site’s blog, more than $7 million was donated to a variety of projects in March 2011 alone. The Temple junior marketing major launched his project to fund the solo album, “We All Walk Fast GET INVOLVED and Nod in Unison,” on April 22 and raised Support Chet Williams’ crowd more than $970 tofunding effort by visiting wards a $1,750 goal in http://kck.st/hubh5l. Williams must raise $1,750 by May 26, or the last two weeks. “I’m overwhelmingly all pledges will be returned. For more information, visit surprised. A lot of www.facebook.com/Chetfriends have given me WilliamsMusic. $25, $30 or $50 towards ALSO ON KICKSTARTER getting this project • Scranton-based writer John done,” Williams said, Kolsun is working to raise $2,000 before June 4 to back a adding that a former music teacher, Jim graphic novel series. More at Buckley, donated to his http://kck.st/exwrqR • Clarks Summit native and project. composer Tony Marasco hopes “There’s no way I to raise $800 before May 27 would have been able to for a proposed large-scale, raise $950 in less than multi-media art endeavor. More two weeks. You can reat http://kck.st/hgRAdR ach so many people in an instant, and that helps so much.” Backers can fund projects on a variety of levels and gain different rewards. For example, anyone who donates $25 to Williams’ project receives a pre-release, signed copy of the album. See WILLIAMS, Page 20


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011

PAGE 19

CRYSTAL

THE NEW HOME OF THE

VISION CENTER www.crystalvisioncenter.com 69

$

129

$

Premium Complete Package

Deluxe Complete Package

SAVE $176.00

SAVE $196.00

SAVE $216.00

Includes Eye Exam & 2 Pairs of Eyeglasses *2 Frames Up to $49 each or $49 Off Any Frame *2 Pairs SV Plastic Lenses --FT28 Bifocals Add $29 per pair---Progressives Add $89 per pair-*2 Hard Shell Case *Eye Exam-Refraction, Glaucoma Test, Cataract Screening, Color Test, Depth Perception Eye Health (Dilation if necessary)

Includes Eye Exam & 2 Pairs of Eyeglasses *2 Frames Up to $89 each or $89 Off Any Frame *2 Pairs SV Plastic Lenses --FT28 Bifocals Add $29 per pair---Progressives Add $89 per pair-*2 Hard Shell Case *Eye Exam-Refraction, Glaucoma Test, Cataract Screening, Color Test, Depth Perception Eye Health (Dilation if necessary)

Includes Eye Exam & 2 Pairs of Eyeglasses *2 Frames Up to $129 each or $129Off Any Frame *2 Pairs SV Plastic Lenses --FT28 Bifocals Add $29 per pair---Progressives Add $89 per pair-*2 Hard Shell Case *Eye Exam-Refraction, Glaucoma Test, Cataract Screening, Color Test, Depth Perception Eye Health (Dilation if necessary)

$

*1 Frame Up to $49 or $49 off any frame *1 pair of SV Plastic Lenses --FT28 Bifocals Add $29 per pair---Progressives Add $89 per pair-*1 Hard Shell Case

29

Outside prescriptions are accepted and guaranteed – a Crystal Vision Center Exclusive

SCRANTON Dr. Marc Pensak, Dr. Megan Wesnak & Associates Keyser Ave. (Across from Keyser Oak Plaza) 961-1400

Includes: Eye Exam, Fitting, Follow-up, 2 Boxes Contacts (B&L 38), Sunglasses (plano), Care Kit & Hard Case

Varilux Comfort Progressive $ Lenses Premium No Line Bifocals Add per pair to any package, includes plastic lenses

WILKESBARRE Dr. Shelley Eskin, Dr. Frank Gazda & Associates 602 Carey Ave. 826-1700

99

$

189

BASIC Complete Package

Already have a prescription?

SAFETY EYEGLASS PROGRAMS We Accept Most Vision Insurances and All Optical Discount Programs. Now Accepting Care Credit

NEW! Contacts - Glasses - Eye Exam Packages!

NEW EYEGLASS PACKAGES! $

ESSILOR

169

upgrade to packages

WYOMING Dr. Lew Lisses Midway Shopping Center 288-7471

129

159

$

$

Includes: Eye Exam, Fitting, Follow-up, 2 Boxes Contacts (B&L 38), 1 Complete Pair of Eyeglasses

(Frame up to $49 or $49 off any frame & Single Vision plastic lenses),

Sunglasses (plano)

Brand

Includes: Eye Exam, Fitting, Follow-up, 4 Boxes Contacts (B&L 38), 1 Complete Pair of Eyeglasses

(Frame up to $49 or $49 off any frame & Single Vision plastic lenses),

Sunglasses (plano), Care Kit & Hard Case

Price per box Add per box to package

B & L Soflens 38 Acuvue Oasys Ciba Air Optix Ciba O2 Optix Encore Premium Freshlook Colors Acuvue Colors Avaira Purevision B & L daily disposable (90 pack)

12.50 30.00 $ 35.00 $ 25.00 $ 21.50 $ 35.00 $ 35.00 $ 27.00 $ 39.00 $ 35.00 $ $

No Charge $ 17.50 $ 22.50 $ 12.50 $ 7.50 $ 22.50 $ 22.50 $ 11.50 $ 26.50 $ 22.50

Some restrictions could apply. See an Optician for Details

DALLAS Dr. Megan Wesnak Rt. 309 Country Club Shopping Center 675-8888

TUNKHANNOCK Dr. Megan Wesnak & Dr. Frank Gazda Route 6 Next to Wisnosky Jeweler 836-3700


GOLackawanna

NEWS

MARRIAGES AND DIVORCES The following marriage license applications were filed in the Lackawanna County Marriage License Bureau between May 2 and 6, 2011: • Suzanne Victoria Santarelli, Old Forge, and Christian David Wenzel, Old Forge. • Tracy Jo Phillips, Greenfield Township, and Darrick Robert Goodrich, Greenfield Township. • Luanne Michelle Kromko, Clarks Summit, and Aston Randolph White, Clarks Summit. • Erin Marie Dutka, Carbondale, and John Torch Williams, Carbondale. • Christine Louise Haberle, Las Vegas, Nev., and George Sam Maragos, Las Vegas, Nev. • Marybeth Anuszewski, Dickson City, and Juan Mercado-Santiago, Scranton. • Maury Elizabeth Donahue, Scranton, and Michael Joseph Cronin, Jr., Middletown, Md. • Peter Thomas Panko, Clarks Summit, and Jessica Fay Hobbs,

Sunday, May 8, 2011 Clarks Summit. • Shannon Natalie Belek, Olyphant, and Christopher Robert Hludzik, Olyphant. • Michelle Kathleen Wimmer, Scranton, and Joseph A. Polster, Scranton. • Cathleen Dawn Mahorney, Moscow, and William Arthur Metschulat, Sr., Moscow. • Michelle Marie Scarfo, Scranton, and Carl Anthony Slack, Sr., Scranton. • Kristy Leah Ranocchia, Clarks Summit, and John David Crowley, Clarks Summit. • Hollie Beth Valashinas, Scranton, and Robert Eugene MacNelley, Scranton. • Melissa Ann Barako, Old Forge, and Mark Edward Walters, Old Forge. • Heather Ann Tolerico, Jermyn, and David Frank Beckage, Jermyn. • Robyn Lynn Nally, Simpson, and Ryan Michael Bonk, Simpson. • Maryliz Ortega-Mercado, Scranton, and Jose M. Medina-Rodriguez, Scranton. • Lisa Russo, Scranton, and Paul Joseph Mackrell, Scranton. • Kathleen M. Duda, Peckville, and Edward G. Grzebin, Jr.

• Amenda A. Bendowski, Clarks Summit, and Grant Palmer, Clarks Summit. The following divorce applications were filed with the Lackawanna County Clerk of Judicial Records, Family Court Division, between May 2 and 6, 2011: • Ariana Bonifanti vs. Edward Bonifanti. • Raider McHugh vs. Heather Marie Grannis. • Michael C. Baumhardt vs. Abby J. Baumhardt. • Allen C. Leach, Jr., vs. Melinda Leach. • James P. Gremli vs. Allison Gremli. • Kristine Totsky vs. Daniel J. Totsky. • Lucyann M. Leggin vs. Alan J. Leggin. • Brenda Rodriguez vs. Cesar A. Mercado. • Frances Bartocci vs. Mark Bartocci. • Carol Blank vs. Jay Blank. • Raymond Boinske vs. Polly Boinske. • Jenine Tuffy vs. Thomas Tuffy. • Michelle A. Rutkowski vs. Thomas P. Rutkowski. • Barbara Colwell vs. Donald Colwell.

Dirty Windows? Serving the Wyoming Valley since 1898

Commercial and Large Residential If You Are Looking For Experience, Call Us

• Competitive Prices • Complete Janitorial Services • Floor Cleaning & Maintenance • Gutter Cleaning • Fully Insured & Bonded

W

(570) 823-7018

ilkes-Barre indow Cleaning, Inc.

203091

20

Continued from page 18

NORTH AMERICAN Exit 1 off Rt. 380 1000 DUNHAM DR. DUNMORE, PA www.nawarhorse.com (570) 346-2453

WARHORSE

UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON BOYS’ BASKETBALL DAY CAMPS Ages 8-15 • Long Center

Session I: Monday, June 20 - Friday, June 24 Session II: Monday, Aug. 15-Fri., Aug. 19 8:30 am - 3:00 pm $185 Includes Camp T-shirt, Basketball & Lunch Daily Visit www.scranton.edu, click on athletics, then icon for Summer Camps for more information or to register on line or contact Carl Danzig at 941-7252

262972

If it isn’t completely funded by Thursday, May 26, all pledges are sent back to the proposed donors. It’s one way Kickstarter ensures projects are completed with public support. Williams said relying on the donations of others can be a bit nerve-racking. “The future of the album doesn’t hang in the balance, but when it comes out does,” he said. “If this doesn’t work, it will be delayed a few months.” If it does work, Williams hopes to release the album in August. He plans to record the 10-track album in June and July with Carl Yost at East Room Recordings. Yost was a former student at Temple who left his studies to pursue the Philadelphiaarea studio full time. Williams’ project may reach its $1,750 goal if the record of music-related donations falls in his favor. According to the Kickstarter blog, more than $13 million has been given to music projects since the site launched in April 2009. The album will also include a unique mixture of instruments and a variety of musicians from both Philadelphia and Scranton that will build their sections to fit into a musical “skeleton” he wrote and performed, Williams said.

280059

SPORTS

ARTS

WILLIAMS


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

S

NEWS

Former editor goes out on his own with music blog

21

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

See BLOG, Page 23 JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Highway 81 Revisted founder Mike Lello has set a launch party for the site for May 14.

SPORTS

“I didn’t have the time to do it, and frankly, it would have been a conflict of interest to do it with the job I had. LEARN MORE “The time was right, and the situaVisit www.highway81revisted.com, follow tion was now appro@Highway81Rvstd on priate.” Twitter or search for On March 1, he “Highway 81 Revisited” founded Highway 81 on Facebook. Revisited and dubbed it the “finest music blog on the web since March 2011.” Lello will celebrate his site’s humble beginnings with a launch party at The Bog, 341 Adams Ave., Scranton, on Saturday, May 14. Performing acts including headliners These United States, who is currently on tour in Europe with Jason Isbell; Pappy, of Cabinet; and Mike Quinn, formerly of And The Moneynotes, whose debut solo effort “Magico” is set for a June 7 release through Prairie Queen Records. “These three artists are the type of artists we would and in some cases already have written about on the blog,” Lello said. “I think it’s going to be a great night of music.” The site title pays homage to the Bob Dylan album and song “Highway 61 Revisited,” and its

ARTS

CRANTON – Mike Lello turned unemployment into opportunity. After almost four years, Lello left his position as the editor of the weekly entertainment newspaper, the Weekender, in February. Both the Weekender and Go Lackawanna are products of the WilkesBarre Publishing Company. “It’s something that I had wanted to do even before I didn’t have a full-time job,” Lello said.


22

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011

ARTS

NEWS

Green Ridge teen room one of several youth programs

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

From left, Leadership Lackawanna project members Nicole McDonald, Ann Nealon, Ryan McGowan, and Terri Nealon Caputo; Jack Finnerty, Scranton Public Library; Diane Demko, Nancy Kay Holmes Branch Library; Michele Legate, Scranton Public Library; and Leadership Lackawanna project members Brandi Jones, Holly Kubicki, and Eric Weinberg celebrate the opening of the teen room at the Nancy Kay Holmes library on April 29.

SPORTS

Teens welcome, involved at local library Whoever said today’s teens are disaffected and uninvolved has not met any of the young adults congregating at the Albright Memorial Library. The library has a very active Teen Advisory Board lead by Anna Kilcullen, youth services librarian. Regular TAB meetings are held on the third Tuesday of every month. The group is composed of approximately 15 teens from area high schools, both public and private. While the teens have a lot of fun, they also have a lot of responsibility. They suggest materials to be added to the library’s young adult collection and also decide upcoming young adult programming. Some of their most successful events have included Murder Mystery Night, Game Night, Karaoke

500 VINE Night and bake sales. For their next major event they will be performing an “Improv Night” on Tuesday, May 24 at 6:30 p.m. Rehearsals began last month and the event is guaranteed to be filled with fun and entertainment. “Improv Night” is open to the public and free of charge with your library card. In June and July, the Young Adult Department at the Albright Memorial Library is holding “Totally Awesome Tuesdays,” which is sponsored by a grant from the Lackawanna County Library System. Pat Finnerty, local musician and stand-up comic, will host “Beatlemania” on June 21. Teens will learn all

about the Fab Four while singing along to their music as performed by Finnerty. A community drum circle will be lead by Thomas Deerheart on June 28. Daniel Kostelec will perform his hilarious, interactive “Shakespeare for Dummies” show on July 5. This show is perfect for teens who are interested in learning more about the Bard but who may not be ready to read his works yet. Finally, a two day working improvisational theater workshop will be lead by local professional actor Heather Stuart on July 12 and 19. If you are a teenager or know any teenagers, these free opportunities are not to be missed. Anyone who wants to join the TAB or needs more information on pro-

gramming can contact Kilcullen at akilcullen@albright.org. Another great resource for young adults is the Teen Zone at the Nancy Kay Holmes Branch Library. The space was unveiled last week and is a safe place where teens can socialize and do their homework. New books, tables, laptops and a television are just some of the highlights of the room. The renovation was performed by the Leadership Lackawanna Class of 2011. All of these services and programs are available to the community, free of charge. If you don’t have a library card, come in and sign up for one today. ‘500 Vine’ focuses on local library services. Find it bi-weekly in Go Lackawanna.


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

Mother always knows best

Scranton City Councilman Frank Joyce “The best advice that I ever got from my mother was to never let anyone intimidate me, no matter how much bigger or fiercer a competitor they appeared to be, and that if I put my mind to doing something, I can always do it.” Joyce’s mother, Marie Tyrell, lives in Scranton.

Duffy

ko, lives in Scranton. Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy Duffy said his mother always instructed him “to work hard.” “That’s what she instilled in me my entire life, as did my father, but it was my mother mainly driving me to work. I used to work at a pizza place up in Daleville... She would drop me off up there, and it was always, ‘Work, work, work.’ “I thank her for that. I probably wouldn’t be where I’m at today if it wasn’t for her instilling that in me.” Duffy’s mother, Carol, 66, lives in Scranton. Scranton School District Superintendent William King

King

King, the seventh of eight children in his family, said one of his mother’s common phrases stuck with him as a piece of advice for getting through difficult times. “Any time you were down and out, whether it was from school or a sporting event… she used to say, ‘Snap out of it.’ “It’s easy in this profession to feel beaten down,” King said, but his mother’s words to him and his siblings sometimes helps him shake off the weight of the day. King’s mother, Betty, passed away in 1999 at age 72. The staff of Go Lackawanna sincerely wishes a happy Mother’s Day to all moms in Lackawanna County.

Former Scott Township Fire Chief Gary R. Ryman, author of “Fire Men: Stories from Three Generations of a Firefighting Family,” will conduct a book signing Friday, May 20, at Maiolatesi Wine Cellars, 210 Green Grove Rd., Scott Township. The son and father of firefighters, Ryman ignites

Starting at

$8,310

BACK TO BASIC - Prices Starting at $818 FREE DELIVERY ANYWHERE!

PHONE 570-295-3203 EK’S STRUCTURES LLC Wegman’s

Circle Drive-In

Scranton-Carbondale Hwy.

EK Structures

Continued from page 21

TABLE TALK

W

Biagio A. Dente, CEC,AAC, HOF Blaise Alan Dente, CCC

hen baking cookies, always set the timer for about half the time recommended, especially with new recipes. This will allow you to fine tune the baking time without the fear of over baking the cookies.

Voted Best Caterer & Best Chef 2010

DENTE’S DE ENTE

Catering & Tent Rental

655-0801

www.dentescatering.com

1 mile from the Circle Drive-In 1990 Scranton-Carbondale Hwy. Blakely, PA

Financing Available No Credit Check

Adams Plaza Parking And

Forum Parking Garage MONTHLY SPOTS AVAILABLE

80

$

00

MONTH

Call For Details Adams Plaza - 343-0050 Forum - 343-4479

SPORTS

content has allowed Lello to continue writing about music without the bands having roots or an upcoming show in northeastern Pennsylvania. “There’s less criteria, I would say, that I need to follow,” he said. “It’s the Wild West. The Internet is the Wild West, which is good, but it also means that there are a million Web sites out there.” The work, he said, is often the same. The rules of writing, editing and reporting don’t change much between print and the web. But the freedom to reach outside the so-called walls of the region is enticing. “It’s the Internet,” Lello said. “We’d right about something on Mars if it was interesting.” Lello said the support of friends in and out of the music community has helped, and the connections he built as a traditional journalist have gotten stronger. “One of the most rewarding

dishing a sword and a shield resembling an Interstate 81 sign. In addition to the launch party, Highway 81 Revisted has already sponsored or co-sponsored shows including a performance by Casio Kids and STRFKR at the River Street Jazz Café in Wilkes-Barre and Record Store Day performances by Title Fight and Miz at the Gallery of Sound’s Mundy Street, WilkesBarre, location.

277144 277899

BLOG

and humbling things is working with really talented people who have a lot of other ways that they could spend their time right now,” he said. “They’ve seen (the site) and they respect it enough that they want to help or they’re just good friends, or both.” Prairie Queen Records owner Bill Orner, for example, serves as an interim webmaster and local musician Brian Langan designed the logo, an owl bran-

the fire, smoke, blood and fear spanning three generations of the “family business.” An additional event is set for Friday, June 24, at Tiffany’s Tap & Grill, 291 Main St., Eynon. For more information, visit www.fire-menbook.com or www.tributebooks.com.

ARTS

Scranton City Council President Janet Evans “Pursue your education so that you can provide a better life for your own children than you yourself had and you will also serve as a positive role model. Another one was, ‘Live within your budget.’” Evans’ mother, Marion Tom-

Evans

Tribute Books sets signing events NEWS

I

n honor of Mother’s Day, the staff of Go Lackawanna asked some local elected and public officials about the best advice they’ve ever reJoyce ceived from their moms.

