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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 24, 2011 COVER PHOTO / JASON RIEDMILLER

COURTESY PHOTO

Sevendust performs in WilkesBarre on April 29. STORY: Page 18

NEWS

3 NEWS

Page 4 – Casey seeks fed funds to fight gangs Page 7 – Crime watch learns about cyberbullying Page 10 – Council looks to privatize some services Page 12– Dems learn education key to energy jobs Page 15– Man allegedly dangled child over mall stairs

18 ARTS

Page 19 – Area winery introduces sangria Page 22 – Jim Florentine pulls no punches Page 23– OPINION: Save the drive to Philadelphia

33 SPORTS

Page 33– OPINION: Carlesimo’s contributions due credit Page 38– A better chance to bag a bird Page 39– Knights’ adjustments work well Page 40 – Road show saves WBS Penguins

ARTS

OUR TEAM GO Lackawanna Editor Christopher J. Hughes -558-0113 chughes@golackawanna.com Reporter/Photographer Rich Howells — 558-0843 rhowells@golackawanna.com General Manager Paul Andrews - 558-0845 pandrews@golackawanna.com

Obituaries — 558-0113 News Tips — 558-0113 news@golackawanna.com Missed Paper — 829-5000 Classified — 1-800-273-7130 Advertising — 829-7101 Subscriptions — 1-800-252-5603 Hours — 9a.m. – 6p.m. 210 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton

SPORTS

No easy ‘solution’ to labor complaint When news broke earlier this week about a labor complaint against the city of Scranton, putting Chief Dan Duffy in the middle on ongoing contract negotiations (or alleged lack thereof) between the Fraternal Order of Police and the administration, you could almost hear a collective “What?!” rise from homes from the Hill Section to North Scranton. One thing became clear in preparing our articles on the topic this week: the complaint is NOT against Duffy. As both sides have openly admitted, Duffy is a pawn in a political ploy by the police union to reach an agreement with the city and, perhaps more specifically,

BEHIND THE BYLINES CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES Scranton Mayor Chris Doherty. Much like the “crime triangle” the chief has discussed in the past, there’s a central issue here surrounded by three parties. In stark contrast to crime being surrounded by the victim, the location and the alleged criminal, the current union dispute puts negotiations into between the chief of police, the department’s union and the city administration. Duffy has fought against the complaint as a perceived personal attack, but police union President Bob Martin said the depart-

ment supports the proactive work of the chief. The argument falls under a reclassification of who’s in and who’s out as far as the union goes in line with a Dec. 2002 order that followed a petition from the city. Surprisingly quiet in the discussion that occurred this week was the third side of the triangle – Mayor Doherty. My efforts to reach the mayor on Thursday fell flat, perhaps a result of the Easter holiday. It seemed everyone but reporters were off on Friday. Meanwhile, the complaint could be a public relations nightmare for a police department whose appointed leader has consistently recalled his roots as an officer first and as a previous member of the bargaining unit, all the while encouraging the public to become “part of the so-

lution” against crime in the city. Public support in favor of the chief has risen at a feverish pace – a nice place to be for someone who was thrown under the squad car. Duffy has expressed fear that citizens will start to reconsider the relationships they’ve built with officers. The union hopes to win the complaint but worries it will be yet another labor-related issue that they’ve already assumed will be ignored by the mayor. Much like a pending Supreme Court decision that could cripple the city’s finances – Martin’s words, not mine – there will likely be no winner here. Christopher J. Hughes is stuck in the middle. E-mail him at chughes@golackawanna.com.

FOR THE RECORD In an April 17 article, Keystone Press Award-winning photographer Jason Riedmiller’s name was spelled incorrectly. The staff apologizes for the error.

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Sunday, April 24, 2011

GOLackawanna

3

Project addresses

HEALTH RISKS

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

N

ot all habits are necessarily bad habits. The Scranton Running Company hopes to replace some bad behaviors with healthier alternatives as they kick off the Oxygen Project, helping local smokers quit to live and breathe better.

The business is currently accepting applications for the 15-week program as they hope to introduce up to 25 smokers between the ages of 18 and 34 to the sport of running, incorporating the advice of medical professionals to help individualize their adrenalinepumping activity. Participants are encouraged to raise funds to benefit the American Lung Association throughout the course of the program, which is expected to begin on May 20 in coordination with the “Body, Mind and Soul Wellness” event held at Scranton’s Downtown Riverwalk. An information night for interested applicants will be held on Thursday, April 28 at 6 p.m. at their location at 3

W. Olive St., Scranton. Building a community The business was founded by Matthew Rosetti and Matthew Byrne in July 2010. Upon opening, one of their biggest concerns was building a customer base. They soon found that one already existed, but it was an unorganized group. “When all these people started coming to us, we looked at each other and said, ‘There are more runners around here than we ever thought.’ We’re starting to see the growth of an organized running community in the area,” Rosetti said. Working with the recently-founded See OXYGEN, Page 16

Aware of the health risks involved for the participants in the newly-created Oxygen Project through the Scranton Running Company, each applicant will be required to go through specialized medical tests, screenings, and monitoring provided by the American Lung Association, Marywood University’s Human Physiology Lab, the Run SMART Project, and Dr. Joel Laury. This “brain trust,” Scranton Running Company co-founder Matthew Rosetti said, will provide smokers a “cautious im-

NEWS

‘Oxygen Project’ takes aim at smoking cessation

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

See HEALTH, Page 8

ARTS SPORTS

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Scranton Running Company founders Matt Rosetti and Matt Byrne hope to help smokers find a healthier habit.


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 24, 2011

Casey: Fed cash needed to fight gangs, drugs

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

S

CRANTON – U.S. Sen. Bob Casey (DPa.) said Thursday morning that local law enforcement officials are effectively fighting against many types of crime in northeastern Pennsylvania, but federal funds are crucial to combating a rise in heroin- and gang-related activity.

Casey, speaking at a press conference at his Scranton office, cited a report titled the “Eastern Pennsylvania Drug and Gang Threat Assessment 2011” which was released last month by the National Drug Intelligence Center as the need for money from Washington in local municipalities. The report looks at 42 of the state’s 67 counties, accounting for eight million people. “We’re fighting a problem in 42 counties of eastern Pennsylvania. This isn’t a couple of cities in a few counties. It demonstrates the challenge that we have,” Casey said. The assessment outlines the increase of New York area and Dominican gangs in the region, the sharp increase of heroin use including among adolescents, and frequent home invasions in eastern Pennsylvania drug markets. It accurately depicts criminal activity that the Luzerne County District Attorney’s office has encountered, Deputy District Attorney David Pedri said. It especially reflects the influx of street gangs in the city of Hazleton. “We see the drug trade moving farther into our community,” Pedri said. “With federal help, we’re able to take a proactive approach to move forward with our prosecutions. Drugs are here in northeastern Pennsylvania. That’s a fact,” he said. The job now is to make the drug trade a difficult one to practice. “With federal grants and good law enforcement, we’re doing that,” Pedri said.

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

U.S. Sen. Bob Casey (D-Pa.) said federal funding is crucial to combatting the area’s drug- and gang-related crimes at a press conference Thursday.

In Pennsylvania, authorities seized nearly 264 kilograms of heroin in 2010, a sharp increase from the nearly 88 kilograms seized in 2009, according to reports given to the National Seizure System. The jump, Casey said, represents the good work of law enforcement along with the increase in the quantity of heroin available.

The senator said he will continue to ask Attorney General Eric Holder for more federal money to combat drug- and gang-related crime in the eastern part of the commonwealth. “I want them to understand the urgency of getting help,” Casey said of a conversation he had with members of the Justice Department Thursday morn-

ing. “The problem is that we’ve got folks in Washington who want to dramatically and substantially slash funding,” Casey

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said. “We have to fight very hard just to maintain funding… We have a lot of work to do.” A decrease in the number of violent crimes “demonstrates that at the federal, state, county and municipal level, the mayors, district attorneys, police officers, prosecutors and federal officials are doing their job,” Casey said. “But on this particular challenge, they need more help.” Lackawanna County District Attorney Andy Jarbola said the challenge for local officials is how to remain one step ahead of criminal trends. The report, Jarbola said, offers crucial information that helps officials properly direct funds and resources. “It comes down to dollars and cents,” Jarbola said. “I certainly want to applaud Sen. Casey for his efforts in getting the money that is absolutely necessary to keep one step ahead of the bad guys.” After the press conference, Casey conducted a closed-door discussion with local and federal officials on fighting back against the region’s challenges.

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Sunday, April 24, 2011

GOLackawanna

NEWS

GOOD COP, BAD COP

5

ARTS GO LACKAWANNA FILE PHOTO

The unfair labor practice filed by the police union last week against the city takes issue with an arrest Chief Dan Duffy made on March 20 in West Scranton.

Union: Labor complaint aimed at city, not chief

with a Dec. 27, 2002, order that approved the city’s petition to remove the superinCRANTON – In 1998, Dan tendent from the bargaining unit. His position became an issue this week Duffy was hired by the Scran- as the police union filed an unfair labor ton Police Department complaint against the city of Scranton datthrough its Comm-D, or Community ed April 14 for his March 20 arrest of John J. McHugh for possession of marijuana. Development, Program as a patrol McHugh was also wanted for an outstandofficer. The hire did not place Duffy ing bench warrant. While the complaint is against the city in the department’s collective baradministration and not against the chief, gaining unit as the program was as clarified by Fraternal Order of Police funded through Community Devel- President Bob Martin, Duffy said he’s still offended by it. opment Block Grants. “Here I am at a high point in my career As beat officers, Duffy said Comm-D when I’m doing as much as possibly can for workers were used as a “nothing more the city of Scranton…and I’m a bargaining than a bargaining chip” in contract nego- chip again,” Duffy said. “I was out being proactive when I was a non-collective bartiations during that time. When he was sworn in as the city’s chief gaining unit member in 1998. I’m back in of police on September 8, Duffy was removed from the bargaining unit in line See DUFFY, Page 15

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

S

S

CRANTON – The filing of an unfair labor practice complaint against the city of Scranton on April 14 represents a list of complaints that have been ignored by administrative officials, including Scranton Mayor Chris Doherty, Fraternal Order of Police President Bob Martin said.

The complaint originates in the Dec. 27, 2002, approved order that excluded the superintendent of the department from the collective bargaining unit in a petition for unit clarification from the city; and Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy’s off-duty arrest of a man in posses-

sion of marijuana on March 20. “The law is that he (Duffy) is not part of the bargaining unit,” Martin said. “He should be able to go out and make arrests… but because of the fact that he left the bargaining unit at the mayor’s pushing, he can’t do bargaining unit work.” Efforts to reach Doherty for comment were unsuccessful. Members of the FOP, Martin said, support the chief, but he crossed a legal line last month. “On March 20, he received some complaints and took it upon himself to get in his car. He went over to West Side and came across this guy wanted for a warrant, so he arrested him,” he countered. “It doesn’t take a whole lot of rocket science to figure it out. He was on patrol. He was doing bargaining unit work. See UNION, Page 15

SPORTS

Chief finds union’s unfair labor complaint ‘absurd’


PAGE 6

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Cyberbullying facts addressed in Taylor For more information on the Taylor Neighborhood Crime Watch, e-mail taylorneighborhoodcrimewatch@yahoo.com or call (570) 614-9863.

and concerned citizens,” Castellano said. The advent of the Internet and social media sites has taken bullying to a very different level. “Bullying and harassment have been going on forever; it is not a new thing. It has been going on since we all were children but it happened in a different form,” Castellano said. “Now, with the advent of technology, this idea of being able to bully or harass somebody has taken on a whole new meaning because it is easier. You don’t really need a lot of guts to communicate some-

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TAYLOR – Borough residents had the chance to learn about cyberbullying and Internet harassment Wednesday evening through a presentation by Lackawanna County Deputy District Attorney Frank Castellano. Castellano spoke before members and guests of the Taylor Neighborhood Crime Watch, a citizens’ group in Taylor. Presentations like the one given Wednesday are happening throughout Lackawanna County. “We spend a lot of time in schools and a lot of time in communities and spend a lot of time talking to the people about issues that are important to us because a community is really a collaborative effort between law enforcement, municipal government, school districts,

thing from the privacy of your own home to somebody that you wouldn’t have the gumption to say face-to-face.” Children as young as those in third grade now have their own computers and cell phones but, as Castellano explained, they may not necessarily understand the power of their words. Cyberbullying and Internet harassment are not protected under the First Amendment, he said. “There is a real difference here between First Amendment free speech and a crime. I don’t think a lot of kids understand that and, unfortunately, I don’t think a lot of adults understand that, either,” he said. “We all know that as citizens of the United States and as citizens of Pennsylvania we have First Amendment freedoms….We still have the freedom to express ourselves. “That is not what we are talk-

NEWS

GET INVOLVED

By STEPHANIE LONGO For Go Lackawanna

not protected by the First Amendment. That is the crime of a terroristic threat,” he said. “If the person who received that message truly feels harassed or threatened by it, then law enforcement considers it a crime.” Castellano suggested that parents review e-mails and text messages and to learn who their children are becoming friends with on their social networks. “If you are a parent, be an intrusive parent,” he said. “There is no definition of a small-town schoolhouse anymore. Our kids have access to kids and people all over the world.”

ing about in these kinds of cases,” he continued. “Now we have those words, phrases, and comments that cross the line and are no longer protected by the First Amendment but they are now crimes because they are threatening or they are harassing or they, in some way, cause the receiver of the message to feel that they are in danger.” The district attorney’s office steps into a situation once the recipient of the messages begins to perceive danger. “If you say to someone, text it, type it, e-mail, it or post it, “I’m going to kill you”, that is

280059

Crime watch welcomes deputy district attorney for presentation


GOLackawanna

NEWS

Continued from page 3

& 2011

Best Brightest Thomas Hogan Omeed Firouzi Samantha Snyder Gabrielle Richards Robert Kost

ARTS

out more. Then, all of a sudden, you find yourself eating better. You find yourself drinking a little bit less or going out less. It all naturally feeds into one another, whether it’s con-

The times leader

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MUSIC:

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scious or not. It’s the rule of unintended consequences, but it’s a good one,” Rosetti said. The American Lung Association teaches behavioral modification in their programs to avoid “triggers” that may cause a former smoker to start up again, something that nicotine gum or other cessation methods don’t provide, according to ALA program specialist Anthony Delonti. He warned that once a lung is damaged, however, “the damage is done.” “There are some reversible things like chronic bronchitis, which a lot of smokers get, that can actually be helped. Things like emphysema can be stemmed, so it doesn’t get to the point where people are just reliant on oxygen all the time. Throughout a smoker’s life, there’s always going to be some emphysema, whether it’s really felt or it’s a shortness of breath,” Delonti said. Working with a group of other smokers also allows them to relate to one another, SRC co-

founder Matthew Byrne added. “It’s bringing people together with similar struggles and a common goal of getting healthy. People can get hooked on running. It’s been proven that it’s addictive.” Rosetti also stressed the economic benefits of breaking the habit. If the health dangers don’t “trigger that sense of immediacy,” he believes the numbers will. “People are spending a shocking amount of money on cigarettes, and the unemployment rate is very high. We’re in a persistent recession, particularly in this region of the country, so to continue to go out and spend money on something like smoking is beyond irresponsible,” Rosetti said. “That’s $40 or $50 a month, and there’s not just direct costs. There are higher insurance premiums paid if you check that smoker’s box. Maybe more dry cleaning, fire insurance, and greater long-term healthcare costs.”

The final winners for each category will be announced at The Times Leader’s 2011 Best & Brightest Awards Ceremony to be held at The Woodlands Inn & Resort on Wednesday, May 11, 2011.

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CRIMINAL COMPLAINTS The following criminal complaints were filed in Lackawanna County Court between April16 and April 20: BLAKELY • William C. Lindgren, Jr., 25, of Grant Street, Scranton, faces charges including accidents involving damage and involving death or personal injury, fleeing police, reckless and careless driving, and driving with a suspended license for an alleged hit-and-run on the Scranton Carbondale Highway on April 16. Blakely Patrolman Shawn P. Chorba was the arresting officer. Lindgren was held for a lack of $5,000 bail after an April17 arraignment. A preliminary hearing is set for April 25. DUNMORE • Shannon Risner, 23, of Walsh Plaza, Olyphant, faces charges of defiant trespass, disorderly conduct and harassment for an alleged incident on April18. Risner allegedly went to a Larch Street home in Dunmore in an attempt to see her son. She was not allowed on her property, per a court order. Dunmore Patrolman William Jordan was the arresting officer. Risner was held for a lack of $1 bail following an April18 arraignment. A preliminary hearing is set for April 25. MOOSIC • John Bolchune, 26, of Wagner Street, Moosic, faces charges of simple assault and harassment for an alleged April17 domestic dispute involving his girlfriend, Allison Hull. The couple attended an event, and Bolchune allegedly became intoxicated. When Hull noticed him urinating on the bedroom floor, she yelled at him. He allegedly choked her and slammed her head onto the floor. Moosic Police Officer Jason Jarecki was the arresting officer. Bolchune was arraigned April 17, and held for10 percent of $5,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for April 25.

Sunday, April 24, 2011 April16. Boone allegedly grabbed her by her hair, pulled her off of a bed and grabbed her by the neck. Scranton Police Cpl. Anthony Loureiro was the arresting officer. Boone was held for $5,000 bail after an April16 arraignment. A preliminary hearing is set for April 25. • Shawn A. Festa, 34, of Main Street, Old Forge, faces charges of burglary, terroristic threats and criminal mischief for an alleged incident involving his ex-girlfriend, Hope Fisher, on April16. Festa allegedly broke into Dennis’ apartment. Scranton Patrolman Ronald Alongi, Jr., was the arresting officer. Festa was held for a lack of $20,000 bail after an April16 arraignment. A preliminary hearing is set for April 25. • Kenneth Smith, 38, of Madison Avenue, Scranton, faces charges of aggravated assault, simple assault with a deadly weapon, reckless endangerment and terroristic threats for allegedly stabbing Donna Fuller in the neck on April16. Fuller’s wounds required 20 sutures, according to an affidavit. Scranton Patrolman Brett Griffiths was the arresting officer. Smith was held for a lack of $30,000 bail after an April16 arraignment. A preliminary hearing is set for April 25. • Shane Connor, 30, currently held at the Lackawanna County Prison, faces charges of indecent assault and sexual contact with a minor for allegedly touching the private area of a then-7-year-old girlin April 2010. Connor was held for $50,000 bail after an April 20 arraignment. A preliminary hearing is set for April 27.

VANDLING Christopher Allen Mitchell, 26, of Main Street, Vandling, faces charges of simple assault and harassment for an alleged April17 domestic dispute involving Cristina Barron. Barron told Forest City Police Officer Christopher Mitchell that Mitchell punched her in the face. EMTs said she may have suffered a broken jaw. Forest City Patrolman Peter Ryan SCRANTON Stachura was the arresting officer. • Darryl Boone, 28, of Palm He was arraigned April18 Street, Scranton, faces charges of and held for a lack of $5,000 simple assault and harassment bail. A preliminary hearing is for an alleged domestic dispute set for April 25. involving Stacey Nardelli on

LACKAWANNA COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

County approves aid to low income families By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – Low income families and the homeless of Lackawanna County will receive a $165,000 boost from the state after Lackawanna County Commissioners unanimously approved the distribution of Act 137 funds at their April 13 meeting. Act 137, passed by the state legislature in 1992, permits the county to increase fees for recording mortgages and deeds to raise revenue for affordable housing, increasing its availability to residents whose annual income is less than the median income of the county. Last year, the county collected about $180,000 for housing programs, and approximately $165,000 in funds are anticipated for 2011, Director for Planning and Economic Development Harry D. Lindsay said. The First-Time-Homebuyer Program, facilitated by Neigh-

borhood Housing Services of Lackawanna County, will receive $110,000; the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, provided by the Scranton-Lackawanna Human Development Agency, will receive $40,000; the Permanent Supportive Housing Program, operated by United Neighborhood Centers of Northeastern Pennsylvania, will accept $12,500; and $2,500 is reserved for general administration. Lindsay said that LIHEAP provided emergency repairs or replacement of malfunctioning furnaces for 11 to 12 low income families in 2010. He also praised the work of UNC on rehabilitating neighborhoods in South Scranton and NHS for never defaulting on any of their loans, due in part to required credit counseling. “We appreciate the opportunity to continue this important program for modest income families throughout the county. To date, since October 2009, we’ve

Decision temporarily removes CMC meters

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – In a 3-2 spilt decision, City Council gave final approval to the removal of 78 parking meters surrounding Community Medical Center to allow permit parking for hospital employees until renovations are completed at their staff parking garage. CMC agreed to compensate the city $2,000 per metered spot, payable on a quarterly basis. At council’s April 12 meeting, they amended the legislation to deposit the money in a special city account instead of having the funds benefit

helped 11 families of modest income become homeowners, facilitating about $1.43 million worth of purchases throughout the county from Carbondale all the way down to Dunmore,” NHS Executive Director Jesse Ergott told commissioners. Michael Hanley, executive director of UNC, said that his organization obtained a grant from the Department of Housing and Urban Development for $125,000, requiring them to raise a 20 percent local match. They have raised “about half” of that match, and participants must pay a “modest fee” to be in the program. “This is for eight individuals who have been chronically homeless. They’ve been living on the street many times for a number of years due to special needs that they may have. This brings them off the street, puts them in an apartment, and provides support services for them,” Hanley added.

Council suggests privatization of two departments By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

the Scranton Parking Authority, earmarking the money for the police and fire departments. “We’re looking to set them aside for public safety expenses in the event of layoffs and other possible situations,” Councilman Jack Loscombe said. The fee, Council President Janet Evans explained, will be paid to the city of Scranton since Scranton Parking Authority employees are not required to monitor the meters during the term of the agreement.

SCRANTON – City Council voiced several suggestions to fill the looming hole in 2011 budget on Tuesday, including the privatization of the Scranton Sewer Authority and the Department of Public Works. Council’s Finance Chairman Frank Joyce said at previous meetings that he believes up to $11.3 million has already been misspent in the 2011 budget. The council majority has said often in recent weeks that they would not be in favor of the rumored summer layoffs of police, fire, clerical and DPW workers, nor would they support the bor-

See METERS, Page 14

See COUNCIL, Page 14


Sunday, April 24, 2011

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Contestants in last year’s local history quiz show included, from left, front, David Wenzel, Erika Funke and Dan Perry. Back, Ryan Leckey and Sarah Hosie.

