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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 18, 2012 ON THE COVER / RICH HOWELLS PHOTO

NEWS

3 NEWS

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO/ FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Abington’s TJ Murray looks for an open man during Tuesday’s action in Hazleton. STORY: Page 31

Page 4 – ’High profile’ Cordaro moved from prison Page 6 – Dunmore man sent emails after death Page 8 – Fire forces 13 from West Side homes Page 15 – PEL plan for Scranton needs work

18 ARTS Page 18 – POSH owner strong Philharmonic supporter Page 22 – HISTORY: Maple syrup program set Page 25 – Lights, camera, Scranton

30 SPORTS Page 30 – ROBINSON: Watch Carey in future Page 32 – Crusaders last locals standing Page 35 – Prep solid with silver

ARTS

OUR TEAM GO Lackawanna Editor Christopher J. Hughes 558-0113 chughes@golackawanna.com Reporter/Photographer Rich Howells – 558-0483 rhowells@golackawanna.com Advertising Representative Karen Fiscus – 970-7291 kfiscus@timesleader.com Obituaries 558-0113

News Tips 558-0113 news@golackawanna.com Missed Paper – 829-5000 Classified 1-800-273-7130 Advertising – 829-7101 Subscriptions – 1-800-252-5603 Hours of Operation 9a.m. – 6p.m.; M-F; 210 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton 18503

Et tu, ex-Sen. Robert Mellow? SPORTS

“Beware the ides of March.” - Soothsayer, “Julius Caesar” by William Shak-

espeare. When the news release was issued March 14 concerning a public corruption-related news conference called by the United States Attorney’s Office, I immediately looked at my calendar. The conference itself was set for the ides of March. Instantly, I was transported back to my sophomore English class, standing before a crowded classroom as I recited Mark Anthony’s famous funeral speech for Roman dictator Julius Caesar, as written by

BEHIND THE BYLINES

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES Shakespeare. Like Anthony, U.S. Atty. Peter Smith came to bury former longtime state Sen. Robert Mellow this week, not to praise him. “The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones,” Shakespeare wrote. This week, news outlets including our parent paper, The Times Leader, wrote very similar tidings for the man who served the 22nd district for 40 years before a Nov. 2010 retirement. We all did love him once, not without cause, as he injected funding into a variety of local

projects including the integral role he played in the establishment of The Commonwealth Medical College. Mellow’s good won’t be interred with him as his name will likely continue to adorn the Lackawanna College theater, Blakely park, Marywood University athletic center, Keystone College children’s center, and stretches of road in Jessup and Moosic for years to come. For some, however, they’ll likely be tainted with the allegation that, from 2006 to 2010, he conspired to have staff members paid by the Pennsylvania Senate when, in reality, they performed political tasks including fundraising to the tune of $120,000. Thursday’s news was, in essence, an obituary for a life of

public service that left some reporters in the room questioning what we will not know about an investigation into Mellow. Plea agreements often allow suspects to admit to certain misdeeds while striking others from the public eye. Mellow’s merely acknowledges his conspiracy to commit mail fraud and filing a false tax return for misusing staff members – rules he knew well after more than three decades in office. While his colleagues and successors this week lamented the grievous fault of the 70year-old Democrat from Peckville, the rest of us are left to mourn a region marred by yet another man who has lost his reason while in a position of great trust.

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES does not cast off soothsayers. Email him at chughes@golackawanna.com.

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Sunday, March 18, 2012

GOLackawanna

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From paving projects to flooded neighborhoods, residents upset with state of city

Debris fills a storm drain on North Cameron Avenue.

The end of a drainage pipe under Keyser Avenue is barely visible.

The black top on Pike Street is litered with potholes and patches.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Flooding plagues parts of North Cameron Avenue.