23


24

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Brush with fame takes backseat What could be better than hanging out backstage with some of your favorite musicians? Well, a few things, actually. With this job, you never know who you’ll be rubbing elbows with or calling up week to week. I’ve interviewed politicians, business owners, community leaders, actors, writers, artists, comedians, and musicians, each having their own distinct quirks and personalities. Sometimes it’s easy to get swept up in their lives, and every once in a while, something more comes out of that half-hour or so you share – it’s just not always in the way you’d expect. Sometimes I get the honor of talking to someone I’ve followed or looked up to for years, so when I had the opportunity to talk to Lajon Witherspoon, the lead singer of heavy metal act Sevendust, I was beyond thrilled. Here is a band I had listened to since I was about 14 years old, and their music had gotten me through some rough times throughout my life. After seeing them several times in concert, it was surreal to have their singer only a phone call away. We ended up talking for about 20 minutes, and he was as nice and accommodating as I expected him to be. He was humbled by any praise I laid on him, and by the end of our conversation, I think he realized the kind of fan I was. Out of nowhere and without solicitation, he gave me his personal phone number and said to call him the day of the concert so that we could meet in person backstage. If I had to guess, I’m sure the look on my face at that moment was priceless. Backstage partying? This was a new era for me.

Once the initial shock wore off, my pessimistic side took over and said, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” After all, I’m sure this guy does hundreds of interviews, and I doubt mine really stood out that much from the rest. Sevendust opened for Avenged Sevenfold at the Mohegan Sun Arena in Wilkes-Barre. My little brother’s favorite band is Avenged, so I knew I’d be taking him to the show whether this fabled meeting happened or not. I was sure to secure two tickets, just in case. My cynicism was not unfounded. The day of the show, I left a voicemail message for Lajon as well as a text, but received no response. As a last ditch effort, I contacted the tour manager and asked if there was any possibility of this happening, but he said that security was only allowing about 10 people backstage and they were already over their limit. Either Lajon hadn’t checked his phone or he just didn’t want to let me down – whichever reason was fine by me. Maybe I even wrote his number down wrong in my excitement. Whatever the circumstances, I wasn’t taking it personally. This isn’t to say, however, that I wasn’t a bit disappointed inside. I was up front about the odds with my brother, Justin, when I told him the story, so he wasn’t expecting to meet anyone any more than I was. In fact, he seemed just thrilled to be at the show at all, considering this was his first real concert.

My first show was also at his age, 16, seeing The Offspring and Lit at Montage Mountain. I remember not being able to see much from my cheap lawn seats, but it was a nice, easygoing introduction into my lifelong passion for live music. For me, it was just another show, but for him, this was something he’d remember for the rest of his life. I knew that because he is just like I was at that age – a quiet, introverted geek who enjoys his escapism. He wears his headphones almost constantly, just as I did, and the music offered the reason, understanding, and motivation that many of my peers at the time didn’t. Eventually I got over the teen angst, and I’m sure he will too, but in that moment, it was interesting to watch history repeat itself. Our seats were excellent and gave us a perfect view of the stage. I was pretty sure Justin wasn’t quite ready for the pit, despite his enthusiasm. Sevendust tore it up like they always do, and while I didn’t find Three Days Grace nearly as impressive as most of the crowd seemed to, I could tell Justin was having a good time. That’s when I saw the last person I thought I’d see that night, at least up close. Lajon sat in an empty seat just a few feet away from mine in an empty section a few aisles over. He was watching Three Days Grace while several fans swarmed him, asking for pictures or autographs. Here was my chance to finally get backstage. Several possible scenarios were running through my head, but then it occurred to me that tonight wasn’t about me. I had my one-on-one interview and I had my tickets – why push my luck? If we did get backstage, would Justin even be able

to see Avenged take the stage or would we be hanging outside on a tour bus? So, I let it go. Lajon eventually got up and walked in the back without a word exchanged, but as soon as the lights came on and the headliners began, Justin’s face lit up brighter than the flames that shot up from the stage. Here was a kid that I hadn’t seen smile in weeks acting like a total goofball in public, waving his hands in the air and taking pictures like crazy. As he posed for one with the stage behind him and a huge grin on his face, it was clear that I made the right decision. He was completely enamored by what he was wit-

nessing, and by that point, so was I. It was obvious that we had another metalhead in the family, and the earlier disappointment I felt faded and made way for pride as I watched my little brother give the horns. All the autographs or bragging rights in the world can’t top that first concert feeling. Sometimes, when the best laid plans go awry, it can often be for the best, as it simply makes way for other opportunities. Or, in this case, it forces you to see the one in front of you the entire time. Thanks, Lajon. Rich Howells writes about pop culture and more for Go Lackawanna. Read ‘Infinite Improbability’ each week.

VINEYARDS BY THE VIADUCT SATURDAY, MAY 14TH 2011 RAIN OR SHINE 11:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. NICHOLSON CARNIVAL GROUNDS JUST OFF RT 92 ON PARK AVE., NICHOLSON $15 ADVANCE TICKETS - $25 AT THE GATE PURCHASE ONLINE AT: www.NicholsonFireCo.com OR AT: NICHOLSON DINER, THE OFFICE BAR & GRILL, NIMBLE HILL WINERY, LOCHEN’S MARKET, LOCHEN-CHASE, PEOPLES NEIGHBORHOOD BANK, HOTEL ALMONT, INC.

Commemorative Wine Glass to the first 1,300!

FEATURING: ANTLER RIDGE WINERY • PAVLICK HILL VINEYARD NIMBLE HILL VINEYARD & WINERY MAIOLATESI WINE CELLARS • BARTOLAI WINERY GROVEDALE WINERY • NORTHERN WINE & SPIRITS GAY’S TRUE VALUE - WINE MAKING SUPPLIES Arts, Crafts, Clothing, Hand-Made Items, Homemade Specialties. HOT AIR BALLOON TETHERING WITH ENDLESS MOUNTAINS HOT AIR BALLOONS LIVE WOOD CARVING DEMONSTRATION BY THE SAWPTICIAN LIVE MUSIC FROM:

THE COAL TOWN ROUNDERS, MIDNIGHT SONS, AND RETRO ROCKET

SPONSORED BY: PEOPLE’S NEIGHBORHOOD BANK, SOUTHWESTERN ENERGY, GERTRUDE HAWK, ROSENN, JENKINS & GREENWALD, CABOT OIL & GAS AND WILLIAMS PARTNERS LP


Sunday, May 8, 2011

25

GOLackawanna

CLICK: World Laughter Day

& 2011

The times leader

CIVICS:

Thomas Hogan Omeed Firouzi Samantha Snyder Gabrielle Richards Robert Kost

Selena Adamshick Michael Papi Shelley Black Lauren Skudalski

BUSINESS SKILLS:

Neil Mattern Loren Schott Rachel Spect Delilah Van Gorden

MATHEMATICS: Timothy Yurish Noah James Long Danielle Phillips Katelyn Arcelay Ami Patel

FOREIGN LANGUAGES:

Brianna Winter Jackeline Torres Amanda Lara Samantha Martin Cicely Hazell

MUSIC:

Comedienne Michelle Morgan

ART:

ENGLISH & LITERATURE:

Rebecca Ann Richards Caitlin Vitale Joseph Hornak

COMPUTERS & TECHNOLOGY: Jacob Daniels Sergey Ivanov Karisa Nicole Calvitti

JOURNALISM: Brianna Wise Matthew Morgis Rebecca Farrell

SCIENCE & ENVIRONMENT:

Letitia Warunek Carly Sokach Alexandra Elizabeth Chapin Sara Brozena Pierce Donovan

PERFORMING ARTISTS:

SERVICE TO THEE COMMUNITY:

Linnae Homza Courtney Sult ne Morgan Elise McGrane Erin Ryan Ronald Klepadlo

SPORTS

Megan Gallagher Kelcie Lushefski Molly Allan Eric Petterson II Julia Kundratic

Jillian A. Puhalla Meghan Hourigan Courtney Prozeralik Katie Joyce Amanda Urbanski

The final winners for each category will be announced at The Times Leader’s 2011 Best & Brightest Awards Ceremony to be held at The Woodlands Inn & Resort on Wednesday, May 11, 2011.

N NUMBER

ONE AUD AUDITED

NEWS NEWSPAPER

IN LUZERN LUZERNE COUNTY – AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)

Comedian Kenny Jay

RICH HOWELLS PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

ARTS

Brandon Harding Alexandra Petsuck Sara Lynn Kathryn Tressa

Comedian Bobby Keller performs as Melvin McPhinnis.

ATHLETICS:

Each year The Times Leader Best & Brightest program honors local high school students for their scholastic achievements and community service. Listed here are this year’s finalists.

81968

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Mayor Chris Doherty, right, is joined by comedienne Jeannine Luby to proclaim May 1 to 7 ‘World Laughter Week’ in the city. World Laughter Day was observed through events on May 1 in Scranton.

NEWS

Best Brightest


PAGE 26

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011

TO ADVERTISE IN THE DINING GUIDE CALL:

Paul Andrews - 558.0845 • T’Shaiya Stephenson - 558-0845 • Karen Fiscus - 829.7291

The Real Deal...

FREE Regular Size Fry

with purchase of steak & soda

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Sunday-Thursday 11am-10pm Friday & Saturday 11am-Midnight 532 MOOSIC STREET, SCRANTON, PA

570-341-5100


Grille THEOS METRO Ipanema Brazilian Churrascaria Greek American Cusine

Full Menu Available: Steak, Seafood, Fish, Chops, Pastas, Burgers & more

2 for Tuesdays Mondays $ 95 2 Can Eat for $22 12 oz. Lobster Tail Dinner 24 Thursdays - Lamb Night Wednesdays - Greek Night $ 00 2 off any Greek Specialty Entree Dinners Starting At $1295

Treat Mom Today Open at Noon

Sundays - FREE Kids Meal With Each Adult Entree (under 10)

1911 N. Main Ave. Scranton, PA 18508 Phone: 570-558-0742 Fax: 570-558-0743 Offers not valid on holidays

BAR HOURS: 11:00AM-2:00AM 7 DAYS A WEEK

596 Mercer Ave. Kingston 283-2050

For A Complete Menu & Coupon Visit www.theosmetrorestaurant.com

JOIN US AT OUR SCRANTON LOCATION THURSDAYS FROM 5PM TO ? FOR HAPPY HOUR. $1.00 OFF ANY SANDWICH 715 N. STATE STREET, CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.MYCANGIANOS.COM 570-586-4896 FAX: 586-0573 400 SPRUCE STREET, SCRANTON • 570-207-2667

CREEK SIDE GROVE

WWW.MYCANGIANOSCREEKSIDEGROVE.COM CATERING • GIFT BASKETS • GOURMET ITALIAN SPECIALITIES • DINNERS • DELI • DESSERTS • PASTRIES & MORE!

Special Deal!!! FREE Dessert on Your Birthday!

Tues, Wed, Thurs, & Sun 5-9pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm

www.ipanemagrille.com

The Real Deal...

FREE Regular Size Fry

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Sunday-Thursday 11am-10pm Friday & Saturday 11am-Midnight

with purchase of steak & soda

532 MOOSIC STREET, SCRANTON, PA

570-341-5100

Lunch Served Mon.-Sat. 11am-4pm Dinner Served 7 Days a Week

Daily Lunch Specials Starting at $8.50 Catering and Party Platters Available for All Events FREE Delivery BYOB GERRITY’S SHOPPING CENTER | CLARKS SUMMIT

570.585.1250

w w w. a t a m i s u s h i . c o m

TABLE TALK Specializing In Italian American Cuisine Catering is available • Receive a FREE in private party dinner on your Buy one entree at regular price, birthday (call for room. Call today for get second entree of equal or details.) lesser value, for 1/2 off with pricing and details. this coupon. • Hours are flexible On and Off-site Not valid with other offers. Coupon to accomodate must be presented prior to ordering. catering for all Expires: 6-30-11 private parties. occasions.

Happy Mother’s Day!

1/2 OFF Entree

Biagio A. Dente, CEC,AAC, HOF Blaise Alan Dente, CCC

984 E. Drinker Street • Dunmore 570.348.0188 Open 7 Days a Week Mon-Thurs 11am - 10pm Fri & Sat 11am - 11pm Sunday 3pm - 9pm Accepts:

Biagio, Emma Jean, Alan & Staff at Dente’s Catering & Rental Co. Voted Best Caterer & Best Chef 2010

DENTE’S ’S

Catering & Tent Rental

655-0801

www.dentescatering.com


GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011

ARTS

NEWS

28

BRADLEY LANPHEAR PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

1. Justin Ondrey of Throop. 2. CAC NEPA Director Mary Ann LaPorta runs with participants at Sunday’s event.

For the

KIDS

SPORTS

T

he Children’s Advocacy Center of NEPA held its annual “Moonlight in May” event at Nay Aug Park on May 1. The event, which serves as a fundraiser for the multidisciplinary approach to helping child victims of sexual and physical abuse, featured a children’s fun run, and a 5K and 10K walk/run. Awards were given for top overall finishers, master men and women runners, and top finishers in 10 different age brackets. For more info on the Children’s Advocacy Center, call (570) 969-7313.

4. Children participate in a fun run at the seventh annual Moonlight Run.


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

29

3. Runners take off at the start of races inside Nay Aug Park.

NEWS ARTS

6. From left, Roseanne Puchilowski and Melony Plisko, both of Moosic; Stephanie Tilberry, of Taylor; and Alex Puchilowski, of Moosic. 7. Don; Joey, 6; and Laurie Ewing, of Tobyhanna, with their dog Chica. 8. From left, Logan, 5; Paul; Cameron, 2; Karen; and Jaimee, 3, all of Old Forge.

SPORTS

5. Billy Fox, 7, of Scranton.


NEWS

30

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011

“T

By ROGER MOORE

The Orlando Sentinel

SPORTS

ARTS

hor,”thefirstsummercomic-bookblockbusteroutofthe gate, has a lot of the winking wit we’ve come to expect from post-“Spider Man” Marvel movies. It has a hunky, self-mockingyoungstar,solidsupportfromacoupleofOscarwinners and the slick sheen of state-of-the-art effects.

“You know, for a crazy homeless But if it weren’t for those effects, for all the story’s attention to “fran- person, he’s pretty cut.” The film’s best scenes involve the chise” and “there’s more money to be made from FUTURE movies,” it Norse god as fish out of water. He might feel more than incomplete. stalksintoadinerandbellows“Ineed Simply put, the movie’s alien-god- SUSTENANCE!” He hurls coffee stuck-on-the-real-world (Earth) cups to the floor to ask for seconds. scenes sing. And the ones in a digital He also gets into a drinking game Merrie Olde Land of Oz where Odin, with fellow Scandinavian (SkarsThor, Loki and the Nordic gods re- gard), a scientist wrapping his head around the notion that side are little better than thismaybe“the(mythic) glossy filler. stories I heard as a child” The esteemed Ken- IF YOU GO come to life. Portman has neth Branagh wasn’t What: “Thor” wholly able to overcome Starring: Chris Hems- a great gift at delivering warm-for-Thor’s-form that “creation myth” worth, Natalie Portlooks that are both sexy partofanyepicsagawith man, Anthony Hopand funny. Dennings has simple effects. But once kins, Tim Hiddleston, the punchlines, reacting he leaves “the Realm Kat Dennings Directed by: Kenneth to Thor the way most of Eternal,” Asgard, where Branagh us would. Odin (Anthony Hop- Running time: 114 Thor’s first words, kins) rules, things pick minutes staggering to his feet on up. In a drawn-out first Rated: PG-13 Earth, “Hammer. HAMact, Odin tries to keep ★★★ MER!,” earn a “We know the peace with the warlike Frost Giants. But his headstrong you’re hammered” from her. Meanwhile, a lot of scheming is goson, Thor (Chris Hemsworth) isn’t having it. So Odin kicks Thor out in ing on back on Asgar. Thor’s skulking thehopehewill“castasideallselfish” brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) is up impulses. He tosses Thor’s hammer to no good, and Thor’s comrades through the wormhole that exiles need Mr. Hammertime’s help. And him to Earth, too. If Thor ever on Earth, the secret S.H.I.E.L.D. proves worthy, he’ll be able to agency (Clark Gregg and Jeremy Renner included) is trying to get this heft that hammer again. On Earth, hot young as- situation under control without havtrophysicist Jane Foster ing to involve Captain America, Nick (Natalie Portman) is Fury or Ironman. All that complicated Marvel interinvestigating astral anomalies with her connection feels tedious here. But Scandinavian mentor Hemsworth, Hopkins (a tiny part), (Stellan Skarsgard) Portman and Dennings make “Thor” and her dizzy science- work. And as comic-book over-satimpaired intern (Kat urationsetsinoverthelong,hotsumDennings). They’re the mer, we may look back on this one first humans Thor meets with fondness and the reassuring onarriving, banished. Andthe thought that with this possible franintern is impressed with this blond chise, there is room for and hope for improvement. lunatic’s physique.


Sunday, May 8, 2011

Fight for miners retold

“It was nice to hear the words come to life from the man who I wrote them for, but my job is to give him everything he needs to put on a great performance, and right now I think I have big chunks that are stumbling blocks,” Gordon said. “Now I know it, but I need to fix those so he can do the best job he can do.”

UpstatePA

Wings&WineFest

Saturday, May 14th

11am–5pm

Whipple Performing Arts Studio

Village Shopping Center

Route 29 South

COME FOR THE WINGS! Starlite Playhouse Wing Cook-off

Tunkhannock, PA

COME FOR THE WINE! Several Pennsylvania Wineries

STAY FOR A FULL DAY OF

ARTS

FUN!

GET YOUR TICKETS IN ADVANCE & SAVE! Info: www.NEPAwinecountry.com or 570.836.5253 First 1,000 guests receive commemorative wine glass.

Wine Country NEPA

An NEPA Wine Country Event

Luxury Townhomes, Incredible Views!     

SPORTS

Read under the working title “For the Least of Them,” the one-man play is told from Curran’s perspective and delves into the man’s historical impact. As the founding pastor of Holy Saviour Church in Wilkes-Barre in 1895, he fought for the rights of local miners, many of whom were members of his own parish. Friends with both John Mitchell, president of the United Mine Workers of America, and U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt in his time, Curran played a significant role in settling the Anthracite Coal Strike of 1902. The emotional story also gives audiences insight into the daily lives of the workers for the Pennsylvania Coal Co. Still a work in progress, the first half of the roughly two-hour play takes place in late October of 1902 in Curran’s room in Holy Saviour Church, and the second act occurs about four months later. The Rev. William Pickard allowed the basement to be used for the intimate performance, attended by about 20 people. “He was a tribute to our area.

Gary Anderson portrays Father John Curran during a reading of "For the Least of Them," a play-inprogress about the "fighting labor priest" on Wednesday in the basement of the rectory of Parish of St. John Neumann in South Scranton.

NEWS

S

CRANTON – In the basement of the rectory of St. John Neumann Parish on Wednesday night, the spirit of the area’s “Labor Priest,” the Rev. John J. Curran, was resurrected for one night of live theater. Award-winning actor Gary Anderson, who was in town to portray historical lawyer Clarence Darrow in “Honoring the Judiciary: Clarence Darrow’s Judicial Perspective” the following night, performed the first ever live reading of local playwright K.K. Gordon’s latest work, which chronicles the struggles of Curran and the mining community he supported in the early 1900s.