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

year’s contestants. Quiz questions are created by students at Valley View and Riverside high schools, and the students take on roles as co-hosts during the actual event. Students were chosen by Valley View teachers Cynthia Cerminaro and Kathleen Myers along with Riverside educator Shawn Murphy. In addition, students are helping to create the game board, PowerPoint presentations and table skirts for the competition. Contestants in 2010 knew quite a bit about the area’s industrial history and some of its high-profile people. “People knew a lot more than we originally gave them credit for,” Moran-Savakinus said. In all, it allows contestants and audience members to laugh and learn at the same time. “The bottom line is that local history can be fun.”

SPORTS

SCRANTON – Local elected officials, television personalities, actors and more will unite on stage this weekend to prove that history, above all, can be fun and engaging. The Lackawanna Historical Society will host the second annual “You Live Here: You Should Know This!” local history quiz show in Shopland Hall at the Scranton Cultural Center on Friday and Saturday, April 29 and 30, beginning at 7 p.m. The one-time admission cost for both nights is $10 for adults and $5 for children.

The 2011 quiz show will follow a “Jeopardy!”-meets-“Family Feud” format with individual contestants choosing questions worth 10 to 50 points from categories such as “People,” “Places,” and “Industry,” according to LHS Director Mary Ann MoranSavakinus. If the contestant answers incorrectly, the opposing three-member team has a chance to steal the points. Survey says competition will again be fierce this year with the championship and runner-up teams each returning with one new team member each. Champions Catherine Cullen and Jack McGuigan will be joined by David DeCosmo, and runners-up David Wenzel and Dan Perry will team with Andrea Mulrine. “They were very competitive. They took the game seriously, and they came to win,” MoranSavakinus said of each of last


GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 24, 2011

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By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – Experts representing manufacturing, education and private industries each indicated to members of the Senate Democratic Policy Committee that investments into education, on-thejob training and similar programs are crucial to the future of the commonwealth’s economy.

The committee hearing Wednesday at Marywood University was called to discuss energy, economic development and job creation initiatives. Panelists indicated that each hinges on an informed, talented workforce. R. Chadwick Paul, president and CEO of Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Northeastern Pennsylvania, said the group’s calculated capital investments have created 4,500 jobs in 46 companies

that graduated from their technology incubator. “The jobs that were created by Ben Franklin’s clients paid 33 percent more than the average Pennsylvania pay scale,” Paul said. The creation and retention of sustainable jobs remains an important issue, he added. “The Ben Franklin Technology Partners is clearly working. What See PANEL, Page 17

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Members of the Senate Democratic Policy Committee, from left, Larry Farnese, John Yudichak, John Blake, Lisa Boscola, and Jay Costa, hear from experts on the state’s need to invest in education to boost manufacuting jobs in Pennsylvania.


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

PAGE 13


GOLackawanna

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Continued from page 10

The hospital will also provide proper signage to indicate the new parking arrangement. Additionally, they revised the legislation to place bags over the meters instead of having the meters physically removed. On Tuesday, they made another amendment to limit the agreement to Dec. 31, 2011, or whenever the employee parking garage reopens, whichever comes first. The agreement will affect 23 meters located in the 1700 and 1800 blocks of Mulberry Avenue, 31 spots in the 200 and 300 blocks of Arthur Avenue, 21 spots in the 1700 and 1800 blocks of Linden Street, and three spots in the 300 block of Colfax Avenue. While the amendments were passed unanimously, Councilmen Bob McGoff and Pat Rogan voted against the final passage of the legislation. Rogan said that he believes CMC employees should park in the hospital’s other garage and leave the meters for visitors, noting

COUNCIL

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Continued from page 10

rowing of additional money. Council Vice President Pat Rogan said he would be willing to discuss the deficit with Mayor Chris Doherty but would not even negotiate these suggestions if brought up. With the better enforcement of rental registration and implementation of the StreetSmart parking meter program delayed, Rogan suggested other sources of revenue for the city. “I have talked to many people in the business community over the last month, and they believe that the sale of the Sewer Authority would bring in nearly $50 million, and that’s a low estimate. With the $50 million brought in, we can close the budget gap as well as instituting a city-wide paving program. The majority of the streets in the city will finally be paved once and for all,” Rogan said.

that additional parking is already being used by CMC in the adjacent Nay Aug Park. Evans said outpatients receive free parking in the visitors’ parking garage, so that would allow them fewer spaces. Rogan also argued that the garage’s $4 flat fee for 24 hours of parking isn’t fair to visitors only staying for a short time. “Passing this legislation is simply a vote to increase fees for people who visit relatives at CMC hospital,” Rogan said. “I personally believe that the city has done more than enough to accommodate the CMC in that region…Now they want to take away 150 spots.” Rogan encouraged his fellow council members to “see the light,” but Councilman Frank Joyce said that the money paid by CMC would be far more than what would be collected from the meters, which are not always occupied. Funding public safety is also important, he said. “If we could have more revenue coming into the city, which would ultimately help save police and fire positions, then, yes, I have seen the light. I’ve seen the light of voting this through and saving our police and fire poHe believes the authority is rife with nepotism and that their costs to the city have only gone up over the years. He also proposed the privatization of the DPW. “The refuse portion of the DPW can be done easily by the private sector. Unlike police and fire work which should not be done by the private sector, garbage collection can. It is in many other towns and many other cities,” Rogan said. At the very least, he added, the city should conduct an efficiency survey of the DPW. He feels that garbage collection could be done in four days each week, leaving the fifth day for fixing potholes and other roadwork. Council President Janet Evans said she also favors the privatization of the Scranton Sewer Authority, as well as the refinancing the city’s debt and the sale or lease of the city’s parking garages after 60 days notice to the Scranton Parking Authority.

sitions,” Joyce said. “This legislation represents a compromise. No situation is ideal,” Evans agreed. Council ultimately passed the agreement 3-2. They also unanimously ap-

proved the introduction of legislation to execute an addendum to the city’s agreement with the Scranton Parking Authority, then tabled it to allow city solicitor Boyd Hughes review and amend the legislation for fu-

ture passage. As it stands, the legislation says that when any meters are taken out of service and replaced by permit parking for four months or more, the fees will be paid directly to the city, not the authority.

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Sunday, April 24, 2011

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

Continued from page 5

the same boat again.” The chief’s non-duty arrests since taking office last year have made headline news, and he assumes he’s had a dozen or so of those criminal apprehensions since September. The complaint, he said, is senseless. “How it was put was, ‘You can’t actively go out and look for crime.’ Yeah. OK,” Duffy said, dismissing the complaint. “I’m a policeman. I don’t know what else to do.” What it won’t do is deter his personal proactive policy, he said. “I’m still going to be a citizen, I’m still going to be a police officer, and I’m going to take a vested interest in this city. For me not to act, I should be fired. My oath is still the same as their oath…You don’t take and oath and say, ‘I, Daniel J. Duffy, do solemnly swear to be a collective bargaining unit member.’ The first oath of office you take is that you’re a policeman.” Duffy said phone calls and e-mails from citizens have shown their support, along with the individual visits he’s received from his own officers. Those men and women, he said, don’t represent the union’s complaint.

UNION Continued from page 5

That’s what the difference is. “I thought that he understood the difference.” Martin said he had similar conversations with Duffy following two driving under the influence arrests he made on the evening before Thanksgiving. A similar labor complaint was prepared but never filed due to a perceived miscommunication with the lodge’s attorney, according to Martin. A nearly identical complaint against then-Chief David Elliot was filed in 2003, but Martin said no action was taken.

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – A special meeting of the Lackawanna County Prison Board on Monday, April 18, to discuss personnel matters offered little information on the hiring of a new prison warden. Interim Warden Vincent Mooney, Jr., was appointedtothepositiononDec.1, 2010. Lynne Shedlock, the county’s communications director, said

20applicationswerereceivedfor the position, and the board selected the top three applicants. The concerns of the board are to “hire the right person,” District Attorney Andy Jarbola said Monday. The board is taking additional time to establish whose expertise makes the best fit for the county. Jarbola indicated more information on the warden’s position could come from an April 27 meeting

Lackawanna County employes (sic).” Any decision in the union’s favor in a Supreme Court of Pennsylvania case involving the ability of a financially distressed municipality like Scranton to alter arbitration awards issued to labor unions could destroy the city’s finances, Martin said. “If we were to take a total win at the Supreme Court, the financial consequences to the city of Scranton would be devastating. I don’t think we’re going to take a clean win, but we don’t have to take a clean win to cripple this city,” he said. Still, he contends, “The mayor doesn’t recognize the labor board or labor law.”

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

DICKSON CITY – A 41-yearold man allegedly repeatedly swore at police and had to be tased twice after they were called to his Templeton Drive home for a dispute with his sister. Paul Jacob Coyne, of Templeton Drive, Dickson City, faces charges of disorderly conduct, resisting arrest, harassment and obstructing the administration of the law for the alleged April17 incident. According to a criminal complaint: Officers Christopher Tully and Scott Benzeleski were dispatched to the Templeton Drive home just before 10 a.m. Coyne answered the door and allegedly told police they should “not be on his (expletive) property” and that they “better get the (expletive) away” from his home. Eileen Coyne, his sister, said he was being verbally abusive told her and later alleged that he pushed her throughout the home. When officers attempted to follow her to the side of the house, Mr. Coyne charged at Tully, became verbally aggressive toward Benzeleski and charged at him, too. Officers told Mr. Coyne “a total of 7 (sic) times” that he was under arrest. When he stepped towards officers he was tased in the chest. He attempted to stand up after the first taser cycle ended and was tased a second time. Mr. Coyne was treated at MidValley Hospital after complaining of chest pain. He was arraigned April 17 and held for a lack of $5,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for April 25.

Police: Man dangled child over mall stairs

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – A city man allegedly held a young child by an arm and a leg over the railing of a set of stairs inside the Mall at Steamtown. Shawn Lamel Mayo, 26, of Market Street, Scranton, faces charges of reckless endangerment, child endangerment and simple assault for the April19 incident.

According to an affidavit: Scranton police were conducting a plain clothes detail inside the mall when they observed a man later identified as Mayo pulling a child through the mall’s center court. Mayo then ran up a set of stairs away from the child and hid behind a tree so he could not be seen. As the child climbed the stairs, Mayo allegedly ran to him on a landing between the first

and second floor of the mall. He picked the child up by an arm and a leg, lifting him over the railing above an open area. Officers allegedly saw him lift the child over the rail twice. The child was not injured and was placed into the custody of his mother, Tasia Davis. Mayo was held for a lack of $2,000 bail after an April 19 arraignment. A preliminary hearing is set for April 26.

SPORTS

All quiet on the warden front

During public comments made Tuesday before City Council, Martin said that “Chief Duffy just happens to be a part of the collateral damage in all of this,” referring to the union using labor complaints as a “tool to get the mayor to sit down and negotiate” terms of their contracts. “We knew that the chief should be out doing this kind of work. Now they’re mad at us because we’re making them stick to the rules,” Martin said in an interview Thursday. Martin also takes issue with a March 25 order that supports the union’s allegation that the city improperly unilaterally transferred “the work of processing arrested persons to

Man swore, charged at police

ARTS

SCRANTON – A man out on bail allegedly swallowed a roach to hide it from police during a traffic stop this week. Jameson Emmanuel Duggan, 27, of Cedar Avenue, Scranton, faces charges of possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia and tampering with physical evidence for the alleged April 19 incident. According to an affidavit: Scranton Patrolman William Golden stopped Duggan’s vehicle on Cedar Avenue for an improper lane change. Police recognized Duggan for his recent distribution of illegal drugs. He also had a summary warrant our for failure to pay for a criminal trespassing charge from Magistrate Alyce Hailstone Farrell. Duggan mumbled when police asked if he understood a written warning, and police suspected he was concealing narcotics. He allegedly struggled with Golden and Patrolman Michael Costanzo, at which time he swallowed all contraband in his mouth. He told the officers he “swallowed a roach…and that he was scared because he was out on bail,” the complaint states. Duggan was held for a lack of $5,000 bail after an April 19 arraignment. A preliminary hearing is set for April 26.

DUFFY

“I know that the majority of our department does not agree with this, and they find it very embarrassing,” Duffy said. “Other people who have headed up different lodges of the Fraternal Order of Police that have called me or walked up to me and apologized. If that’s not a huge message to the union representatives, I don’t know who the message is to.” In the complaint, union officials state that “the work of apprehending and arresting individuals has been the sole and exclusive province of the members of the bargaining unit,” including off-duty arrests. The 2002 order excludes the superintendent of the department from the bargaining unit as a managerial employee. “Do I believe the chief should be in the bargaining unit? No way! I have to make decisions that will ultimately impact the department,” Duffy said, adding that if his leadership resulted in union complaints that he shouldn’t benefit from any legal battles. Duffy said he hopes the complaint doesn’t negatively affect the public’s views of officers in the Scranton Police Department. “They’re the ones that go in and do that job day in and day out,” he said. “I respect what they do because I do what they do. I’m just leading by example. I’m a supervisor, but that doesn’t eliminate me from being proactive and going out and arresting criminals.”

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Man on bail swallowed blunt, police say

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Sunday, April 24, 2011 “We’re trying to get them hooked on something else, something that’s a little bit healthier.” “You’re not reducing your stress chemically. You’re doing it through the natural endorphins,” Anthony Delonti, program specialist at the American Lung Association, said. Delonti said that the number one cause of death for smokers is heart disease because of a lack of oxygen to the heart muscle, the tightening of the arteries, and higher blood pressure and heart rates. “It’s an unnatural higher heart rate, as compared to when you’re running.”

Electric City Runners and utilizing popular locations like the Lackawanna River Heritage Trail, Lake Scranton and Nay Aug Park, the SRC has introduced their own runs and walks each Wednesday at 6 p.m. The innovation didn’t stop there. “One of the ideas and the approaches we had when we opened the store was to be more than a traditional retailer. It’s really a community orient- The odds of success ed business, so we While some wanted to use this smokers may bestore as a platform LEARN MORE lieve it’s too late to to pursue a couple quit, Rosetti said The Oxygen Project is of chosen commumany serious longnity initiatives,” now accepting applicaterm health implitions. Interested parRosetti explained. ties from age 18 to 34 cations can be Last year, they can contact the Scranavoided if they started the Team ton Running Company, kick their butts at Survivor program, 3 W. Olive St., Scranan early enough training a team of ton, at (570) 955-0921 age. breast cancer survi- or info@scrantonrun“Even the highvors to run the ning.com. An informaest success rates of Race for the Cure. tion night will be held smoking cessation Riding high on that at the business on programs is 30 perThursday, April 28, at success, the SRC cent,” Rosetti said. decided to take on 6 p.m. “Say we get 10 peoThe American Lung smoking cessation ple to quit smokAssociation will hold with the Oxygen ing out of the 25 their Fight For Air Project. Walk in Wilkes-Barre that we take. on June 4, starting at That’s a coup – Trading the Robert L. Betzler that’s a big win.” addictions Fields at King’s ColByrne said he Approximately lege. For more info, has personal rea20,000 adults in visit www.lunginfo.org/ sons for getting bePennsylvania die wbwalk. hind the project. annually from “My dad smoking-related causes, and smoked for 50 years. It’s why tobacco-related health care he struggled with his health costs residents about $4.7 bilmost of his life. He passed away lion annually in the state, actwo years ago. When he finally cording to information providdid quit about four or five years ed by the SRC. After reading ago, it still took its toll for so about the “shockingly high” many years. It was tough,” he rates of smoking in northeastsaid. ern Pennsylvania alone, Roset“We supported him and ti began developing a way to begged him for so many years use his knowledge to fight to quit and he just couldn’t. back. When he had a scare, he was fi“One of the things that bothnally able to put them down.” ered us is that in most tradiRosetti said the concept is tional smoking cessation profar from a “holier-than-thou angrams, the exercise aspect of it ti-smoking crusade.” was always treated as an after“This is more of a communithought. A lot of people who ty initiative to lend a hand and quit smoking put on weight. take our knowledge of the This is a way to mitigate that sport that we love and apply potential weight gain or obesthat to something new in an ity risk,” Rosetti said. unconventional way to an old “When you smoke, when you game with high stakes,” Rosettake that nicotine into your ti added. lungs, it replicates an adrena“I want people to put the line release,” he continued. Lung Association out of busi“It’s a proven scientific fact that ness the right way,” Delonti 20 minutes of rigorous endusaid. “We succeeded with turance exercise and beyond repberculosis, so let’s see what we licates that same feeling - that can do with this.” runner’s high, so to speak.

Easter party welcomes hundreds of kids The 12th annual O’Malley Free Easter Party was held Sunday, April 17, at the Keyser Valley Community Center. The event welcomed more than 800 children and their families for photos with the Easter Bunny, a candy bag, refreshments and more. Entertainment was provided by DJ Jason Miller of Extreme Entertainment. Shown is host Patrick O’Malley, at right, with some of the party’s participants.

Marywood awarded $100,000 Hunger-Free Communities grant Marywood University, in collaboration with 21 community organizations, was awarded a $100,000 Hunger-Free Communities grant from the United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Services. The consortium was one of only 14 grants awarded in the country out of over 200 applications. The purpose of this project will be for the community to collaborate on a plan improve access to nutritious food through research, planning, and implementation of hunger relief activities. Principal Investigators from Marywood include Dr. Joanne Christaldi, Dr. Gerald Zavorsky, and Dr. Lee Harrison. Shown at the announcement are, from left, front, Linda Steier, Meals on Wheels; Dr. Joanne Christaldi, assistant professor of nutrition and dietetics, Marywood University; Sr. John Michele Southwick, IHM, assistant director of campus ministry, Marywood University; and Sr. Ann Walsh, Friends of the Poor. Back, Deb Peterson, Voluntary Action Center; Christopher Doherty, Lackawanna CAO; Rich Kurtz, Weinberg Regional Food Bank; and Peg Kopko, United Way of Lackawanna and Wayne Counties.


Sunday, April 24, 2011

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Man who eluded police for months captured By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

and another alleged burglary involving threats and harassment against the same woman on Nov. 8, 2010 on Prospect Avenue. In all, Padelski faces four counts of criminal trespassing; three counts of burglary; two counts each of terroristic threats and criminal mischief; and one count each of simple assault, harassment, theft by unlawful taking, receiving stolen property, fleeing from police, driving with a suspended license, and criminal conspiracy. He faces $10,000 bail for each of the four incidents. He was arraigned on April 16, and a preliminary hearing is set for April 25.

ARTS

SCRANTON – A city man, listed in current court papers as being homeless, will face four sets of charges for three separate events when he appears in court on Monday. Anthony Padelski, 28, was arrested April 15 following two alleged burglaries in the Hill Section, but additional charges against him date back to Sept. 1, 2010, according to court records. According to an affidavit: Padelski and another man, Jordon Williams, 25, of South Webster Avenue, face charges of burglary, criminal trespassing and criminal mischief following the alleged theft of copper pipes from a home on Madison Avenue. Police later located what they suspected was a getaway vehicle at a car wash on Ash Street. As Patrolman Lowell Stevens approached the car, it sped away. Police began pursuit and Cpl. Rich Bachman later captured Williams on foot on Monroe Avenue. Williams faces additional charges of theft by unlawful

taking, possessing an instrument of crime and receiving stolen property. He was arraigned April 16 and held for a lack of $10,000 bail. A preliminary hearing is set for April 25. Meanwhile, Padelski had allegedly broken into a basement on East Gibson Street in an attempt to hide from police, bringing additional charges from the April 15 incident. He was captured by Cpl. Joe Harris as he tried to escape out the front door of the home. Padelski was also charged for an alleged Sept. 1, 2010, burglary on Jackson Street involving terroristic threats against a former girlfriend

NEWS

isn’t working is what we’ve had to do in the past two years due to budget cuts,” he said. Promising companies have been turned away and investments have been scaled back, losing opportunities for the state, he said. Locally, institutions like Johnson College have provided skill-based education that yield positive employment results. One hundred percent of the school’s precision machining students had job offers upon graduation last year, President Ann Pipinski said, and a welding training program was reintroduced last fall to meet the needs of the Marcellus Shale natural gas drilling boom. “We need to keep our employees in northeastern Pennsylvania trained to be able to get onto those job sites and earn a good living,” Paul Casparro, training director for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and National Electrical Contractors Association apprenticeship program, said. “It’s better that our people be

there than people from Florida, Alabama, Texas, and Oklahoma. We need to employ our own people.” The message was no surprise to area Senators John Blake (D-Archbald) and John Yudichak (D-Plymouth Township). “You saw the stream of that fabric…about the necessity for us to invest in education and training,” Blake said after the hearing. “We need to create better connections between our academic community, our training community and industry in order to guarantee that we’re using these dollars in the most efficient and effective manner.” Yudichak said the message is one he’s received quite often from area CEO’s and vice presidents on manufacturing facility tours. “If they’re going to compete with the world, they need a highly educated, highly skilled workforce,” Yudichak said. “That’s why the cuts the basic education and the cuts to higher education are so out of touch with the economic reality on the ground. “We can position Pennsylvania to be the keystone state of energy, but we need to make those investments in education.”

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 24, 2011

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By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

F

ew heavy metal bands would refer to their shows as a “family affair,” but no band is quite like Sevendust. Since the release of their first self-titled album in 1997, the Atlanta, Ga.-based group has had several gold records and Billboard-charting hits, but singer Lajon Witherspoon is most proud of their fan base’s dedication, giving him both hope and relevance for over a decade.

Sevendust is touring in support of Avenged Sevenfold with Three Days Grace and will be at the Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza in Wilkes-Barre on Friday, April 29. Witherspoon said he wanted to be in a band from a young age. With his father being an artist, he was always around instruments as a child. Every genre “from country to R&B to jazz” was accepted in his home, so when he joined the band that

would eventually become Sevendust, those influences came with him. “Everyone kind of has their flavor, but we all eventually end up liking the same type of things. It’s really cool to have a band full of eclectic music listeners,” Witherspoon said. The 1990s introduced a new wave of metal acts into the mainstream, many of them having See SEVENDUST, Page 20

IF YOU GO What: Avenged Sevenfold with Sevendust and Three Days Grace Where: Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza, Wilkes-Barre When: Friday, April 29, 7 p.m. Cost: $44.75, $39.75, $25


Sunday, April 24, 2011

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Mixing modern, traditional style NEWS

Scranton’s newest Thai restaurant opens By JESSICA MEONI For Go Lackawanna

D

He currently operates the Thai Thai location in Wilkes-Barre, which opened in 2007. The new restaurant marks his return to downtown Scranton. Thai cuisine typically uses a balance of spicy, hot, sweet, and salty flavors in lightly prepared dishes with special attention to detail in appearance and aroma. Thai Thai Scranton

Thai Thai employees include, from left, Manager Deach Areesonti, Pong Eingnguluem, Bowie, Kritsana Srisonchai, and Emsya.