NEWS

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO

INFRASTRUCTURE AN ISSUE RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

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RICH HOWELLS PHOTOS

Councilman Jack Loscombe discusses drainage issues near Lafayette Street in West Scranton.

body coming down the road was trying to avoid the holes where the bad terrain in the road went. (They) came at her head on,” Galdieri told City Council at its March 1 meeting. While these issues are vastly different, they share a common contributor – both have existed and, according to residents, have been virtually ignored by city officials for decades. Flooding common in neighborhood Newcomb’s next-door neighbor, Jerry Maus, said his house appears to be floating whenever it rains heavily, the result of a drainage pipe under Keyser

Avenue, just a block away, spewing what looks like “rapids” down Lafayette Street. A sewer drain on the opposite corner meant to slow the flooding “becomes a fountain” as water shoots into the air when it fills the small opening, which is mostly blocked by debris and sentiment. The former sidewalk on Lafayette has since eroded into a gully, leading the “waterfall” into one of the lowest neighborhoods in the city. “It’s been coming from the top of the mountain since 1972, since I got here, like gangbusters, and the three sewers can’t take it,” Maus said, referring to

the higher elevated West Mountain just up the road. “It’s bad. You can hear it roaring when it comes down the street.” “After it’s been raining hard for 15 minutes, you can take a boat and drive it down to Dewey Avenue,” Newcomb said. “There’s one pipe that floods this whole neighborhood, and the state says it’s the city and the city says it’s the state, and all they do is fight back and forth and nobody wants to take responsibility for it.” Tired of having the fire department See PROBLEMS, Page 12

SPORTS

Less than three miles away, Frank Galdieri of Steele Street in Scranton has a much different issue getting to and from his home. Coming off the Morgan Highway, the only route giving access to his community is Pike Street, a road riddled with potholes. “I drive a motorcycle on that road and constantly am getting swerved at by people that are trying to avoid the potholes and come at you on a blind curve. I can tell you that my life has flashed before my eyes on many occasions. On two occasions, my wife was actually run off the road into a ditch because some-

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efore Charles Newcomb, Jr. purchased his house on the 200 block of North Cameron Avenue in West Scranton in 2005, he was allegedly told by the previous owner that “a little ponding” would occur on the street when it rained. Soon after he moved in, he came home to a disaster. “I’ll never forget. I came home from work, parked in front of the house, went upstairs, got changed, and in a matter of five minutes, there was water up to our steps and there were people coming down in canoes in between the houses to get the people on Merrifield Avenue out in boats. I’ve never seen anything like it in my life,” Newcomb recalled on March 14, standing on his previously submerged front lawn.


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 18, 2012

Cordaro too Pre-cremation fee ordinance introduced ‘high-profile’ for first jail

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com

Former Lackawanna County commissioner Robert Cordaro has been moved from a medium security prison in New York after the warden apparently became concerned he was too “high profile” to be safely housed there, Cordaro’s attorney said in a letter to the court. AttorneyPeterGoldberger wrote to U.S. District Judge A. Richard Caputo on March 9, asking him to request that the Federal Bureau of Prisons re- Cordaro consider the decision tomoveCordarofromtheFederalCorrectional Institution in Otisville, N.Y. Cordaro, sentenced in January to 11 yearsinprisononcorruptioncharges,had requested he be housed as close to Scrantonaspossible.Otisvilleisaboutonehour away from Scranton, Goldberger said. Afterjustonedayatthefacility,thewarden was made aware that a local television station had sent a camera crew to film at the prison gate to illustrate a short clip that ran about Cordaro’s placement, Goldberger said in the letter, which does not identify the station. “Apparently from this occurrence, the warden concluded that Mr. Cordaro was too ‘high profile’ to be safely housed at Otisville,” Goldberger said. “As a result, after a few days in administrative segregation, Mr. Cordaro was removed from Otisville and now finds himself at the metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. awaiting a new designation.” The Brooklyn facility is a transfer center where inmates are temporarily housed pending a decision on the permanent placement. Goldberger asked Caputo to write a letter to the Bureau of Prisons, reiterating the judge’s recommendation that Cordaro be housed as close to Scranton as possible. In a reply to Goldberger’s letter filed Monday, Caputo declined the request. “I made my recommendation to the Bureau of Prisons at the time of sentencingand,basedonevents,itisapparentthe Bureau of Prisons attempted to follow my recommendation. Therefore, there is no need for me to repeat my recommendation,” Caputo said. Cordaro was later moved to Fort Dix Federal Correctional Institution in New Jersey.