He was right in our backyard; he was born and raised in Hawley. He was a very influential person, a very courageous person, and a very saintly man,” Pickard said. Gordon wrote the play with Anderson in mind and said it took at least three weeks of 10hour days to research and write the show. “Putting this together was a remarkable experience. I knew nothing about Father Curran when I met Gary. After working with him on one of his Darrow plays, we went looking for Father Curran’s grave and didn’t come close to finding it. But on the way, he said, ‘I’d really like to have somebody write a play about Father Curran,’ and I said, ‘I do more than turn the lights on!’” he recalled with a laugh. “There are some bugs in this play, but I’m proud of it. I felt I got to know this man very well to the point where I was having nightmares about losing my mule in the mines…My connection with reality was gone for about two months.” Known across the country for his plays about “Scopes Monkey Trial” lawyer Darrow, Anderson was thrilled to work with the “remarkable” playwright on another history-laden piece. “Plays and the creative forces that go into them, such as K.K.’s great talent, can also be an instrument of social justice to remind us of how far we’ve come and how far we still have yet to go, so if that moves you to tears, then good.” During a question and answer session after the performance, several members of the audience said how moved they were by Gordon’s words. Local playwright Art Walsh, who was sent the script in advance, said he could only read through the first five pages because “it hurt.” Among other touching scenes in the play, Curran describes the pain of giving last rites to a 7year-old girl who died in the mines. “I can’t imagine a time when we did that to our children,” Anderson told the audience. Gordon said that once edits and revisions are made, the play will once again be performed for the public at Marywood University during Thanksgiving weekend later this year.

RICH HOWELLS PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

1,350-2,300 sq. ft. Immediate Occupancy Maintenance-Free Lifestyle Minutes to PA Turnpike and I-81 Planned Amenities—Pool & Clubhouse Directions: From I-81 South take the Pittston Exit to Route 315 South. At first light turn right onto Oak Street (about 2 miles) turn right onto Pittston Bypass. At next light, turn left onto William Street (3 blocks) turn right at Fulton Street. At 4-way Stop cross Butler Street and enter Grandview Drive.

Models Open Daily Contact: Susan Parrick, Director/Marketing & Sales

877-442-8439

287103

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

31

GOLackawanna


32

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011

NEWS

‘Broom’ good for a laugh

DAVID LEE

SB-18527 (L-r) KATE HUDSON as Darcy and GINNIFER GOODWIN as Rachel and in Alcon Entertainments romantic comedy SOMETHING BORROWED, a Warner Bros. Pictures release.

COLIN COVERT Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

L

et’s hope audiences craving matrimonial entertainment got their quota from the William and Kate Show. Otherwise they might fall prey to “Something Borrowed,” an expectationcrushing offering that falls far short of rom-com industry best practices.

I can’t imagine an audience for this other than backers, relatives or friends of the filmmakers, and even they will find their mettle tested. Deeply dimpled Ginnifer Goodwin is a wallflower lawyer, Kate Hudson is her domineering alpha-blonde best friend, and Colin Egglesfield is apparently the only available man in New York City. He and Goodwin were study partners in law school on their way to something more when her smooth, confident pal swooped in and snatched him like a hawk seizing a rabbit. Now the couple is about to marry, while Goodwin smiles bravely from the sidelines with aching, unrequited longing and holds back tears. The film is a two-hour pity party for her character, as her hopes for Eg-

IF YOU GO

What: “Something Borrowed” Starring: Kate Hudson, Ginnifer Goodwin, Colin Egglesfield Directed by: Luke Greenfield Running time: 103 minutes Rated: PG-13 for sexual content, including dialogue, and some drug material ★

glesfield to snap out of it and realize he loves her are raised and dashed. We learn quite late in the game that the handsome fellow is also high society, but he’s such a wimpy, passive, calfeyed nonentity it’s hard to imagine either the dominatrix or the dishrag wanting him. Still, Goodwin regards him with a love slave’s beaming adulation and quavers, “I never thought someone like you could like someone like me.” It’s one thing to root for a plucky underdog, but it’s tough to maintain sympathy for a masochist. The film duly grinds through scene after rusty mechanical scene. Yes, there is a sad walk in the rain. Yes, the frenemies confirm their bond by performing a tightly choreographed oldies number. Yes, there are caramelized New York vistas, standard comic friends and over-insistent musical cues. In the script’s only laugh-outloud line, one character de-

scribes summer in the Hamptons as “a zombie movie directed by Ralph Lauren.” With that throwaway joke, this lifeless, mindless enterprise critiques itself.

IF YOU GO

The pleasant but insubstantial comedy “Jumping the Broom” — produced by Dallasbased preacher T.D. Jakes, who also has a small part in the film — is a culture-clash comedy about two African-American families squaring off during a weekend-long wedding on Martha’s Vineyard. Sabrina (Paula Patton) is the well-to-do bride, whose uptight mother (Angela Bassett) barks orders at her household staff and occasionally lapses into highfalutin French. Jason (Laz Alonso) is the groom, an investment banker from a workingclass Brooklyn family. His mother (Loretta Devine) is a postal worker, overprotective and easily slighted, determined that the wedding be a traditional African-American one. Both families, of course, have secrets that are revealed in melodramatic, not-entirely-convincing fashion. Inevitably, the bonds between Sabrina and Jason are tested, only to be finally strengthened. In other words, you’ve seen this sort of wedding-from-hell movie many times before.

What: “Jumping The Broom” Starring: Paula Patton, Mike Epps, Angela Bassett, Laz Alonso, Loretta Devine Directed by: Salim Akil Running time: 108 minutes Rated: PG-13 for adult content, strong language ★★★

Sabrina is supposed to be a morally complicated figure , and Jason has his own share of intriguing hang-ups about his family. Yet there’s nothing at stake between them; of course, they’re going to end up together and help their warring families find common ground. Still, there’s something to be said for a movie that attempts to reckon with class and cultural differences among contemporary African-Americans. And the filmmakers are at least smart enough to fill out the story with sweet subplots and funny supporting players. Hardly groundbreaking or even especially memorable, but “Jumping the Broom” (the title refers to a wedding tradition among black families) nonetheless leaves a smile on your face.

The Best Kept Secret In Your Backyard

Senior Vacations - Close To Home and Easy On Your Wallet Bocce Ball • Mini Golf • Shuffle Board • Nature Walks Fishing • Boat Rides And Much Much More!

Call Today (570) 488-6129 Waymart, PA

287101

SPORTS

ARTS

‘Borrowed’ an ‘I don’t’

CHRISTOPHER KELLY McClatchy Newspapers


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

33

NEWS ARTS SPORTS


PAGE 34

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011

Com

All Major and Minor Repairs

19.99 19 99

$

EVERY DAY SPECIALS

OIL CHANGE, FILTER & LUBE OR

34.99

$

OIL CHANGE, FILTER & LUBE FULL SYNTHETIC *DIESEL EXTRA

944 SHOEMAKER AVE. WEST WYOMING • 613-9222

MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5, SATURDAY 8-NOON

Bingo’s

Hoagies Great Hoagies

ONLY

2

$

50

503 Slocum Street Swoyersville • 287-4001 Mon-Sat 9-3 or until sold out

with

You Could Win A FREE GAS CARD.

A new winner each day, so enter as often as you like.

25

$

or a

Gas Card Each Day

500

$

Grand Prize Gas Card

Read The Times Leader daily to see if you’re a winner. Fuel Up Contest Rules:

The Times Leader is giving away a $25 gas card each day, and a $500 card to the grand prize winner on May 29, 2011. Register for your chance to win by filling out the official entry form to the right

and dropping it off at a participating location. Read The Times Leader each day to see if you’re a winner. Must be 18 or older to win. See specific contest rules and details at timesleader.com.

Drop Off Your Entry Form At One Of These Locations.

Robert’s Automotive Cartridge World Bingo’s Hoagies Borino Tire & Auto Center

Cooks Pharmacy Cross Valley Federal Credit Union Humphrey’s Bootery & Bags Orloski’s Car Wash & Lube

National Paint & Supply Co. Ochman’s Coins & Jewelry Schiel’s Family Markets Philly Subs & Pizzeria The Computer Shop

BRING THIS COUPON TO PPLY Y NATIONAL PAINT & SUPPLY AND GET

$5 off of Breath Safe™

per gallon of any finish

Maximum of $25 off. Valid thru 5-31-11. One coupon per household. Cannot combine with any other offers.

1154 WYOMING AVE., WYOMING • 288-1408

Please return completed entry form to a participating store by noon on May 26, 2011. Winners will be chosen through a random drawing. Name: ________________________________________________ Address: ______________________________________________ City: ____________________________State: ____ Zip: _________ Phone: ___________________________________ E-mail Address: _________________________________________ Do you subscribe to The Times Leader? ❑ Yes Would you like to subscribe? ❑ Yes ❑ No No purchase necessary. Prizes have no cash value and are nontransferable. Winners agree to having their name and photo used for publicity. Copies may be examined at our 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre office. The winners will be determined through random drawing from all entries received during duration of promotion. This newspaper cannot answer or respond to telephone calls or letters regarding the contest. Sponsors’ employees and their immediate families are not eligible to enter.

❑ No

NUMBER

ONE

AUDITED

NEWSPAPER

IN LUZERNE COUNTY – AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)

285470

ert’sive Robm ot Autpolete Car Care

Fuel Up


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

35

KEEPING SCORE TOM ROBINSON

M

OSCOW – Four of the most impressive streaks in Lackawanna County high school sports continued Monday when the Valley View boys and Abington Heights girls claimed Lackawanna Track Conference Division 1 titles. Valley View won its 41st straight conference meet and sixth straight division title with an 87-63 victory over host North Pocono.

Abington Heights extended its streaks to 31 meets and five championships with a 114-36 rout at Delaware Valley. Winning championships is business as usual for the Cougars and Lady Comets, but this season’s title had extra significance for Valley View, which returned to Division 1 after winning five straight titles in Division 2. “It was a lot more special,” Valley View coach Brian Kearney said. “Not taking away from any other year, but it was special moving up and being able to win our division anyway.” North Pocono was the defend-

ing Division 1 champion and entered the regular-season finale undefeated and tied for the lead. The Cougars quickly established control by winning the first seven events on the track, including two relays, one of which was a school record time of 8:12.7 by Ryan Campbell, Aaron Wilkinson, Jordan Siddons and Brandon Bednash in the 3200. Valley View opened a 51-22 lead before North Pocono won on the track for the first time. The Cougars wound up outscoring the TroSee TRACK, Page 38 J. MICHAEL SCHIRRA PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

SPORTS

See ROBINSON, Page 40

ARTS

Valley View’s Mike Fazio leads North Pocono runners Paul Almedia, right, and DeShaun Boone in the 200 meter race on Monday at North Pocono.

SCRANTON – If the Lackawanna Track Conference was going to catch up to the Abington Heights girls, this seemed like the year to get the job done. Instead, the Lady Comets were celebrating again this week when the regular-season ended with a fifth straight division title and the postseason began with Thursday’s championship in the Jordan Relays. Abington Heights has won five straight and seven of the last eight Class AAA girls’ titles at the Jordan Relays. Relays have always been a strong suit of the Lady Comets and they were again Thursday when the 50 points – out of a possible 60 – put up by Abington Heights was the most of any of the four champions. The Lady Comets have kept rolling even after losing three straight strong graduating classes, capped by the 2010 class of state champion and current University of Pittsburgh sprinter Jordan Hoyt and multiple statemedal winners Krista Matsko and Brittney Martin. All three had relays among their state medals. “We have a very young group of girls with very big shoes to fill based on our last four years,” Abington Heights coach Frank Passetti said. “We had sophomores and freshmen all over the track. They really held up well to the pressure and gave it all they have.” Seniors like Stephanie Lalos, Sarah Gronsky and Maggie Fruehan and junior Elisia Cadman certainly have made major contributions, but Abington Heights would not have been

NEWS

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Comets continue reign at relays


36

GOLackawanna

Sunday, May 8, 2011

HIGH SCHOOL NOTEBOOK

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Four homers pound Pocono

Four innings. Four at-bats. Four home runs. Dan Pisanchyn turned in the ultimate 4-for-4 effort for the Abington Heights baseball team Thursday afternoon, hitting homers in each at-bat to help the Comets end the Lackawanna League Division 1 game at North Pocono in just four innings, 25-10. Pisanchyn nearly duplicated the effort of Scranton’s Tyler Buckley, who hit four home runs in four swings on the same field in a 2009 game. Thursday was a big day for sluggers. Joe McCarthy hit two home runs for Division 1 leader Scranton, which extended the league’s only unbeaten record through nine games in a 10-4 victory over Delaware Valley. BOYS’ TENNIS Abington Heights, Scranton Prep and Holy Cross finished off Lackawanna League division championship seasons. The Comets and Cavaliers went unbeaten while winning Divisions 1 and 2. Holy Cross needed a playoff victory over rival Dunmore to take Division 3. District 2 team tournament play got underway Thursday but the first matches involving Lackawanna County teams are not until Monday. Fifth-seeded Valley View is at fourth-seeded Montrose and sixth-seeded Holy Cross is at third-seeded Dallas Monday in Class AA quarterfinals. Scranton Prep has a bye into Tuesday’s 12:30 semifinals at Kirby Park. Abington Heights has a bye into the District 2-4 Class AAA semifinals Tuesday at 11:30 at Kirby Park. The finals of both tournaments are scheduled for later Tuesday. Singles play is scheduled for Thursday and Friday with the doubles tournament set for May 18 and 19. BOYS’ VOLLEYBALL Lackawanna Trail (10-1) has clinched at least a tie for the Lackawanna League title. The Lions defeated thirdplace Forest City, 25-14, 23-25, 25-15, 25-14 Thursday then extended their winning streak to five with a 25-17, 25-18, 25-7

FINAL LACKAWANNA LEAGUE BOYS’ TENNIS STANDINGS DIVISION 1 Abington Heights 12-0 Delaware Valley 10-2 Scranton 7-5 Wallenpaupack 6-6 North Pocono 4-8 Honesdale 3-9 West Scranton 0-12 DIVISION 2 Scranton Prep 11-0 Valley View 8-3 Montrose 8-3 Mid Valley 3-8 Western Wayne 1-10 DIVISION 3 Holy Cross 5-4 Dunmore 5-4 Riverside 0-9

romp at Elk Lake Thursday. Only Western Wayne still maintains a chance to tie Lackawanna Trail. DISTRICT 2 CHAMPIONSHIPS Tennis is followed by track and field as District 2 continues to move into its spring championship season. The District 2 junior high championships are Saturday at Scranton Memorial Stadium. The varsity track meets are scheduled for May 16 and 17 at the same site. Class AA boys and girls compete the first day followed by Class AAA the second day. The girls’ soccer tournament, which includes all teams in the same event without separation for enrollment, begins May 19. The boys’ volleyball tournament is scheduled for May 23, 24 and 26. The district will run open tournaments in baseball and softball. Baseball is scheduled to run May 23 to June 2. Softball is planned for May 24 to June 3. WRESTLING Rule changes are ahead in high school wrestling. The Figure 4 leg lock around the head will now be illegal. A Figure 4 around an opponent’s body or both legs was already illegal. Another change makes the boundary line inbounds, expanding the overall wrestling area. Previously any part of the two-inch wide line was considered out-of-bounds.

Redeemer bests NP

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

D

ALEVILLE – North Pocono’s hopes of a fourth Wyoming Valley Conference boys’ volleyball title in the last five seasons took a major hit Thursday night, but the way the Trojans rallied after a rough start against Holy Redeemer shows that they still are a serious threat to win a fifth straight District 2 Class AA championship.

The Trojans won their first 11 matches before falling to the Royals, 25-13, 28-26, 17-25, 25-22 in the showdown between the last two unbeatens in the conference. “Without a doubt, as a new coach coming in, I wanted to keep the continuity and keep everything together, and we did that,” said Bill Kline, who was named to replace Chris Summa just before the start of preseason practice. “I was around the program because my son (Will) was on the JV team, so I knew what was here. “We had no different expectations than to be where we were going into tonight. I was very confident in the boys and they have responded.” Although they could not pull out a win, the Trojans even had a response to Holy Redeemer’s blazing start in which the Royals seemed to win every battle at the net while opening a 22-9 lead. North Pocono won more points the rest of the way (7773) but was unable to get those that it needed to close out wins in the second and fourth games. “After Game One, we went toe-to-toe with them,” Kline said. North Pocono had a 9-4 lead early in Game Two, lost the advantage, then had it back with a chance at the winning point twice. Pete Alexis, a 6-foot-11 Penn State basketball recruit, had the kills that prevented the Trojans from clinching after leads of 2423 and 26-25.

NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Holy Redeemer’s Peter Alexis hits the ball over North Pocono’s Brent Bisignani, left, and Dom Verdetto, Thursday night at Pocono High School.

North Pocono made him work, but Alexis finished with 24 kills. The Trojans led, 23-9, in Game Three but had to fight off a rally that slowed their momentum some going into what proved to be the final game. Cory Hannon served five straight points for a 21-18 North Pocono lead in Game Four, but Alexis had three more late kills, including on the deciding point. Holy Redeemer had a big week, first beating Coughlin, which started the week in third place, then breaking the tie at the top. “We were looking at this entire week: Coughlin Monday and North Pocono Thursday,” Alexis said. “When you looked at it, everything about the season built up to these two matches.” Robert Wingert had a strong all-around game for the Royals with 39 assists, 14 service points, six kills and four blocks. Dom Verdetto had 10 kills and

seven blocks for North Pocono. Ryan Rinaldi had 20 assists, three kills and four blocks. Tim Cummings had seven kills, three digs and 10 service points. Matt Bartkowski had five kills and three digs. Hannon had 12 service points. “We’re going to see them again,” Kline said. “This was a league match. “The next time we face them is going to be a bit more important, in districts.” Holy Redeemer’s toughest remaining league challenge is with Abington Heights, which moved into third place at 10-2 with a pair of wins. The Royals host the Comets May 17. The latest win for Abington Heights was 25-17, 24-26, 25-15, 25-23 over Dallas Thursday. Drew Shumaker had 11 kills and three digs, Andy McLane had 10 service points and nine kills and Eric Wasser had 35 assists and 15 service points for the Comets.


w w w .va lleych evro let.co m

9 M O DELS 0% AP R O VER 30 EPA EST

2011 C H E V Y

4 5

AL L N E W 2011

AAVV AAILAB I LA B LLEE

L S • LT • LT Z

$

O R

**

1 6,995

LEA S E FOR

$1 7 ,1 7 5

AP R F o rr60 60 M o s

2011

S IL V E RAD O

Stk.#11230,4.8L V 8 4 Sp eed A utom atic,Stabilitrak, D eep T inted G lass,A ir C ond itioning,Fold ing R ear Seat,17” SteelW heels,40/20/40 Seating

0

AP R F o rr60 60 M o s

S TA R TIN G AT

$

1 8,3 99

C H E V Y C AM ARO

$22,7 3 5 $

AP R F o r60 r 60 M o s

24,999

L S • LT • LT Z Stk.#11517

MSR P

S TA R TIN G AT

$

1 8,499

O R

$3 0,43 9

LEA S E FOR

2011 C H E V Y

In clu d es AAR P R eb a te

%% 0 $ 9 17

MSR P

$25,490

S TA R TIN G AT

AP R r7 2 M o s F o r7

P er Mo .

E Q U IN O X

AW D a n d FW D

$

** 9 9 20,2

N EW 2011 S ILV E RAD O HD D URAM AX D IE S E L S IN S TO C K !!

L S • LT • LT Z • 4 C yl.• 6 C yl.

ST K #11458

MSR P

$23 ,490

O

S TA R TIN G AT

C H E V Y TRAV E RS E

0%%

**

**

S TA R TIN G AT

** ** R 9 9 0 $ 9 9 22 23 ,4

FW D & AW D

MSR P

%%

$

**

O R D EERR Y O UR UR CCAM A M AARR O S TA R TIN G AT ER TIBL TI BL E $ C O N V ER , TO TO D AY AY !