IF YOU GO WHAT: Thai Thai Scranton WHERE: 309 N. Washington Ave., Scranton HOURS: Monday to Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 10 a.m. INFO: For more information, call (570) 963-7745. JESSICA MEONI PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

serves nearly 120 meals, including traditional favorites such as Pad Thai, which are noodles with shrimp, chicken, eggs, ground peanuts, bean curd, scallion and bean sprouts as well as more modernized dishes such as Fettuccine Kee Mao, a stirfried fettuccine with the patron’s choice of chicken, pork or beef over broccoli, tomato, onion, bell pepper, egg, chili and basil leaves. Prices range from $6.99

Goong Sam Rod, also known as three flavors shrimp; Pad Thai, famous Thai noodles with shrimp and chicken; and the Royale Tom Yum Goong soup are among the many dishes available at Thai Thai Scranton.

appetizers including steamed wontons or crispy spring rolls to more filling Chef Specialties at $16.99 and up, including a sautéed wild boar with red curry paste, eggplant, lime, coconut milk and peppercorn. Lunch specials are available Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. for $7.99 with a choice of beef, chicken or pork as

well as a soup of the day. Lunch entrees typically include a choice of Pad Thai, curry, macaroni, rice, or noodle soup. Invented in the 1980s in Taiwan, another novel inclusion on the menu is bubble tea, which is a foam tea sweetly flavored with fruit or milk. Thai Thai Scranton’s version of the tea is more reminiscent of a smoothie or milk-

shake. This version of bubble tea is often called a Snow Bubble. The drink also contains “tapioca pearls” - round, chewy tidbits found in a bunch at the bottom of the cup – and is served with an oversized straw. Thai Thai Scranton offers over twenty flavors of bubble tea, including mango, papaya, strawberry, honeydew and coconut.

By STEPHANIE LONGO For Go Lackawanna

PECKVILLE - After you’ve had your fill of candy, a glass of wine may be just what the doctor ordered to take the edge off of a busy holiday weekend. On April 24 from 2 p.m. until 7 p.m., the Ferrone Family Winery, 505 Main St., Peckville, is unveiling its newest wine flavor, sangria. For a $7 cover, the winery’s sangria party will give peo-

ple the chance not only to taste the new flavor but also to see how it can be used in recipes, including a fruit dip and even London broil. Sunday’s events are part of a weekend-long celebration to help break up an otherwise quiet season, winery owner Tim Ferrone explained. “April, as a wine month, is quiet,” he said. “There isn’t much going on because May is

the month when everything starts off because it is further into the spring and more people are out and about. From February to May it is pretty quiet; after January 2 no one really thinks about drinking wine for a while.” The Ferrone Family Winery, which opened in June 2009, is rapidly gaining a reputation loSee FERRONE, Page 32

SPORTS

Peckville biz adds sangria to list of wines available

ARTS

each Sreesonti, manager of the recently opened Thai Thai Scranton, said he hopes to attract customers with the eatery’s generous portions and humble pricing. “Thai Thai Scranton will be sure to please,” Sreesonti said of his new endeavor at 309 N. Washington Ave., Scranton.

STEPHANIE LONGO PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Ferrone Family Winery owner Tim Ferrone holds a bottle of the store’s newly introduced sangria.


SPORTS

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GOLackawanna

Scranton joins in celebration of laughter On Sunday, May 1, Scranton will join over 60 countries in the celebration of World Laughter Day with activities that will make the community smile and laugh it up at Nay Aug Park and Afa Gallery, both in Scranton. Scranton’s World Laughter Day celebration is presented by Laugh to Live! owner Jeannine M Luby, who is a certified laughter yoga leader has been organizing smaller events each year around the time of World Laughter Day - celebrated the first Sunday in May - for the past four years. “We mark our calendars for all kinds of occasions. I think it’s important that we make time to laugh, be happy and enjoy the now instead of always looking to what’s next,” Luby said. Laughter may help with the prevention of heart attacks and healthier blood flow, healthier immune system, pain management and more. World Laughter Day activities in Nay Aug Park will take place between noon and 3 p.m. Events include laughter yoga at noon, a 12:30 p.m. story time with children’s author Angela DeMuro and her Mu Birds, and a 2 p.m. joke telling showcase for children ages 5 to 12. The laughter continues at Afa Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton, from 5 to 7 p.m. with a comedy show that features comics including Kenny Jay, Paul Spratt as MC, “The Wingman” James Holeva, Bobby Keller, Jeremy Pryal, William Robbins, John Walton, Michelle Morgan and Jeannine M. Luby. Admission to the show is a $10 donation to benefit the Humor Therapy Fund and includes a World Laughter Day T-Shirt, while supplies last. To get tickets for the comedy show, event details or to make a donation online, visit www.laughtolive.net or call Jeannine Luby at (570) 6507518.

Sunday, April 24, 2011

SEVENDUST Continued from page 18

since faded away. Witherspoon said it’s a credit to their personal, yetrelatablesongwritingthathas produced eight albums and kept them “still relevant” in an everchanging industry. “What you see is what you get. We’re not trying to write songs to necessarily be just like that onehit wonder…We’re a band that I feel take our time with the songs, and it means a lot. I think everyone can get something out of it. We’re not preaching to anyone. We’re just writing about stuff that happens and goes on in our lives the same as everyone else’s,” he explained. “If my brother comes in with some lyrics, I definitely know what he’s going through because I might have been the guy who was sitting in the back lounging when he was crying thinking about what he’s talking about in the song. I think that’s what’s beenabletokeepusstrong,being like that.” The band hasn’t been afraid to experiment with their sound either, mixing soulful melodies with harsh breakdowns and dual vocals. They also perform acoustic versions of their songs, which fans have embraced wholeheartedly. Witherspoon feels that the band has always been able to connect with their audience, no matter the size of the venue. “In a Sevendust show, we always try to bring it in. To me, they’re more like family reunions but just in a bigger place. We always seem to somehow command the crowd, and I think that’s something a band is able to

COURTESY PHOTO

Sevendust performs in support of Three Days Grace and Avenged Sevenfold on Friday in WilkesBarre.

do when you have a connection with people.” Now 38, he’s grown up with his fans both literally and figuratively. “Honestly, I feel like we’ve all grown up together in a sense. It’s been a blessing for us to now see that the cat that was my age…He has two kids and my kids come to shows and guess what? His kids come to the show now,” Witherspoon said. “It’s been very interesting to grow up with people on the scene. That’s kind of how we’ve done it because I don’t really like to say that we have fans. I like to say that we have family because that’s a true statement.” While it’s hard to leave his actualfamilyathomewhileontour, he feels blessed to be able to take people away from their troubles and “bring a piece of serenity” to theirlives.Themusicseemstobe as much of an escape to him as it does to his fans.

“We always found a way to make Sevendust work. Even in the darkest hours, I think we always that we had hope enough to say, ‘You know what, man? Even if this all falls through, we could get in the van or buy an old bus and still show up and some of those beautiful people that have grown up with us are going to showuptotheshow,sowecando this no matter what,’” he said. “It might not be the biggest, but we know somebody is going to come out.”

When he is able to return home, Witherspoon said he’s still able to be the man he is on stage, but with a few “less cuss words.” While both his children are also musically inclined and enjoy rocking out with their father, he admits that his 11-year-old is still not convinced that her old man is cool. “When are you going to realize that I’m kind of cool?” he asked with a laugh. “You better hurry up before it’s too late and I’m not anymore!”

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NEWS ARTS SPORTS


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NEWS

22

Sunday, April 24, 2011

Funnyman Jim Florentine comes to Mt. Airy Casino By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

W ARTS

hether or not you find comedian Jim Florentine funny at first may depend on which side of his joke you’re on. If you like your humor on the edgier side, then you’re probably already familiar with the infamous prankster and co-host of “That Metal Show.” He’ll pull no punches when he performs at Gypsies Lounge & Nightclub at Mt. Airy Casino Resort on Saturday, April 30, at 8 p.m.

SPORTS

IF YOU GO Who: Comedian Jim Florentine Where: Gypsies Lounge & Nightclub at Mt. Airy Casino Resort When: Saturday, April 30, doors at 8 p.m., show at 9 p.m. Cost: $13-$15

Even as a child, Florentine said he was a sarcastic troublemaker. Being grounded only gave him the opportunity to make prank phone calls. “I just did that out of boredom. I’d just be sitting home, so I’d pick up the phone and start making prank phone calls. I had nothing better to do with my time. Who’d have known that I’d make a living out of it later on in life?” Florentine said. The habit continued when he started in stand-up comedy. While waiting to perform later in the night, he’d answer calls from telemarketers and attempt to keep them on the phone as long as possible, eventually recording five “Terrorizing Telemarketers” albums of pranks on unsuspecting salesmen. This caught the attention of fellow comedians Adam Carolla and Jimmy Kimmel, who hired him for the Comedy Central hit “Crank Yankers” in 2002. Using puppets to reenact the prank calls, Florentine voiced the characters “Special Ed” and his rude cousin

“Bobby Fletcher” for the duration of the show’s run. While he never walked away from offensive material, the show had few complaints about its often edgy content. “It’s a puppet, so somehow you can get away with it. Even cartoons – “Family Guy,” “South Park,” all that stuff – somehow, if it’s coming through a puppet or a cartoon, it’s OK in some weird way. I don’t know how that works,” Florentine said. With comedy partner Don Jamieson, he released two DVDs of hidden camera high jinks called “Meet The Creeps.” The concept was considered for a TV series, but he said that executives found it “too mean.” “Any time you do a hidden camera prank or just a prank in general, it’s going to be mean, whether it’s a little innocent fun or whatever,” Florentine said. “I guess it’s because in our bits, we don’t reveal and go, ‘Hey, we were just joking around,’ and everyone’s all, ‘Oh, you got me!’ We don’t do that. I don’t like that. I like it to just fade to black and people go, See FLORENTINE, Page 24


Sunday, April 24, 2011

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Library services help make sense of dollars

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Cosmo’s Cheesesteaks offers authentic Philadelphia subs without the drive.

A

TASTE THE TOWN

PAUL ANDREWS “Tomorrow, I’m going to try the fried onions,” said Rodman. I went back to practicing my order. In Philadelphia, ordering cheesesteaks is no joke. As you enter the counter, you state your order either “wit” or “wit out,” referring to onions. Next you proclaim your choice in cheese: wiz, American, or Provolone. The famous “soup Nazi” Seinfeld episode comes to mind, only switch the soup for cheesesteaks. The strict Philly-style ordering instructions are displayed at Cosmo’s, although the Scranton staff has a much more laid back approach in taking your order. The gal who greeted me was as friendly as possible and explained a few different fry choices.

Cosmo’s in Scranton smacks of a Philly cheesesteak joint; cheese, bread, variations, even the hot sauce instead of pizza sauce. Salerno got it right, and creating a Philadelphia-style cheesesteak stop is no easy feat. But nowhere did I see the cheesesteaks referred to as “Philly cheesesteaks.” It seems to me, whenever I see the word “Philly cheesesteaks” on a menu, I am usually let down. After all, in Philadelphia, there just called cheesesteaks. Another gripe with what are often branded as “Philly cheesesteaks” is that a truly authentic Philadelphia cheesesteak never uses pizza or marinara sauce. It’s hot sauce. You never, ever, see marinara sauce as an option. It’s always hot sauce. So I asked Salerno, why not call them Philly cheesesteaks? “I don’t need it. People See ANDREWS, Page 32

‘500 Vine’ highlights local library services and events. Find it biweekly in Go Lackawanna.

SPORTS

s I’m careful not to mess up my order, I can’t help but to overhear all the feedback being given to Cosmo Salerno, owner of Cosmo’s Cheesesteaks and Cheese Fries at 532 Moosic St., Scranton. “The best damn sandwich I ever had,” said Andrew Rodman of Sioux City, Iowa. Rodman had been visiting town with his wife who was on company business with Wells Fargo. Rodman ordered a cheesesteak with Provolone cheese and mushrooms.

informed investment choices. The Kiplinger Washington Letter is a weekly newsletter which contains business trends, economic information and U.S. government news. No Load Fund X is a monthly newsletter which contains information about the best mutual and exchange traded funds and offers information regarding funds to sell or buy. For those seeking historical information on stocks or businesses, the library has archives of both The New York Times and Scranton-based newspapers on microfilm. The newspapers can be particularly useful during tax season to obtain historical stock quotes. All images from microfilm can be scanned and either printed or saved to a flash drive or other external hard drive. Morningstar Investment Research Center, an online database, is available both on-site at the library and remotely from anywhere in the community, accessible with a library card number. This valuable database provides information on over 20,000 stocks and funds, including detailed reports, company quarterly reports, stock history for up to 5 years, SEC information and more. One of Morningstar’s key features is the “Portfolio XRay.” This feature allows users to select different stocks for an investment portfolio and see how they complement each other before actually investing any money. This resource can be accessed through the library’s homepage, www.albright.org. From personal finance to consumer information, the library offers a variety of resources to the community, free of charge. If you don’t have a library card, come in and sign up for one today!

ARTS

One cheesesteak, hold the ‘Philly’

The library is committed to educating the community on all finance-related matters. An informed citizenry is essential to the economic vitality of a community. The Albright Memorial Library offers the community a variety of financial resources to assist in finance and businessrelated decisions, including newspapers and databases. The library has subscriptions to a host of financial magazines and newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal, Barron’s and Investor’s Business Daily. They contain up to date business news, stock information, commodity news, stock trends, and mutual fund information. The Wall Street Journal and Investor’s Business Daily are daily newspapers, while Barron’s is a weekly publication. They are free to read to patrons with library cards and the Reference Department, located on the second floor of the library, retains copies for one month. Value Line, Kiplinger Letter, and No Load Fund X are newsletters that are published on a weekly and monthly basis. Value Line Investment Survey provides analysis and research on stocks, mutual funds, options and convertibles and published in three different sections entitled “Ratings and Reports”, “Small and MidCap”, and “Selections and Opinions”. Value Line provides information to assist people in making timely and better-

500 VINE

NEWS

A

s tax season winds down, many people have begun to realize the importance of understanding their finances. According to the Pennsylvania Library Association, 41 percent of adults in the U.S. give themselves a C, D, or F on their knowledge of personal finance, 25 percent of adults do not pay bills on time, and 33 percent of adults have no savings or retirement.


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 24, 2011

FLORENTINE

SPORTS

Continued from page 22

‘What the hell just happened?’ To me, that’s more exciting.” Florentine also has a passion for hard rock and heavy metal music that he’s been able to work into his career. He joined Jamieson and Eddie Trunk to co-cost “That Metal Show” on VH1 Classic in 2008. Currently in its seventh season, Florentine said he found most of the rockers he’s met to be down-toearth, enjoying his interview with Black Sabbath drummer Bill Ward the most. “(Ward)’s really sharp. He’s got some great stories, and you don’t hear too much from him…Just to have him on telling old Black Sabbath stories was great,” he recalled. Florentine took his comedy to same stage as metal greats Anthrax, Megadeth, and Slayer during last year’s American Carnage Tour, which was a

I can assure you that the low-budget “Super” is neither quiet nor little, and that’s a good thing. Starring the last guy you’d expect to see bounding around in a bright red costume, “Super” is the story of Frank D’Arbo, an average guy aptly played by Rainn Wilson who admits right away that the only perfect moments he ever had were marrying his wife and helping a police officer locate a criminal by pointing him in the right direction. When he loses his wife to an arrogant drug dealer, it’s only natural that he turns to the only other thing that made him happy to save her – fighting crime. As if he needed any more motivation than that, he is divinely inspired (at least he believes so) by a bizarre holy vision brought on by watching a cheesy Christian-

“challenge,” to say the least. “I had to do three five-minute sets between each band. By the time Slayer came on…the people in the crowd were like, ‘Alright, enough already! We know you’re a comedian! C’mon!’ So I’d bring hot Jager girls, because I was the Jagermeister emcee, to try and distract them so they could at least look at eye candy and so they don’t throw crap at me,” Florentine cracked. Currently working on material for a new comedy album to be released by Metal Blade Records, Florentine said he is “really psyched” to perform in the area again after several years away and experience the freedom to say and do whatever he pleases. “I love doing the stand-up. I’ll always be doing that because I’m my own boss up there and I can do whatever I want. I can basically go to work drunk wearing an AC/ DC shirt. I’ve always wanted that freedom,” he said.

Rainn Wilson portrays mild-mannered Frank D’Arbo / The Crimson Bolt in ’Super.’

themed superhero fight the devil on TV. Calling himself the Crimson Bolt and wearing a costume that amusingly bears a logo with his own mask on it, he tackles petty crime with a monkey wrench, working his way up to the evil Jacques while shouting, “Shut up, crime!” While this may all sound hilarious, or just plain dumb if it isn’t your cup of tea, don’t worry – it gets serious really quickly. The beatdowns he delivers

with his weapon of choice are actually quite brutal, and we discover that the reason his wife was so easily led astray was because she was a former drug addict.Frankisclearlymentallyunstable, but he shifts from crazy in a funny way to crazy in a disturbing way depending on the scene. When he meets Libby, a comic book geek who enthusiastically becomes his sidekick, Boltie, he finds that becoming a superhero is a fantasy for her in more ways than one.

In an unlikely cross between “Juno”and“Kick-Ass,”themovie blends those awkward, selfaware characters from practically every indie film you’ve ever seen with the harsh consequences of what costumed vigilantism would probably be like in reality. Like “Kick-Ass,” it admits that you’d have to be pretty out there to run around in tights thinking you could save the world, but “Super” takes the insanity up a notch by being even more unpredictable. Just when you think the film is going to settle into the sensibilities laid out by its predecessors in the genre, it throws you for a loop with a moment of violence or a strange plot twist. The characters, though, are where the real madnesslies,butIwon’truinit with nasty spoilers. See HOWELLS, Page 32

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Over the last few years, movie audiences have come accustomed to seeing superheroes on the big screen every summer. As their success has grown, so has the amount of comic book-inspired films, whether they be direct adaptations or direct influences of the genre. There are so many now that the summer just can’t hold them all, and this year in particular, we’ll be seeing men in tights all year round. Unfortunately, 2011 started with the disappointing “Green Hornet,” a comical take on the hero that was neither comical nor heroic. With “Thor,” “X-Men: First Class,” “Green Lantern,” and “Captain America: The First Avenger” eager to redeem Seth Rogan’s stinker, it may be easy for moviegoers to miss a quiet little indie film called “Super” that was recently released in select theaters and on cable on-demand. For those who can’t wait forthenextgoodversus evilepic,

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‘Super’ gives big ‘shut up’ to expectations


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Sunday, April 24, 2011

ARTS

NEWS

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By COLIN COVERT Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

SPORTS

“W

ater for Elephants” is partly a sawdust love story, partly a survival story. It opens with an old man’s reminiscence, as Jacob Jankowski (Hal Holbrook) tells a young circus hand about his own Depression-era adventures under the big top. He didn’t join the show out of any romantic impulses about carnival life. The wellplanned veterinary career he expected was torpedoed by a family tragedy. And the first train he could hop just happened to be carrying roustabouts, a menagerie, a gorgeous trick rider, Marlena (Reese Witherspoon), and her possessive husband, the circus’s owner and ringmaster, August (Christoph Waltz). That’s where the romance enters. And the survival drama, too.

Twentysomething Jacob (Robert Pattinson, looking much nicer tanned and smiling than he does in the “Twilight” series) gets a crash course in circus etiquette. The workers hate the performers, the train doesn’t slow down when deadbeats get tossed off, the coochie dancers like to tease virginal lads and the animals produce staggering quantities of manure. As to the age-old commandment Keep Your Hands off the Boss’ Wife, he is respectful. At least initially. A handsome, expensivelooking adaptation of Sara Gruen’s 2006 bestseller, “Water for Elephants” balances the colorful glitz of a three-ring spectacle with the atmospheric realism that a rich drama demands. Witherspoon, doing her best work since her Oscar-

REVIEW What: “Water For Elephants” Starring: Reese Witherspoon, Robert Pattinson, Christoph Waltz, Hal Holbrook Directed by: Francis Lawrence Running time: 115 minutes Rated: PG-13 for moments of intense violence and sexual content ★★★ 1/2

winning “Walk the Line,” is a decent, dutiful wife struggling with her feelings for Pattinson’s kind, hunky animal-lover. Waltz gives his role surprising depth. He’s a commanding personality, shading into cruelty, but you don’t want to poke his eyes out. He can be both ruthless and kind, and when he acts out violently he’s contrite. But some infractions can’t be excused, and Marlena

and Jacob find themselves dancing a very precarious tightrope duet of suppressed desire. Their animal attraction eventually pours out with catastrophic results. Witherspoon’s costumer did a great job fitting her with theatrical spotlight attire and sleek Jean Harlow gowns for romantic nights on the town. Pattinson seems to improve as the movie goes along, over-indicating at first but gradually relaxing into his naive, awkward character. And the endlessly entertaining Waltz moves beyond his silky-monster thing to create a character who deserves admiration and pity, as well as scorn. Even if your circus taste runs more to Soleil than Ringling, there’s a lot here to like.


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 24, 2011

NEWS

CLICK: POWER! speed marketing at Sno Mountain

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Michele D’Angelo, Scranton and Stott Seaman, Old Forge.

BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Easter Egg Scramble

1. Greater Scranton Jaycees President Martina Coon, left, Brooke Coon, 11, both of Scranton, and the Easter Bunny. 2. Four-Year-old Kali Mayer of Scranton picks up an egg. 3. Greater Scranton Jaycees Chairwoman Beth Shechner of Clarks Summit broadcasts the rules for the Easter Egg Scramble. 4. Dawn Pisanchyn, left, and daughter Payton, 2, both of Olyphant.

ARTS

5. Bella Quinn, 2, of Madison Township, left, and Alton Rose, 3, of Taylor. 6. Maryann Kendrick, 6, of Wilkes-Barre, left, Meagan Calogero, and Marissa Calogero, 5, both of Old Forge. Sarah Farrell, Scranton and Nancy Kaminski, Dallas, of Sno Mountain.

SPORTS

Josh Klingerman, Bloomsburg and Ashok Divecha, Carbondale, of 105 The River.

Vincent Shuta, Olypahnt and David Good, Honesdale.

7. Ashley Ogozaly, left, and her daughter Serenity Fay, 8 months, both of Carbondale. 8. Children ages 4 to 7 begin the hunt during the Greater Scranton Jaycees Easter Egg Scramble in Nay Aug Park on April 17.