SCRANTON – Lackawanna County Commissioners introduced an ordinance on March 14 that will allow the coroner’s office to impose a $25 service fee for the issuance of cremation permits and investigation. According to the legislation, Pennsylvania Act 152 of 1990 requires coroners in third class counties to investigate the “deaths or persons whose bodies are to be cremated, buried at sea or otherwise disposed of as to be thereafter unavailable for examination,” though the county coroner has not previously charged for this service as other areas do. A second reading and final vote of the ordinance is scheduled for com-

missioners’ next meeting on March 28 at 10 a.m. In other business: • Commissioners unanimously approved the issuance of two series of general obligation notes totaling $8,811,000 at a fixed annual interest rate to refinance 2002A and 2002B bonds. • Commissioners unanimously awarded Brian T. Kelly, CPA and Associates, an $8,000 contract to conduct the Child Care Information Services audit and Snyder & Clemente a $12,500 contract to conduct the Area Agency on Aging audit. • Commissioners unanimously accepted a bid from GOHN Manufacturing for grave markers for the Office of Veterans Affairs for 2,300 markers at $13,225.

• Commissioners unanimously approved a payment in lieu of taxes agreement with Goodwill Industries of Northeastern Pennsylvania, Inc. • Commissioners unanimously authorized TMG Health, Inc., to construct an additional 2,400 lineal feet of conduit lines under Valley View Drive in the Valley View Business Park at no cost to the county. • Citing the county’s recent 38 percent tax increase, Childs resident Michael Catanzaro and other local Tea Party members encouraged commissioners to amend the Home Rule Charter to require all future millage increases over 25 mills to be approved by voter referendum, presenting them with a motion which Commissioner Jim Wansacz agreed to review.

O’Brien: Mistrust ‘tainted’ area baseball By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – Lackawanna County Commissioner Jim Wansacz said last week that he and fellow Democratic Commissioner Corey O’Brien weren’t too concerned about the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees’ new nickname, but O’Brien had much harsher words for franchise owner Mandalay Baseball Properties on March 14 regarding the change and the team’s future management. once brought the International League officials ancommunity togethnounced on March 7 that the Triple-A er. Yankees would be called the Empire “While baseball reState Yankees as they played many of mained pure, the motheir games in New York state during tives of government the 2012 season as PNC Field in Moosic and team management undergoes renovations. The move became tainted. Miscame as a surprise to many, including O’Brien trust developed when county officials. The name will be a temporary mar- our government contracted with a priketing strategy, Wansacz said, and vate entity to sell our franchise. Since dropped after the 2012 season. A formal then, mistrust has continued to build. name change would require the approv- When our community’s team is given a al of commissioners and the Lackawan- new nickname without speaking with na County Multipurpose Stadium Au- the community first, mistrust continues,” he said. thority. “If Mandalay fails to turn a corner in The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees are at the end of its player development our community quickly and begin contract in 2012, leaving the possibility building confidence, their future here that the team may not play in the area, will be unproductive.” He said it would be “no easy task” for though the area is still guaranteed to have a Triple-A franchise as long as the them to rebuild trust and confidence, referring to the commissioners’ and the team isn’t sold. On Wednesday, O’Brien recalled at- public’s ongoing issues with Mandatending baseball games as a teenager lay’s management. Mandalay and SWB when “the motives of those involved Yankees, LLC, would need to do so were genuine and positive” and said through “actions, not words,” he insistthat he felt the family-friendly sport ed.

O’Brien said that while Mandalay must add professional baseball management officials to the area team and work with the New York Yankees to identify those professionals, “government needs to do everything in its power to protect baseball in Lackawanna County while understanding the inherent limits placed on us by previous contracts.” O’Brien stressed that his comments should not be seen as calling for SWB Yankees President Kristen Rose’s termination, but rather to illustrate “the importance of Mandalay building the best possible team of baseball professionals with reputations of getting the job done in minor league baseball” with the New York Yankees’ help. “If Mandalay brings the best local team to the plate and we allow ourselves to think positive about baseball and not dwell on the past, baseball will be reborn, our community will be stronger, and our trust will be restored.”