1500 E X T C AB 4W D

$3 0,620

IM P AL A

Stk.#11173,3.5L V 6 A utom atic,D ualZ one A ir C ond itioning,Stabilitrak,Six-W ay Pow er D river Seat, P W ,P D L ,T ilt,O nStar,X M Satellite R ad io

Stk.#11735,2.4L D O H C M F I A utom atic, A ir,R em ote K eyless E ntry,A M /F M /C D / M P3,PW ,PD L ,O nStar,X M Satellite

MSR P

1LT • 2LT • 1SS • 2SS

** 9 9 22,9

2011 C H E V Y

S TA R TIN G AT

AP R F o rr60 60 M o s

C O UP E

S TA R TIN G AT

$

%%

2011

Stk. #10531,4.8L V 8,A ir,C argo Sid e D oor,C ustom C loth Seats,A M /F M Stereo,F ull F loor C overing,16” W heels

0%%

Stk.#11570,4.3L V 6 4 Sp eed A utom atic,A ir C ond itioning,L ocking R ear D ifferential, 17” SteelW heels,Stabilitrak w / T raction C ontrol

$ 9 15 0 P er Mo .

2500 C ARG O V AN

$27 ,63 5

L S S E D AN

In clu d es AAR P R eb a te

8’ Bo x

$22,560

2010 C H E V Y E X P RE S S

MSR P

2011 C H E V Y

C H E V Y M AL IBU

1L S S E D AN

O N S E L E CT V E HICL E S

TuTu rn-B rn-B y-Tu y-Tu rn rn N a viga vi ga tio ti o n

MSR P MSR P

2011

u p to

60 m os .

nS ta r O nSta

-S TO CK CK & INI N -STO INI N -B-B O UN UN D

C HE V Y C RUZE

S TA R TIN G AT

S IL V E RAD O

1500 2W D RE G U L AR C AB

M PG HW Y

2011 C H E V Y

LEA S E$ FOR

269

P er Mo .

2011 C H E V Y

S IL V E RAD O

L S 4W D

1500 4W D C RE W C AB

Stk.#11099,4.8L V 8 A uto.,A ir C ond itioning,Stabilitrak, P W ,P D L ,K eyless E ntry,O nStar,X M Satellite R ad io, C hrom e W heels,Pow er H eated M irrors,A M /F M /C D

27 ,495

**

0

%%

MSR P

AP R 60 M o s F o rr60

Stk. #11370,5.3L V 8 A utom atic,C lim ate C ontrol, Stabilitrak w / T raction C ontrol,P W ,P D L , B luetooth,A uto L ocking D ifferential,8 Passenger Seating,T hird R ow Seat,O nStar,X M Satellite

$3 4,505

MSR P

S TA R TIN G AT

$

TAH O E

0

%%

27 ,999

**

$42,7 95

AP R r 60 M o s F o r60

S TA R TIN G AT

$

** 9 9 3 8,4

*Tax & tags additional. ** Price includes all rebates and Ally down Payment Assistance (must finance through Ally) to qualified buyers. Low APR in lieu of rebates. CRUZE: lease for 39 mos at $159 per month plus tax and tags, 12K miles per year, Security deposit is waived, $2519 due at signing to qualified buyers; MALIBU: lease for 39 mos at $179 per month plus tax & tags, 12K miles per year, $1949, first payment, security deposit and tags due at lease due at signing to qualified buyers. EQUINOX: lease for 39 mos at $269 per month plus tax & tags, 12K miles per year, $2459 due at signing (includes security deposit) to qualified buyers. Prior sales excluded. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Must take delivery by May 9, 2011.

K EN W

A L L A CE’S

w w w .v alleyc hev ro let .c o m

V AL L EY CH EV R OL ET The Bes t P rices In

601 KI D D ER STREET, W I LKES-BA RRE, PA

The V a lley! TH E B EST C O V ER AG 100,000-M I L E

821- 2772 • 1- 800- 444- 7172

M

O FF I8 1 TO EX IT 1. B EAR

R IG HT O N

B USIN ESS R O UTE 3 0 9 TO SIX TH LIG HT. JUST B ELO W

AM

5 Y EA R S O F C O U R TES Y TR A N S P O R TA TIO N 100,000-M I L E S 5 Y EA R S O F R O A D S ID E A S S IS TA N C E

W hic hev er c om es firs t. S ee dealer for lim ited w arranty details .

W

YO M IN G

O PEN SATUR D AY 8 AM -12 N O O N M O N . -FR I. 8 AM -6 :3 0 PM

ER ICA .

5 Y EA R P O W ER TR A IN LIM ITED W A R R A N TY

100,000-M I L E S

O N .TH U R S. 8 : 3 0 8 : 0 0 pm ; FR I. 8 : 3 0 7: 0 0 pm ; SAT. 8 : 3 0 5 : 0 0 pm

EX IT 170 B

E IN

N E W S E RV ICE HOURS

V A LLEY M ALL.

2 2 1 Co nyngha m Ave., W ilk es -B a rre

5 70 .8 2 1.2 778


38

GOLackawanna

TRACK NEWS

Continued from page 35 Track

jans, 61-26, on the track to make up for North Pocono’s 37-26 advantage in field events. Brandon Jackson swept both hurdles events during the fast start and added to a win in the 1600 relay. Mike Fazio was also part of three wins in the 200, 400 relay and 1600 relay. Bednash, Wilkinson, Siddons and Nyeem Wartman won twice each. Bednash won the 400 and Wilkinson the 1600 during the strong start. Wartman had wins in the See TRACK, Page 40

SPORTS

ARTS

FINAL LACKAWANNA TRACK CONFERENCE STANDINGS DIVISION 1 BOYS Valley View..............................7-0 North Pocono...........................6-1 Honesdale ...............................5-2 Scranton Prep.........................4-3 Wallenpaupack .......................3-4 Delaware Valley ......................2-5 Abington Heights ....................1-6 Lakeland ..................................0-7 DIVISION 2 BOYS Dunmore .................................6-0 Holy Cross ................................5-1 Scranton ..................................4-2 Montrose..................................3-3 Riverside .................................2-4 West Scranton..........................1-5 Western Wayne ......................0-6 DIVISION 3 BOYS Elk Lake...................................6-0 Blue Ridge ................................5-1 Mid Valley ................................4-2 Carbondale..............................3-3 Lackawanna Trail ...................2-4 Mountain View .........................1-5 Susquehanna .........................0-6 DIVISION 1 GIRLS Abington Heights ...................7-0 Valley View ...............................6-1 Honesdale ...............................5-2 Wallenpaupack .......................3-4 North Pocono .........................3-4 Scranton Prep.......................2-4-1 Lakeland .................................1-5-1 Delaware Valley ......................0-7 DIVISION 2 GIRLS Western Wayne ......................6-0 Holy Cross ................................5-1 Montrose .................................4-2 West Scranton.........................3-3 Dunmore..................................2-4 Riverside...................................1-5 Scranton..................................0-6 DIVISION 3 GIRLS Elk Lake...................................6-0 Lackawanna Trail.....................5-1 Mid Valley ................................4-2 Carbondale..............................3-3 Mountain View........................2-4 Blue Ridge ................................1-5 Susquehanna .........................0-6

Sunday, May 8, 2011 LOCAL COLLEGE SPORTS RECAP

Tennis players named all-stars GL ONLINE For daily roundups of local college sports, see www.golackawanna.com/sports. TOP STORY University of Scranton sophomore Tim McGurrin was selected as a first-team Landmark Conference men’s tennis all-star in both singles and doubles. Freshman David Teres earned the same all-star status and was selected as the conference Rookie of the Year in voting by the head coaches. McGurrin, a Clarks Summit resident, was 6-0 in the conference at number-two singles and teamed with Teres to go 5-1 in the conference at number-one doubles. Senior Carl Caceres was selected for the fourth straight year, earning a spot on the second team as a singles player. SEASON AWARDS Baptist Bible College’s Kacee Rava was named Colonial States Athletic Conference Rookie of the Year. Rava batted .416 and went 13-2 with two shutouts as a pitcher. Keystone College’s Carissa Iyoob, Marywood University shortstop Kim Lope and outfielder Meghin Palmer and Baptist Bible third baseman Erin Law were among the first-team allstars. BBC catcher Karin Mowry and Marywood designated player Kaitlyn Brennan made the second team. Iyoob, a senior from Valley View, was Keystone’s top hitter and pitcher. She batted .447 to rank fourth in the CSAC and was second among the conference’s pitchers with 105 strikeouts. The honorable mention list includes Marywood third baseman Ashley Dommes, catcher Shawna Sandy and utility player Alexandra Stine, BBC shortstop Stephanie Kreiser, outfielder Heidi Howell and utility player Rava and Keystone designated hitter Stephanie Puckett received honorable mention. Sandy is a Scranton High

JIM O’CONNOR-NJ SPORT PICS

Wyatt Nolan, pictured, and doubles partner Daniel Pfafman won their match against Cabrini College in the CSAC semifinals on Friday.

graduate, Stine is from Valley View and Puckett is from Riverside. Scranton’s Danielle Wylie was a first-team Landmark women’s tennis singles all-star and joined Elisha Connell to form a secondteam doubles combination. Attacker William Roerden and midfielder George Downey IV represented Marywood as first-team Colonial States Athletic Conference men’s lacrosse all-stars. Nick Parks, Nick Johnson, Jimmy Drescher and goalkeeper Jesse Habich made the second team while John Pelligrini received honorable mention. WEEKLY HONORS Keystone College’s Bryan Henry received his third CSAC Baseball Player of the Week award while pitcher Jeremy Beeching made the Honor Roll. Beeching, a senior from Valley View, struck out 13 and allowed just two hits in six innings. PLAYOFF GAMES Marywood and Baptist Bible turned Saturday’s CSAC men’s tennis championship match in Easton into a meeting of local rivals when both won semifinals

Friday. Marywood shut out Cabrini, 5-0, and had commanding leads in two of the matches that were unfinished when the top-seeded Pacers clinched the win, ending the match. Baptist Bible knocked out Keystone College, 5-2, to become the first Defenders men’s team to reach a CSAC final in any sport. Kimberly Commisso had seven goals and an assist Wednesday when Marywood defeated Neumann University, 21-13, in the semifinals to advance to its first CSAC women’s lacrosse final Saturday against GwyneddMercy College. Taylor Nelson and Mike Rufo scored three goals each Wednesday when Scranton defeated Catholic, 12-9, in the Landmark men’s lacrosse semifinals to advance into Saturday’s final against Goucher. Marywood won its first two CSAC softball playoff games, eliminating Baptist Bible, 6-1, Thursday to reach the fourteam, double-elimination portion of the tournament. Stine threw a three-hitter with 12 strikeouts and hit the

game-winning, two-run homer in the fifth inning for the Pacers. Marywood then used homers from Dommes and Brennan to defeat top-seeded Neumann, 5-3, Friday before falling to Centennary, 4-3, later in the day on two runs in the bottom of the seventh. Moravian defeated Scranton, 7-1, Friday in the first game of the Landmark Conference’s four-team, double-elimination softball tournament. Scranton cut into a six-goal deficit and got four goals from Katie Slade, but Drew held on for a 10-8 triumph Wednesday in a Landmark women’s lacrosse semifinal. NEW COACHES Dominique Lemire-Ross has been hired to take over the women’s tennis program at Marywood University. Lemire-Ross spent the last three seasons as head coach at Dallas High School. Keystone College named Keith Moore, an assistant at Elmira College the past two seasons, as its new head men’s soccer coach. - Compiled by Tom Robinson


Sunday, May 8, 2011

GOLackawanna

S

BILL ARSENAULT provisional effort. “It’s awesome and the best feeling ever to set a school record at the Penn Relays,” Doyle said. “I had a lot of adrenaline during the event. Everybody was cheering and clapping so that added to the excitement. When I let my first throw of the finals go, it felt almost perfect and I knew it would be a personal best when I let it go.” Doyle traveled to Shippensburg last Saturday for the Paul Kaiser Invitational and won the shot (45-2), finished second in the discus (128-6) and had a personal best in the hammer to finish fourth (143-8). She will compete in the PSAC Championships next weekend in Slippery Rock. She was named Freshman of the Year in last year’s meet after finishing first in the shot (44-2), 10th in the discus (108-09) and 15th in the hammer (132-10). She’s improved on all three marks this season. STINE IN THE RUNNING Albright senior Gabby Stine (Valley View) is competing in the Middle Atlantic Conference Outdoor Track Championships this weekend. “Gabby has qualified in the 3000 meter steeplechase,” coach Deneen Ebling said. “I also expect her to run a leg of the 4x800 relay.” The versatile Stine has career marks in the 800 (2:42.27), the 1500 (5:25.88), the 5000 (21:43.39) and the mile (6:03.40). She prepped for the MAC meet by posting a 1500 time of 5:37.29 in the Paul Kaiser Classic at Shippensburg. “Gabby continues to be a quiet leader on the team and strives to improve her performances,” Ebling said. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Sophomore pitcher Emily Orr is expected to play a more significant role on next season’s Fairfield softball team.

SPORTS

DOYLE NAILS HER SHOT April Doyle picked the perfect place to set the school record in the shot put – in the Penn Relays. Doyle (Lakeland) is a sophomore at Kutztown University and one of the top performers in the weights with the women’s track team. At the 177th Penn Relays, which drew close to 20,000 high school and college athletes and drew over 100,000 fans, Doyle finished third in the Eastern College Division on opening day last Thursday. Her 46-4 effort is a Kutztown record, the top throw in the PSAC and 13th best in the country in Division II, an NCAA

ON CAMPUS

ARTS

ophomore Emily Orr (Abington Heights) is pitching for the Fairfield softball team, which is currently 28-18 overall and leading the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference with a 10-2 mark. Orr, a left-hander, has a 2-1 record with a 3.41 earned run average. In 12.1 innings, she’s given up 17 hits and six runs, all earned. She’s walked five and struck out seven. The highlight of the season was a five-inning no-hitter in an 8-0 non-league victory over Hartford. A second-inning walk cost her a perfect game. “Emily has become a strong competitor this spring,” coach Julie Brzezinski said. “I honestly consider her a ‘pitcher’ and not just someone who pitches. She knows the game and her opponents’ weaknesses and uses her off speed pitches to keep them off balance.” Orr is one of four pitchers behind senior standout Sarah Minice. “Emily has been limited as the duties after Minice has been streamed out,” Brzezinski said. “Next year, however, she will be one of three pitchers and we are really looking forward to her continued improvement with all facets of her pitching game.”

NEWS

Orr to play bigger role

39


40

GOLackawanna

ARTS

NEWS

SPORTS BRIEFS Pens stay alive into Saturday ONLINE: For the results of Saturday’s Penguins-Charlotte playoff game, see golackawanna.com/sports. Brad Thiessen made 23 saves and Chris Collins scored the game’s only goal midway through the third period Friday night as the Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton Penguins kept alive their American Hockey League title hopes with a 1-0 victory over the host Charlotte Checkers. Collins scored at 8:54 on assists from Bryan Lerg and Ryan Craig. The win avenged Charlotte’s 1-0 victory Wednesday and allowed the Penguins to cut Charlotte’s lead in the best-ofseven series to 3-2. Three of four games in a one-week stretch were shutouts. The Penguins tied the series by winning Game Two, 3-0, April 30 on the first of two Thiessen shutouts. Charlotte won, 2-1, in overtime Monday before Mike Murphy’s 44-save Wednesday put the Checkers in command of the series. Yankees toss PawSox David Phelps allowed just one hit in six scoreless innings Friday night to lead the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees to a

Sunday, May 8, 2011 10-1 International League romp over the visiting Pawtucket Red Sox. Phelps (2-3) walked one and struck out seven. Jordan Parraz and Doug Bernier each drove in three runs as the North Divisionleading Yankees won for the third time in four games to improve to 17-10. Scranton’s Giglio, Stallone named all-Academic University of Scranton baseball players David Giglio and Chris Stallone were each named first-team District II all-Academic by the College Sports Information Directors of America and Capital One. The district honors are the first step toward a possible academic all-American award. Giglio, a history and political science major, has a 3.67 cumulative grade point average. He leads the team in batting average (.380), doubles (8), home runs (6), RBI (48) and slugging percentage (.620). Stallone was named alldistrict for the third straight season. He was a first-team All-American last season after gaining third-team honors in 2009. Stallone’s 3.95 GPA is the highest among all senior student-athletes at the university. The finance major is batting .374 and leading the team in hits with 49 and stolen bases with 21.

ROBINSON

SPORTS

Continued from page 35

able to continue its title run without a new wave of talent coming into the high school program in the past two years. Sophomores Kelsey O’Donnell, Taylor Ross, Jess McMinn and Alex Chapman and freshmen Isabelle Clauss, Erin Jaeger, Missy Burke and Jen Burke were all prominent in Thursday’s title. The Jordan Relays, with their 56-year history, is one of the area’s most prestigious events. With field athletes sitting out and without a league title on the line or the combination of district titles and state qualifying berths at stake, it does not, however, have the implications of the meets that are ahead at Scranton Memorial Stadium. That allows the event to have different meaning to different teams

J. MICHAEL SCHIRRA PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Pole vaulters Mo Bruckner from North Pocono and Tyler Chesko share congratulations after Bruckner won an exhausting tiebreaker on Monday.

TRACK Continued from page 38

100 and 400 relay. Pete Calderone led the way for North Pocono, winning the shot put and javelin. Elisia Cadman and Erin Jaeger led Abington Heights to its clinching win. Cadman swept the hurdles and ran on the 1600 relay. Jaeger won the 3200 and was part of the

as they work toward the District 2 Championships on May16 and17. While Abington Heights celebrated the continuation of the longest current string of success in the event, the Valley View boys were able to use the Jordan Relays as part of their ongoing transition to their new level of competition. The Elk Lake program also had a night to show it could compete with the bigger schools. Valley View is about to see if it can move up from Class AA to Class AAA champion on the district level after moving from Division 2 to Division1champion in the LTC regular season. “Being on this track for the first time this year gives the kids a look at some of the competition they’re going to face,” Valley View coach Brian Kearney said. “Even though it’s just relays, it gives you some idea.” Elk Lake, which swept the Class AA titles, has at its base the strength

1600 and 3200 relay teams. The Western Wayne girls and Elk Lake boys matched Valley View’s accomplishment of wrapping up titles with victories in head-to-head meetings of their division’s final unbeatens. Western Wayne beat Holy Cross, 93-57, in Division 2 girls. Elk Lake swept the Division 3 championships, beating Blue Ridge, 89-61, in the boys’ showdown and rolling to a 113-34 victory in girls. Dunmore finished its season a week earlier as the Division 2 boys’ champion.

of a cross country program which swept state championships last fall. Coach Will Squier’s training philosophy will keep the Warriors from showcasing their distance runners in Tuesday’s Robert Spagna Lackawanna Conference Championship meet, so this was their chance to compete against the Division1and 2 schools. Although the meet is scored as separate Class AAA and AA events, the top teams go head-to-head. Elk Lake not only took the first-place Class AA points, it also beat the winning Class AAA team in half of the six boys’ races and one of the girls’ events – both1600 medleys, plus the distance medley and 3200 relay on the boys’ side. “We wanted to come down here and make a statement,” Squier said. “We haven’t had a chance to run against the Division1and 2 teams. “The kids want to let everyone know that we’re running up there, too.”

North Pocono’s Sarah Downer runs a leg of the 4x400 relay.