Sunday, April 24, 2011

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CLICK: House and Garden Show at Waverly Community House

NEWS JIM GAVENUS PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Cindy Ackmann and Kathy Miller.

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Edward Magee with his granchildren Greg and Hunter Page.

Marge Black and Leigh Weber at the Home and Garden Show held at the Waverly Community House.

SPORTS Mary Ann Pakunas, Abigail Sebastian and Holly Sebastian.


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GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

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NEWS ARTS

ROGER MOORE The Orlando Sentinel

REVIEW What: “African Cats” Starring: Narrated by Samuel L. Jackson Directed by: Keith Scholey and Alastair Fothergill Running time: 89 minutes Rated: G ★★★ 1/2

Music, image and narration combine in the Disney film to present life and death, up close (and yet almost bloodless), capturing a

world where man isn’t yet the biggest threat; other lions and everybody’s favorite monster, the crocodiles, are. Jackson’s enthusiastic narration, even managing the odd joke, the splendid images and especially the wonderful sound — cheetah calls, grunting aardvarks wrestling, lions trying to muster up their most menacing roar — makes “the Disney version” of the hard life both educational and terrific, kid-friendly entertainment.

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arth Day becomes Mother’s Day in “African Cats,” a magnificent new wildlife documentary from Disneynature. It’s an engrossing and often-moving film built around the fierce protect-my-young instincts of a lioness and a female cheetah struggling against the odds on the Kenyan Masai Mara savanna. Almost every shot is a postcardperfect African vista, and every

animal is shown in majestic closeup — lions, cheetahs, hyenas, aardvarks and even the homely wildebeest, their snouts covered in flies. And yes, almost every situation and story thread duplicates what National Geographic did with its March documentary, “The Last Lions.” But it’s not a put-down of the darker and more straightforward “Last Lions” to suggest “Cats” is to “Lions” what poetry is to prose.


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GOLackawanna

FERRONE

HOWELLS

Continued from page 19

Continued from page 24

cally and nationally for its unique wine flavors. This year, the winery took home a gold medal in the Finger Lakes International Wine Competition for its watermelon wine and a bronze medal for its raspberry açai wine. Ferrone has even made tomato and garlic flavored wines. “What I like to do is come up with something unique and creative besides what we already have,” he said. “You don’t go into a state store and buy watermelon flavored wine. Sangria is pretty much everywhere, but I figured we’d give our twist to it and see what happens.” Another thing that sets the Ferrone Family Winery apart from other, larger wineries is the fact that everything is done inhouse. “We are a small winery. We do everything by hand, even applying the labels to the bottles and carrying the cases back and forth from the truck,” Ferrone said. “It is homemade wine at state store quality. It isn’t the old-fashioned ‘keep-it-cold-anddrink-it-fast’ kind of wine. It is a good quality.” Besides his best-selling and award-winning watermelon, black currant, and pomegranate

I will, however, give due credit to the absolutely awesome casting. Wilson, known to most as lovable dweeb Dwight Schrute from NBC’s “The Office,” shows us the darker side of nerdom in this role, and Ellen Page, becoming better known now for her serious roles, jumps in headfirst as the sadistic Libby. I really couldn’t take my eyes off of either the entire time, but Page stole every scene by revealing what’s underneath the cute young girl demeanor in the most over-the-top way possible, but that isn’t a criticism. It was a blast to see the whole cast just let loose and revel in this quirky and erratic script, including surprises like Kevin Bacon as the villain and fan-favorite Nathan Fillion as The Holy Avenger. Liv Tyler is decent in her plotdevice role as Sarah, Frank’s wife, but random appearances by underrated actors like Michael Rooker, Sean Gunn, and Andre Royo made me wonder who was going to pop up next in each scene. The eclectic cast makes “Super” work, although they’re helped along by the black comedy and odd imagery embedded in the story. Writer/director James Gunn, who brought us 2006’s monster movie throwback “Slither,” has demonstrated once again how well our favorite genres can merge together if handled correctly. With no comic to stay true to, the movie is free to play with

ANDREWS Continued from page 23

SPORTS

Sunday, April 24, 2011

know when they taste my steaks that I do it right,” says Salerno. “I go through a lot to make sure these steaks are authentic. It’s easy to slap the word “Philly” in front of cheesesteak, but the taste is the only way to authenticate the Philadelphia style.” As for me, I feel confident that I have eaten enough of them to be classified an expert in cheesesteaks. I am a big fan and I’ve been to all the places in Philadelphia. The first steak I had was at Pat’s. I remember my dad and I were hungry before a Phillies game and we went to Pat’s. Since then, any time my wife and I pass through Philadelphia, we stop at either Pat’s or

STEPHANIE LONGO PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

The Ferrone Family Winery recently captured awards for its watermelon and raspberry acai wines.

LEARN MORE For more information about the Ferrone Family Winery, call (570) 905-4895 or visit www.ffwine.com. The winery is located at 505 Main St., Peckville, and is open Monday through Friday from 2 to 8 p.m. and on Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m.

wines, Ferrone offers more than 80 different styles of wine from all over the world. He also sells beer- and winemaking essentials in his store and recently started offering wine making classes along with custom labeling. For wine purists, Ferrone also makes and sells more traditional flavors, including chardonnay and merlot. Tony Luke’s. I couldn’t tell you which I prefer, each have their own unique taste. Lucky for me, Cosmo’s is right around the corner from our office here on Wyoming Avenue. I was thrilled after eating at Cosmo’s. It’s also nice when the owner stops by to personally ask you how the food was. It says a great deal about how important your business is to them. I must have heard Cosmo Salerno ask 20 times, to all different customers, “How was everything?” Well, when Salerno asked me, I all but mimicked the guy who proclaimed it was the best damn steak he had ever had. I explained to Salerno that I had been to all the Philadelphia shops, and that couldn’t remember ever having eaten a better cheesesteak. You don’t have to take the

“I don’t call the chardonnay, merlot, and pinot grigio standard wines, but that is what they are,” he said. “If you go to a restaurant, you see the chardonnay or the merlot on the menu. You don’t see watermelon on a menu. My concept is that if you start getting them in the restaurants, people will be curious.” Overall, Ferrone urges people to try a sample of one of his more exotically-flavored wines and even welcomes input from his customers. “I like different. Different is good,” he said. “I enjoy talking to the customers and hearing their stories. I also want to know what kind of flavors they are looking for or would like to try. New ideas and concepts for wine are always welcome here.” drive to Philadelphia to have the best cheesesteak anymore. Cosmo’s takes the cake, hands down. Paul Andrews is the general manager of Go Lackawanna.

While offering a ’Shut up’ to crime, ’Super’ also quiets the viewers expectations as the film mixes the superhero and independent film genres.

your expectations, and while it resembles movies like “KickAss” that we’ve seen before, it definitely contains many of its own original ideas. In the same way that indie films try to capture how people really act as opposed to the idealized black-and-white characters that Hollywood perpetuates and recycles again and again, “Super” utilizes this quasi-realistic aesthetic to examine the superhero genre. It doesn’t follow the conventions familiar to mainstream movie storytelling, and it doesn’t end how those films end either. It leaves you puzzled, it leaves you thinking, and it doesn’t leave your head for the rest of the week. Compared to most popcorn flicks, which is frankly what most superhero films are, that’s quite the feat for the pudgy Crimson Bolt. Let’s hope other indie filmmakers take notice, because Hollywood certainly won’t.


Sunday, April 24, 2011

GOLackawanna

University right to honor Pacers, Defenders Carlesimo’s contributions undefeated in

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LOCAL COLLEGE SPORTS RECAP

REMEMBERING PETER CARLESIMO

TOM ROBINSON

· The Royals Annual Award Dinner May 6 will honor the late Peter A. Carlesimo for his contributions to the University of Scranton. · The annual dinner, scheduled for 6 p.m. at the university’s Byron Recreation Complex, annually honors a person who has made special contributions to the athletics department. It also serves to raise funds for the athletics department and the student-athletes that it serves. · NBA and college basketball coach P.J. Carlesimo, Peter’s son, will deliver the keynote address. · Peter Carlesimo came to Scranton in 1944. He guided the growth of the department as athletics director for 16 years, went 80-60 as coach of the football team, served through two stints as men’s basketball coach and one as cross country coach. · Later in his career, Peter Carlesimo was athletics director at Fordham University and executive director of college basketball’s National Invitational Tournament (NIT). · Tickets are $150 per person and can be purchased by contacting Robert Davis at (570) 941-6667 or at davisr9@scranton.edu. Corporate special ticket packages are also available.

to Scranton for the celebration. P.J., a Scranton Prep graduate who was a sophomore athlete at Fordham when the family moved to New Jersey, said that he and his older siblings will always consider Scranton their home. Their mother, the former Lucy Rogan, is from Olyphant, and may make the trip back as well. P.J., 61, has now spent 40 years of his life as a basketball coach. His career has taken him to an NCAA championship game as Seton Hall’s head coach to stints as head coach of three NBA teams, assistant coach of the NBA champion San Antonio See ROBINSON, Page 36

GO ONLINE For daily roundups of local college sports, see www.golackawanna.com/sports. TOP STORY Marywood University and Baptist Bible College remained undefeated and in the first two spots in the Colonial States Athletic Conference men’s tennis standings. The Pacers improved to 5-0 in the CSAC and 10-3 overall while the Defenders moved to 3-0 and 4-3. Keystone College went into the weekend tied for third at 2-2 and 2-5. Marywood posted a pair of 8-1 wins, beating Neumann College April 16 and Keystone Monday. Daniel Pfafman and Ethan Jones rolled to 6-0, 6-0 singles sweeps at third and fourth singles and won separate doubles matches against Keystone. Baptist Bible edged Neumann, 5-4, Tuesday in league play and added a 9-0 nonleague win over Keuka in Wednesday’s home finale. BBC won the second through fifth singles matches to pull out the win over Neumann. Matt Benjamin posted a 6-0, 6-0 win at fourth singles and lost just one game while combining with Caleb Evans for the team’s only doubles victory. YEARLY AWARDS Senior women’s soccer captains Andrea Barker and Meghan Coyle were named Marywood’s Co-Senior Student-Athletes of the Year at the school’s annual sports banquet. Coyle was also named Pacers Club Humanitarian Award

winner. WEEKLY AWARDS Marywood’s Taylor McKeown picked up multiple women’s lacrosse awards. McKeown was named CSAC Player of the Week and Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) Metro/ South Region Offensive Player of the Week and was selected to the Synapse Sports (formerly womenslacrosse.com) Division III Honor Roll after combining for 13 goals and two assists in a pair of wins. McKeown and teammate Allie Sodl were placed on the Boardwalk All-American Watch List. TOP EVENTS BBC came within a half-inning of winning the National Christian College Athletic Association Division II East Region baseball championship before falling, 7-6, to Philadelphia Biblical University Wednesday. Alexandra Stine, a freshman from Valley View, threw a six-hitter to lead Marywood to an 8-1 win over Immaculata University in the opener of a CSAC doubleheader Monday. Immaculata took the second game, 4-2. Scranton’s Jamie Bresnahan shot a 76 Sunday to finish the Empire 8 Conference Golf Championships tied for second with a 72-hole total of 311. The Royals finished fourth. Nick Parks scored the 100th goal of his career during a 10-7 victory over Gwynedd-Mercy College that allowed Marywood to clinch its fourth straight CSAC men’s lacrosse playoff appearance. - Compiled by Tom Robinson

SPORTS

share when he delivers the keynote address at the dinner. “For people who didn’t get to meet and know him, they’ll get to see people who grew up in academics and athletics and look back and hear about early athletes at the university and the sacrifices they made,” P.J. said. “It was a challenge for them how tough it was to be an athlete at the University of Scranton. “Now, you see how far it has come.” P.J. said his father’s influence extended beyond athletics. “For a lot of people, he was one of the faces of, if not the face of the university,” he said. That was particularly true on the national athletic level where Peter Carlesimo kept active on NCAA committees before eventually moving on to become athletics director at Fordham University and the executive director who kept the NIT relevant in the college basketball world in an era when the NCAA Tournament was growing into the March Madness it has become. When P.J. travels around the National Basketball Association, currently as assistant coach with the Toronto Raptors, he understands how far Peter Carlesimo’s reach extended. “One of the good things about the NBA and traveling to 29 cities is that very seldom does a week go by when I don’t run into someone from Scranton who knew us or who knew my Dad,” P.J. said. That is what will bring P.J., his nine siblings, and other family members back

men’s tennis

ARTS

Perhaps that appreciation for the other coaches he met early in his life is what makes P.J. Carlesimo so proud of the impact his father had on the University of Scranton program. That dedication to Royals athletics will be remembered May 6 when Peter Carlesimo, who died in 2003, is honored in a dinner at the Byron Recreation Complex, one of the many impressive athletic facilities the university now boasts. “I remember how much the campus has changed over the years,” P.J. said. “For him to be part of a critical time in the growth of the university when he was always scraping for fields, he would just be so proud – and he was before he passed away.” As director of athletics from 1953 to 1968, Peter Carlesimo was part of making sure sports had a prominent place on a campus that has enjoyed some of the finest moments NCAA Division III competition has to offer. That will be part of the message P.J. will try to

KEEPING SCORE

NEWS

A father’s influence has been responsible for many lives spent enjoying – and careers spent working in – sports. A conversation with P.J. Carlesimo about his early years in sports, extends from the influence of his father, Peter Carlesimo, to the input of the many men who helped shape his life by giving him a positive impression of coaching.


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 24, 2011

ON CAMPUS

Stephen Arcure missed the first 19 games of the seaB I L L A RSEN A ULT son with an injury but the junior from Clarks Summit (Scranton Prep) is back in action with the William & Mary baseball team. Arcure, a 5-foot-10, 170-pound outfielder, has played in 19 games and started 15 for the Tribe since returning and is hitting .281 (18-for-64) with five doubles, four RBI and 10 runs scored. “Stephen is finally starting to get caught up to game speed,” coach Frank Leoni said. “We had high expectations for him coming into the season.” After a so-so freshman season (.238 average in 130 plate appearances), Arcure came into his own last season as a sophomore. He led the team in hitting (.339) with 15 doubles and 41 RBI. He also led the Tribe in stolen bases with 12 and had 18 multi-hit games and nine multi-RBI games. He was named to the Colonial Athletic Association second team. Last season, he went errorless in 78 chances in the outfield. Thus far this season, he hasn’t made an error in 20 chances. Prior to going to William & Mary, Arcure was a two-time Lackawanna League MVP and a fourtime league first-team All-Star. For his career at Scranton Prep, he averaged .423 with a .523 onbase percentage. He also won 20 games as a pitcher, including an 8-1 mark with two saves and a 1.70 earned run average as a senior. HIGGINS DOING THE JOB Senior Brad Higgins (Lackawanna Trail) has a 3-1 record and a 2.61 earned run average as a starter for the Keystone baseball team. The 6-foot, 190-pound right-hander has started six games and in 31.0 innings, he’s given up 24 hits and 13 runs, nine earned. He’s walked 12 and struck out 30. Higgins had his best game early in the season in Winter Haven, Fla. He pitched six innings of oneSee ARSENAULT, Page 35 COURTESY PHOTO

Scranton Prep graduate Stephen Arcure has bounced back well from a season-starting injury.


Sunday, April 24, 2011 Cognetti won the No. 6 singles in a 4-3 victory over St. Joseph’s, the No. 5 singles in a 7-0 triumph over St. Peter’s, the No. 3 doubles in a 4-3 victoContinued from page 34 ry over Loyola University Mahit ball with three walks and ryland, and the No. 5 singles nine strikeouts in a 3-0 triumph and the No. 3 singles in a 6-1 over Messiah. triumph over La Salle. “Brad has developed into a “Through her hard work and solid starting pitcher for us this determination, Annie has made year,� veteran coach Jamie great strides, particularly in Shevchik said. “He has been her singles play,� coach Steven consistently throwing strikes Reiniger said. “At first she and competing at a high level.� struggled against most of her Higgins was mainly a relief teammates, and it seemed like pitcher with a couple of spot she needed a lot of work.� starts his first three seasons This spring, she saw action with the Giants. anywhere from four to six in singles and with the third douHENKELMAN A SAILOR bles. Gregory Henkelman has “That’s a huge turnaround become one of the key skippers from the beginning of fall when for the Johnson & she was nowhere Wales sailing near playing with “Brittney (Martin) the team, which comtop six,� Reinpetes out of Provi- has been working iger said. “She dence, R.I. continues to imhard all season Sophomore prove due to her and has been one positive attitude Henkelman (Abington of our most con- and tremendous Heights) recently sistent freshmen. work ethic.� finished 10th in MARTIN SOLID the No. 3 race at She is ranked in FROSH the Southern Sethe top three in ries Two out of Freshman BrittNewport. Prior to both the 800 and ney Martin that, he and his (Abington 1500 in our conpartner finished Heights) has ference as well as quickly become a 11th in the Series Two race, also out with the 4x400 key performer for of Newport. the Seton Hill relay team.� “Greg started women’s track his sailing career — Coach Tim Creamer team. here in his freshMartin recently man year with very limited won the 800 meter dash and prior experience,� coach Alan helped the 4x400 relay finish Penney said. “As a sophomore, second in the Washington & he has become one of the leadJefferson Invitational. Her 800 ers on the team as well as a time was 2:20.72 and the relay regatta-ready skipper.� time was 4:12.13. Henkelman, with fellow In the recent Bernie Benson sophomore Emily Greagori of Memorial at Robert Morris, Warminster making up his she finished second in the 800 crew, did a solid job this spring with an improved time of finishing in the top half of the 2:19.81, and helped the 4x400 fleet in both regattas. finish first in an improved time “Greg plans to sharpen his of 4:04.24. skills over the summer and “Brittney has been working return in September and make hard all season and has been a big impact on the New Enone of our most consistent gland sailing circuit,� Penney freshmen,� coach Tim Creamer said. said. “She is ranked in the top three in both the 800 and 1500 COGNETTI HELPING in our conference as well as WILDCATS with the 4x400 relay team.� Freshman Anne Cognetti Seton Hill will compete in (Scranton Prep) competed in the West Virginia Intercolleboth singles and doubles with giate Athletic Conference the Villanova women’s tennis Championships next weekend team last fall and this spring. in Wheeling, W.V.

GOLackawanna

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 24, 2011

ARTS

NEWS

SPORTS BRIEFS

League victory. The Yankees, who won 6-0 Wednesday, took the final three games and four out of five in the McGloin throws Blue-White series, which allowed the fourtouchdown pass time defending champions to West Scranton graduate Matt McGloin threw a pass for the only take the North Division lead touchdown when the Blue defeat- away from the IronPigs. Adam Warren pitched eight ed the White, 10-0, the rain-shortscoreless innings Wednesday, ened Penn State Blue-White Game April 16 at Beaver Stadium. allowing five hits and a walk while striking out three. When it was over, Penn State Kei Igawa worked the first four coach Joe Paterno said he had not yet chosen a starting quarterback, innings Thursday. George Kontos pitched three-plus innings for but he was “99 percent sure” it the win and Kevin Whelan postwould be either McGloin or Rob Bolden. Bolden started early and ed his league-high sixth save. McGloin late in the 2010 season. McGloin threw a 17-yard touch- Abington park offers golf clinic The Abington Area Communidown pass to Brandon Mosebyty Park is offering a Swing for Felder. He finished 5-for-10 for 109 Life Youth Golf Academy Clinic yards and was the most effective at Scott Greens Golf Club July 25 quarterback in the game, which to 27. was stopped early in the second The clinic is for students half. entering fourth-through-12th Bolden went 0-for-5 with an interception; Kevin Newsome was grade in the fall. The clinic will run 9 a.m. to 3-for-7 for 22 yards; and Paul noon each day with July 28 as a Jones was 0-for-1. rain date. There will be a $105 fee with Local Yankees shut out ’Pigs lunch and drink included. twice See www.abingtonparks.com Four pitchers combined on a for information and online regisfive-hitter Thursday night when tration. the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees shut out the Lehigh Valley AH sets annual triathlon for IronPigs for the second straight May 13 night for a 3-0 International The Abington Heights High

ROBINSON

SPORTS

Continued from page 33

Spurs and assistant coach with Team USA, including the original “Dream Team.” It would not have happened for P.J. without his days in Little League baseball, junior football and playing basketball at the Boys’ Club and in Catholic school programs or without his time traveling with the university’s teams, whether as a ball boy, bat boy or simply a son supporting his father’s passion. “Growing up in that environment, I had a very positive impression of coaching,” P.J. said. “I played for guys who I thought were really good men and really good teachers.” The only part of the career choice that might have surprised a young P.J.is that the coaching path did

not lead him into football. One of Peter Carlesimo’s good friends, dating back to their days as teammates on Fordham’s famous Seven Blocks of Granite offensive line, was Vince Lombardi, the game’s greatest coach. When P.J. and Peter had time to sit down and talk sports, it was often over the old reel-to-reel film coaches used to watch of their football teams. “I remember watching plays and asking questions,” said P.J., who played football at Fordham as a senior despite having attended Scranton Prep at a time when the school did not offer the sport. “He’d make corrections here and there. “I always respected coaches because of him and his interactions with players.” On May 6, the entire University of Scranton community will get a chance to show respect for one of its coaching greats.

School Physical Education Department’s 29th Annual Triathlon will be held May 13. The triathlon includes both Ironman and five-team participants, based on grade level.

Each team consists of one biker for miles, two runners for 2.5 miles each and two canoers for the course at Fords Pond Ironman competitors perform each activity by themselves.

The Abington Heights Triathlon is a co-operative effort supported by the Abington Heights Food Service Department, Student Council, and Senior Class.

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 24, 2011

More chances to Event sweeps run Lady bag bird this year

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

HIGH SCHOOL ROUNDUP

T

By TOM VENESKY For Go Lackawanna

hanks to something that happened three years ago, hunters will have increased opportunity to harvest a trophy-size gobbler this season. The spring gobbler season runs from April 30 to May 31 and Pennsylvania Game Commission officials said hunters should find an abundance of mature gobblers in the 2- and 3-year-old range due to excellent spring reproduction in 2008 and 2009 in many parts of the state.