Sunday, March 18, 2012

GOLackawanna

34 arrests, 57 citations at Parade

“Even incidents we had weren’t as severe as they were in the past. Whether it was because more officers were out there or because the crowd was more well-behaved, I’m not sure, but it seemed to go more smoothly this year.” Capt. Carl Graziano

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“Even incidents we had weren’t as severe as they were in the past. Whether it was because more officers were out there or because the crowd was more well-behaved, I’m not sure, but it seemed to go more smoothly this year.” In addition, the Pennsylvania State Police’s Bureau of Liquor

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NEWS

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CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – City police made 30 arrests for public drunkenness, disorderly conduct, and other charges on March 10 during the Scranton St. Patrick Parade, according to Capt. Carl Graziano. Police also executed two additional minor drug arrests and two arrests for driving under the influence on Saturday, he added. The department had more officers on the street thanks to assistance provided by Road Scholar Trucking in Dunmore. The company blocked intersections that had been blocked by police in previous years. “It certainly helped to free up some officers,” Graziano said.

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PUBLIC HEARINGS FOR FARE INCREASE COLTS is increasing its bus fares and would like to hear from you. COLTS last increased bus fares in 1994, more than 17 years ago. Our short-term goal is to raise fares equal to inflation. However, COLTS is sensitive to the impact that a fare increase could have on our customers so we are recommending implementing the increase in a two-pronged phase over the next two years. COLTS will hold five public hearings to present and discuss the implementation of fare increase over the next two years: • Tuesday, March 6, from 10 a.m. to Noon and from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the COLTS Board Room, 800 North South Road • Wednesday, March 7, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at The Mall at Steamtown, 2nd Floor next to the Variety Shop. • Saturday, March 24, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at The Mall at Steamtown, 2nd Floor next to the Variety Shop. Below are COLTS’ current bus fares, pass and ticket prices along with the proposed increases: Current price $1.25 .60 Free Free .25 n/a n/a $11 $10 $40 $20

Proposed Price for July 2, 2012 $1.50 .75 Free Free .50 .25 $3.50 $13.50 $6.75 $48 $24

Proposed Price for July 1, 2013 $1.75 .85 Free Free .75 .35 $4.00 $15.75 $7.85 $56 $28

COLTS is conducting a 30-day public comment period to obtain input from riders, the public, local agencies and businesses, and government officials from Tuesday, March 6, 2012 through Thursday, April 5, 2012. During this time, anyone wanting to submit comments to COLTS may do so using the following methods. You can submit comments in writing to: COLTS Fare Increase, 800 North South Road, Scranton, PA 18504. You can also submit comments via e-mail to: info@coltsbus.com.

SPORTS

Fare Instrument Full Cash Fare Half Cash/Reduced Fare Senior Citizen’s Fare Children’s Fare Transfers Half Fare Transfers Day Pass 10-Ride Adult Pass 10-Ride Student Pass 31-Day Adult Pass 31-Day Student Pass


GOLackawanna

New Keyser auto business approved

Sunday, March 18, 2012

Emails from the grave?

Jack Froese of Dunmore died in June 2011, but account sent emails to friends last fall.

TYLER MILES For Go Lackawanna

Scranton – A variance was approved to Geremia Gil of 2 Grand St., Scranton, for a family-owned auto whole sale and repair business to be located at 535 North Keyser Avenue during Thursday’s zoning board hearing. Gil, originally from New York, has resided in Scranton for more than 12 years. He anticipates that with his new business he can create jobs for area residents. For now, though, the dealership will be operated with the help of his wife and a hired mechanic. The lot is flanked by two other commercial businesses, one of which is another car dealership. The landscape is well maintained by owner David J. Walsh of Huckleberry Lane, who said he plans on paving an additional 20 feet for the incoming cars. In other business: • A storage unit was unanimously approved to be built by Bill Jordan of 827 South Irving Avenue., Scranton. The unit, which will be situated at 819 Beech St., will house Jordan’s RV camper, antique cars, and some trucks from his towing business. A paper with 23 signatures was also presented during the hearing, showcasing the approval of neighboring residents. • A commercial building at 829-31 Adams Ave. will be converted to an apartment complex with an indoor garage after approval was granted to 402 North Washington LLC. Twenty-five one- and two-bedroom apartments will be created, and the primary tenants are expected to be students of The Commonwealth Medical College.

By BILL O’BOYLE boboyle@timesleader.com

D

UNMORE– Jack Froese, 32, died last June, making it difficult to understand why his family and friends received e-mails from him five months later. The Dunmore resident died in his sleep from a heart arrhythmia, but his e-mail account generated several messages to friends and family – all of which dealt with subjects only the receiver and Froese would know about, recipients said.