56TH ANNUAL JORDAN RELAYS · The Valley View boys, Abington Heights girls and both Elk Lake teams won titles. · Class AAA boys’ standings: Valley View 44, Honesdale 40, Scranton Prep 31, North Pocono 18, Abington Heights 16, Delaware Valley 16, Tunkhannock 16, Pittston Area 15, Scranton 14, Wallenpaupack 14, West Scranton 11. · Class AAA girls’ standings: Abington Heights 50, Honesdale 36, Scranton Prep 32, Western Wayne 24, Valley View 21, Pittston Area 16, West Scranton 16, Wallenpaupack 13, North Pocono 11, Delaware Valley 8, Tunkhannock 7 and Scranton 0. · Class AA boys’ standings: Elk Lake 45, Blue Ridge 43, Mid Valley 31, Holy Cross 29, Dunmore 26, Riverside 20, Western Wayne 16, Lackawanna Trail 9, Montrose 7, Carbondale 4, Lakeland 4. · Class AA girls’ standings: Elk Lake 48, Montrose 40, Lakeland 34, Holy Cross 33, Dunmore 24, Blue Ridge 19, Lackawanna Trail 12, Mid Valley 10, Carbondale 6, Riverside 5. · Lackawanna County wins: Abington Heights, AAA girls, 400 relay, Sarah Gronsky, Kelsey O’Donnell, Isabelle Clauss, Elisia Cadman, :51.94; Abington Heights, AAA girls, 3200 relay, Erin Jaeger, Taylor Ross, Stephanie Lalos, Jess McMinn, 10:07.52; Valley View, AAA girls, 1600 medley, Colleen Martin, Sara Dubravcak, Carli Lucke and Tory Legg, 4:35:10; Valley View, AAA boys, distance medley, Aaron Wilkinson, Jordan Siddons, Mark Mileski , Garrett Rupe, 8:34.34; Holy Cross, AA girls, 400 relay, Nikolette McCloe, Kira Graziano, Kaitley McDonnell, Ashley Hensel, 51.94.


We want you to know that you can feel good about the future of healthcare in Scranton and Northeast Pennsylvania – because the future is brighter for you, your family and our community.

quality care in the community, but also keep jobs right here at home. In fact, our local hospitals and economy will benefit from at least $68 million for upgrading services and facilities over the next five years.

Mercy Scranton, Mercy Tyler and Mercy Special Care are now affiliated with Community Health Systems, Inc, one of the nation's leading operators of acute care hospitals. As part of this relationship these facilities join a broad network of 11 other hospitals in Pennsylvania. One change you'll notice today is the renaming of the hospitals to Regional Hospital of Scranton, Tyler Memorial Hospital, and Special Care Hospital. While the names have changed the spirit of compassion established by the Sisters of Mercy will continue.

The employees, physicians, and volunteers throughout the Scranton, Tunkhannock and Nanticoke areas now have the opportunity to learn what more than 80,000 other healthcare professionals across the country already know – they are part of a national organization dedicated to creating great places for people to work, physicians to practice medicine, and patients to receive care.

This new relationship will allow us not only to continue providing

www.RegionalHospitalofScranton.net

Looking to the future, we will work diligently to continue to earn your trust and support. The outlook for healthcare really is brighter for our communities, so let’s all take a minute to smile together.

www.TylerMemorialHospital.net

www.SpecialCareHospital.net


FAMILY CIRCUS

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

STONE SOUP

THE ARGYLE SWEATER DRABBLE

CLASSIC PEANUTS


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011

PAGE 43


PAGE 44

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011

The Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS®, Inc.

Open House Directory 12:30-2PM

SUNDAY, MAY 8

$165,000

335 Highland Ave., South Abington

Nasser Real Estate Dir: Up Layton Rd to Right on Snyder, then Right on Highland, home on Right (Sign) MLS#11-1290

SUNDAY, MAY 15 $129,000

RR2 Box 259 Highland Dr., Dalton

1-3PM

$296,400

101 Beech Lane, Elmhurst

1-4PM

$239,900

500 Spring Run Lane., Madison Twp.

Coldwell Banker Town & Country Dir: Route 307 from Clarks Summit. After passing Shultzville Deli go straight onto Creek Hollow Rd. Mile to right turn at Dickinson Rd then half mile to left on Highland Drive. House on left MLS#11-1570

Coldwell Banker Town & Country Dir: From Scranton, Route 435 to Rt. 590, left onto Buckingham, proceed uphill and turn left onto Beech Lane....house on right, on corner of Beech Lane and Buckingham. MLS#11-770

RE/MAX Home Team Dir: I380S Moscow Exit 22 L on 690/Church St L 690/ Market St R on Brook St R on Haas Pond Rd L on Major Rd to Spring Run lane, up hill on right. MLS#11-1919

1-3PM

1-3PM

1-2:30M

$129,000

102 Garwood Dr., Scranton

Coldwell Banker Town & Country Dir: Located in Pennwood section of South Scranton. Herbert Street to Pennwood leading to Garwood. MLS#11-693

$140,000

829 Electric Street, Scranton

Prestige Realty Dir: North Blakely St. In Dunmore by post office & high rise turn onto Electric St. Follow all the way down until almost the end property is on the right corner see Prestige Realty sign MLS#11-768

$132,000

47 Lincoln Ave., West Wyoming

Prudential Preferred Properties Dir: Wyoming Ave to Wyoming, R on Dennison, go over tracks, R at cemetery, L of Washington, R on Watson, L of Lincoln. MLS#11-190

Visit timesleader.com & Click “Buy A Home” to see the most up to date list of Open Houses.

226895

1-3PM


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011

MARKETPLACE

100 Announcements 200 Auctions

golackawanna.com

300 Personal Services 400 Automotive

500 Employment 600 Financial

700 Merchandise 800 Pets & Animals

PAGE 45

900 Real Estate 1000 Service Directory

To place a Classified ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@golackawanna.com 150 Special Notices

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 110

Lost

LOST BEAGLE: 7 months old, 11 1/2 “ high, black back with white belly and legs. Last seen in Falls, Coolbaugh Mountain Road on Wednesday 4/27. REWARD. Call 570-388-2775 or 570-388-3239 LOST BLACK CAT. 1 yr old, a few white hairs under chin. Near Carverton Road and 8th St. REWARD!! Please call 570-696-1309

LOST RING

Anniversary Diamond Band in vicinity of Woodland’s on 4/29. Please call 570-814-0004.

120

Found

FOUND - Keys for SUBARU on RIver St. 570-417-3689

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified! 150 Special Notices ADOPT We can give your infant love and security, you can help make us a family. Expenses paid. Please call Denise & Howard 1-877-676-1660.

ADOPT: Adoring Mom, Dad, Big Brother would like to share a lifetime of hugs & kisses in our loving home with a newborn. Please Call Lynda & Dennis 888-688-1422 Expenses Paid

380

310

PAYING $500

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm

FREE CONSULTATION

for all legal matters Attorney Ron Wilson 570-822-2345

380

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

PP&L CUSTOMERS... Save money each month on your residential or business electricity and help the environment by switching to GREEN energy. Nothing to buy, same reliable energy, no contracts,cancel anytime, no cancellation fees, receive one bill. For details call toll free 855-256-4454 lynnbythelake@ hotmail.com

Attorney Services

Travel

W OULD Y OU LIKE TO GO TO NY? Call us to make your reservation! 570-824-2228 570-793-1769

Travel

YANKEES TRIP TO CINCINNATI June 20, 21 and 22 (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday) Catch the Yankees take on the Reds at The Great American Ballpark in Cincinnati, Ohio Trip Includes: *Round trip bus transportation *Beer, soda & food on the bus *Great box level seats to two games (Mon & Tues night) *Hotel accommodations at the Millennium Hotel. Just three blocks from stadium and walking distance from Cincinnati Zoo and other downtown attractions Price: $350 Call 570-287-9701 for more info.

409

CADILLAC `94 DEVILLE SEDAN

94,000 miles, automatic, front wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, air bags, all power, cruise control, leather interior, $3,300. 570-394-9004

412 Autos for Sale

2004 VOLVO XC70 Cross Country, All Wheel Drive $11880

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

YANKEES SPECIAL Yanks vs Boston

Sunday, 5/15 @ 8pm Section 212 $126.00 ticket/bus 1-800-432-8069

2007 PONTIAC G6 GTP 1 OWNER LEATHER AND MOONROOF $14950

406

ATVs/Dune Buggies

QUARTER MIDGET RACE CAR 76 inch Bull Rider,

Honda 120 motor, Kirkey seat, new brake system, A-Main feature wins Asphalt/Dirt, Many Extras, Value $6,000, Sell for $2,999 Call (570) 954-2749

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

412 Autos for Sale

FORD `07 MUSTANG 63,000 highway

miles, silver, runs great, $11,500. negotiable. 570-479-2482

We’ll run your ad untilthe vehicleissold

412 Autos for Sale

CADILLAC ‘06 STS

BMW `07 328xi

Black with black interior. Heated seats. Back up & navigation systems. New tires & brakes. Sunroof. Garage kept. Many extras! 46,000 Miles. Asking $19,500. 570-825-8888 or 626-297-0155 Call Anytime!

BMW `93 325 IC Convertible,

Metallic Green Exterior & Tan Interior, 5 Speed Transmission, Heated Seats. 2nd Owner, 66k Miles. Excellent Condition, Garage Kept, Excellent Gas Mileage. Carfax available. Price reduced $7,995 or trade for SUV or other. Beautiful / Fun Car. 570-388-6669

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

BUICK ‘07 LUCERNE One Owner. Leather, CD, Alloy Wheels $15,580

To place your ad call...829-7130

Selling Your Car? Call Classified at 829-7130

Autos under $5000

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

412 Autos for Sale

CHRYSLER `07 300

AWD, 6 cylinder, Silver, 52,600 miles, sunroof, heated seats, Bose sound system, 6 CD changer, satellite radio, Onstar, parking assist, remote keyless entry, electronic keyless ignition, & more! $17,600 570-881-2775

55,600 miles, automatic, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, all power, AM/FM radio, CD player, new new brakes. $10,900. 570-760-6983

To place your ad call...829-7130

V8, Auto, 1,200 miles, all options, show room condition. Call for info. Asking $24,995 Serious inquiries only. 570-636-3151

412 Autos for Sale

CHEVROLET ‘06 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

Silver beauty, 1 Owner, Museum quality. 4,900 miles, 6 speed. All possible options including Navigation, Power top. New, paid $62,000 Must sell $45,900 570-299-9370

To place your ad call...829-7130

CHRYSLER ‘06 300C HEMI

Light green, 18,000 miles, loaded, leather, wood trim, $24,000. 570-222-4960 leave message

CHRYSLER `02 PT CRUISER Inferno Red, flame

design. Chrome wheels. 47,000 miles, one owner. Looks and runs great. New inspection. $5,800 Call (570) 472-1854

FORD `04 MUSTANG Mach I, 40th

ANNIVERSARY EDITION

FORD `07 MUSTANG GT

Premium package, silver, black leather interior, 5 speed manual. 20,000 miles. $18,900 (570) 868-3832

FORD ‘02 FOCUS WAGON

Low mileage, One owner $6,995

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG GT CONVERTIBLE Red with black top.

6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $18,500 570-760-5833


PAGE 46

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

FORD ‘05 EXPLORER SPORT TRAC XLT

MAZDA `04 RX-8 Hunter Green,

MERCEDES-BENZ `95 SL 500 Convertible, with

5 door hatchback, All wheel drive $12,874

80,000 miles. New brakes & rotors. New alignment. Two new rear tires. No accidents.

PRICE REDUCED 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

HYUNDAI `04 TIBURON GT

Blue, 5 speed manual, CD, Air, factory alarm, power windows & locks. 38K. $7,500 negotiable. Call 570-540-6236

HYUNDAI ‘11 SONATA GLS, automatic. Only 2,400 miles. $19,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

LANCE MOTORS 565 E. Main St.

Plymouth, PA 570-779-1912 04 Nissan X-Terra $8995 02 Plymouth Grand Voyager $3995 02 Chevy 4x4 $5995 01 Pontiac Grand Am $3895 00 Ford F-150 4x2 $3995 00 Saturn Sedan $3195 99 Jeep Grand Cherokee $5495 99 Jeep Cherokee Red $3895 99 Chrysler Sebring LX, 78K $4495 99 Chevy Suburban, 4x4 $4495 95 Plymouth Acclaim $2495 93 Jeep Wrangler $3395 See Pictures On Our Website lancemotors.com

LEXUS `95 ES 300 Beautiful, mint

condition. Grey with leather interior. 2 owners.New brakes rotors & shocks. Ice cold AC. Fully loaded. 112K. Asking $4,900 (347) 452-3650 Mountain Top

$8,000 or best offer. For more information, call (570) 332-4213

Rare, Exclusive Opportunity To Own...

‘26 FORD MODEL T Panel Delivery

100 point Concours quality restoration. Red with black fenders. Never Driven. 0 miles on restoration. RARE! $40,000 $38,000 $36,500

2002 BMW 745i The Flagship of

the Fleet New - $87,000 Midnight Emerald with beige leather interior. 61K miles. Mint condition. Loaded. Garage Kept. Navigation Stunning, Must Sell! $20,000 $18,600

1993 CADILLAC ALANTE 2 Door

Convertible Exquisite Candy Apple Red black soft top. 13,000 original miles. All available options, including gold alloy wheels. Garage Kept. 1 owner. Final Model Year. Gorgeous Automobile! $31,000 $29,900 $27,900

From an Exotic, Private Collection

Call 570-650-0278

Toplaceyour adcal l . . 8 29-7130 MERCEDES-BENZ `01 C-240

Loaded, automatic, AC, heated leather seats, 4 door. $4,700 Call 570-388-6535

MERCEDES BENZ `74 450 SE MERCEDES-BENZ `05

SOLID CAR! Interior perfect, exterior very good. Runs great! New tires, 68K original miles. $5,500 FIRM. 570-905-7389 Ask for Lee

240C

4Matic, V6 - Gray, 77K highway miles, Excellent condition, dealer serviced. Sun roof, heated seats. $15,500. Call 570-288-3916

removable hard top, dark Blue, camel interior, Summer Driving Only, Garage Kept. Very Good Condition, No Accidents. Classy Car. Price Reduced! $13,995 or trade for SUV or other. 570-388-6669

To place your ad call...829-7130

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

SUZUKI ‘10 SX4

5 door hatchback, Only 8,600 miles $15,892

Earn Extra Cash For Just A Few Hours A Day.

Deliver

MINI COOPER `08

Clubman. Black & White. Sunroof. 30K miles. Leather interior, fully loaded. 6 speed. Excellent condition. 40 MPG. $20,500. Call 570-262-8811

412 Autos for Sale

NISSAN ‘05 ALTIMA

Auto, one owner, Local trade $11,435

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

PONTIAC ‘69 FIREBIRD 400 CONVERTIBLE Blue/white top & white interior. Recent documented frame-off restoration. Over $31,000 invested. will sell $21,500. 570-335-3127

PORSCHE `02 BOXSTER S

Great convertible, black top, 6 speed manual transmission, carbon fiber dash, leather interior, front & rear trunk, fast & agile. $18,000 or best offer. Call 570-262-2478

SUBARU `02 IMPREZAmileage, WRX Low

57,000 miles, 5 speed, all-wheel drive, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, cruise control, AM/FM radio, CD changer, rear defroster, new Blitz Stainless Exhaust, AEM Cold Air Intake, TURBOXS Blowoff Valve & Boost Control. $10,500. (201) 704-8640 Call before 7:30 pm

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

TOYOTA `06 AVALON New tires, new

brakes, Inspected March 4, AC, AVPS, Fully loaded, 18,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty. 90,000 miles. $12,900. (570) 881-3712

TOYOTA `93 MR2 T-top, 5 speed.

AM/FM/CD, AC, power antenna. New tires. No rust. Great condition.

$5,000

(570) 708-0269 after 6:00PM

TOYOTA ‘09 SCION TC

Automatic, moon roof, low miles. $17,945

(No Collections)

Available routes: Laflin/Hudston

$920 Monthly Profit + Tips

225 daily papers / 240 Sunday papers

Chamberlain Street, Driftwood Drive, Hilldale Drive, Jason Drive, Lombardo Drive

Duryea

$560 Monthly Profit + Tips

149 daily papers / 141 Sunday papers Adams Street, Blackberry Lane, Cherry Street, Columbia Street, Cranberry Terr., Evans Street

Dallas

$400 Monthly Profit + Tips

92 daily papers / 144 Sunday papers

Baldwin Avenue, E. Center Hill Road, Claude Street, Midland Drive, Saginaw Street

West Pittston

$760 Monthly Profit + Tips

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

183 daily papers / 186 Sunday papers

VW ‘07 BEETLE

Parsons

Leather Interior, Alloys, Moon Roof $12,990

Exeter Ave., Ann Street, Clear Spring Ct., Ledgeview Drive, Susquehanna Ave., York Ave.

$965 Monthly Profit + Tips

194 daily papers / 222 Sunday papers

Wyoming Street, Auburn Street, West Chestnut Street, East Elm Street, John Street 560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CADILLAC `80 COUPE DEVILLE Excellent condition, $3,000 located in Hazleton. 570-454-1945 or 561-573-4114

To find a route near you and start earning extra cash, call Rosemary at

570-829-7107

281006

1/2 Ton, 4WD, automatic, V6 $15,992

SUZUKI ‘08 SX4


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011 415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVROLET `68 C10 New 350 motor and

LINCOLN `88 TOWN CAR 61,000 original

new transmission. REDUCED TO $5,000 FIRM (570) 906-1771

CHEVROLET `72 CHEVELLE

Two door hard top. 307 Motor. Needs work. Comes with additional 400 small block & many parts. $5,000. Serious inquires only. (570) 836-2574

CHEVROLET `76 PICKUP Very Good Condition! Low miles! $7500. FIRM 570-905-7389 Ask for Lee

To place your ad call...829-7130

CORVETTES WANTED 1953-1972

Any Condition! Courteous, Fast Professional Buyer. Licensed & Bonded corvettebuyer.com 1-800-850-3656

FORD `52 COUNTRY SEDAN CUSTOM LINE

STATION WAGON V8, automatic, 8 passenger, 3rd seat, good condition, 2nd owner. $9,500. 570-579-3517

FORD `66

Mustang Coupe. Pearl white, pony interior. Pristine condition. 26K miles. $17,000 or best offer. (570) 817-6768

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

miles, garage kept, triple black, leather interior, carriage roof, factory wire wheels, loaded, excellent condition. $5,500. Call Mike 570-237-7660

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $8,900. Call 570-237-5119

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. $31,000. Call 825-6272

To place your ad call...829-7130

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT DRASTICALLY

REDUCED!! This model only produced in 1967 & 1968. All original 45,000 miles, Color Burgundy, cloth & vinyl interior, 350 rocket engine, 2nd owner. Fender skirts, always garaged. Trophy winner at shows. Serious inquiries only, $7,500. 570-690-0727

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

$$$ HIGHEST PRICE PAID $$$ FOR JUNK VEHICLES PICKED UP 570-876-1010 570-346-7673 468

Auto Parts

468

Auto Parts

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 and Up $125 extra if driven, pulled or pushed in. NOBODY Pays More

570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6 am-9 pm Sunday 8 am - 68 pm

421

Boats & Marinas

CUSTOM CREST 15’

Fiberglass boat with trailer. Outboard propulsion. Includes: 2 motors Erinmade, “Lark II series”

PRICE REDUCED! $2,400 NEGOTIABLE

570-417-3940

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

FORD ‘99 E350 BUCKET VAN Triton V8. 2 speed

boom; 92,000miles; $9999 or best price. Great condition. Call 570-675-3384 or 570574-7002

439

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON ` 06 SOFTTAIL NIGHTTRAIN Dark gray metallic, new rr tire & brakes, many extras. $10,900 (570) 592-4982

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘10 SPORTSTER 1200

A MUST SEE! Custom Paint. Only driven under 10 miles!! Asking $8,900 or best offer. For info, call 570-864-2543 or 215-379-1375

SUZUKI `07 C50T CRUISER EXCELLENT CONDITION Windshield, Bags,

Floorboards,V&H Pipes, White walls,Garage Kept. 6K Miles $5,200 (570) 430-0357

SUZUKI ‘04 GSXR 1000CC

Less than 1,000 miles. Team colors with matching helmet & jacket. Fender eliminator kit. Scorpion exhaust. $6,000. Call Dave after 5 pm 570-825-0394

439

Motorcycles

SUZUKI ‘04 GSXR 1000CC

Less than 1,000 miles. Team colors with matching helmet & jacket. Fender eliminator kit. Scorpion exhaust. $6,000. Call Dave after 5 pm 570-825-0394

YAMAHA `04 V-STAR

1100 Custom. 5800 miles, light bar, cobra exhaust, windshield, many extras, must sell. $4,900. Call 570-301-3433

YAMAHA `97 VIRAGO

750cc. 8,000 miles, saddlebags, windshield, back rest, Black & Pearl, Excellent Condition. Must See. Asking $2,499. Call after 4. 570-823-9376

YAMAHA ‘07 650 V-STAR Custom Midnight

Edition. Matted black finish. Mint condition. New tires, inspected, fully serviced & ready to ride. Windshield & sissy bar. Low miles & garage kept. $3,950 or best offer. Call 570-762-5158

YAMAHA` 08 R1 BEAUTIFUL BIKE Perfect condition.