As a result, PGC wild turkey biologist Mary Jo Casalena expects this spring’s harvest to top 40,000 birds for the third consecutive year. “The reason for the optimistic outlook is due to the excellent summer reproduction in 2008 and 2009, which has provided for a higher proportion of adult (2- and 3-year-old) gobblers in the population,” Casalena said. Gobbler hunting prospects are strong in the northeast, particularly in Wildlife Management Units 4C and 4E, which both maintain two of the highest spring harvest densities in the state. PGC biologist Kevin Wenner said both of those WMUs have been gobbler hunting hotspots for several years, particularly 4C. “It has a good mix of forest and agricultural land, which gives turkeys food sources and cover. It’s a good overall scenario,” Wenner said. With plenty of mature gobblers in the woods this season, hunters shouldn’t have a problem hearing plenty of gobbling. Wenner said he’s been hearing birds every morning for the last three weeks. But that doesn’t mean that hunting a wary gobbler will be any easier. With a week left before the season opener next Saturday, Casalena encouraged hunters to start scouting potential hunting areas to pinpoint a mature bird. “Scouting can improve hun-

ters’ chances, especially if they line up multiple locations for the spring season,” Casalena said. “Prior to the season, however, hunters should consider not using turkey calls to locate gobblers, because it will educate birds and cause them to be less inclined to respond to the early-morning calls of in-season hunters.” Wenner said the best scouting method is to listen for birds gobbling in the morning or early evening before they roost. During the late morning and early afternoon, he said, it’s a good idea to watch fields for strutting gobblers trying to attract hens. While there might be more mature gobblers in the woods this season, hunters will also have more time to pursue them thanks to a change in hunting hours. Under the change, legal hunting hours from the opening day of the spring gobbler season through the third Saturday (April 30-May 14) will retain the current one-half hour before sunrise until noon time frame. However, the remainder of the season (May 16-31) will be expanded to run all day, from one-half hour before sunrise until one-half hour after sunset. “Although all-day hunting will increase disturbance of nesting hens, the impact will be minimal because all-day hours will only cover the last See TURKEY, Page 41

Comets past Valley View By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Sarah Gronsky and Elisia Cadman led Abington Heights to sweeps in the 400meter dash and 300-meter hurdles Wednesday afternoon, giving the Lady Comets the boost they needed to get past Valley View, 83-67, in a meeting of Lackawanna Track Conference Division 1 unbeatens. The victory, their 29th straight, gives the Lady Comets the upperhand toward a likely fifth straight division title. Abington Heights outscored Valley View, 34-2, in the four individual track events immediately before and after the Cougars’ only relay win in the 400. Teams receive five points for first place, three for second and one for third. Abington Heights got all nine from the 400 and 300 hurdles and took first and second place for eight of the points in the 1600 and 800. Stephanie Lalos got the decisive stretch started and helped finish it. Lalos, who had already anchored the winning 3200 relay, won the 1600, ahead of teammate Taylor Ross. She finished second behind Erin Jaeger, another 3200 relay team member, in the 800. Gronsky, Missy Burke and Jess McMinn went 1-2-3 in the 400 before Valley View broke up the rush with its relay win. Cadman, Isabella Clauss and Jessica Kurey then went 1-2-3 in the 300 hurdles. Missy Burke also won the triple jump and was part of the winning 1600 relay team with Gronsky, Clauss and

Cadman. Valley View was coming off a boys’ and girls’ championship sweep of last weekend’s Icebreaker Relays at Wallenpaupack. Division 3’s unbeaten coleaders also went head-tohead Wednesday. Elk Lake emerged with sole possession of the division lead after a 105-44 romp over Mid Valley. Holy Cross and Western Wayne remain tied for the Division 2 lead at 4-0. Holy Cross hosts Western Wayne in the regular-season finale May 2. DREAM GAME Plans are being made for the 77th annual Dream Game July 27. The Scranton Lions Clubsponsored football all-star game is scheduled for Scranton Memorial Stadium. Nick Parise has taken over as game chairman. Scranton Prep’s Nick Donato will coach the City team. Lackawanna Trail’s Steve Jervis will guide the County. A coaches meeting on Wednesday will help settle the rosters for the games.

COURSE RECORD Moscow resident and former Scranton Prep golfer Nicholas reach tied the fivemonth-old course record set by PGA Tour player Jason Bohn when he posted a 10-under-par, 62 at the Junior Invitational on the 7,344-yard Sage Valley Golf Club in Graniteville, Ga. Reach, a University of Georgia recruit and one of the top junior players in the country, is attending the Gary Gil-

christ Golf Academy in Florida.

BATTLES AT THE TOP All three Lackawanna League baseball leads went through changes after headto-head meetings among the leaders. Valley View took down the two former Division 2 coleaders, handing Old Forge and Riverside their first defeats in a three-day stretch. The wins moved the Cougars into a first-place tie with Riverside at 5-1. Lackawanna Trail handed Blue Ridge its first loss in Division 3 and took that lead away from the Raiders with a 5-1 record. Scranton defeated West Scranton for sole possession of the Division 1 lead at 5-0. HOW THEY STAND Dunmore became the first spring team to clinch at least a tie for a division title when the Bucks improved to 5-0 in Lackawanna Division 2 boys’ track. The Bucks are at Montrose Wednesday with a chance to win the division outright. Each Lackawanna League softball team division is down to one unbeaten at 6-0. Wallenpaupack, Valley View and Elk Lake are the division leaders. Delaware Valley and Scranton Prep are 7-0 and on top of Divisions 1 and 2 of Lackawanna boys’ tennis. Lackawanna Trail is 6-0 and first in Lackawanna boys’ volleyball. North Pocono shares the Wyoming Valley Conference boys’ volleyball lead with Holy Redeemer at 8-0.

Teams receive five points for first place, three for second and one for third. Abington Heights got all nine from the 400 and 300 hurdles and took first and second place for eight of the points in the 1600 and 800.


Sunday, April 24, 2011

GOLackawanna

39

NEWS ARTS

Scranton stays on top

Adjustments strengthen baseball team By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

sion 1, Old Forge and Riverside in Division 2 and Blue Ridge in Division 3 suffered their first defeats. “Being undefeated feels great,” senior Tim Fisch said. “We feel like we’re in a good position right now.” Landing in a good position has not been easy for the Knights, who have won all their games by

See SCRANTON, Page 41

GO LACKAWANNA FILE PHOTO

Scranton’s Joe McCarthy is one of the Knights’ top returnees. The team has made significant adjustments that have allowed them to remain the league’s sole undefeated team at this point in the season.

SPORTS

The Scranton Knights had some adjustments to make as they opened defense of their Lackawanna League Division 1 baseball title. Tanner Schmidt has provided the answer to two of the team’s biggest questions, putting himself in the middle of the only unbea-

ten start in the entire league. Schmidt was at it again Monday when the Knights outscored West Scranton, 12-10, in a meeting of 4-0 teams to determine sole possession of the Division 1 lead. A total of five teams entered the week with unbeaten records, but only the Knights still stand tall after West Scranton in Divi-

three runs or less behind an overpowering top third of the batting order and a rebuilt pitching staff that has done just enough. Schmidt, a junior pitcher/third baseman, has been right in the middle of both. After playing on the junior varsity and seeing limited varsity time last season, he has joined top returnees Fisch, Joe McCarthy and Kyle Booth in leading the way for the Knights.


40

GOLackawanna

Sunday, April 24, 2011

ARTS

NEWS

Sweep of games in Norfolk could save first round

PHOTO COURTESY THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT / THOMAS SLUSSER

SPORTS

Norfolk Admirals’ Carter Ashton takes a shot on goal and is taken out by the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins’ Andrew Hutchinson in the second period inside the Scope Arena.

Road wins rally Pens By TOM VENESKY For Go Lackawanna

NORFOLK, Va. — It was a familiar feeling for Nick Petersen. During Friday’s Game Five playoff matchup between the WilkesBarre/Scranton Penguins and

Norfolk Admirals, Petersen scored two first-period, power-play goals – the first playoff tallies of his American Hockey League career – to lead the Penguins to a pivotal 2-1 win. The Penguins swept all three

games in Norfolk to carry a 3-2 series lead back to Wilkes-Barre for Saturday’s Game Six. The road wins gave the Penguins two chances to clinch the first-round Calder Cup series. For Petersen, putting up playoff

points is nothing new. During the last three seasons in juniors, Petersen totaled 56 points in 47 playoff games. He now has two goals in five AHL playoff games. See PENS, Page 41


Sunday, April 24, 2011

GOLackawanna

SCRANTON Continued from page 39

Continued from page 40

TURKEY Continued from page 38

Norfolk’s Mike Angelidis collides with Penguins players Geoff Walker and Brian Strait in the first period of Friday’s away game.

and put it to them tonight,” Petersen said. Despite welcoming star players Blair Jones, Mattias Ritola and Mike Angelidis back to the lineup, the Admirals power play was shut down by the Penguins penalty kill for most of the night. With Brad Thiessen playing like a wall in net and the defense blocking shots, the Penguins killed off the first five Admiral power plays, including four in the first two periods. “Everyone stepped up and

played well,” coach John Hynes said. “We didn’t give up any big plays, which was important. That’s a key when you play against a great offensive team.” The Admirals did manage to find the back of the net on their sixth power play of the night, when Norfolk defenseman Mark Barberio blasted a one-timer from the point at 9:45 of the third period to cut the Penguins’ lead to 2-1. Thiessen finished with 23 saves.

two weeks of the season,” said the PGC’s Mary Jo Casalena. Game Commission wild turkey biologist. “By then, hunting pressure decreases and most hens are in their later stages of nest incubation, at which point they are less likely to abandon their nest if disturbed. “We anticipate the many benefits will far outweigh the minor disturbance of hens, particularly the increased hunting opportunity for all hunters, such as youth and adults who attend school or work during the morning who now will have the option of a late afternoon hunt.”

Casalena noted that the Game Commission will monitor the afternoon harvest in relation to population trends and age class of gobblers to gauge the impact of all-day hunting. Of the 49 states that conduct turkey seasons, 34 have all-day hunting for all or part of the season, including Maryland, Ohio and Virginia. To further expand opportunity, the board extended the spring gobbler season through May 31. This change was implemented to provide additional recreational hunting without impacting the resource because disturbance of hens would be minimal since most hens would be in their later stages of nest incubation, according to the PGC.

SPORTS

“I like to be a star player and put up big goals,” Petersen said. “I was happy to step up.” Early on, there was a hint that Petersen could be in for a big night. Six minutes into the game, a pass from Keven Veilleux sprung Petersen on a breakaway and his five-hole attempt almost got through the pads of Norfolk goaltender Dustin Tokarski. On the next shift, two Norfolk penalties resulted in a Penguins 5-on-3 power play for 1:15. The Penguins struck quickly when Brett Sterling sent a pass through the crease to Petersen at the far post for the easy tip-in. With less than two minutes remaining in the first period, the Penguins went on their second power play and Petersen converted on a wraparound attempt after he picked up a loose puck from a Sterling shot. That made it 2-0 and the Penguins were in control with two periods to play. “We wanted to come out

ARTS

PENS

NEWS

PHOTO COURTESY THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT / THOMAS SLUSSER

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins players celebrate after Nick Petersen scores a goal in the first period for a 1-0 lead.

“He’s our number-one pitcher now,” Scranton coach Jamie Higgins said of Schmidt, who worked the final inning to save Monday’s win. “He has two wins and the save. “He throws strikes.” And, he handles them at the plate. Schmidt has moved from seventh to second in the batting order, fitting in between Fisch and McCarthy. All three are batting well over .400 to rank just behind Booth’s teamleading .500 average. “Tanner’s kind of pulling double duty for us,” Higgins said. “He moved up to the twohole and he’s doing well in that spot making contact.” The top third of the lineup was at its best against West Scranton. Fisch and Schmidt got it started with three hits and three runs each. McCarthy followed with a single, double and three RBI. McCarthy, already leading the team in runs, moved into a tie with Booth for the team lead in RBI. Higgins has been happy with the way McCarthy, perhaps the league’s most feared power hitter, has handled being the focal point of most opponents’ scouting reports.

“It’s funny to watch when Joe comes up how much different kids deal with him,” Higgins said. “He has a reputation and kids are real careful. He knows it. He’s doing a good job seeing some pitches and using all fields.” Higgins said that was evident in the first inning against West Scranton when McCarthy waited for his chance to drive in the game’s first two runs. “West pitched him away and pitched him away,” Higgins said. “He got two strikes against him, adjusted, went the other way and doubled down the line for two runs.” Fisch, who has undergone his own lineup adjustment this season by moving from second base to the outfield, gets the offense started from the leadoff spot. He’s used to igniting the attack after running the point on Scranton’s two straight championship basketball teams. “He’s a nightmare on the bases,” Higgins said. “He’s real fast.” That speed was the reason Fisch was moved defensively. He patrols center field when McCarthy pitches and otherwise spends most of his time in left field. The look is a little different, but the Knights are still putting together wins, something they are doing more effectively than any other team in the league this season.

41


PAGE 42

FAMILY CIRCUS

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

STONE SOUP

THE ARGYLE SWEATER DRABBLE

CLASSIC PEANUTS


Sunday, April 24, 2011

BOYS Class AAA …Event …Class AA 18.0… 110 Hurdles… 18.5 46.0… 300 Hurdles… 47.0 12.0… 100 Dash… 12.1 24.5… 200 Dash… 24.7 55.5… 400 Dash… 56.0 2:10… 800 Run… 2:11 4:58… 1600 Run… 5:00 11:00… 3200 Run… 11:10 10-6… Pole Vault… 10-6 122-0… Discus… 120-0 43-0… Shot Put… 42-0 145-0… Javelin… 143-0 18-6… Long Jump… 18-6 39-0… Triple Jump… 37-10 5-8… High Jump… 5-7

GIRLS Class AAA …Event …Class AA 18.8… 100 Hurdles… 19.3 56.0 …300 Hurdles… 55.5 14.2… 100 Dash… 14.3 29.5… 200 Dash… 29.6 1:08.0… 400 Dash… 1:08.5 2:35… 800 Run… 2:40 6:10… 1600 Run… 6:12 13:30… 3200 Run… 13:30 7-6… Pole Vault… 7-6 86-0… Discus… 83-0 29-0… Shot Put… 28-0 88-0… Javelin… 85-0 14-8… Long Jump… 14-8 30-6… Triple Jump… 30-0 4-8… High Jump… 4-7

BRADLEY LANPHEAR/ FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Cindy Good of Elk Lake leads the 100 hurdles ahead of Mid Valley’s Taylor Mercado and Elk Lake’s Carley Bennett during action on Wednesday.

43

NEWS

As track and field athletes move through the second half of the regular season, they will be racing the clock as well as each other. Individual athletes qualify for the District 2 meet based on meeting qualifying standards during the season. Teams are allowed one entry in each relay. The standards that athletes must meet or surpass to qualify for districts are:

GOLackawanna

ARTS SPORTS


PAGE 44

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

From The Times Leader Homes Magazine


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

MARKETPLACE golackawanna.com

100 Announcements 200 Auctions

300 Personal Services 400 Automotive

500 Employment 600 Financial

700 Merchandise 800 Pets & Animals

PAGE 45

900 Real Estate 1000 Service Directory

To place a Classified ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@golackawanna.com 310

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 150 Special Notices ADOPT: Adoring Mom, Dad, Big Brother would like to share a lifetime of hugs & kisses in our loving home with a newborn. Please Call Lynda & Dennis 888-688-1422 Expenses Paid

ADOPTING A NEWBORN

is our greatest wish. Abundance of love, secure life of family awaits. Annie & Mike 1-800-606-5589. Expenses Paid. ADOPTION A loving married teacher couple with so much to offer would love to adopt your newborn. We can provide a lifetime of happiness, security & educational opportunities. Expenses paid. Nancy/Kevin 1-866-254-3529 www.nancykevin 2adopt.com

PAYING $500 MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm

310

Attorney Services

Bankruptcy $595 Guaranteed Low Fees www.BkyLaw.net Atty Kurlancheek 825-5252 W-B

Attorney Services

412 Autos for Sale

BMW `07 328xi

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

To place your ad call...829-7130 380

Travel

SPRING GETAWAYS

Longwood/QVC 4/30 Seneca Lake W/E 4/30 to 5/1 Baltimore Aquarium 5/14 Sight & Sound Joseph 5/14 NYC/World Yacht 5/22 Boston Pop W/E 5/28 to 5/30

1-800-432-8069

Upcoming Trips

Hollywood Casino, 5/9 $25 free slot play & $5 off buffet. 1 Lucky Rider Wins $100 Free Slot Play Price: $23 Hunterdon Hills Playhouse 6/24 Branson Style Dinner Show. Choice of 5 entrees.Price:$85 570-654-2967 Yankees Home Games 5/1 Blue Jays 5/15 Boston 5/22 Mets 6/26 Rockies (Old Timers Day) 1-800-432-8069 YANKEES TRIP TO CINCINNATI June 20, 21 and 22 (Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday) Catch the Yankees take on the Reds at The Great American Ballpark in Cincinnati, Ohio Trip Includes: *Round trip bus transportation *Beer, soda & food on the bus *Great box level seats to two games (Mon & Tues night) *Hotel accommodations at the Millennium Hotel. Just three blocks from stadium and walking distance from Cincinnati Zoo and other downtown attractions Price: $350 Call 570-287-9701 for more info.

406

ATVs/Dune Buggies

QUARTER MIDGET RACE CAR 76 inch Bull Rider,

Honda 120 motor, Kirkey seat, new brake system, A-Main feature wins Asphalt/Dirt, Many Extras, Value $6,000, Sell for $2,999 Call (570) 954-2749

To place your ad call 829 7130

SUZUKI ’00 QUAD MASTER 4x4, auto, 520

miles, winch, heated grips. $4,650. 570-239-2877

409

Autos under $5000

CADILLAC `94 DEVILLE SEDAN

94,000 miles, automatic, front wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, air bags, all power, cruise control, leather interior, $3,300. 570-394-9004

CHRYSLER `97 SEBRING Convertible. Gold

with newly installed navy top/rear window. 124,000 city miles. As is. Asking $2,100. Negotiable. 570-822-2776 or 570 709-9404 Leave Message

412 Autos for Sale

ACURA `08 RDX Good Condition. 53,000 miles. AWD, Full Power, AM/FM, CD Changer, Blue Tooth, XM Radio, Leather Interior & Sunroof $20,500 (570) 814-8398

Call after 9:30 a.m.

Black with black interior. Heated seats. Back up & navigation systems. New tires & brakes. Sunroof. Garage kept. Many extras! 46,000 Miles. Asking $19,500. 570-825-8888 or 626-297-0155 Call Anytime!

To place your ad call...829-7130

BMW `93 325 IC Convertible,

Metallic Green Exterior & Tan Interior, 5 Speed Transmission, Heated Seats. 2nd Owner, 66k Miles. Excellent Condition, Garage Kept, Excellent Gas Mileage. Carfax available. Price reduced $7,995 or trade for SUV or other. Beautiful / Fun Car. 570-388-6669

BMW `93 325 IC Convertible,

Metallic Green Exterior & Tan Interior, 5 Speed Transmission, Heated Seats. 2nd Owner, 66k Miles. Excellent Condition, Garage Kept, Excellent Gas Mileage. Carfax available. Price reduced $7,995 or trade for SUV or other. Beautiful / Fun Car. 570-388-6669

CADILLAC ‘06 STS

AWD, 6 cylinder, Silver, 52,600 miles, sunroof, heated seats, Bose sound system, 6 CD changer, satellite radio, Onstar, parking assist, remote keyless entry, electronic keyless ignition, & more! $17,600 570-881-2775

CHEVROLET ‘06 CORVETTE CONVERTIBLE

Silver beauty, 1 Owner, Museum quality. 4,900 miles, 6 speed. All possible options including Navigation, Power top. New, paid $62,000 Must sell $45,900 570-299-9370

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

CHEVROLET `84 FORD ‘02 MUSTANG NISSAN `06 SENTRA 1.8 S, Special Edition, Power CONVERTIBLE CAPRICE CLASSIC RedGT with steering, brakes, black top. Excellent Condition. Very Clean. New Tires. Burgundy red with vinyl top. MUST SEE! $2,000 or best offer (570) 269-0042 Leave Message

CHEVROLET 2010 CAMARO V-6 Victory Red, black interior, all bells and whistles. $25,000 570-706-6489

CHRYSLER ‘06 300C HEMI

Light green, 18,000 miles, loaded, leather, wood trim, $24,000. 570-222-4960 leave message

CHRYSLER `02 PT CRUISER Inferno Red, flame

design. Chrome wheels. 47,000 miles, one owner. Looks and runs great. New inspection. $5,800 Call (570) 472-1854

FORD `04 MUSTANG Mach I, 40th

ANNIVERSARY EDITION V8, Auto, 1,200 miles, all options, show room condition. Call for info. Asking $24,995 Serious inquiries only. 570-636-3151

To place your ad call...829-7130

FORD `07 MUSTANG 63,000 highway

miles, silver, runs great, $11,500. negotiable. 570-479-2482

FORD `07 MUSTANG GT

Premium package, silver, black leather interior, 5 speed manual. 20,000 miles. $18,900 (570) 868-3832

FORD `92 MUSTANG

Convertible, 55,000 original miles 5.0 auto, some engine upgrades. Garaged showcar. $8200 (570) 283-8235

6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $18,500 570-760-5833

HYUNDAI `04 TIBURON GT

Blue, 5 speed manual, CD, Air, factory alarm, power windows & locks. 38K. $7,500 negotiable. Call 570-540-6236

MAZDA `04 3

Hatchback, 92,000 miles. Excellent condition. auto, sunroof, premium sound and alloy wheels. $8,300 (570) 864-2337

MAZDA `04 RX-8 Hunter Green, 80,000 miles. New brakes & rotors. New alignment. Two new rear tires. No accidents.

PRICE REDUCED $8,000 or best offer. For more information, call (570) 332-4213

MERCEDES-BENZ `01 C-240 Loaded, automatic, AC, heated leather seats, 4 door. $4,700 Call 570-388-6535

windows & locks. 6 CD changer. Excellent condition, 43K. $12,500. 570-881-6897

Volkswagen ‘03 GTI moonroof, 5 speed, loaded,$9750 excellent condition, 570-578-2149

412 Autos for Sale

PONTIAC ‘69 FIREBIRD 400 CONVERTIBLE Blue/white top & white interior. Recent documented frame-off restoration. Over $31,000 invested. will sell $21,500. 570-335-3127

TOYOTA `93 MR2 T-top, 5 speed.

AM/FM/CD, AC, power antenna. New tires. No rust. Great condition.