Patty Froese, Jack’s mother, and his sister, Sarah Veater, said they have no explanation on how the e-mails were sent. They don’t know if someone other than Jack sent them and, frankly, they don’t want to know. They prefer to think that Jack sent them from beyond and any other explanation just doesn’t matter. “I guess I want to know why I didn’t get one,” Patty Froese said. “I guess it bothers me a little, but maybe one day I will get one.” They have checked Jack’s computer, but they can’t access his account – nobody knows his password. Yet the e-mails came from Jack’s account through November. His computer has been unplugged for months and sits under a chair in his room, Patty said. Nobody uses it, she said. The story has gotten the attention of international and national media. AOL and Yahoo posted a video done by the BBC about the story on Wednesday. Matt Danzico, a reporter

with the BBC, grew up in Northeastern Pennsylvania and was a friend of Froese’s. He learned of the story when home for Christmas and put together the video. The New York Daily News also ran a short story on Tuesday. “This has been extremely tough because Jack was such a big part of all of our lives,” Veater said. That’s why when her cousin, Jimmy McGraw, and a friend, Tim Art, walked into the Froese home in late November, everybody was taken aback. The two men showed the family the e-mails that included information known only between McGraw, Art and Froese. But there haven’t been any more e-mails since November. One e-mail dealt with Art’s house. He was remodeling it and the attic was to become a master bedroom. He showed it to Froese and Jack joked that it could be his room someday. In the e-mail received after Froese’s death, Jack told Art to get the attic cleaned up. Other e-mails were titled, “I’m watch-

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Jack Froese, right, passed away in June, but family members said they received emails from him last fall. Froese is pictured with his sister, Sarah Veater.

ing.” Sean Loughney was making a guitar for Froese, who had requested a special wood that was difficult to work with. McGraw put the unfinished guitar in Froese’s casket. The e-mail he received from Froese included an apology. “He told Jimmy he was sorry about the wood,” Patty said. McGraw broke his leg sometime after Froese died. Another e-mail from Froese noted he had warned McGraw about his weak ankles. “You got to be careful,” the email said. “I like to think it’s somehow him letting us know he’s still okay,” Veater said. “Like he’s watching out over us and he sees what we are doing.” Froese’s family and friends remain hopeful the e-mails will resume. “It makes us feel good think-

ing that it’s him,” Veater said. “That he got to come through to us one more time. If it isn’t him, okay; we don’t want to ruin the feeling that we have heard from him.” Froese has two children – Emma Rose, 5, and Coilin, 4. His dad, Jack, Sr., 55, doesn’t talk about the e-mails. Patty says she really doesn’t want to know where they came from or who may have sent them. “I want my son to live on forever; I still talk about him like he’s still here. He’s still my son,” she said. So Jack’s computer will stay unplugged under the chair in his bedroom and Patty said she will still have trouble sleeping. “All I know is that this makes everyone feel good,” she said. “Weird things happen.”