3700 miles, new rear tire, undertail kit, cover. Price negotiable $7,600 570-852-9072

442 RVs & Campers

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, water purifier, awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, raised panel fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS

Travel Trailer. 29’, mint condition, 1 slide out a/c-heat. Stove, microwave, fridge, shower inside & out. Many more extras. Reduced. $13,500. Call 570-842-6735

SUNLITE CAMPER 22 ft. 3 rear bunks,

center bathroom, kitchen, sofa bed. Air, Fully self contained. Sleeps 6. New tires, fridge awning. $4500. 215-322-9845

442 RVs & Campers

TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft

Rear queen master bedroom, Walk thru bathroom. Center kitchen + dinette bed. Front extra large living room + sofa bed. Big View windows. Air, awning, sleeps 6, very clean, will deliver. Located in Benton, Pa. $4,900. 215-694-7497

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

2008 TOYOTA MATRIX 1 Owner $13880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

To place your d ll 829 7130

BUICK `05 RENDEZVOUSFully CX AWD,

loaded, 1 owner, 18,000 miles. 6 cylinder. New inspection, tires & brakes. Like new, inside & out. $16,900. Call (570) 540-0975

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVROLET `09 EQUINOX LS Low mileage, 15000

miles, automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, anti-lock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, cruise control, AM/FM radio, cassette player, CD player, keyless entry, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, tinted windows. $17,500. (570) 954-9333 Call after 9:00 a.m.

CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR Custom Van. 67K

miles. Interior has oak wood trim, carpeting, storage areas, TV, rear seat convertible to double bed, curtains. Seats 7. Power windows & seats. Custom lighting on ceiling. New exhaust system. New rear tires. Recently inspected. Excellent condition. $4,200 or best offer. Call 570-655-0530

To place your ad call...829-7130

CHEVY ‘07 TRAILBLAZER LT

On-Star, Leather. Satellite Radio. $14,990

CHEVR0LET`02 EXPRESS

CONVERSION VAN Loaded. Low miles. Excellent condition.

$18,900

570-674-3901

CHEVROLET `05 TRAILBLAZER LT Black/Grey. 18,000

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

DODGE `10 GRAND CARAVAN Only 17k miles. Fully loaded. Excellent condition. Factory & extended warranty. $17,995 (570) 690-2806

DODGE `94 DAKOTA with cap. 1 owner,

garage kept, very good condition. Many extras including lift & back seat. 29 MPG gas. $4,000 or best offer (570) 868-0944

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

GMC `99 SUBURBAN

Champagne exterior, leather interior, power windows & locks, 4 wheel drive. $4,850. Call for condition and known issues. 570-362-4080

HONDA `10 ODYSSEY

DODGE `97 RAM

1500 LARAMIE MARK 3 82,000 miles, automatic, chrome step up and mirrors & leather interior. Good Condition. Drums Area. $4,500 401-524-9763

FORD `99 E250

Wheelchair Van 78,250 miles. Fully serviced, new battery, tires & rods. Seats 6 or 3 wheelchairs. Braun Millennium lift with remote. Walk up door. Front & rear A/C. Power locks & windows. Excellent condition. $9,500. 570-237-6375

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

KIA `02 SEDONA

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

451

EX, Van, Sunroof. 61,000 miles. Loaded. Good condition. $5000 or best offer. 570-606-7654

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Special Edition. Maroon, Fully loaded. Leather seats. TV/DVD, navigation, sun roof plus many other extras. 3rd seat . Only 1,900 Miles. Brand New. Asking $37,000 (570) 328-0850

HYUNDAI ‘10 TUCSON LTD

Navigation, Blue Tooth, XM Radio $21,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

542

Logistics/ Transportation

miles. Well equipped. Includes On-Star, tow package, roof rack, running boards, remote starter, extended warranty. $16,000 (570) 825-7251

CHEVROLET `06 SILVERADO 1500 4X4 pickup, extended cab, 6 1/2 ft. box, automatic. Pewter. 48,000 miles. Excellent condition. $15,000 Negotiable (570) 954-7461

CHEVY `05 EQUINOX

LT (premium package), 3.4L, 47,000 miles. All wheel drive, power moonroof, windows, locks & seats. Leather interior, 6 cd changer, rear folding seats, keyless entry, onstar, roof rack, running boards, garage kept. $14,750. 570-362-1910

XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is seeking experienced forklift operators & Inexperienced candidates with great employment history to work at their Mehoopany, PA location. The following skills are necessary for these positions: • High School Diploma/GED • Computer Skills • Valid Driver’s License • Criminal Background Check • Pass Pre-employment Drug Screen & Physical • Part-time position for experienced driver only. All full-time positions come with the following benefits: medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after 1 year, and paid vacation. Pay increase based on skill development.

Every Thursday in May

10:00 am - 4:00 pm Tunkhannock Library

Interested Applicants can Apply Online! www.XLCServices.com or Call 888-382-4078

278278

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

PAGE 47


PAGE 48 451

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

INTERNATIONAL ‘95

DUMP TRUCK Refurbished, rebuilt engine, transmission replaced. Rear-end removed and relubed. Brand new 10’ dump. PA state inspected. $12,900/best offer. 570-594-1496

We got $50 worth of food for only $25 at Amici Restaurant.

Michael & Jessica Benson of Carbondale

JEEP `00 WRANGLER

TJ, Black with grey interior. 4 cylinder, 5-speed manual transmission. CD player, hardtop, full doors, sound bar. 4” Skyjacker Suspension lift with steering stabilizer. Like new BF Goodrich 35’s with Full size spare. Only 85,000 miles. $6,999 (570) 301-7221

Triple black, economical 6 cylinder. 4x4 select drive. CD, remote door opener, power windows & locks, cruise, tilt wheel. 108k highway miles. Garage kept. Super clean inside and out. No rust. Sale price $6,895. Scranton. 570-466-2771

JEEP `07 WRANGLER X 4x4, stick shift, soft

top. Red exterior, well maintained, garage kept. 11,500 miles, one owner. AC, CD player, cruise control. Tow package with cargo carrier. Excellent condition. $18,700 Call 570-822-9680

JEEP ‘02 WRANGLER Low Miles $13,980

50-90

% OFF

LOCAL DINING, ENTERTAINMENT SHOPPING, SERVICES & MORE!

! DEAL DAILY

NEPA

JEEP `02 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

When you sign up, we will let you in on huge savings. You’ll receive a different local deal every day!

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

TRUCKS FOR SALE

Ford, GMC, International-Prices starting at $2,295. Box Truck, Cab & Chassis available. Call U-haul 570-822-5536

SIGN UP FOR FREE

@ nepadailydeal.com


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011 451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

JEEP ‘06 COMMANDER 4WD, Only 38K $15,990

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

MAZDA ‘08 TRIBUTE Utility, 4WD $18,655

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

MITSUBISHI `95 MONTERO SR 4WD 177,102 miles, auto-

matic, four wheel drive, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, power seats, cruise control, AM/FM radio, cassette player, CD changer, leather interior, sun roof, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, new Passed inspection, new battery. $2,500 (570) 868-1100 Call after 2:00 p.m.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? To place your Turn to classified. ad call...829-7130 It’s a showroom in print! NISSAN ‘09 ROGUE Classified’s got AWD, low miles, automatic, the directions! remote start, back up sensors $20,880

560 Pierce St. Kingston, PA www.wyoming valleymotors.com 570-714-9924

SUZUKI `07 XL-7 56,000 miles,

automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, all power, CD player, leather interior, tinted windows, custom wheels, $13,000 Call 570-829-8753 Before 5:00 p.m.

PAGE 49 451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

518 Customer Support/Client Care

TRACTOR TRAILERS

FREIGHTLINER ’97 MIDROOF 475 CAT & 10 speed transmission. $12,000 FREIGHTLINER ’99 CONDO 430 Detroit, Super 10 transmission. Asking $15,000. ‘88 FRUEHAUF 45’ with sides. All aluminum, spread axle. $6,500. 2 storage trailers. 570-814-4790

To place your ad call...829-7130

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 468

Auto Parts

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

506 Administrative/ Clerical

SECRETARIAL POSITION

Professional firm in Scranton seeks reliable part to full-time secretary with good people and organization skills. Must be proficient with Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Photoshop knowledge a plus. Starting $10-$12/ hour based on experience. Full healthcare benefits & paid vacation. Please fax resume to Nina Ciarla at 570-207-9305 or email to: nciarla@ facilitydesignltd.com

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

tion is looking for a p r o f e s s i o n a l with excellent customer service skills. This is a telephone intensive position and requires strong oral communication and computer skills. Applicants must be dependable, highly motivated and good at multi-tasking. Minimum 3 years experience in customer service. We offer a competitive starting rate and full benefit package including comprehensive health benefits and 401k. Send resume to:

Craft Oil Corporation

Attn: Human Resource Dept. P.O. Box 5066 Avoca, PA 18641 Or Email: jmcginty@ craftoilcorp.com No Phone Calls Please. EOE

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

NIGHT AUDITOR

Apply in person. Knights Inn 310 Route 315 Pittston, PA 18640 570-654-6020

Logistics/ Transportation

DRIVERS

LUBRICATION DISTRIBUTOR HAS OPENING FOR

CUSTOMER SERVICE PERSONNEL Craft Oil Corpora-

542

DELI CLERKS

Gerrity’s Supermarkets is now hiring Part Time Deli Clerks. Looking for dependable and customer oriented individuals. Sales Commission Bonus. Apply at: 2020 Wyoming Ave. Wyoming; or 801 Wyoming Ave. West Pittston, or at: www.gerritys.com

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

542

Logistics/ Transportation

ROUTE TECHNICIAN

Come join the leader in the pest control industry. Orkin Pest Control is currently accepting applications for FullTime Route Technician. Experience is preferred but not Necessary. Email resumes to smoran@rattinc.net or fax them to 570-208-4817

Fanelli Brothers Trucking has established new and increased driver pay package and an increased sign on bonus. Due to additional business, Fanelli Bros. Trucking Co. is adding both regional and local drivers to our Pottsville, PA terminal operation. Drivers are home most nights throughout the week. Drivers must have 2-3 years of OTR experience, acceptable MVR and pass a criminal background check. The new pay package offers: • .38 cpm for qualified drivers • $1,500 sign on bonus • Paid vacations and holidays • Health/Dental/ Vision Insurance • 401K Plan Contact Gary Potter at 570-544-3140 Ext 156 or visit us at 1298 Keystone Blvd., Pottsville, PA

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

545

Marketing/ Product

PART-TIME MARKETING

In search of a dynamic person with great communication skills and ability to multi-task. The successful candidate will be punctual, organized, reliable, creative, conscientious, and personable. Must have prior marketing experience. Must be a self-starter with reliable transportation. Computer skills a must. Willingness to work Saturdays a must. Positive attitude and high energy a must. Fax resume to 570-822-3446. No phone calls please.

548 Medical/Health

CAREGIVER

Part Time in-home care for female adult in Dallas. Must reside nearby. Bathing required. Call 570-675-2539.

DIETARY AIDES

Healthcare Services Group at Highland Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center is currently accepting applications for part time Dietary Aides. Also hiring Full & Part time Housekeeping & Laundry Aides. Apply in person Monday - Friday between the hours of 9am-4pm at: 750 Schooley Ave. Exeter, PA 18643


PAGE 50 566

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011 Sales/Retail/ Business Development

INDEPENDENT INSURANCEInsurance AGENCY Local

Agency is looking to hire a Commercial Lines Customer Service Agent to handle existing book of business. At least (3) to 5 years experience is preferred, position available in our Wilkes-Barre office. Salary commensurate with experience, Benefit Package includes, Health Benefits, Life Insurance, 20 day PTO Time & 401k plan. Please forward resume to: Eastern Insurance Group Attn: Renee Valenti, 613 Baltimore Drive, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18702. Swift Kennedy & Assoc. specializes in Group Employee Benefits Plans and has an opening in our Wilkes-Barre office. Candidate must have prior group sales experience and be licensed to sell insurance. Compensation is based on experience. Send resume to jerry@ swiftkennedy.com

To placeyour adcall. .829-7130 569 Security/ Protective Services

610

Business Opportunities

JAN-PRO COMMERCIAL CLEANING OF NEPA Be Your Own Boss Work Full or Part time Accounts available NOW throughout Wilkes Barre, Scranton, and Hazleton. We guarantee $5,000 to $200,000 in annual billing. Small investment We’re ready Are you? For more info Call 570-824-5774

Janproofnepa.com

To place your ad call...829-7130 630 Money To Loan

“We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

SECURITY

Full-Time Security positions available in Mehoopany. Nights & weekends a must. Must have a valid/clean driver’s license for at least 3 years to date & be able to pass a preemployment drug test. Benefits are available & uniforms are provided. Please apply online at https://jobs.nana. com/careersnms/ Careers.aspx

600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

CREATIVE & EXCITING

Paint your own pottery studio franchise. Low start up & local training. POKE-A-NOSE POTTERY Inspiration is Within Call Jason 570-730-7855 or email: pnpfranchise @yahoo.com

700 MERCHANDISE 708

Antiques & Collectibles

AUTO PARTS. 19301931 Model “A” Ford Parts for sale. Many parts, too many to list. Call for list. $1000 for all. 570-655-0607 Leave message. BARBIE DOLL: 1997 Mattel Hallmark Special Edition Barbie Doll. Fair Valentint; 12” tall; Pink & Torquoise 1870’s dress. New in box $20.735-0191 COLLECTIBLE Seagram’s Mirror – 1908 Stanley Cup $50. Call Mark at 570301-3484 or Allison at 631-6635. COLLECTIBLE: 1963 Topps Mike Ditka Football CardGreat Shape-Make an offer. $50.00 570-824-1180 FOOTBALL CARDS. Philadelphia Eagles. 127 cards, $10. MUST SELL 570-313-5214

708

Antiques & Collectibles

PICTURES: Pittston St. Johns pictures of the school fire of 1960 copies & some originals. also, the 1964 St. Johns year book. both for $20. Add also King’ college year book of 1980. $20. BOOKS on 5 great women of our times”Jack & Jackie” A portrait of an American marriage in the Kennedy family. “Living History” a book on Hillary Clinton. “Going Rogue” A amazing life of Sarah Palin. “My Turn” Memoirs of Nancy Reagan. “A Secret Life of Marilyn Monroe” $10. each. 655- 9474 email bing 1124.1@netzero.com YEARBOOKS: Coughlin H.S. 1926, 1928, 1932, 1937, 1940, 1961, 1963, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1949. G.A.R. H.S. 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1945, 1946, 1951, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1961, 1965, 1966, 1970, 1980, 1985, 2005, 2006. Meyers H.S. 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1960, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977. Kingston H.S. 1938, 1939, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1949. Plymouth H.S. 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1938, 1943, 1944, 1959, 1960. Hanover H.S. 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1960. West Pittston H.S. Annual 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1931, 1932, 1959. Luzerne H.S. 1951, 1952, 1956, 1957, 1959. Berwick H.S. 1952, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1967, 1968, 1969 ,1970. Lehman H.S. 1973, 1974, 1976, 1978, 1980. Nanticoke Area H.S. 1976, 2008. Dallas H.S. 1966, 1967, 1968. Bishop Hoban H.S. 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975. West Side Central Catholic H.S. 1965 1974, 1980, 1981. Westmoreland H.S. 1952, 1953 - 1954 G.A.R. H.S. 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976 Pittston H.S. 1936, 1951, 1954, 1963 Pittston Hospital School of Nursing, J.O.Y. of 1957, 1959 West Pittston H.S. 1950, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1960 Hazleton H.S. 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1945, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964 Hazle Twp H.S. 1951, 1952 570-825-4721

710

Appliances

DRYER. GE Electric. White, 6 cycle, heavy duty. Excellent condition. $130. 570-881-2384 WASHER AND DRYER. Extra large capacity, white, like new. $100 each. 570-814-5689

726

Clothing

BABY GIRLS clothes (0-18 months) tons of outfits, like new $150. Maternity clothes, over 20 pieces $40. 570-212-2347

GENE’S RECONDITIONED APPLIANCES 60 Day Warranty Monday-Friday 8:00PM-5:00PM Saturday 8:00AM-11:00AM Gateway Shopping Center Kingston, PA

(570) 819-1966

To place your ad call...829-7130 REFRIGERATOR, Kenmore, white side by side with ice and water in door. Excellent condition $450. Call 570-654-3135 or 570-760-5519

REFRIGERATOR. Kenmore, Almond. 21.6 cf, ice maker, filtered water. Excellent condition. $300. AIR CONDITIONER. Whirlpool, 6000 BTU, energy efficient. $80 570-868-6018 WASHER. Maytag. Fabric-matic. Heavy duty, extra large capacity top loader. 25 1/2” wide. White. Good condition. $325 570-885-1338 WASHER/DRYER. Whirlpool,electric. Excellent, $350. REFRIGERATOR, Roper, 18.2 cu ft. Excellent. $200. 570-474-5188

712

Baby Items

BABY ITEMS: Newborn swing $50. Childcraft crib $75. Childcraft oak 4 drawer chest $50. Oak dresser combo changing table $100. Newborn-12 month clothing - girl $5. each 570-825-0569 BASINET, for baby, blue & white, excellent condition. $50.; BABY BATHTUB $10; BABY SWING, Oraco $40. Call 570-829-2599 BASSINET: With canopy, mobile, music, vibration. Storage area underneath. Light green/ cream pattern for boy or girl. Excellent conditions. Extra sheets, mattress pad included. $40. 570-855-9221

CLOTHING. Great Buys! Girls, like new. Sizes 10-12. Large box $25, Size 14 $25 box. Misses women’s, Medium $20, X-large $25. 570-474-6028 JACKET Mens Brown Leather Jacket. Medium. Long. Good Condition. $10. 675-0920 JACKETS. Leather. Boys black size 14. Genuine Italian stone. $25 each. 570-868-6018 WOMEN’S size 3X 4x clothing including pants and tops, some with new tags. $5 for new and $2 for slightly used. Great for gifts. Size 20W mauve evening dress for $10. Excellent condition. Call between 10 am & 9pm. 570-288-9936

728

Commercial/ Industrial Equipment

GENERATOR Honda EB 2500 $400 570-674-7034

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 730

Computer Equipment & Software

COMPUTER SYSTEM COMPAQ XP PRO SP3, Includes mouse, keyboard, monitor. Still a year left on warranty. $75. 570-457-6610