To place your ad call...829-7130

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

$$$ HIGHEST PRICE PAID $$$ FOR JUNK VEHICLES PICKED UP

MERCEDES-BENZ `05 240C 4Matic, V6 - Gray,

MERCEDES-BENZ `95 SL 500 Convertible, with removable hard top, dark Blue, camel interior, Summer Driving Only, Garage Kept. Very Good Condition, No Accidents. Classy Car. Price Reduced! $13,995 or trade for SUV or other. 570-388-6669

NISSAN `08 ALTIMA

Low mileage, 18000 miles, automatic, front wheel drive, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, power seats, all power, cruise control, GPS/navigation system, AM/FM radio, CD changer, Mp3 player, keyless entry, leather interior, sun/moon roof, rear defroster, new floor mats, Winter Frost pearl paint, heated seats, side mirror defroster, backup camera, auto rear view mirror dimmer, Bluetooth, phone, nav., & radio controls on steering wheel, 4.5 years remaining on 7 year 100,000 miles Nissan bumper to bumper Premium Warranty included, EXCELLENT CONDITION Altima HYBRID 35city/33 highway mpg. $18,900. 570-371-9001 Call after 5:00 p.m.

$5,000

(570) 708-0269 after 6:00PM

To place your ad call...829-7130

77K highway miles, Excellent condition, dealer serviced. Sun roof, heated seats. $15,500. Call 570-288-3916

412 Autos for Sale

570-876-1010 570-346-7673 468

Auto Parts

468

Auto Parts

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 and Up $125 extra if driven, pulled or pushed in. NOBODY Pays More

570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6 am-9 pm Sunday 8 am - 68 pm


PAGE 46 412 Autos for Sale

Rare, Exclusive Opportunity To Own...

‘26 FORD MODEL T Panel Delivery

100 point Concours quality restoration. Red with black fenders. Never Driven. 0 miles on restoration. RARE! $40,000 $38,000 $36,500

2002 BMW 745i

The Flagship of the Fleet New - $87,000 Midnight Emerald with beige leather interior. 61K miles. Mint condition. Loaded. Garage Kept. Navigation Stunning, Must Sell! $20,000 $18,600

1993 CADILLAC ALANTE 2 Door

Convertible Exquisite Candy Apple Red black soft top. 13,000 original miles. All available options, including gold alloy wheels. Garage Kept. 1 owner. Final Model Year. Gorgeous Automobile! $31,000 $29,900 $27,900

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 412 Autos for Sale

SUBARU `02 IMPREZAmileage, WRX Low

57,000 miles, 5 speed, all-wheel drive, 4 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, cruise control, AM/FM radio, CD changer, rear defroster, new Blitz Stainless Exhaust, AEM Cold Air Intake, TURBOXS Blowoff Valve & Boost Control. $10,500. (201) 704-8640 Call before 7:30 pm

TOYOTA `06 AVALON New tires, new

brakes, Inspected March 4, AC, AVPS, Fully loaded, 18,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty. 90,000 miles. $12,900. (570) 881-3712

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CADILLAC `80 COUPE DEVILLE Excellent condition, $3,000 located in Hazleton. 570-454-1945 or 561-573-4114

PORSCHE `02 BOXSTER S

Great convertible, black top, 6 speed manual transmission, carbon fiber dash, leather interior, front & rear trunk, fast & agile. $18,000 or best offer. Call 570-262-2478

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

SCION ‘08 TC

Low mileage, 42,000 miles, 4 speed, front wheel drive, 2 door, antilock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, cruise control, AM/FM radio, CD player, Mp3 player, keyless entry, sun/moon roof, rear defroster, tinted windows. $14,200. (570) 443-7522 Call before 9:30 p.m.

FORD `52 COUNTRY SEDAN CUSTOM LINE

STATION WAGON V8, automatic, 8 passenger, 3rd seat, good condition, 2nd owner. $9,500. 570-579-3517

To place your ad call...829-7130

FORD `65

GALAXIE 500 CONVERTIBLE

White with red leather interior. Black top. 289 Engine, rebuilt. 61,000 original miles. Original owners manual EXCELLENT CONDITION! $8,800. (570) 881-2447

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

FORD `66

Mustang Coupe. Pearl white, pony interior. Pristine condition. 26K miles. $17,000 or best offer. (570) 817-6768

LINCOLN `88 TOWN CAR 61,000 original

miles, garage kept, triple black, leather interior, carriage roof, factory wire wheels, loaded, excellent condition. $5,500. Call Mike 570-237-7660

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

From an Exotic, Private Collection

Call 570-650-0278

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVROLET `68 C10

New 350 motor and new transmission. REDUCED TO $5,000 FIRM (570) 906-1771

CHEVROLET `72 CHEVELLE

Two door hard top. 307 Motor. Needs work. Comes with additional 400 small block & many parts. $5,000. Serious inquires only. (570) 836-2574

CHEVY `66 BEL AIR 2 door post car, in

good condition for age. Serious inquiries only, call for details. $8,500 or best offer. Call Steve at 570-407-0531

CORVETTES WANTED 1953-1972

Any Condition! Courteous, Fast Professional Buyer. Licensed & Bonded corvettebuyer.com 1-800-850-3656

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $8,900. Call 570-237-5119

To place your ad call...829-7130 MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. $31,000. Call 825-6272

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. $31,000. Call 825-6272

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT DRASTICALLY

REDUCED!! This model only produced in 1967 & 1968. All original 45,000 miles, Color Burgundy, cloth & vinyl interior, 350 rocket engine, 2nd owner. Fender skirts, always garaged. Trophy winner at shows. Serious inquiries only, $7,500. 570-690-0727

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

FORD ‘99 E350 BUCKET VAN Triton V8. 2 speed

boom; 92,000miles; $9999 or best price. Great condition. Call 570-675-3384 or 570574-7002

439

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON ` 06 SOFTTAIL NIGHTTRAIN Dark gray metallic,

STUDEBAKER ‘31 Rumble seat, coupe

new rr tire & brakes, many extras. $10,900 (570) 592-4982

TANK ‘07 VISION 2007 Tank Motor

Road King 19,000 miles, new tires, lots of extra chrome. Like New. $12,900. Call 570-639-1989 or 570-760-1023

Good condition. Call for details (570) 881-7545

Sports Vision Motorcycle. 250 cc, Brand new. 0 miles. $2,400. For more information call Tom at 570-825-2114

421

Boats & Marinas

CUSTOM CREST 15’

Fiberglass boat with trailer. Outboard propulsion. Includes: 2 motors Erinmade, “Lark II series”

PRICE REDUCED! $2,400 NEGOTIABLE

570-417-3940

SALT CREEK SKIF 14’ fiberglass fish-

ing boat, tri-hull (very stable), 25 HP Tahatsu outboard, Full Galvanized Trailer. Perfect Condition. Built in fuel tank. All new in ‘01. $2,500 570-256-7311

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $21,900. 570-288-4322 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

C-3500 CHEVY

Food Truck with new motor 50,000. Excellent condition. All stainless steel body. Call Jack at 570-881-5825 or Rich at 570-357-8319

HARLEY DAVIDSON `01

HONDA

2004 CRF 100. Excellent condition. $1500 or best offer. 570-498-7702

KAWASAKI ‘06

Vulcan Classic 1500 Black and chrome. Fuel injected. 21” windshield. Passenger backrest. Floor boards. Remainder of warranty. Expires Feb., 2012. Kept in heated garage! Never damaged. 7,000 miles. Great condition! $6,800 570-574-9217

SUZUKI `07 C50T CRUISER EXCELLENT CONDITION Windshield, Bags,

Floorboards,V&H Pipes, White walls,Garage Kept. 6K Miles $5,500 (570) 430-0357

SUZUKI ‘04 GSXR 1000CC

Less than 1,000 miles. Team colors with matching helmet & jacket. Fender eliminator kit. Scorpion exhaust. $6,000. Call Dave after 5 pm 570-825-0394

YAMAHA `04 V-STAR 1100 Custom. 5800

miles, light bar, cobra exhaust, windshield, many extras, must sell. $5,995. Call 570-301-3433

YAMAHA `97 VIRAGO

750cc. 8,000 miles, saddlebags, windshield, back rest, Black & Pearl, Excellent Condition. Must See. Asking $2,499. Call after 4. 570-823-9376

439

Motorcycles

YAMAHA ‘07 650 V-STAR

Matted black finish. Mint condition. New tires, inspected, fully serviced & ready to ride. Windshield & sissy bar. Low miles & garage kept. $4800. or best offer. 570-762-5158

YAMAHA` 08 R1 BEAUTIFUL BIKE Perfect condition.

3700 miles, new rear tire, undertail kit, cover. Price negotiable $7,800 570-852-9072

Toplaceyour adcal l . . 8 29-7130 YAMAHA` 09 VSTAR 650 CLASSIC

Like New. Less than 1000 miles. White and chrome. Garage kept. $6,300 (570) 817-8127

442 RVs & Campers

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, water purifier, awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, raised panel fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, water purifier, awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, raised panel fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS

Travel Trailer. 29’, mint condition, 1 slide out a/c-heat. Stove, microwave, fridge, shower inside & out. Many more extras. Reduced. $15,500. Call 570-842-6735

SUNLITE CAMPER

22 ft. 3 rear bunks, center bathroom, kitchen, sofa bed. Air, Fully self contained. Sleeps 6. New tires, fridge awning. $4500. 215-322-9845

442 RVs & Campers

TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft

Rear queen master bedroom, Walk thru bathroom. Center kitchen + dinette bed. Front extra large living room + sofa bed. Big View windows. Air, awning, sleeps 6, very clean, will deliver. Located in Benton, Pa. $4,900. 215-694-7497

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

BUICK `05 RENDEZVOUSFully CX AWD,

loaded, 1 owner, 18,000 miles. 6 cylinder. New inspection, tires & brakes. Like new, inside & out. $16,900. Call (570) 540-0975

CHEVR0LET`02 EXPRESS

CONVERSION VAN Loaded. Low miles. Excellent condition.

$18,900

570-674-3901

CHEVROLET `05 TRAILBLAZER LT Black/Grey. 18,000

miles. Well equipped. Includes On-Star, tow package, roof rack, running boards, remote starter, extended warranty. $16,000 (570) 825-7251

CHEVROLET `06 SILVERADO 1500 4X4 pickup, extended cab, 6 1/2 ft. box, automatic. Pewter. 48,000 miles. Excellent condition. $17,000 Negotiable (570) 954-7461

CHEVROLET `09 EQUINOX LS Low mileage, 15000

miles, automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, anti-lock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, cruise control, AM/FM radio, cassette player, CD player, keyless entry, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, tinted windows. $17,500. (570) 954-9333 Call after 9:00 a.m.

DODGE `10 GRAND CARAVAN Only 17k miles. Fully loaded. Excellent condition. Factory & extended warranty. $17,995 (570) 690-2806

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVY `05 EQUINOX

LT (premium package), 3.4L, 47,000 miles. All wheel drive, power moonroof, windows, locks & seats. Leather interior, 6 cd changer, rear folding seats, keyless entry, onstar, roof rack, running boards, garage kept. $14,750. 570-362-1910

CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR

Custom Van. 67K miles. Interior has oak wood trim, carpeting, storage areas, TV, rear seat convertible to double bed, curtains. Seats 7. Power windows & seats. Custom lighting on ceiling. New exhaust system. New rear tires. Recently inspected. Excellent condition. $4,800. Call 570-655-0530

CHEVY `94 GLADIATOR

Custom Van. 67K miles. Interior has oak wood trim, carpeting, storage areas, TV, rear seat convertible to double bed, curtains. Seats 7. Power windows & seats. Custom lighting on ceiling. New exhaust system. New rear tires. Recently inspected. Excellent condition. $4,800. Call 570-655-0530

DODGE `94 DAKOTA with cap. 1 owner,

garage kept, very good condition. Many extras including lift & back seat. 29 MPG gas. $4,000 or best offer (570) 868-0944

FORD `01 LARIAT 250 Super Duty

with slide-in camper new tires, 4 door, 8’ bed. Soft and hardtop for bed covers., Good condition. Sold together or separately $10,900 (570) 639-5478

FORD `03 F150 LARIAT Contractor ready

with ladder rack & tool box, 4x4 diesel, under 97K. Great condition, $17,000 or best offer. 570-925-2845

FORD `99 E250

Wheelchair Van 78,250 miles. Fully serviced, new battery, tires & rods. Seats 6 or 3 wheelchairs. Braun Millennium lift with remote. Walk up door. Front & rear A/C. Power locks & windows. Excellent condition. $9,500. 570-237-6375

KIA `02 SEDONA

EX, Van, Sunroof. 61,000 miles. Loaded. Good condition. $5000 or best offer. 570-606-7654


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

HONDA `03 ODYSSEY High mileage,

140000 miles, automatic, front wheel drive, 4 door, anti-lock brakes, air conditioning, air bags, power locks, power windows, power mirrors, AM/FM radio, CD player, rear defroster, rear windshield wiper, $5,990 (570) 606-4198

HONDA `10 ODYSSEY

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

JEEP `07 WRANGLER X 4x4, stick shift, soft

top. Red exterior, well maintained, garage kept. 11,500 miles, one owner. AC, CD player, cruise control. Tow package with cargo carrier. Excellent condition. $18,700 Call 570-822-9680

Find a newcar online at

509

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 468

Auto Parts

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA CA$H ON THE $POT, Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

timesleader.com

Special Edition. Maroon, Fully loaded. Leather seats. TV/DVD, navigation, sun roof plus many other extras. 3rd seat . Only 1,900 Miles. Brand New. Asking $37,000 (570) 328-0850

HUMMER ‘05 H2

Yellow with black leather interior. Front & rear heated seats. Many chrome accessories. $28,500 or best offer. Call (570) 788-9826 or (570) 956-8547 Leave Message

INTERNATIONAL ‘95

DUMP TRUCK Refurbished, rebuilt engine, transmission replaced. Rear-end removed and relubed. Brand new 10’ dump. PA state inspected. $12,900/best offer. 570-594-1496

JEEP `00 WRANGLER

ONLY ONL NLY L ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

NISSAN `08 ROGUE SL. AWD, 1 owner,

no accidents. 4 door hatchback, 6 cylinder, roof rails, dark gray, black interior. Premium wheels, new tires, brakes extra set of snows. Premium sound/Bose/bluetooth, XM radio. Intelligent key entry. Newly inspected 36,900 miles $19,500 (570) 371-7227

SUZUKI `07 XL-7 56,000 miles,

automatic, all-wheel drive, 4 door, air conditioning, all power, CD player, leather interior, tinted windows, custom wheels, $13,000 Call 570-829-8753 Before 5:00 p.m.

TRACTOR TRAILERS

TJ, Black with grey interior. 4 cylinder, 5-speed manual transmission. CD player, hardtop, full doors, sound bar. 4” Skyjacker Suspension lift with steering stabilizer. Like new BF Goodrich 35’s with Full size spare. Only 85,000 miles. $6,999 (570) 301-7221

LEXUS `04 GX 470 Black with dark

gray leather interior. DVD player. Fully loaded. 92,000 miles. Excellent condition. $19,000 (570) 675-4424

FREIGHTLINER ’97 MIDROOF 475 CAT & 10 speed transmission. $12,000 FREIGHTLINER ’99 CONDO 430 Detroit, Super 10 transmission. Asking $15,000. ‘88 FRUEHAUF 45’ with sides. All aluminum, spread axle. $6,500.

506 Administrative/ Clerical

NIGHT AUDITOR

Apply in person. Knights Inn 310 Route 315 Pittston, PA 18640 570-654-6020

To place your ad call...829-7130 507 Banking/Real Estate/Mortgage Professionals

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

CARPENTERS 10+ years experience and roofing experience a must!

PAINTERS

10+ years experience. Must be able to brush, roll & spackle. Steady work! Good pay! Benefits available. Call 570-654-4348

LABORERS

Gas field Cleanup Crew. Must be physically fit and willing to work in all weather conditions. Pre-employment and Random Drug Testing. Must be available to work Day/Night Shifts. Starting wage $15.00 per hour. Benefits available after 90 days. 570297-4720 or apply in person @ 22020 Rt. 14 Troy, PA.

To place your ad call...829-7130 533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

MECHANIC

Responsible for daily maintenance of equipment. Knowledge in hydraulic and electrical systems. Welding a plus. Competitive salary and benefits. Solomon Container Service 495 Stanton St. Wilkes-Barre 570-829-2206

542

Logistics/ Transportation

HYDRO-VAC & TRANSPORT DRIVERS

CDL A or B with Tanker Endorsement. 2 Years Experience required. Clean MVR. Must be able to work/day night shift. Pay up to $30.00/hour. Benefits available after 90 days. Call 570297-4720 or apply in person at 22020 Rt. 14 Troy, PA. Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

TRI-AXLE DRIVER

4-5 years experience. Start immediately. All local work. No out of town. Call Danny Jr. at 570-237-1734, Danny Sr. at 570760-7896, or Home # at 570-654-0525.

545

HOME HEALTH MARKETER

CareGivers America is seeking a marketer for home health. Experience with home health marketing or pharmaceutical sales needed. Resumes to: rjacobs@caregivers america.com

PART-TIME MARKETING

opening for a part time Clerk/Teller. Requires attention to details, GL experience & excellent customer service skills. Please send resume to: PG&W Employees FCU Attn: Carole Fischer 265 S. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 Email: cfischer@ pgwefcu.org / EOE

Professional, Experienced, Opportunity, (Blinds, Shades, Verticals, Horizontals) for top Co. Work in own area. Email resume to Edwin@distinctive treatments.com or call 516-358-9612.

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

WINDOW TREATMENT INSTALLERS

FOOD SERVICES MANAGER

This position plans, directs, and supervises the camp’s food service. It is responsible for the oversight of the kitchen staff, facility maintenance, and food. Responsibilities including menu planning, overseeing the cooking and serving of meals, supervising the kitchen staff, and ordering of food and supplies.

2 storage trailers. 570-814-4790

Previous experience working in a camp or institutional food service setting, experience as a cook, and cooking for large groups is required. Excellent communication, management, and interpersonal skills are also required. Candidates should have the ability to lift 50lbs. and be able to stand for up to 8 hours.

TRUCKS FOR SALE Ford, GMC,

This year, our resident camp will be held at Camp Archbald in Kingsley, PA from July 17th until August 21st. Kitchen staff members are not required to live onsite.

International-Prices starting at $2,295. Box Truck, Cab & Chassis available. Call U-haul 570-822-5536

548 Medical/Health

DURABLE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT MANAGER Seeking manager with at least 3-5 years experience with durable medical equipment. Resumes to nepamedsupplies@ yahoo.com

LPN/RN

Part Time. Flexible hours. Private Clinic. Available immediately. Send resumes to: c/o Times Leader Box 2505 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250.

542

Logistics/ Transportation

548 Medical/Health

Friendship House Therapeutic Staff Support

BA/BS in Human Service field required, Autism Spectrum Disorder experience strongly preferred. Part time day positions available. Please reply to: BMcCartney@friendshiphousePA.Org Or mail resume to: Friendship House c/o Beth McCartney 1509 Maple Street, Scranton, Pa 18505 visit us On-Line at www.friendshiphousepa.org 542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Marketing/ Product

In search of a dynamic person with great communication skills and ability to multi-task. The successful candidate will be punctual, organized, reliable, creative, conscientious, and personable. Must have prior marketing experience. Must be a self-starter with reliable transportation. Computer skills a must. Willingness to work Saturdays a must. Positive attitude and high energy a must. Fax resume to 570-822-3446. No phone calls please.

CLERK/TELLER PART TIME Credit union has

548 Medical/Health

Interested candidates should submit a resume to careers@gshpa.org or mail to Girl Scouts in the Heart of Pennsylvania Attention: Human Resources, 350 Hale Ave., Harrisburg, PA 17104

XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is seeking experienced forklift operators & Inexperienced candidates with great employment history to work at their Mehoopany, PA location. The following skills are Thursday, necessary for these positions: • High School Diploma/GED April 17th, • Computer Skills • Valid Driver’s License April 21st, and • Criminal Background Check April 28th • Pass Pre-employment Drug Screen & Physical 10:00 am - 4:00 pm • Part-time position for experienced Tunkhannock driver only. All full-time positions come with the Library following benefits: medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after 1 year, and paid vacation. Pay increase based on skill development.

Interested Applicants can Apply Online! www.XLCServices.com or Call 888-382-4078

Casual Bus Operator

The County of Lackawanna Transit System (COLTS) is hiring Casual Bus Operators for coverage as needed. This position is safety sensitive and requires pre-employment and random drug and alcohol screening. Preferred candidates should be comfortable in all driving situations while providing customer service. The position consists of varied hours Monday through Saturday, with little advance notice and starts with a pay of $15.00+ per hour. To be considered for an interview, you: • Need a high school diploma or GED equivalent; • Must show that you are a U.S. Citizen or present your proof of Employment Eligibility; • Must have a Commercial Driver’s License (CDL); • Passenger Endorsement with no Air Brake Restriction is preferred but not required to be hired. However, the prospective employee will be expected to acquire this endorsement within two weeks of being hired; • Must have acceptable driving record ; • Must be physically capable to perform the essential job functions; • Must have no conviction of a felony, or any drug-related convictions; • Must comply with all other applicable qualifications for employment established by the organization; COLTS is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Applications are available via www.coltsbus.com or by request at 570-346-2061 and should be sent to: Casual Bus Operator ATTN: Dorothy A. Sterling Hill COLTS 800 North South Road; Scranton, PA 18504 Or to jobs@coltsbus.com

278278

451

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PAGE 48

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

548 Medical/Health

RESIDENTIAL CARE AIDES

Part time positions available. Looking for caring & compassionate people for Alzheimer’s assisted living facility. Must be a high school graduate. Reliable applicants need only apply. No phone calls please. Apply within.

Keystone Garden Estates

100 Narrows Rd Route 11 Larksville

Find a newcar online at

timesleader.com

ONL NLY L ONE N LE LEA L E DER D . ONLY LEADER. timesleader.com

Riverstreet Manor has an opportunity available for a Full Time Day Shift

HOUSEKEEPING AIDE

We offer a competitive salary and benefits. Every other weekend & holiday rotation required. Willing to train. Opportunities for

RN’S AND C.N.A.’S

are also available. All interested parties please apply in person at Riverstreet Manor 440 North River St. Wilkes Barre, PA 18707

551

Other

FLAGGERS WANTED

Hiring 50. Vehicle required, $8-$30 per hour. Will train. 570-714-FLAG. EOE

554

Production/ Operations

EQUIPMENT OPERATOR

Candidate must have HS Diploma/ GED & a good work history. Equipment experience and knowledge of hydraulic machines is a must. Benefits include Health, Paid Holidays/Vacation & 401K. Please call Al at 570-822-6880.