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 18, 2012

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NEWS

Fire chief: Response time appropriate

West Side blaze angers victims

Monday blaze highlights struggle to operate efficient department, Davis notes

the city’s fire department with 100 men. Mayor Chris Doherty SCRANTON – The city’s fire proposed the staff reduction in chief said Tuesday that the re- his 2012 budget, and council sponse time to a massive fire maintained that recommendaalong Swetland Street that dis- tion in their amended budget. “It’s pretty tough. The less placed 13 people was appropriate and fell within department people you have, the more you’ve got to do. It’s very diffiguidelines. “They were all there in due cult, but it boils down to one time,” Chief Tom Davis said. thing: There is absolutely no “The water was there on the money.We’regoingbythecouncilbudgetwhichhadusreduced first responders.” The alarm went off at head- to 100 men,” Davis said. “ I cry to the mayquarters at 9:03 or every day, but a.m., Davis said. ENGINE 7 there is no money.” The first engine ar- QUESTIONED One saving grace rived at 9:08 a.m., could be the Feb. 24 following by a sec- Fire Chief Tom Davis application towards ond engine and said Tuesday that in a Staffing for AdeRescue1at 9:11and Engine 7 from West Scranton were in quate Fire & EmerTruck 2 at 9:12. service Monday, the gency Response, or The fire was too additional response much to handle for would have done little SAFER, grant from the 19 men that re- to change the impact the Federal Emergency Management sponded from of the fire. “If Engine 7 was Agency. Davis said Scranton. there, maybe it would the city has applied “Weretheydown have made a differfor $12 million in as far as manpow- ence, but you still grants which “could er?Yes,”Davissaid. would have lost the possibly take all the “The fire got such a house (at 1518-20 men back” that head start that we Swetland St.),” he were laid off at the felt we needed said. end of 2011. Dunmore in there.” That likelihood is slim, howDunmore nearly matched Scranton’s manpower by add- ever. Davis said the city is not sure if and when such a grant ing 15 men to the scene. Davis said that if the fire oc- could materialize. He also curred at this time last year, noted that Harrisburg only reScranton would have had up to ceived $1.5 million from a re27 fire fighters on scene before cent request. “We’re trying everything we calling for mutual aid. Theemotionalresponsefrom can here to keep this departfire victims Monday showcases ment afloat. Believe me when I just how difficult it is to operate tell you, it’s tough.” CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

COMMUNITY CALENDAR West Side Clean-up Day, Sun., March 18, 2-4 p.m. Info: http:// hydeparkneighborwatch.wordpress.com/ Basketball tournament, to benefit the Baptist Bible College division of Restore Her, Sat., March 24, registration at 5:30 p.m., play begins at 6 p.m. Proceeds help raise awareness about and provide aid to the victims of human trafficking. Cost: $5 per team or $3 per individual before March 24; and $8 per team or $5 per individu-

al on the day of the event. Info: Clayton Baltzer at (614) 9355813 or clayton.baltzer@my.bbc.edu. NEPA Blogfest, Fri., March 30, 6-10 p.m., Rooney’s Irish Pub, 67 S. Main St., Pittston. ‘The View’ with a Scranton Attitude: Let’s Hear it from Both Sides, Fri., March 30, 7 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Cost: $6. Submit your events to news@golackawanna.com, via fax at (570) 558-0854, or over the phone at (570) 558-0113.

COURTESY SCRANTON FIRE DEPARTMENT / BILL BOOCK

The fire at this double-block home at 1518-20 Swetland St., spread to a neighboring residence.

FIRE DISPLACES 13

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – As he watched his home burn Monday morning, Steve Flatt had some pointed words for the city’s top official. “Thanks a lot, mayor!” Flatt, 53, of 1518 Swetland St., Scranton, yelled, directing his anger toward Mayor Chris Doherty following cuts to the Scranton Fire Department that he proposed in Nov. 2011 and went unchanged in City Council’s amended budget. “I lost everything! Everything! I’m on Social Security. Look what I’ve got now!” Flatt was one of 13 people displaced by the fire that consumed 1518-20 Swetland St. The fire, Scranton Fire Chief Tom Davis said Tuesday, began after a child at 1520 Swetland St. was playing with a candle Monday morning. It extended to 1516 Swetland St., displacing homeowner Michael Conforti and three others. The fire enguled Flatt’s home of 10 years quickly. “My wife’s on the computer, I’m downstairs working on something. I come upstairs and I hear somebody yell, ‘Call 911.’ I run out the door, I look down the porch, and there’s flames coming out of the picture window of

‘Right now I wish I was in that house. I lost everything. I can’t believe this is happening to me.’

Fire victim Steve Flatt

the neighbor’s house,” he said. “Right now I wish I was in that house. I lost everything. I can’t believe this is happening to me.” As flames spread to the exterior of Conforti’s home, he documented the fire on a video taken with his cellular phone. He said he had no idea of the danger outside his window. “I didn’t know anything was going on until my neighbor started banging on my door. Then the cops were trying to get me out of the house,” Conforti, 42, said. “I had enough time to run back in, get my dog, and get back out.” Conforti was staying with his parents following Monday’s fire, but an information technology business he ran out of his home could be ruined. “I’m out of business now,” he said. “I at least have a place where I can stay, but my life is in