732

Exercise Equipment

EXERCISE BIKE: “Half Price” Nordictrack exercise bike. 16 levels. Like new. $125. 204-4449

742

Furnaces & Heaters

COAL STOVE: Englander. 27-3000 heats approximately 2600-2800 square feet. Burns chestnut coal. Firebrick-lined, built in blower system, large glass viewing area, 6” top or rear exhaust, 610 lbs. Must pick up. $500. 570-497-4132

GLASS DOOR. 3 way glass door for bath tub. $25 570-331-8183

HEATER: Timberline vent-free propane gas heater with firelog. Wall mounted. 15,000 to 25,000 BTUs, sells for $250 asking $99. Excellent condition. 570-328-5611 570-328-5506

SINKS: 2 new Arlington double bowl sinks with slight imperfection (almond). $30. or best offer. For details 457-6380

OIL: Home heating oil. Approximately 150+ gallons. Must remove from tanks. $2.00 a gallon Located in Jermyn. 570-877-3861

716 710

Appliances

Building Materials

744

Furniture & Accessories

ARMOIRE. For computer. Excellent condition. $100 570-256-7208 BEDROOM SET 4 piece Basset, white, dresser with 3 drawers, desk with matching chair & lighted bookshelf, single bed with convertible canopy. Excellent condition. $350. 287-8711. BEDROOM SET 5 piece, complete, dark wood, like new queen size, 7 ft. dresser with double mirror. Asking $599. 655-5404 BEDROOM SET mission oak wood twin size complete & cabinet never used! $175. 905-5602 BEDROOM SET: Four piece solid oak bedroom set purchased at Ashley Furniture approximately 4 years ago for $2,800. In excellent condition, like new. $900. Call after 4 p.m. 570-466-3169 CURIO CABINET: solid oak, three glass shelves and two lights for display $200. Bridal Precious Moment knick knacks $5 to $35. Hunter green couch reclines on both sides, drawer in center bottom and hidden pull out table with cup holders $150. 570-704-8117 DAY BED white wicker Henry Link with trundle, desk, chair, mirror, night stand, 6 draw dresser, removable bookcase, wardrobe, magazine stand $500. or call for individual prices 570-498-0977 DESK, Computer corner desk Gray,light oak, excellent condition. $75 570-868-6018 DESK, Secretary drop down top 3 drawers, pecan finish, excellent condition. $100. 287-2517

744

Furniture & Accessories

GOLDEN LIFT CHAIR, weight capacity 375 lbs. Medium brown, never used, $450. Call 570-388-6044 LIVING ROOM SET. Couch, 2 matching swivel rockers and Ottoman. $350 570-474-5188 LOVESEAT & OTTOMAN solid sand colored cushioned, excellent shape $200. 570/824-7807 or 570-545-7006 MIRROR large full size wall mirror 30” x 52” great for salon or gym $50. or best offer. 570-905-5602 MIRRORS: 2 mirrors that fit on dressers. $50 for both. 570-313-5213 PANTRY/CABINET: 6 1/2ft tall, 3ft wide with shelves and lots of storage space. White with light wood trim. Excellent condition. $50. 570-855-9221 PATIO SET: 7 piece white, rectangle table, new cushions that are 1 year old $250. 883-5640 ROCKER. Maple. 6 months old. $30 570-824-2571 SOFA. Green sectional w/sleeper and recliner. $100 570-417-9280

752 Landscaping & Gardening Bruce’s Lawn Service See our ad under Call An Expert 1165 Lawn Care LAWN MOWER Yard machine, 5.75 H.P., 22” cut, mulches, high wheeled, good condition. $85. 570-881-7116 LAWNMOWER Craftsman /Honda motor includes bag not self propelled, new blade runs good $150. after 3pm 655-3197

758 Miscellaneous AQUARIUM: 30 gallon. With all needed accessories $50. 570-829-1541 BARREL, wooden. 53 gallon. Excellent condition $195. 570-876-3830 BATHROOM SINK SET: Gerber white porcelain bathroom sink with mirror and medicine cabinet. Matching set. $80. 570-331-8183

BEAUTY SALON two chairs beige color hydraulic lift & swivel $50 each 570-905-5602 BEER MEISER Dansby, holds 1/4 keg. $225. 283-2047 BLU TOOTH used 12 volt $50. 12 volt travel cooler $35. 12 volt refrigerator $35. Jack LaLanne power juicer $50. Sharp SF 7320 copy machine. $150 570-675-7024 CANES & WALKING STICKS - Uniquely made from the roots of Slippery Elm trees. Over 16 available. $4 & 5 each. Call 570-735-2081. CHILTON & Motor Manuals for auto/ truck repair, ranging from 1960 to 1980. each $12. Truck door for 1973-1980 passenger side Dodge Pickup new, never used. $100. Pinto trailer hook for dump truck. $40. Radiator for 1950/ 54 model Chevy truck. $75. Tail Lights, new, for Ford dump or box truck, brackets included. 2 for $25. 570-823-6829 CHOCOLATE SET Rose Theme. 5 piece. Small Repair. $20. Dinnerware - 8 place setting. Royal Staffordshire American Legend. With extras. $100. 570-675-0920

DESK: O’Sullivan Corner Work-center 5.5’x5’.5 finished in pine laminate, in excellent condition, sells for $250. asking $99. E-mail photo available. Call 570-328-5611 or 570-328-5506

MOWER Craftsman 6.75 hp, self propelled bagging mower, key start, fully services $165. 878-2849

COFFEE MAKER. Restaurant style, 2 pot Bunn Pour O Matic. $80. PUMP, windshield, for Jeep Wrangler, $50 570-709-2926

756

DINETTE SET: round top on pedestal bottom, with 4 matching chairs in solid maple. Mint Condition Less than one year old. Four cushions included. $175. 570-288-5835

POWER CHAIR: Jazzy. With leg supports. Red, comes with charger. May need a new battery. $350.00. 570-331-0632

DISHES Apple dishes 12 place setting with salt/pepper shakers, butter dish and matching canister set $25. Call 570-631-6635 9am5:30pm or 570-2835958 After 5:30.

DRESSER 5 drawer oak, very good condition $50. 570-878-2849

Medical Equipment

758 Miscellaneous

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER. Cherry, real wood. 57” wide. $20. 570-674-2985

AB-DOER In box never opened, $70. VCR Magnovox with all hookups, on screen display record & timer $20. DVD player $15. 570-822-8957

K I T C H E N TA B L E , small, oak. Sides fold down. $50. Call (570) 829-2599

ALUMINUM CAP: Black. For 6 foot truck bed. $200.00. 570-283-5142

DISHES. 2 sets of china, Service for 12. $100. Yellow set, service for 8, $40 570-824-2571 FIREPLACE, electric, built in heater, $300, TRAVEL CASE, Golf club, $10.WIRING, 250” roll 12/3, $50 570-675-7024 HUTCH, Mahogany. $50. STOVE, Camping, $30. LANTERN, camping $25 570-287-8092


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011

PAGE 51

758 Miscellaneous

772

Pools & Spas

776 Sporting Goods

GARAGE SALE ITEMS. LUGGAGE RACK, for top of car, $40. ENTERTAINMENT CENTER, oak with glass doors, $40. CHAIR, rocking, wood, $15 570-868-8449

SWIMMING POOL: 24ft round, 4ft deep. Plains. YOU dismantle and remove. Pump/filter not included. $350. 570-823-2958

CAMO HUNTINGBLIND. Portable For single person. $50 570-829-1541

IRONING BOARD $8; WAFFLE MAKER $10; (2) LAMPS, $15 each; ITALIAN POTTERY $30 for all. Call 570-829-2599 SLEEPING BAGS. 3 childrens’. $7.50 570-474-6028 STEAMER: Large. On Wheels. $50. 570-313-5213 TIRES -4 Dayton Timberline P255/ 70/R16 good tread $150. 570-824-7015 TIRES. Various sizes. $145 to $240. Call for details 570-969-1481 TIRES: Four (4) Good tread. 255/70/R16 $100.00 570-824-7015 TRAILER HITCH with hardware, fits 20052008 Escape, Mercury Mariner, Mazda Tribute $110 or best offer. 570-466-1214 TRUCK BOX. Kobalt aluminum. Fits small truck. $85 Call Mark at 570-829-1478

762

Musical Instruments

CLARINETTE 42, solid state 3 piece, stereo, phono & eight track stereo tape player with speakers. Albums & tapes available. $50 (570) 735-6167

DIGITAL PIANO

Roland RP-101-MH Digital Piano with cabinet and bench. Excellent condition hardly used. Paid $2400 $1500. 570-417-1734 PIANO Baldwin console with matching bench $995. tuned a440 almost mint, hardly used, excellent, delivered. call 570-474-6362 PIANO Beautiful Story & Clark console piano with matching bench. Excellent condition. $750. Call 570-287-8711 PIANO/SPINET brown, great for students $75. 570-417-9280

To place your ad call...829-7130 770

Photo Equipment

BACK UP CAMERA 12 volt, used $50. 570-675-7024

772

Pools & Spas

LADDER: “A” Frame for above ground pool. Purchased last year for $180. Sell for $100. Optional conversion kit $15. 570-574-2149

774

Restaurant Equipment

MIXER. Hobart, 20 quart. Excellent condition. $850 570-288-5571

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT,

8x12 walk in cooler $2300; 8x8x10 walk in freezer $3800; Pizza oven with stones $2000; Stainless steel kitchen hood $3000; Stainless steel pizza oven hood $4000; bread pan rack $100; 2 soup warmers for $100; 2 door sandwich prep table $500. All equipment is sold as is. For more info, call

570-847-0873

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT,

Somerset Dough Sheeter, Model CAR-100. Only 1 available. $1,500 Call for more info

570-498-3616

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT,

CROSS BOW by Weider (over 65 exercises) $75. 570-654-2396 GOLF CART BAG, Mizuno, brand new $50. PSE Compound bow with soft case, excellent condition $50. 50lb. automatic deer feeder $20. Bow Flex XLT with lat bar & leg extension, all cables, bars, and instructions included $200. Sit up bench with leg holder $20. Outdoor sun shelter 9x13 $25. 570-212-2347 GOLF EQUIPMENT. Clubs, cart. 13 various irons, woods, etc plus other items. $50. 72 golf balls, $10, 2 bags of tees, $3. 570-474-6028 PALOMINO 1988 COLT POP UP STOVE COOLER CONVERTOR, good tires, new springs $950. 693-0140 POOL TABLE antique solid slate with everything included business type excellent condition $950. 570-208-3888

782

Tickets

SOMERSET TURN OVER MACHINE model SPM45, $500; ALSO, Bunn Pour Over Coffee Machine, Model # STF15, $225 For more info, call

TICKETS: Glee Concert, 2 tickets, June 8, Floor. 4-Row 2 Wells Fargo Center, Philadelphia. $250. 570-690-6003

570-498-3616

786 Toys & Games

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT,

GAME TABLE SET. 10 in 1. Pool, hockey basketball, etc. Approximately 4x6 $45. 570-868-6018

AMERICAN EAGLE MIXER, 20 quart mixer, Model AE-20, with timer and guard, $1300. ALSO, Bev Air 2 door refrigerator/ sandwich prep table, Model SP48-12, $1300.

LITTLE TYKES play house good condition $175. 704-8117

792

Call 570-498-3616 for more details.

776 Sporting Goods 08 LOWE 14 Foot Aluminum Boat. Hand Galvanized Trailer. 40 pd Thrust Electric Motor. $900. 570-675-3171 BASKETBALL HOOP, portable. great condition. paid $150 asking $60. price negotiable. 814-4064 BICYCLE. Boy’s 20” Pacific DS2, 6 speed. $30. Boy’s 20” Magna Excitor, 21 speed. $40 570-868-6018 BICYCLE: 26” Sears ladies 3 speed bicycle, in very good condition, helmet included. $35. 570-696-1703 BOWLING BALL: NEW 16 pound Brunswick Groove Blue/burgundy. This ball is new in the box $15.00. 570-829-2695

Video Equipment

DVD PLAYER Toshiba all region, model sd-590. Plays dvd”s from any country. Remote. Like new in box $50. 833-2598

To place your ad call...829-7130 794

Video Game Systems/Games

XBOX 360 250gb slim system. Holiday bundle. $199. Eric 609-433-5660 (in Wilkes-Barre)

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

BUYING SPORT CARDS Pay Cash for

baseball, football, basketball, hockey & non-sports. Sets, singles & wax. 570-212-0398 Mr. Baseball, buying all sports cards and memorabilia. 203-557-0856

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise WANTED: Free or very cheap television for woman in nursing home without one. Approx. 20” screen thats in good working condition. Call (570) 654-3291

815

Dogs

Cats

CAT - Female Calico free to a good home. 5 years old, spayed & litter trained. Needs a loving home ASAP. Also free kittens. 570-762-1015

815

Dogs

PAWS TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130

Dogs

AKC DOBERMAN PUPPIES

Black/Rust, 5 males, Parents OFA certified. VWD cleared, thyroid done, Ready 5/28. $600. Approved homes only. For info (570) 974-1047

AKC registered White in color, 5 months old, all shots,$550, moving must sell. 954-4656 SHILOH SHEPHERD Rare breed. Male, white plush coated. 19 months old, excellent temperament. $800 570-288-5571

835 AKC GREAT PYRENEES PUPS Both parents calm, well mannered & loving. Raised with children. 1st shots, wormed, heath guarantee. $500. (570) 937-4154 COCKER SPANIEL PUPPY FOR SALE 3 months old, with papers. All shots & records. Crate trained. Comes with crate & all supplies. $600 or best offer. (570) 212-2335

PetsMiscellaneous

CHAMELEON cage (new) with all accessories. $45. Call 570-631-6635 9am-5:30pm or 570-283-5958 After 5:30. CHINCHILLA. With cage. 4 ft. high. $100 570-417-9280

845

Pet Supplies

FISH TANK, 30 gallon. Includes everything you would need. With wooden stand. $100 Call (570) 762-1015

To place your ad call...829-7130 ENGLISH SETTER PUPPIES Registered. Vet checked, $350 Ready to go. 570-443-9189

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS

AKC shots, wormed www.mountain hauskennels.com 570-746-1689

PET CARRIER, Petmate Pet Taxi Deluxe, small size, 18” L x 10” H x 10” W, heavy duty plastic shell with latches to lift off top, side ventilation, metal pinch latch door for easy opening, excellent $10. 570709-3146 in Laflin.

Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

AKC ALASKAN MALAMUTE PUPPIES!

Very beautiful, excellent bloodlines. Family raised. 1st shots, wormed. $625 each. Call 570-374-2190 or 570-259-8503

AMERICAN BULLDOGS NKC registered.

Both parents show champions. White with eye patches. $800 and up. 570-430-8420

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

SHIH TZU PUPPY

800 PETS & ANIMALS 810

815

GOLDEN RETRIEVER & LAB PUPPIES

Yellow $350. Black $250. Wormed. 570-836-1090

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

DUPONT

Single family home for sale in quiet neighborhoodBeautiful 2400 Sq. Ft. with 6 bedroom, 2 full baths, 2 story home, fully air conditioned, oil & gas heat, renovated kitchen, full unfinished basement, 2 enclosed porches, 15 x 20 deck with power awning cover – generous size lot, off street parking, first floor washer & dryer. All appliances included.

JUST REDUCED $168,000

Call 570-421-0587 or Rodite@enter.net use “Dupont Home” in email subject line.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

PARDEESVILLE

738 PARDEESVILLE RD CORNER LOT

home. Family raised and socialized. Vet check and vaccinations. Parents are ACA registered. Tootsie Roll (the mother) is our family pet. $500. 570-837-1980 Cell 570-713-8170

ITALIAN CANE CORSO Mastiff Puppies

Registered and ready to go! Parents on premises. Blue & blue fawn. Vet Checked 570-617-4880

POMERANIAN PUPPIES

Parents on premises Shots Current. $500. 570-401-1838

Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

Mountaintop Unbelievable VALUE! 14 Oaklawn Ave,

Mountain top PA 18707 cape cod, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, dining room, office/study, family room, finished basement, .38 acre, deck. At Your Service Realty Inc. Lisa Poholek $85,450 Call (570)902-9983

Manor, ranch, single family, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, double car attached garage, eat-in kitchen, dining room, living room, fireplace, forced air furnace, central air, unfinished basement, 82x150 lot size and spacious, deck. Great location. Nice yard. Perfect neighborhood. Must see. $219,000 Call (570)885-4900 before 9:00 p.m. to set an appointment

Find a newcar online at

timesleader.com

ONL NLY L ONE N LE LEA L E DER D ONLY LEADER. . timesleader.com

WEST WYOMING

TOY TOWN SECTION

148 Stites Street

CHARMING BUNGALOW $74,500

906 Homes for Sale

GOLDENDOODLE PUPPIES looking for good

WEST WYOMING HOME5thFOR SALE 545 Street

Single family built in 2005. 2.5 baths, two story with attached garage. Oil furnace with central air. 90 x 140 corner lot. Kitchen with center cooking island, dining room, raised ceiling with glass door entry & hardwood floor. Carpeting thru out home. Tiled kitchen and bath. Kitchen appliances included.

NICELY PRICED $219,900 (570) 233-1993

THORNHURST

2 or 3 bedroom home in Country Club Estates. 1.5 bath with lots of storage space. For info & pics, 1061fairway. weebly.com Call 570-472-3032

650 sq. ft. On corner lot with 2 car garage. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, walk up attic & full heated basement, hardwood floors with three season room. Freshly painted & move in condition. 570-446-3254

WILKES-BARRE Affordable Newly built 3 bedroom home. 20-year no-interest mortgage. Must meet Wyoming Valley Habitat for Humanity eligibility requirements. Inquire at 570-820-8002


PAGE 52 909

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011 Income & Commercial Properties

PITTSTON

5 UNIT MULTI FAMILY 2 Buildings. 4 Car garage. Prime location with over 6,000 sf. 3 New furnaces in last 2 years. New roof in ‘08. Separate utilities. Close to churches, parks & town. Fully rented gross income over $25,000!! $169,000 OBO 570-563-1261

912 Lots & Acreage

JENKINS TOWNSHIP

New Section in Highland Hills, Charles Place Open! Four 1+ acre lots available. Call 570-498-9244

theGuide It’s Your Entertainment News Source.

915 Manufactured Homes

ASHLEY PARK

Laurel Run & San Souci Parks, Like new, several to choose from, Financing &Warranty, facebook.com/ MobileOne.Sales Call (570)250-2890

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

AVOCA

3 rooms, wall to wall carpeting, appliances, coin-op laundry, off street parking, security. No pets. $410/month (570) 655-1606

BEAR CREEK

New furnished 3 room apartment Includes water, septic & most of the heat. No smoking & no pets. $750/ month. + security, references. Could be unfurnished. Call (570) 954-1200

CARBONDALE

Large, partially furnished 1 bedroom, all utilities included. $750 / month. Call 570-267-0855

DALLAS

2 apartments Modern 1st floor 2 bedroom apartment & large 2nd floor 3 bedroom apartment. Washer & dryer. Gas heat. Off street parking. No pets. $600 - $690. Call Joe 570-881-2517

Read it every Friday in The Times Leader. NUMBER N

ONE AUDITED

NEWSPAPER NEWS

IN LUZERNE LUZERN COUNTY


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011 941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

DALLAS

Short term or month to month as needed. 2 bedroom, completely furnished apartment in beautiful area. Includes all appliances, utilities, cookware, dishes etc. Carport included. $800 month. 570-675-2486

PERFECTLY CHARMING FORTY FORT SECOND FLOOR, Immaculate 4 rooms with appliances, laundry, porch, parking. Management provided, 2 YEAR SAME RENT $465 + UTILITIES, NO PETS/SMOKING/ EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION REQUIRED.