554

Production/ Operations

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Supports Director of Manufacturing by ensuring efficient execution of the production schedule, product quality, planning and executing maintenance programs, and communicating with customers and key leadership team members. Lead production and maintenance teams to ensure safe and efficient manufacturing operations. Detailed, timely communication with logistics team, quality assurance, customer service and customers on production status. Responsible for maintaining Database system information for current production status. Work with the logistics team in planning material needs for upcoming production. Assists with production scheduling to ensure production schedule meets customer requirements and enables efficient operations. Knowledge of GMPs and quality assurance requirements. E-mail resume with cover letter to info@ LionBrewery.com Include job title in subject line.

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified! QUALITY CONTROL TECHNICIAN – Entry Level

Will assist QC Supervisor, establish, examine and maintain quality on production floor. Position will be “on hands” in production dept., on floor testing and sampling. $ 13/hour to start. Hours: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m Mon. – Fri. Must have prior experience in QC and with Microsoft Word & Excel. Will operate forklift and some heavy lifting may be required. Must be detailed oriented and have ability to multi-task. Competitive benefit package. Candidates meeting qualifications should forward resume with wage requirements to: AEP Industries, Inc.,Attn: Human Resources, 20 Elmwood Ave., Mountain Top, Pa. 18707, Fax (570) 474-9257, Email: Grullony@ aepinc.com We are a Drug Free Workplace. EOE

706

600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

FLORAL SHOP

The only shop in the area! 1,300 sq/ft retail & 1,300 sq/ft storage

$63,000 Includes

established sales, all equipment, showcases, inventory & memberships to FTD, Tele-Floral & 1-800-FLOWERS. Willing to train buyer. Owner retiring after 25 years in business. Room for potential growth.

CALL 570-542-4520 Pictures available.

630 Money To Loan “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC. “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

To place your ad call...829-7130

Arts/Crafts/ Hobbies

PATTERNS Simplicity Daisy Kingdom size 3456 on pattern, all fabric & details to match pattern, size 3 - 30 patterns, includes material to match, Daisy Kingdom doll pattern also on pattern $200. One 18 gallon tall tote (plastic) with lace, all sizes, some eyelet $50. Many plastic dolls to crochet dresses for, air freshners included $20. 570-674-3843 SEWING MACHINE Singer Spartan. (free delivery) $10. 570-855-2568

708

Antiques & Collectibles

BASEBALL UNIFORM 1950’s A.G. Spaulding wool, Milton Team $200. 570-239-8377

Collect Cash. Not Dust. Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

702

Air Conditioners

AIR CONDITIONER $40 570-740-1246

Antiques & Collectibles

YEARBOOKS: Coughlin H.S. 1926, 1928, 1932, 1937, 1940, 1961, 1963, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1949. G.A.R. H.S. 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1945, 1946, 1951, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1961, 1965, 1966, 1970, 1980, 1985, 2005, 2006. Meyers H.S. 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1960, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977. Kingston H.S. 1938, 1939, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1949. Plymouth H.S. 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1938, 1943, 1944, 1959, 1960. Hanover H.S. 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1960. West Pittston H.S. Annual 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1931, 1932, 1959. Luzerne H.S. 1951, 1952, 1956, 1957, 1959. Berwick H.S. 1952, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960, 1967, 1968, 1969 ,1970. Lehman H.S. 1973, 1974, 1976, 1978, 1980. Nanticoke Area H.S. 1976, 2008. Dallas H.S. 1966, 1967, 1968. Bishop Hoban H.S. 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975. West Side Central Catholic H.S. 1965 1974, 1980, 1981. Westmoreland H.S. 1952, 1953 - 1954 G.A.R. H.S. 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976 Pittston H.S. 1936, 1951, 1954, 1963 Pittston Hospital School of Nursing, J.O.Y. of 1957, 1959 West Pittston H.S. 1950, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1960 Hazleton H.S. 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1945, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964 Hazle Twp H.S. 1951, 1952 570-825-4721

710

Appliances

REFRIGERATOR Frigidaire, 18 cu. ft. white, $100. or best offer. 570-287-9946 REFRIGERATOR Kenmore, almond, 21.6 cu. ft. with ice maker & filtered water $300. 570-868-6018

Call 829-7130 to place an ad.

WASHER: Kenmore front loader, new door lock, but needs new motor. $200. 570-954-2899

ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L E DER D . ONLY LEADER.

To place your ad call...829-7130

timesleader.com

FOREIGN world coins total of 90, mostly older types all for $15. 570-735-6638

700 MERCHANDISE

708

LIONEL TRAIN SETSpirit of 76 engine, caboose, & 3 box cars (Georgia, NC & Delaware) slightly used great condition. $175. 570-287-5045 STATE QUARTER COIN SETS in folders. $20. 824-1180

712

Baby Items

BASSINET with canopy, mobile, music, vibration. Green/white pattern for boy or girl. Can also be used as bedside sleeper. Includes matt pad & sheets. Excellent condition. $50. 570-855-9221 INFANT CLOTHES LARGE PLASTIC BOX $10. 570-285-3119

712

Baby Items

HIGHCHAIR, white vinyl highchair with blue print padding $ large tray $30. Walker red, blue & yellow $15. Yellow infant seat vibrates with music, great for feeding $40. 570-208-3888 UMBRELLA stroller, red & blue plaid $7. Backless booster seat $5. Car seat, gray with blue trim, $30. Pack & Play, Graco blue & yellow with animal print pad, asking $30. Stroller, green & cream plaid $40. Booster high chair, cream with burgundy, $25. TV video baby monitor, brand new, $50. Baby bath tub shower $20. Wooden changing table $60. Eddie Bauer car seat, beige & black suede $40. 570-239-5292

716

Building Materials

DOOR. 36”x80” solid wood, 6 panel. Exterior or interior. Natural oak finish, right or left with hardware. $200. Call 570-735-8730 or 570-332-8094 DOUBLE UTILITY SINK, with spraying faucet. Barely used. $75. 570-417-4188 leave message. GLASS DOOR. 3 way glass door for bath tub. $25 570-331-8183 LIGHT FIXTURE Beautiful tiffanystyle light fixture measuring 13”H x 32”W x 14”D, stained glass piece of art is done in white & mother-ofpearl tones & has a polished brass finish. Asking price is $350.. ALSO, a pair of polished brass and acrylic wall sconces measuring 7”H x 9”W. These classic looking fixtures are priced at $48. for the pair. Call 570-430-1366 if interested. Photos upon request.

720

Cemetery Plots/Lots

CEMETERY PLOTS

Plymouth National Cemetery in Wyoming. 6 Plots. $450 each. Call 570-825-3666

726

Clothing

BOY’S CLOTHES sizes M/L, all like new 25 items for $30. Boy’s sizes L/XL polos, shorts, shirts, sweatshirts, 25 items $30. Barely worn, some still have tags 237-1583

To place your ad call...829-7130 JACKET: boys genuine Italian stone leather jacket, size 14. $25. 868-6018

726

Clothing

PROM GOWNS, excellent condition, (3) available, sizes 4, 8, & 10. Colors watermelon $75., black $50. & seamfoam green $75. Worn only once. Call 570-239-6011

730

Computer Equipment & Software

DESK. Computer Desk $50. Call 7358730 or 332-8094 LAPTOP: Dell d610 refurbished:w7sp1,o fc10,antivirus+more. p4mc.6,60gb,dvdr wifi, new battery & bag. warranty $225. Dell d600 laptop refurb: w7sp1 ,ofc10, antivirus + more. p4mc 1.6,40 gb, cdrw+dvd, wifi, new battery & bag, warranty $200. HP d530 small desk top/monitor/keyboard/mouse=system. refurb:w7 sp1, ofc10,antivirus+mor e.p4 2.6,80gb, cdrw + dvd, warranty/ complete system $150.570-862-2236 TABLET: Coby tablet PC with touchscreen and android OS. New! $99. Eric 609-433-5660 (in Wilkes-Barre) 609-433-5660

732

Exercise Equipment

WEIGHT BENCH, curling bar, weights. can deliver. $12. 570-855-2568

742

Furnaces & Heaters

HEATER. Propane gas, with 30’ copper tubing. $100 or best offer. 570-287-9946 HEATERS (4) kerosene, all serviced & working. $30 each, call Monday Thursday after 6 pm 570-288-6214

744

Furniture & Accessories

BAR STOOLS for counter/island, saddle seat, walnut wood, 24” like new $40 set of three. 570-696-4494 BED twin complete with rails $50. 570-675-2879 BEDROOM SETdresser with mirror, highboy dresser, nightstand & regular size bed. $250. 570-287-0563 BUNKBED Oak bunkbed with ladder & upper guide rail. Very good condition. Can use as 2 twin beds. $100. 570-388-2501 CHINA CABINET tan/white marble finish, god Condition $60. Television Stand 2 glass shelves & bottom shelf wood, excellent condition $75. Motion mirror with sound Tropical Scenery .$25. 570-855-5737

744

Furniture & Accessories

COFFEE TABLE Solid oak, 53 1/4” X 24” with 3 glass top inserts. Excellent condition, $50. 570-288-3723 COUCH, love seat, & pillows, off white with green & red flowers, very good condition. S shaped coffee table (Mother of Pearl) $200. for all. 570-287-3716 CURIO CABINET Solid oak, three glass shelves & two lights for display $200. Bridal Precious Moment knick knacks $5 to $35, Hunter green couch reclines on both sides, drawer in center bottom and hidden pull out table with cup holders $150. Vera Bradley retired pattern purse $20. Vera Bradley retired pattern wallet $10, Dooney and Burke black purse $10. call 570-704-8117 DESK, drop down top 3 drawers, pecan finish, 36x 44 x15” excellent condition. $95. 570-287-2517 GAZEBO brand new 10’x12’ $400 new. Sturdy steel construction, net & fence panels included $225. 570-474-5643 GRANDFATHER CLOCK, cherry, carved top, beautiful 83”hx22’w, new, never used $375. 570-457-7854

To place your ad call 829 7130 HUTCH, Oak, lights, glass shelves, great condition $250. Oak Table, six chairs, good condition $150. Oak sideboard, great condition $250. 570-829-4025 LAMP - Parlor stand up lamp. Very good condition. Grey metal color. $25. 570-740-1246 LIGHT BASKETBALL SWAG rim net, glass globe is red white blue $45. Lamp tiffany floor 69” tall shade is 5” high 14” across lamp shines towards ceiling $60. Empress fiber bed cover queen size in original package $50. Syroco 2 piece wall planter with silk flowers $45. Canister set 4 pieces stainless steel by Revere Wear, excellent condition $50. 570-288-5628 LIVING ROOM Sofa and Loveseat. Leather. Light beige, great condition $350. 823-9551 LOVESEAT & OTTOMAN solid sand colored cushioned, excellent shape $200. SOFA: 100% Italian black leather sofa & loveseat, very good condition $550. 570/824-7807 or 570-545-7006


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

PAGE 49


PAGE 50 744

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 Furniture & Accessories

756

Medical Equipment

OUTDOOR PATIO SET green & white in color. Great shape, needs umbrella. $200 (570) 824-1180

WHEELCHAIR, electric Nutron 350 watts.black, has 2 batteries, & charger. $500. 654-1578

PATIO FURNITURE. 5 piece, umbrella and cushions. Round table, excellent condition, $200. TABLE plus 4 plastic chairs and umbrella, $50. Good condition. 570-474-5188

758 Miscellaneous

PICTURE: giant Southwest $75. Wooden Teepee shelf stand $75. Area rug, olive green with leaf imprint, approximate 5x7 $40. 570-239-5292 ROCKER - mauve swivel/rocker. Excellent condition. $30. 570-287-1913 SLEEPER SOFA 84” sage green leather in good condition, bed is full size and comes with foam mattress pad. Asking $125 or best offer. 570-388-4095 SOFA antique provincial sofa with matching Mr. & Mrs. chairs, 2 oak end tables, matching coffee table, 2 brass lamps, great condition $900. cell 570-436-7657 or 570-929-2645 eves, McAdoo SOFA TABLE 48” all wood sofa table, medium shade, $45. 570-868-5275 STUFFED CHAIR with matching ottoman, excellent condition $75. 570-954-3650

752 Landscaping & Gardening AZALEAS Mature 3, 3 Rhododendrons, 1 Holly, pavers, all for $50. FREE DARK FILL 3 tons, you haul, Plains. 570-826-0079 Bruce’s Lawn Service See our ad under Call An Expert 1165 Lawn Care LAWN MOWER, rear bag, gas, 6.5 hp Poulan $50. 570-655-6770

To place your ad call...829-7130 LAWNMOWER Craftsman /Honda motor includes bag not self propelled, new blade runs good $150. after 3pm 655-3197 RAKE, PICK, and SQUARE SHOVEL . All 3 for $ 20. Call 570-735-2081 Spike & Gorilla’s Lawn Care & Outdoor Maintenance See our ad under Call An Expert 1162 Landscaping & Gardening YARDVARK wood chipper 3hp Briggs engine, no spark otherwise good $75 firm after 3pm 570655-3197.

AB-DOER brand new, in box never opened $149.99 value will sacrifice for $70. Lexmark 232 color ink jet printer new in the box $20. 1200 dpi premium photo quality also sharp surround sound speakers set for a sharp boombox 5 speakers in all $20. DVD/VCR combo Sharp with hook ups works great $40. 5000 air conditioner energy saver works great $40. in the Ashley/Wilkes-Barre Area Ask For Jamie 570-822-8957 BARREL, wooden. 53 gallon. Excellent condition $195. 570-876-3830 BATHROOM SINK SET: Gerber white porcelain bathroom sink with mirror and medicine cabinet. Matching set. $80. 570-331-8183 BEDLINER: 89 Chevy S10, standard cab $30. 2000 Chevy Cavalier LS rear trunk spoiler, black $10. Four barrel carb running from Chevy motor $50. 3 suitcases in excellent shape $40. 570-740-1246 BOOKS: (2) World War II Veterans : Tom Brokaw’s “The Greatest Generation” stories of World War II heroes 390 pages published 1998. Both books in good condition. $10. each Call Jim A WWII veteran at 655-9474. BUMPER rear 97-04 Ford full size pickup with brackets $100 after 3pm 655-3197 CANES &WALKING STICKS for hiking & walking. $4 each. Christmas manger, handmade, wooden includes 15 nativity figurines, must see, great deal 15. Christmas Decorations, over 200 items, old fashioned Christmas figurines, under the tree items, Christmas lights and window displays, Christmas vases & flowers. $65. Toast Master Snackster snack & sandwich maker and Toastmaster reversible broiler oven both for $ 15. call 570-735-2081 COKE COOLER for sale. 36” H, 25” W, 18” D. Very good condition. from 1940”s - 1950’s. gas station model with Westinghouse compressor. Asking $350. or best offer, must sell. Jake 570-829-7859

758 Miscellaneous CANISTER SET 4 piece, burgundy, $8. Hamilton Beach can opener, used less than 1 year $8. Vacuum bags, Electrolux upright, 4 ply, style C (generic) 10 count $10. Electrolux upright 4 ply style U, 8 count $10 and style U (generic) 10 count $10. 570-868-6018 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Sauder for 27” TV, glass door with 3 shelves and 2 drawers on one side and 2 doors under section for TV. Woodtone finish. $40. Maple kitchen table with drop down leafs and 2 captain chairs $40. CALL: 829-4776 HARLEY inspection cover fits 85-96 $20. harley c to r console door cover pak fits 92 or later $20. harley l to r mirror, short stem, left, fits all 65 and later models, new $25. 570-735-1589 SEWING MACHINE. Singer is in a sewing machine table with stool. $200. 570-654-1578 SHAMPOOER: Big Green canister power brush deep cleaner/hot water extracted system $50. 570-288-3723 TOASTER OVEN Hamilton Beach, excellent condition. $10. 570-288-1063 TURKEY FRYER allin-one gas & charcoal single burner smoker grill & turkey fryer, propane tank! Like new over $300 invested. take all for $165. Cash or paypal. 570-735-2661 VACUUM CLEANER, Fantom Fury, dualcyclonic cleaning system, no bags needed, attachments inc. optional hose extension, HEPA filter, owner’s manual, excellent condition, $84. Call (570) 709-3146 anytime in Laflin

To place your ad call 829 7130 WHEELS & TIRES from ‘98 Jeep Cherokee 15” aluminum with silver comes with tires 225/75r/15. 2 wheels with 1 new tire & 1 needs to be replaced. Wheels are in excellent condition. $100. 570-287-5045

762

Musical Instruments

GUITAR a Fender Stratocastor, apple red color with case, new, sacrifice price. $200. 570-371-8581 HALF STACK! Peavey valve king 100 watt tube head/Laney 320 watt cabinet/rack gear including Furman power conditioner, Alesis micro verb 4 and 2 others. Will sell individually. $850. 362-2568

762

Musical Instruments

HARMONICA Hohner with button. $50, or best offer 570-287-9946 PIANO - Baldwin C just tuned, excellent, Delivered $550. or best offer. Call 570-474-6362

766

Office Equipment

776 Sporting Goods

786 Toys & Games

BASKETBALL HOOP: Lifetime Quick Court II adjustable basketball hoop, sand filled, great condition. $100. 570-825-5353

BICYCLE, Woman’s Schwinn Collegiate 3, 26”, new tires. $75. 570-654-2657

To place your ad call...829-7130

CASH

FAX MACHINE HP 640 LIKE NEW $40. 570-288-3401 OFFICE EQUIPMENT Canon Image class MF5500 combination copier & fax machine with new toner cartridge. Good condition $100. 570-735-0191

772

Pools & Spas

SAND FILTER for 24’ above ground pool $50. 1.5HP pool pump/motor $50. Aqua Bug automatic pool cleaner $25. Safety pool ladder for 4’ above ground pool $25. Solar cover for 24’ round pool $25.675-0630

774

Restaurant Equipment

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT,

8x12 walk in cooler $2300; 8x8x10 walk in freezer $3800; Pizza oven with stones $2000; Stainless steel kitchen hood $3000; Stainless steel pizza oven hood $4000; bread pan rack $100; 2 soup warmers for $100; 2 door sandwich prep table $500. All equipment is sold as is. For more info, call

570-847-0873

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT,

Somerset Dough Sheeter, Model CAR-100. Only 1 available. $1,500 Call for more info

570-498-3616

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT,

AMERICAN EAGLE MIXER, 20 quart mixer, Model AE-20, with timer and guard, $1300. ALSO, Bev Air 2 door refrigerator/ sandwich prep table, Model SP48-12, $1300.

Call 570-498-3616 for more details.

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT,

SOMERSET TURN OVER MACHINE model SPM45, $500; ALSO, Bunn Pour Over Coffee Machine, Model # STF15, $225 For more info, call

570-498-3616

776 Sporting Goods PING PONG TABLE asking $50. Yale Gun Safe, fireproof, 14x17.5 $100. 570-825-5847

FOR ANTIQUE GUNS Old Shot Guns

Rifles, Swords & Daggers, Military Items Vintage Scopes Old Toys & Coins

PRIVATE COLLECTOR.

570-417-9200 POOL TABLE American Heritage 7’ oak & slate pocket table with blue cloth, includes cwall rack, 4 cues & brdige. Excellent codnition, buyer must move $999. 570-474-2206 TENT Pop-up cloth paintball bunker/ tent, never used, $20. Huffy Micro bike, blue, $30. Disney proncess tricycle with adult push handle $25. WWE championship toy belts $10 each. Little Tykes girls vanity $25. Children’s shopping cart $10. Childrens Dirt devil battery operated vacuum $10. Small lego set $5. 570-239-5292

778

Stereos/ Accessories

SPEAKERS one pair of two way floor or bookshelf speakers, good condition in original boxes. Can be seen in downtown Wilkes-Barre $15. 607-565-1726 STEREO: Technics with 2 3 1/2” speakers $50. 239-5292

780

Televisions/ Accessories

TELEVISION: GE. 28” works good, needs remote $90. 570-740-1246 TELEVISIONS: Consoles with remotes, 24” RCA color, stereo sound, works great $100. Magnavox 24” color, in original box 8 years, rarely used $50. 570-826-0079

784

Tools

TOOL BOX new for a full size pickup truck, new diamond plate 70” l x 20” w x 17” deep crossover new in box, toolbox with sliding tray. location West Pittston. $125. 570- 299-7073

DVD’S Harry Potter (1st four movies) all $30. WWE wrestling figurines & accessories 20 for $35. Tech Decks ramp & skateboards (15) all for $25. 570-237-1583 GAME TABLE 10 IN 1 approximate 3 X 5 $50. 868-6018 GAMES Are You Smarter Than A Fifth Grader new, sealed $12. Little Tykes snacks & snow cones cart, working cone maker, beverage dispenser, snack/vending tubes, play cash register, scale, cutting boards, used 2x $40. cash or paypal. 735-2661.

To place your ad call...829-7130 TOY BOX Little Tikes toy box with pink lid and book shelf. $25 570-388-2501

794

794

XBOX 360 holiday bundle. new! 250gb slim system. $229 Eric 609-433-5660 (in Wilkes Barre)

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! 796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

Mr. Baseball, buying all sports cards and memorabilia. 203-557-0856

548 Medical/Health

800 PETS & ANIMALS 810

Cats

CAT: Blue a 6 year old cat, free to good home. My allergies have gotten worse & I can no longer give him the affection & attention he needs. Blue is strictly an indoor cat & is declawed (front paws only), & neutered. 570-878-7327

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! 548 Medical/Health

Video Game Systems/Games

GUITAR ONLY for Guitar Hero III X-Box 360 & Playstation 2, used almost new $20. 570-868-6018 PS2 GAMES: Call Of Duty 3 Special Edition $12. Call Of Duty World At War Final Fronts $15. Guitar Hero $10. Hitman 2 $10. Dance Dance Revolution Extreme 2 $12. Tekken Tag Tournament (some scratches works fine) $5. PLAYSTATION GAMES: Spongebob Squarepants Supersponge $10. Tony Hawks Pro Skater (some scratches works fine) $5. Crash Bandicoot 2 Cortex Strikes Back (some scratches works fine) $5. PC GAMES: Hells Kitchen (Windows Vista, XP or MAC) $15. Excellent Condition unless noted. Cash or PayPal. Take $85 for all. 570-735-2661

554

Video Game Systems/Games

Production/ Operations

NURSE

7a – 7p Weekend Program

NURSES

All Shifts – Per Diem

CNAs

Evenings & Nights, Per Diem All Shifts Competitive Salary & Benefits Package

Golden Living Center Summit 50 N. Pennsylvania Avenue Wilkes-Barre Fax 570-825-9423 or pamela.smith2@goldenliving.com EOE M/F/D/V

554

Production/ Operations

554

Production/ Operations

CNC TECHNICIAN Sapa Extruder, Inc. an aluminum manufacturing facility located in the Crestwood Industrial Park in Mountain Top, has an opening for a 2nd shift CNC Technician for its fabrication department. Qualified applicants must have experience with Fanuc controllers and aluminum machining, Mastercam and AutoCAD. The successful candidate should be able to read blueprints and understand GD&T. Experience in set-up reduction program, macro writing and Solidworks a plus but not required. Applications can be submitted or resumes can be mailed to:

Sapa Extruder, Inc. 330 Elmwood Avenue Mountain Top, PA 18707 Attn: Human Resources teresa.mandzak@sapagroup.com E.O.E. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

PAGE 51

Join the Leader The Times Leader r The Times Leader, Luzerne County’s #1 newspaper, has an immediate opening for a proven sales leader. We are looking for an individual, with a strong media and digital sales background, to sell The Times Leader, Go Lackawanna and online advertising. Responsibilities include: • • • • •

Background in media sales and marketing Strong track record of prospecting and closing Solid computer and digital sales knowledge Superior verbal and written communication skills High energy level and an eagerness to learn

In addition to receiving invaluable training, the Times Leader offers a generous salary and commission plan and great benefits including medical, dental, 401k, insurance and more. This is a fabulous opportunity for a driven and creative individual to showcase their sales abilities. Pre-employment drug screening and background check required. Interested candidates should send letter of interest, resume and salary history to: The Times Leader Human Resources Department 15 N. Main Street • Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 hiring@timesleader.com No Telephone Calls Please! We are an equal opportunity employer committed to diversity in the workplace.