there.” Crews were called to the home at about 9:03 a.m. on Monday with Engine 8 arriving first from North Main Avenue, followed by Truck 2 at fire headquarters on Mulberry Street, Rescure 1 from Wyoming Avenue, and Engine 2 from Pittston Avenue, according to Assistant Fire Chief Jim Floryshak. “The fire was well advanced upon our arrival, and we had some other problems. The electric supply to the house had burned off right as we arrived, and we had live wires in the street. That hindered us a little bit,” Floryshak explained. Power lines sparked as they struck Swetland Street while drivers worked carefully to position engines. Crews quickly knocked down a portion of the fire to try to move inside, but “the fire was already very well advanced, and it got to a point where it wasn’t safe to be in that building,” Floryshak explained. The structure was torn down Monday afternoon. Conforti said Friday that an insurance agent and independent adjuster told him the water damage to the second floor of 1516 SwetSee FIRE, Page 13


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 18, 2012

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NEWS

Feds allege former state senator used Senate staff for political purposes

MELLOW AGREES TO GUILTY PLEA

signed the case. Caputo’s finding on that issue will significantly impact the guideline range. Should he agree the loss is less than $10,000 the guidelines would call for a sentence of six to 12 months. If he finds the loss is $120,000, the sentence range would be 27 to 33 months. Caputo is not obligated to follow the guideline range, however, and could sentence Mellow up to the maximum. Mellow would not be permitted to withdraw the plea if he is unhappy with the sentence. It was not immediately clear Thursday what impact the charges might have on the $11,579 per month pension Mellow has been receiving since he retired. State pension laws calls for the forfeiture of a pension of anyone convicted of a crime related to their public office. The state Employees Retirement System will have to evaluate Mellow’s case to determine if the charges against him meet that criteria.

TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER tmorgan@timesleader.com

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n a case that’s akin to the state “Bonusgate” scandal, former state Sen. Robert J. Mellow was charged Thursday by federal authorities with illegally using Senate staff to perform political campaign and fundraising work on state time. U.S. Attorney Peter J. Smith announced Mellow, 70, of Peckville, has agreed to plead guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud and filing a false tax return in connection with a scheme federal prosecutors say cost the Senate as much as $120,000.

Prosecutors say that between 2006 and 2010 Mellow, a former Democratic leader, conspired with others to have staff perform various functions for Friends of Bob Mellow, an organization that raised money for his campaign and other Democrats he supported. The scheme permitted Mellow to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for his campaign and the campaigns of others, prosecutors said. In some cases, Mellow directed staff to perform campaign work on state time, while other times he acted with “willful blindness” by “looking the other way” while the violations occurred, Smith said during a press conference. The case mirrors charges that were filed in the “Bonusgate” scandal that led to the convictions of several state representatives on charges they used staffers on state time to do campaign work. Those cases were filed by the state Attorney General’s Office. Mellow, who retired in November 2010, had served for 40 years in the 22nd District, which includes all of Lackawanna

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ex-Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Mellow, left, speaks in Harrisburg in 2009. Mellow agreed to plead guilty this week to two federal charges, according to the U.S. Attorney’s office.

County and parts of Monroe and Luzerne counties, including Avoca, Duryea and Dupont. Mellow is known to have been under investigation since at least June 2010, when federal agents raided his Archbald home and office in Peckville. Scope of probe Court documents associated with that search indicated Mellow was under investigation for extortion, money laundering and fraud. Smith declined to comment Thursday when asked if prosecutors had agreed to drop more serious charges in exchange for the plea. He also declined to say whether others, including the staffers who were paid, would face

charges. In a prepared statement, Mellow said he decided to plead guilty so that he can focus his attention on battling “serious health problems.” Mellow does not specify the health issue, but a source close to the investigation said Mellow is suffering from bladder cancer. The criminal complaint said Senate staffers performed various campaign work, including creating and mailing out fundraising letters for the Friends of Bob Mellow organization. Mellow is also charged with under reporting income on his 2008 tax return. Sentencing possibilities The charges carry a maximum sentence up to five years in

prison and a $250,000 fine, but Mellow most likely will face a lesser sentence that will be calculated based on federal sentencing guidelines. The guidelines are based heavily on the amount of monetary loss to the victim. In this case that would be the state Senate, which paid Senate employees even though they were doing private work for Mellow’s campaign committee. In the plea agreement reached with prosecutors, the government contends the loss could be as high as $120,000. Mellow’s attorneys retain the right to argue the amount is less. The final determination will be up to U.S. District Judge A. Richard Caputo, who was as-