AMERICA REALTY

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

KINGSTON Charming 2 bed-

room, 2nd floor apartment, features a fireplace, built-in bookcases, large living room, dining room, eat-in kitchen, sun room & much more! $525 + utilities. Available June 1. Please call 570-714-8568

AMERICA REALTY

QUALITY COLONIAL FORTY FORT -

FIRST FLOOR DUPLEX. UNIQUE $595 + UTILITIES. Cook’s kitchen with built-ins, formal dining room, front/rear enclosed porches, custom window coverings. TWO YEAR SAME RENT, NO PETS/SMOKING/EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION Managed

E. WALNUT ST.

Light, bright, 1st floor, 2 bedrooms, elevator, carpeted, Security system. Garage. Extra storage & cable TV included. Laundry facilities. Heat & hot water furnished. Fine neighborhood. Convenient to bus & stores. No pets. References. Security. Lease. No smokers please. $840. 570-287-0900

LARKSVILLE

Very clean, 1st floor 3 Bedroom with modern bath and kitchen. New flooring, large closets. Off Street Parking, fenced yard. Water & garbage included. Tenant pays electric & gas service. $575/month. No pets. One year lease. 570-760-5573

NANTICOKE 1st floor, 1 bedroom.

570-288-1422

Heat, water, garbage & sewage included. Off street parking. All appliances included. $530 + security. Call 570-406-5221

HUGHESTOWN

NANTICOKE

AMERICA REALTY

4 Room/2 bedroom, wall to wall carpet, appliances, washer/dryer hookup, off street parking, security, no pets. $470.570-655-1606

KINGSTON A GREAT PLACE!!! LIKE NEW!! 2 bedroom

apartment in great neighborhood. 2nd floor. Includes new kitchen (with new stove, dishwasher & microwave) & bath w/washer dryer hookup. Hardwood throughout with ceramic tile in kitchen and bath. $695/mo + utilities and security. No Pets, references required. Call Scott (570) 823-2431 Ext. 137

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

PLYMOUTH 2 bedroom apt.

Heat, water, stove & fridge included. Near bus stop. $500/mo. No smoking or pets. Security & references required. Call (570) 592-2902

KINGSTON

570-288-1422

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL

PAGE 53

353 East Ridge St 1 person apartment. 1st floor. Heat, water, sewage & garbage included. All appliances & parking. $540/ month. Call 570-301-3170

PLYMOUTH

Available May 15th 1 bedroom, 2nd floor, modern bath, water included. No pets. $400/month + security. Call 570-575-2868

PARSONS

2nd floor, 2 bedrooms, washer, dryer, fridge, stove & heat included. $685/month + security. Call 570-332-9355

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH SECURE BUILDINGS 1 & 2 bedroom

apartments. Laundry facility. Off street parking available. Starting at $440. 570-332-5723

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE West River St.

Large 3-4 bedroom apartments. Heat & hot water included. Balcony. Off street parking. Washer dyer hookup. Pets OK. Call 570-237-0124

944

Commercial Properties

COMMERCIAL SPACE KINGSTON FOR RENT 620 Market St.

Newly Renovated Prime Space. 1,250 sq. ft., Near Kingston Corners. Great location for retail or business office. Easy Access and parking. Call Cliff 570-760-3427

WILKES-BARRE

Handicap equipped. Large 2 bedroom. Includes electric lift, oversized doors, large sit in shower. Appliances. Heat, hot water & much more. Available immediately. References requested. Call (570) 417-3299

WILKES-BARRE

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 - Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!! www.mayflower crossing.com Certain Restrictions Apply*

NANTICOKE

Modern 3 room, wall to wall carpet, washer/dryer hookup, fridge & range. Water sewer, garbage& off street parking included. $430/mo. No pets. Call 570-735-3479

941

WILKES-BARRE

264 Academy St 2 bedrooms, newly renovated building. Washer & dryer. $600/per month includes heat, hot water and parking. 646-712-1286 570-328-9896 570-855-4744

WILKES-BARRE Barney Street

3rd floor, 2-3 bedroom attic style apartment. Eat in kitchen, private entrance. Includes hot water & free laundry. Pets ok. $450 / month. Security, references. 570-237-0124

950

Half Doubles

NANTICOKE

55 Loomis St 3 bedroom, wall to wall carpet, full basement & attic, stove, fridge & water included. No pets. $630 plus security 570-814-1356

PLYMOUTH

Large 1/2 double, off street parking & yard. 2 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, $575 + security. Utilities by tenant. Call 570-690-6289

WILKES-BARRE

178 Charles St Available Now! 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, Townhouse style. No Section 8. $550/month + utilities. References & security required. Call 570-301-2785

953 Houses for Rent

OFFICE, RETAIL OR WAREHOUSE SPACE WILKES-BARRE

Starting at $300.00/month. First month free. 570-829-0897

950

Half Doubles

BACK MOUNTAIN 2 bedroom, 2 bath

home in beautiful rural setting next to Friedman Farms. $1,100 monthly. Call 570-822-2992

HANOVER TOWNSHIP 3 bedroom single

EDWARDSVILLE Recently remodeled

large Victorian half double. 3 bedrooms. Walk-out basement. Private yard. Porch swing. Washer dryer hookup. $700. Call 570-237-0124

KINGSTON Newly renovated. 2

bedroom. Basement, attic, yard. $500 + utilities, security & lease. Call 570-287-5491

KINGSTON

Park Place Beautiful, 3 bedroom, 3 floors, garage, hardwood floors, full basement Back yard. $950 + utilities & security. Call (570) 762-2878

KINGSTON

Spacious 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 baths. large eat-in kitchen, carpeted, finished attic, parking, no pets. $675 + utilities, security, lease. 570-288-2867 leave message

LARKSVILLE bedroom, 1 bath

3 half double, Freshly cleaned & painted. Tenant pays all utilities including sewer. $550 plus security. Call (570) 332-5723

family. 1 1/2 baths. Driveway, yard, nice area. $800 + utilities Call 570-332-5723

HUNLOCK CREEK

Retreat. 3 bedroom home. 2 baths. Hardwood floors. 1 car attached garage. 3 car detached garage. Pool, hot tup & appliances included. $950 + utilities. Available Immediately. Call 386-873-1879

NANTICOKE

3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 bath single. 1st floor laundry. Many extras. All new, inside and out. Rent to own. Owner financing available. 570-817-0601 Leave message with phone number

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

953 Houses for Rent

NANTICOKE Desirable

Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms 2 Free Months With A 2 Year Lease $795 + electric

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

WILKES-BARRE MONARCH RENTALS 3 bedrooms,

all appliances provided. Call 570-822-7039

WILKES-BARRE Parsons

143 Stucker Ave. 3 Bedroom 1-1/2 Bath. 1,900 square foot Modern Home in Great Neighborhood. Includes all Appliances. Large fenced in yard with deck & shed. Off Street Parking. No smokers / pets. $875 / month + utilities. Security, Credit Check & References Required. 570-332-6003

WILKES-BARRE

Whole house for rent. $1300/per month, utilities included, Call 845-224-9151

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

ORANGE

HICKORY GROVE CAMPGROUND Camp sites

available! Shaded. Showers, flush toilets, water & electric. Lake fishing, canoeing, biking & golf. 20 minutes from Wilkes-Barre. 570-639-5478 or 570-371-9770

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

SPRUCE CREEK, PA 30 minutes from

PSU. 300 ft. + of exclusive fishing, hunting, 8+ acres, log cabin, oil heat, out buildings, pond. $775,000. By appointment. Call (717) 919-9222

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1093

Excavating

All Types Of Excavating, Demolition & Concrete Work Large & Small Jobs FREE ESTIMATES (570) 760-1497

1129 Gutter Repair & Cleaning

GUTTER 2 GO, INC. PA#067136- Fully

Licensed & Insured. We install custom seamless rain gutters & leaf protection systems. CALL US TODAY ABOUT OUR 10% OFF WHOLE HOUSE DISCOUNT! 570-561-2328

1165

Lawn Care

BRUCE’S LAWNSERVICE Established 1988.

1204

Painting & Wallpaper

A.B.C. Professional Painting 36 Yrs Experience We Specialize In New Construction Residential Repaints Comm./Industrial All Insurance Claims Apartments Interior/Exterior Spray,Brush, Rolls WallpaperRemoval Cabinet Refinishing Drywall/Finishing Power Washing Deck Specialist Handy Man FREE ESTIMATES Larry Neer 570-606-9638

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

Fully insured. Free estimates. (570) 746-2087 or (570) 721-2746

ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE LLEADER. LEA E DER D .

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

timesleader.com

BLACK LAKE, NY NEED A VACATION?

Come relax and enjoy great fishing & tranquility at it’s finest. Housekeeping cottages on the water with all the amenities of home. (315) 375-8962 www.blacklake4fish.com daveroll@blacklakemarine.com

944

Commercial Properties

944

Commercial Properties

Immediate Occupancy!!

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS 61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701

• Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; laundry on site; • Activities! • Curb side Public Transportation

Please call 570-825-8594 TDD/TTY 800-654-5984

WILKES-BARRE

PROVINCIAL TOWER - S. MAIN Great Commercial Store Front, & Inside Suites Available Steps from New Intermodal Hub & Public Parking

Starting at $650

utilities included FREE RENT - Call For Details Today!

570-829-1573


PAGE 54

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011

Get 27 Rounds Of Golf For Just $35

Find that new job.

The Times Leader Classified section.

Join The Most Exclusive Club In Northeastern Pennsylvania, The Times Leader Golf Club! Play at these courses: Applewood Golf Course

Maple Hill Public Golf Course

454 Mt. Zion Road, Harding, PA (570) 388-2500

S. Ridge Rd., Springville, PA (570) 965-2324

Arnold’s Golf Course

Mill Race Golf Course

490B. West Third St., Nescopeck, PA (570) 752-7022

4584 Red Rock Road, Benton, PA (570) 925-2040

Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club

Morgan Hills Golf Course

260 Country Club Dr., Mountain Top, PA (570) 868-4653

219 Hunlock Harveyville Rd., Hunlock, PA (570) 256-3444

Briarwood “East” & “West” Golf Clubs

Mountain Laurel Golf Course

4775 West Market Street, York, PA (717) 792-9776

HC1, Box 9A1, White Haven (570) 443-7424

Emanon Country Club

Mountain Valley Golf Course

Old State Road, RR#1 Box 78, Falls, PA (570) 388-6112

1021 Brockton Mountain Dr., Barnesville, PA (570) 467-2242

Fernwood Hotel Resort

Sand Springs Country Club

Hollenback Golf Course

Shadowbrook Inn and Resort

Lakeland Golf Club

Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort

Route 209, Bushkill, PA (888) 337-6966

1 Sand Springs Drive, Drums, PA (570) 788-5845

1050 N. Washington St., Wilkes Barre, PA (570) 821-1169

Route 6E, East Tunkhannock, PA (800) 955-0295

Route 107, Fleetville, PA (570) 945-9983

1 River Rd., Shawnee On The Delaware, PA (800) 742-9633

Stone Hedge Country Club 49 Bridge St., Tunkhannock, PA (570) 836-5108

Sugarloaf Golf Course

18 Golf Course Road, Sugarloaf, PA (570) 384-4097

Towanda Country Club Box 6180, Towanda, PA (570) 265-6939

Traditions at the Glen

4301 Watson Blvd., Johnson City, NY (607) 797-2381

Twin Oaks Golf Course RR3 Box 283, Dallas, PA (570) 333-4360

Villas Crossing Golf Course 521 Golf Road, Tamaqua, PA (570) 386-4515

White Birch Golf Course

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad. ONLY ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER. timesleader.com

Over 47,000

people cite the The Times Leader as their primary source for shopping information. *2008 Pulse Research

660 Tuscarora Park Rd., Barnesville, PA (570) 467-2525

Phone orders call 829-7101 or order online at timesleader.com.

White Deer Golf Club

352 Allenwood Camp Ln., Montgomery, PA (570) 547-2186

Woodloch Springs

Woodloch Drive, Hawley, PA (570) 685-8102

Driving Ranges & Instruction Academy of Golf Center 1333 N. River St., Plains, PA (570) 824-5813

International Golf School

Multiple course locations. Call (570) 752-7281 for information.

What Do You HaveTo Sell Today?

*Your membership covers the greens fees at most of the participating golf courses.

❏ Yes!

I want to join The Times Leader Golf Club. Cards are now available.

______ paid in full at $35 per membership (includes Pa. sales tax). Pickup at The Times Leader. ______ membership(s) paid in full at $35 each (includes Pa. sales tax and shipping). ______ TOTAL ENCLOSED Name___________________________________________________

2011

Address_________________________________________________ Phone__________________________ City______________________________ State___ ZIP____________ __ Check one: ❒ MasterCard ❒ Visa ❒ Discover ❒ American Express ss Charge to my credit card # ___________________________________ ___ Exp. date_______ Security Code_____ Signature_____________________________________ Return form to: The Times Leader Golf Club, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 11

N NUMBER

ONE

AUD AUDITED

NEWS NEWSPAPER

IN LUZERN LUZERNE COUNTY

– AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY LEADER. ONL NLY L ONE N LE LEA L E DER D . timesleader.com


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011

PAGE 55

o l a i c r e mm o c n o i s i lev e t a ? n d o i e t a Ne z i n rga o r o s s busine

r u o y r o f deo i v b e w r

www.jvwinc.net

257068

Led by award-winning filmmaker Joe Van Wie, the creative team at JVW Inc is committed to bringing the highest possible production quality and professionalism to Northeastern PA and surrounding areas.


PAGE 56

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N

TH E NU M BER 1 NI S S AN D EAL ER I N TH E NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGI O N

S C AN H ERE FO R S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S

T H E T E N T S A R E

Annual Tent Sale ** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN A ALTIMA LTIMA 2 2.5 .5 S SDN SPECIAL PECIAL E EDITION DITION P ERDN S $0 D ow n Le a s e

STK# N 20139 M O D EL# 13111

M O.

16 S p e c ia l Ed itio n s Ava ila b le !

4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, AM /F M /CD, Allo ys , F o g L ights , S p o iler, All Po w er, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s !

B U Y FO R

2 0 ,79 5

*

$

OR

L EA S E FO R

239

ER M O.

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN R ROGUE OGU SV V w/ w/ SL SL PKG PKG P ERE S

M O.

$0 D ow n Le a s e

15 S L R ogu e s Ava ila b le !

4 Cyl, CVT , L ea ther, Na viga tio n , Ba ck-Up Ca m era , Bo s e S o u n d , Allo ys , S p la s h Gu a rd s & F lo o rM a ts !!

B U Y FO R

$

2 3 ,8 9 5

*

$

OR

w / $500 N M A C C as h & 2.9% For 60 M os !

L EA S E FO R

349

2 7,9 9 5

*

$

OR

w / $1000 R ebate

L EA S E FO R

3 19

P ER M O.

+

TA X

NO M O NEY DO W N L EAS ING TO P $$$ FO R YO UR TRADE

*P

ER M O.

+

$

TA X

U P

FO R

2 7,9 9 5

19 ,4 9 5

*

OR

$

L EA S E FO R

359

$

$0 D ow n Le a s e

B U

Y

M O.

FO R

2 5 ,4 9 5 w / $2000 R ebate

2011 2 0 11 N NISSAN I S S A N TITAN T I TA N SV V 4X4 4 X 4 CREW C R E W CAB CAB S

O ONLY N LY ONE!! ONE!!

SPECIAL S P E C I A L KEN K E N POLLOCK POLLOCK ALL TERRAIN ERRAIN E EDITION! DITION! ALL T STK# N 19917 M O D EL# 36411

M SR P $47,050

V8, Au to m a tic, A/ C, All Po w er, Pro -Co m p 6” S u s p L ift w / W a rra n ty, Pro -Co m p Chro m e W heels , Pro -Co m p T ires , Cu s to m Pa in ted F la res , Aw es o m e T ru ck!

B U Y FO R

$

38

TA X

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $17,347; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $750 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $621.00 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d ta g fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $500 reb a te.

*S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $2000 Reb a te.

*S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $0 reb a te.

P ER M O.

+

,9 9 5

*

w / $3500 R ebate *S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $3500 Reb a te.

6 X - Te rra s Ava ila b le

*

A N D

TA X

*

w / $500 R ebate or G et 1.9% + 60 m os or 2.9% + 72 m os in lieu of rebate

STK# N 20189 M O D EL# 24011

*

P ER M O.

+

25 M u ra n o s Ava ila b le

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN X-TERRA X-T 4X4 P ER ERRA S 4X4

6 Cu b e s Ava ila b le !

*

M O.

$0 D ow n Le a s e

B U Y FO R

M SR P $29,320 Y

L EA S E FO R

329

M SR P $31,540

M SR P $20,940 U

$

V6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

4 Cyl, CVT , L ea ther, Na viga tio n , Ba ck-Up Ca m era , Bo s e S o u n d , Allo ys , S p la s h Gu a rd s & F lo o rM a ts !!

B

OR

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN MURANO MUR “S” AWD AWD P ERANO “S” STK# N 19771 M O D EL# 23211

4 CY L , CVT , Allo ys , Preferred Pkg, Na viga tio n , In terio rDes ign , Ba ck-Up Ca m era , All Po w er F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

$

*

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $17,461; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $0 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $562.00 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d ta g fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs In clu d es $3000 Reb a te.

$

0% APR AVAIL ABL E**

M O.

2 4 ,6 9 5 inc ludes $3000 R ebate

YO UR

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN I S S AN CUBE C 1. 8 SL SL P ER U B E 1.8 STK# N 20295 M O D EL# 21211

B U Y FO R

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $18,826; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $1,000 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $581.00 d u e a t d elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d ta g fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $1000 reb a te.

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $16,629; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $1,000 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $623 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s t m o n th p ym t& ta g fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $500 NM AC Ca s h.

$0 D ow n Le a s e

*

DEAL ER!

M SR P $26,695

10 Fro n tie rs Ava ila b le !

M SR P $29,595

B U Y FO R

$

M O.

$0 D ow n Le a s e

STK# N 20364 M O D EL# 32411

V6, Au to , Prem iu m Utility Pkg, PW , PDL , AM / F M / CD, Cru is e, T ilt, Allo y W heels , F lo o rM a ts !

M SR P $31,910 *P

+ TA X w / $1250 R ebate or $500 N M A C C as h & 0% + 60 m os in lieu of rebate *39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $13,617; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $0 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $470 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d regis tra tio n fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $1250 reb a te.

STK# N 20275 M O D EL# 22411

5 M a xim a s @ Th is P ric e !

M O.

$0 D ow n Le a s e

V6, CVT , A/ C, S u n ro o f, PW , PDL , Allo ys , Pw r S ea t, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s !

M SR P $23,890

$

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN F FRONTIER RONTIERP**ER S SV V 4X4 4X4 CREW CREW CAB CAB

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN MAXIMA MAXIM 3.5S SEDAN SEDAN P ER A 3.5S STK# N 19810 M O D EL# 16111

P R I C E S A R E D O W N

*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d it io na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gr a phic a l Err o rs . A ll Lea s es 12 k M iles PerYea rw / 1s t pa ym ent , t a gs & fees d u e a td elivery. A ll r eb a t es & inc ent ives a pplied . **0 % A PR in lieu o f r eb a t es . As k fo rd et a ils .

Th e

#1 N

K E N

N

is s a n

De a le rin

P O L L O CK

IS S A

N

N

.E. PA

1- 8 66- 70 4- 0 672

229 M U N DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

w w w .ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om

Go Lackawanna 05-08-2011  

Go Lackawanna 05-08

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you