THE TIMES LEADER

Autos timesleaderautos.com

obs


PAGE 52 815

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011 Dogs

PAWS TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130 Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

PAWS TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE

815

Dogs

ALASKAN MALAMUTE AKC Registered Available May 24. Rare breeding & hand whelped. 4 males & 4 females: Seals, Sables & Whites. $600 570-510-6428

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

ALASKAN MALAMUTE PUPPIES AKC RARE Red & white, 2 females, shots & wormed, $450 each. Call 570-477-3398

COCKER SPANIEL PUPPY FOR SALE 3 months old, with papers. All shots & records. Crate trained. Comes with crate & all supplies. $1,000 or best offer (570) 212-2335

COCKER SPANIEL PUPS 2 male black & tan.

1 female chocolate. $300 each. Parents on premises 570-760-2036 or 570-371-6222

Call 829-7130 Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

POMERANIAN PUPPIES

Parents on premises Shots Current. $500. 570-401-1838

GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPPIES, AKC

Shepherds By Fanti 25 Yrs. Experience Family Raised Black/Tan, Black/Red. M/F Hasenborn-Arminus 570-825-5597 570-239-5498

GOLDEN RETRIEVER & LAB PUPPIES

Yellow $350. Black $250. Wormed. 570-836-1090

ITALIAN CANE CORSO Mastiff Puppies

ICCF Registered. Parents on premises. Blue & blue fawn. Ready May 1. Vet Checked 570-617-4880

815

Dogs

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

DUPONT

PARDEESVILLE

738 PARDEESVILLE RD CORNER LOT

POMERANIANS Easter Special AKC, 9-14 weeks, All Shots & wormed. Vet checked. $275 to $400 each. 570-864-2643

SHIH-POO PUPS 7 weeks old, $400. Includes 1st set of shot. Please contact me at (570) 332-6303

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Single family home for sale in quiet neighborhoodBeautiful 2400 Sq. Ft. 6 bedroom, 2 full baths, 2 story home, fully air conditioned, oil & gas heat, renovated kitchen, full unfinished basement, 2 enclosed porches, 15 x 20 deck with power awning cover – generous size lot, off street parking, first floor washer/dryer. All appliances included. Offering price $180,000 Call 570-421-0587 or Rodite@enter.net use “Dupont Home” in E-mail subject line.

906 Homes for Sale Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC. Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

NANTICOKE

Hanover St. Bi Level, single family, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, single car attached garage, kitchen, dining room, office/study, family room, living room, bonus room, utility room, electric heat, finished basement, lot size approximately 90 X 150, deck. newly renovated kitchen, living room, and bathrooms. $154,900 Call (570) 735-9199 after 5:30 p.m. for private showing

Lake Ariel HOME AUCTION NO MINIMUM BID 1382 Woodview

Terrace, Lake Ariel, PA classic home, two story, single family, 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, kitchen, dining room, family room, living room, fireplace, electric heat, .85 acres, deck. Located in a Goldstar community, lake rights, community amenities include pool, beaches, clubhouse, golf, ski slopes, boating and other water activities. BIDS DUE BY MAY 9. LPSAuctions.com (866) 763-9094

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! THORNHURST

2 or 3 bedroom home in Country Club Estates. 1.5 bath with lots of storage space. For info & pics, 1061fairway. weebly.com Call 570-472-3032

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

NICELY PRICED $219,900 (570) 233-1993

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! 915 Manufactured Homes

ASHLEY PARK

Laurel Run & San Souci Parks, Like new, several to choose from, Financing &Warranty, facebook.com/ MobileOne.Sales Call (570)250-2890

AVOCA

DUPONT

Totally renovated 6 room apartment. Partially furnished, brand new fridge/ electric range, electric washer & dryer. Brand new custom draperies, Roman shades, carpeting / flooring & energy efficient furnace & windows. 2 bedroom + large attic loft bedroom with spacious walk-in closet, full tiled bath on 1st floor, Easy access to I-81, airport & casino, off street parking. No smoking, No pets. $750 + utilities & security. 570-762-8265

Apartments/ Unfurnished

PLYMOUTH

Mayflower Crossing Apartments 570.822.3968 - Light & bright open floor plans - All major appliances included - Pets welcome* - Close to everything - 24 hour emergency maintenance - Short term leases available

Call TODAY For AVAILABILITY!! www.mayflower crossing.com Certain Restrictions Apply*

To place your ad call...829-7130

WILKES-BARRE NORTH

PLAINS TOWNSHIP

Walking Distance to the Casino!! 2 bedroom, 1 bath, living room, kitchen, off street parking. $600/month + utilities, security & references. Call Classic Properties Nikki Callahan 718-4959 Ext. 1306

WILKES-BARRE

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE

3 rooms, wall to wall carpeting, appliances, coin-op laundry, off street parking, security. No pets. $410/month (570) 655-1606 Single family built in 2005. 2.5 baths, two story with attached garage. Oil furnace with central air. 90 x 140 corner lot. Kitchen with center cooking island, dining room, raised ceiling with glass door entry & hardwood floor. Carpeting thru out home. Tiled kitchen and bath. Kitchen appliances included.

941

2 bedroom, newly remodeled. Gas heat. Washer/dryer hookup. $475/mo. + security & utilities. No pets. Call (570) 823-5984

2 bedrooms, newly renovated building. Washer & dryer. $600/per month includes heat, hot water and parking. 646-712-1286 570-328-9896 570-855-4744

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

WANTED

CASH PAID 24/7 • Firearms • Gold • Silver • Jewelry • Coins • Tools • Military • Collectibles

Guaranteed Highest Cash Paid!

($10 Bonus per gun with ad)

570-735-1487 DAY 570-472-7572 EVES

Apartments/ Unfurnished

Wilkes-Barre Apartments Available

SAINT JOHN APARTMENTS 419 N. Main St Wilkes Barre Spacious 1 bedroom. Secured Senior Building. Applicants must be over age 62 & be income qualified. Rent start at $501 per month. Includes ALL utilities.

570-970-6694 Equal Housing Opportunity

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

WILKES-BARRE NORTH

1 East Chestnut St. Near Cross Valley & General Hospital. 2nd floor, 2 bedrooms, wall to wall carpet, eat-in kitchen with range, shared yard, water included. Tenant pays gas heat & electric. $425 + security, No pets. 570-814-1356

807 N. Washington 2 bedrooms, 2nd floor. Wall to wall carpeting. Eat in kitchen with appliances. Off street parking - 2 cars. Coin op laundry. All utilities included. $645 / month + security. No pets. 570-814-1356

941

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

Apartments/ Unfurnished

IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE

Immediate Occupancy!!

MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS 61 E. Northampton St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701

• Affordable Senior Apartments • Income Eligibility Required • Utilities Included! • Low cable rates; • New appliances; laundry on site; • Activities! • Curb side Public Transportation

WILKES-BARRE 264 Academy St

1st floor, 1 bedroom apartment. Stove, fridge, water & sewage included. Front & Back porch. $400 + security. Call 570-262-0540

941

Please call 570-825-8594 TDD/TTY 800-654-5984

944

Commercial Properties

944

Commercial Properties

WILKES-BARRE

PROVINCIAL TOWER - S. MAIN Great Commercial Store Front, & Inside Suites Available Steps from New Intermodal Hub & Public Parking

Starting at $650

utilities included FREE RENT - Call For Details Today!

570-829-1573


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

PAGE 53

DISTRIBUTION CENTER

Are You Looking for a Career with a Growing and Stable Company? Do You Want the Opportunity to be Part of a Winning Team? Are You Driven to Work in a Fast Paced Environment? If this sounds like you, we may be your ideal company. As one of the most successful retail companies worldwide, we are eager to share our success with you. Whatever your individual talents or interests, it’s more than likely that we have exactly what you are looking for. With an extensive range of career options, The TJX Companies, Inc. stand out as one of the most successful retail companies worldwide and we are eager to share this success with you. Located in Pittston, just minutes from the PA Turnpike and I-81, we are a company committed to variety and diversity. Currently, positions are available in the following areas:

Human Resources Distribution Supervisor Industrial Maintenance Expense/Finance Shipping/Receiving Associates T.J. Maxx offers advancement opportunities, medical, dental and life insurance, 401(k), paid vacation and paid sick time, in-store discounts, $400 potential referral bonus and a clean, safe working environment. Interested applicants may obtain position information and apply on-line at: www.careers-tjx.com Shipping/Receiving applicants may apply in person at: 400 OldďŹ eld Blvd. Pittston, Pa 18640 For directions, please call 570-603-5890 Applicants will be subject to a pre-employment drug screen and background check. T.J. Maxx is an equal opportunity employer committed to workplace diversity. All programs/bonuses are subject to change at any time due to business necessity.


PAGE 54

NORTH END Large 1 bedroom apartment. Includes heat, hot & cold running water, fridge, stove, coinop laundry, off street parking, back yard. $535 + security. For appointment call 570-814-3138

944

Commercial Properties

COMMERCIAL BUILDING 12,000 + square

foot. Forty Fort 60 Dilley Street Rent with Option To Buy or For Sale. Zoned commercial & Industrial. Warehouse, offices, 4 bath rooms, huge storage area. Available June 1st.

570-881-4993

DURYEA

Half Doubles

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

Lyndwood Avenue Very spacious 3 bedroom half double with neutral decor. Off street parking. Private yard in rear. Ample Storage. Convenient to schools. $560 / month + utilities. 1 year lease, security. No pets. Call 570-793-6294

LARKSVILLE

WILKES-BARRE OFFICE/COMMERCIAL

2,500 SF First Floor $500/month + utilities. Will divide. First month free. 570-829-0897

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs itho t hassle

hookup. No pets. $580 + utilities & security, sewer & garbage included. Call (570) 655-5156

Available immediately, 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, refrigerator and stove provided, washer/dryer hookup, pets ok, Fenced in yard. Great neighborhood. $725.00/per month, plus utilities, $$725.00/security deposit. Call (570) 239-4102

WEST PITTSTON PITTSTON 1/2 DOUBLE SINGLE FAMILY 2 bedrooms, sunroom, new bath, HOME washer/dryer 622 Foundry Street, WILKES-BARRE

178 Charles St Available Now! 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, Townhouse style. No Section 8. $550/month + utilities. References & security required. Call 570-301-2785

953 Houses for Rent

much for your current office? Call us! We have modern office space available in Luzerne Bank Building on Public Square. Rents include heat, central air, utilities, trash removal, and nightly cleaning - all without a sneaky CAM charge. Access parking at the new intermodal garage via our covered bridge. 300SF to 5000SF available. We can remodel to suit. Brokers Protected. Call Jeff Pyros at 822-8577

WILKES-BARRE MONARCH RENTALS STUDENT HOUSING 3 bedrooms,

2 bedroom, 2 bath home in beautiful rural setting next to Friedman Farms. $1,100 monthly. Call 570-822-2992

all appliances provided. Call 570-822-7039

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

143 Stucker Ave. 3 Bedroom 1-1/2 Bath. 1,900 square foot Modern Home in Great Neighborhood. Includes all Appliances. Large fenced in yard with deck & shed. Off Street Parking. No smokers / pets. $875 / month + utilities. Security, Credit Check & References Required. 570-332-6003

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

3 bedroom single family. 1 1/2 baths. Driveway, yard, nice area. $800 + utilities Call 570-332-5723

WILKES-BARRE

TIRED OF HIGH RENTS? Are you paying too

SWEET VALLEY

Available May 1st 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in quiet,country setting. Large eat in kitchen, full basement. No pets. $800/month + security & utilities. Call (570) 477-3346 or (570) 762-2774

3 bedroom, 1 bath half double, Freshly cleaned & painted. Tenant pays all utilities including sewer. $550 plus security. Call (570) 332-5723

BACK MOUNTAIN

Up to 7,500 SF Warehouse. Includes offices and baths. 20’ ceilings. 3 overhead doors with loading dock. Much paved off street parking. Reduced to $800-$2,100/mo. Call 570-885-5919

953 Houses for Rent

LUZERNE

2nd floor, 2 bedrooms, living room, eat-in kitchen, wall to wall, washer & dryer. $485 heat included. Security & references required Call 570-288-8012

NANTICOKE Desirable

Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms 2 Free Months With A 2 Year Lease $795 + electric

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

WILKES-BARRE Parsons

965

Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co. Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co.Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co.

Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co. Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co.Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co.

WILKES-BARRE

950

IMAGING POSITION • Experience in Photoshop a must! • Experience in scanning and toning of photos. • Knowledge of both PC and MAC platforms. • Page proofing required. • Knowledge of typesetting and plating software a plus. • Must be willing to work nights and weekends. Pre-employment drug screening and background check required. Interested candidates should send letter of interest, resume and salary history to: The Times Leader Human Resources Department 15 N. Main Street • Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 rcoolbaugh@timesleader.com No Telephone Calls Please! We are an equal opportunity employer committed to diversity in the workplace.

THE TIMES LEADER

Autos timesleaderautos.com

Selling Your Car? We’ll run your ad until the vehicle iss sold.

Roommate Wanted

SCRANTON/SOUTH

Quiet Block 4 private bedrooms plus shared kitchen & baths, ample closets. $420/month 570-575-6280

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

WILDWOOD CREST

Ocean front, on the Beach. 1 bedroom Condo, pool. 5/6-6/23 $1,250/ week. 06/24 - 9/9 $1,550/week Call 570-693-3525

Jobs

Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co. Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co.Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co.

Apartments/ Unfurnished

Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co. Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co.Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co.

941

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

fied Call Classified 829-71300


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1093

Excavating

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N NUMBER

ONE AUDITED

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IN LUZERNE LUZERN COUNTY


PAGE 56

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 2011

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N

TH E NUM BER 1 NIS S AN DEAL ER IN TH E NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGIO N

S C AN H ERE FO R S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN ALTIMA ALTIM 2.5 SDN SDN P ER A 2.5

M O.

STK# N 20139 M O D EL# 13111

$0 D ow n Le a s e

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN R ROGUE OP** G SV V AWD AW D ER U E S

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PD L , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, Allo ys , AM / F M / CD , PW , PD L , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts

M SR P $26,070

M SR P $23,890 B U Y FO R

$

2 0 ,4 9 5

*

$

OR

w / $1250 R ebate

L EA S E FO R

259

B U Y FO R

$

*P

ER M O.

+

TA X

$0 D ow n Le a s e

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN FRONTIER FRONPT KC SV SV ER IER KC

M O.

M SR P $27,955 B U Y FO R

2 3 ,9 9 5

*

$

OR

L EA S E FO R

329

includes $2000 N issan R ebate or G et 0% up to 60 m os

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $13,856; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $0 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $496.00 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d regis tra tio n fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs In clu d es $2000 Nis s a n Reb a te.

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN MAXIMA MAXIMA “S” SEDAN SEDAN P ER “S”

M O.

STK# N 9736 M O D EL# 16111

$0 D ow n Le a s e

B U Y FO R

2 7,9 9 5

*

OR

w / $1000 R ebate

P O L L O C K

2007 K ia S p o rta ge L X V6

2004 D o dge D a ko ta

Q u a d C a b S p o rt

ER M O.

+

TA X

$0 D ow n Le a s e

M O.

M SR P $31,810 B U Y FO R

$

2 4 ,9 9 5

inc ludes $3500 R ebate or G et 0%

*

up to 60 m os

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $13,856; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $0 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $496.00 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d regis tra tio n fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs In clu d es $3500 Reb a te.

M O.

STK# N 19771 M O D EL# 23211

$

L EA S E FO R

339

M SR P $31,540 B U Y FO R

$

*P

ER M O.

+

TA X

S tk #N 20325A

N IS S A N

2009 D o dge N itro S E 4x4

S tk #N 20248A

2 8 ,4 9 5

$0 D ow n Le a s e

OR

$

L EA S E FO R

369

*P

ER M O.

+

TA X

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $17,662; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $750 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $685.00 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d regis tra tio n fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $500 reb a te.

P R E- O W S tk #N 20268A

*

w / $500 R ebate

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $19,146; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $1,000 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $674.00 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d regis tra tio n fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $1000 reb a te.

S tk #N P10658

*P

V6, CVT , AM / F M / CD , AC, T ilt, Cru is e, F lo o rM a ts

M SR P $31,910

K EN

299

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN MURANO MURAP** N “S” AWD AWD ER O “S”

V6, CVT , S u n ro o f, A/ C, PW , PD L , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts

$

For 60 M os !

L EA S E FO R

STK# N 20096

DEAL ER!

TA X

$

OR

** 2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN TITAN TIPT KC ER AN KC

NO M O NEY DO W N L EAS ING

P ER M O.

*

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $15,120; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $707 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $1,000 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $1207 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym t,reg fees , & $707 ca p co s tred u ctio n . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $500 NM AC Ca s h.

YO UR

* +

2 3 ,8 9 5

w / $500 N M A C C as h & 2.9%

*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $13,856; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $0 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $496.00 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d regis tra tio n fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $1250 reb a te.

$

M O.

STK# N 20320 M O D EL# 22411

2009 M a zda C X 7 F W D

N ED

V A L U ES

2008 N is s a n R o gu e S L A W D

S tk #N 20302A

G A L O R E!

2008 N is s a n M a xim a S E S eda n

S tk #N 19788A

2005 N is s a n Tita n L E C C 4x4

S tk #N 20231A

JUST IN!

V 6, A u to , A /C , Tilt, A llo y W heels , B edliner, To w Pkg, O ne O w ner, O nly 70K M iles

13,995

$

15,995

$

+ T/T

S tk #N 19635A

4 C yl, A u to , L ea ther, M o o nro o f , A M /F M /C D , PW , PD L , P. S ea t, 1 O w ner, O nly 29K

19,995

$

+ T/T

2007 H o nda O dys s ey E X -L

2008 H o nda A cco rd E X -L S eda n

S tk #N 20308A

ON L Y

V 6, A u to , A C , PW , PD L , C ru is e, Tilt, O nly 53K M iles , F res h S ervic & D eta il!

V 6, A u to , L ea ther, C a p tC ha irs , A M /F M /C D , PW , PD L , C ru is e, Tilt, O nly 44K M iles , R ea l N ice!

22,495

$

+ T/T

+ T/T

6 C yl, A u to , A /C , Po w er S u nro o f , A M /F M /C D , PW , PD L , C ru is e, Tilt, C hro m e Pkg, O nly 40K M iles

17,495

$

+ T/T

4 C yl, F W D , A /C , A llo ys , PW , PD L , C ru is e, Tilt, 1 O w ner, O nly 28K M iles

18,495

$

+ T/T

2008 N is s a n Pa thf inder S E V-8 4x4

2009 N is s a n M a xim a S V S eda n

V 8, A u to , A /C , M o o nro o f , A M /F M /C D , B o s e S o u nd, Pw r S ea t, PW , PD L , C ru is e, Tilt, O nly 27K M iles

V 6, C V T, Prem iu m Pkg, D u a l Pa nel M o o nro o f, B o s e S o u nd, L ea ther, H ea ted S ea ts , A llo ys , 1 O w ner! O nly 13K M iles

S tk #N P10660

C E R TIF IE D

25,495

$

S tk #N 20149A

C E R TIF IE D + T/T

26,995

$

+ T/T

4 C yl, C V T, L ea ther, M o o nro o f , Pw r S ea t, B o s e S o u nd, PW , PD L , C ru is e, Tilt, Iridiu m / B la ck L ea ther, A w es o m e

ON L Y

18,995

$

+ T/T

2011 N is s a n X -Terra “S ” 4x4

S tk #N 20055A

V 6, A u to , Va lu e Pkg, S ide S tep s , A ll Po w er, A /C , A M /F M /C D , 1 O w ner, O nly 500 M iles !

C E R TIF IE D

26,995

$

+ T/T

V 6, A u to , S kyview R o o f , A M /F M /C D , PW , PD L , C ru is e, Tilt, A llo ys , O ne O w ner, O nly 10K M iles !

C E R TIF IE D

19,995

$

+ T/T

2010 N is s a n A rm a da S E 4x4 (B lu e)

S tk #N P10557

V 8, A u to , A /C , Po w er 3rd R o w , B a cku p C a m era , F u ll Po w er, C ru is e, Tilt, 2 A va ila ble!

C E R TIF IE D

29,995

$

+ T/T

V 8, A u to , L ea ther, D V D Pla yer, A M / F M /C D , PW , PD L , C ru is e, Tilt, O nly 61K M iles !

19,995

$

+ T/T

2008 F o rd E xp editio n L td 4x4

S tk #N 20274A

V 8, A u to , N a viga tio n, M o o nro o f , L ea ther, H ea ted S ea ts , Po w er 3rd R o w , A M /F M /C D , A ll Po w er, O nly 51K M iles

31,995

$

+ T/T

*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All Lea s es 12 k M iles PerYea rw / 1s tpa ym ent, ta gs & fees d u e a td elivery. All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied .

Th e

#1 N

N

IS S A

K E N

is s a n

De a le rin

P O L L O CK

N

N

.E. PA

1- 8 66- 70 4- 0 672

229 M U N DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

w w w .ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om

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Go Lackawanna 04-24

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