Successor ‘disappointed’ In a prepared statement, Sen. John Blake, D-Archbald, who replaced Mellow, said he was “saddened and disappointed” by the charges, which he said mars Mellow’s otherwise “remarkable and successful” career. Blake vowed to do whatever he can to restore public trust in elected officials. “I hold myself to the highest ethical standards and demand as much from everyone who works in service to the people of the 22nd Senatorial District,” he said. Mellow remains free pending a hearing at which he will officially enter his guilty plea. A date for that hearing has not yet been set. The case mirrors charges that were filed in the “Bonusgate” scandal that led to convictions of several state representatives on charges they used staffers on state time to do campaign work.


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Continued from page 3

pump out his basement, Newcomb estimates that he has spent $15,000-20,000 on a new foundation and new front yard, raising it several inches and replacing the grass with rocks and gravel that are refilled every spring after they are washed away. It’s money that City Councilman Jack Loscombe believes he shouldn’t have had to spend. “I feel bad. Every time it rains heavy, I take a ride down here…It’s discouraging. People shouldn’t have to live like this in this day and age with the taxes they’re paying,” Loscombe said. Based on information he received from the state, Loscombe said storm water is a municipality’s responsibility, not the state’s, yet Newcomb’s numerous letters, e-mails, and phone calls to the city have gone unanswered for years, including a recent message to current Department of Public Works Director Mark Dougher. In Feb. 2011, council called a public caucus with then-director Jeff Brazil, who suggested a pump system costing around $50,000 to divert water out of the area as a temporary solution. Newcomb said that Brazil told him at the time that new piping was ready to go and the DPW would donate the manpower, but no one ever followed through. The Scranton Sewer Authority, at the behest of Loscombe and State Rep. Kevin Murphy, D-Scranton, installed a drain in front of Newcomb’s property, but he noted that it only slows down the flooding for a moment before it overflows, “like trying to take a straw and drain a pond.” New drains were installed just blocks away on North Cameron Avenue two years ago, but workers never made it to his neighborhood. Loscombe and Newcomb agree that the only real solution would be to reroute the offending pipe, hidden by overgrown weeds on a city-owned lot, to nearby Lindy Creek. “Nobody in City Hall has ever acknowledged this problem ever. The only people that ever

Floodwater fills North Cameron Avenue during a storm.

‘I have been trying unsuccessfully for 18 of those 24 years to try and have this road resurfaced. The only thing holding it together is the patch material from the potholes.’ Frank Galdieri On the condition of Pike Street

Pike Street hasn’t been paved in more than two decades.

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO

A homemade sign at the intersection of the Morgan Highway and Pike Street asks Mayor Doherty to "Restore The Pride."

acknowledged this problem are the people that are on council now, with the exception of (Bob) McGoff,” Newcomb lamented. “If you support the wrong people politically, that’s it – you’re done. It’s crazy. It’s not just my house, either; it’s the whole neighborhood.” More than a bump in the road During the March 1 council meeting, Galdieri expressed similar frustration over the “deplorable” condition of Pike Street, a roughly half-mile road which he said hasn’t been resurfaced in 24 years. “I have been trying unsuccessfully for 18 of those 24 years to try and have this road resurfaced. The only thing holding it together is the patch material from the potholes,” Galdieri began. “It’s not only in bad condition, it’s dangerous. As a retired police officer with the city of Scranton and an acci-

dent reconstructionist, I can tell you somebody’s going to get hurt or killed.” Also speaking with Loscombe about the road months before, the councilman took pictures and agreed the road was “beyond repair.” “We’re driving on dirt and holes that are just unimaginable… On the westerly side of the street, we are getting huge amounts of runoff. A simple rainstorm turns that roadway into a raging river. When there’re serious rainstorms, we basically cannot cross that roadway. The water is so deep,” Galdieri described. “Twenty-four years is more than enough.” His neighbors agree. A sign posted on a telephone pole by a resident two years ago reads, “Restore the pride. Mayor Chris, pave this st (sic). It’s been 22 yrs (sic).” “I have been writing letters to the city for the past 18 years to the DPW. Every year, the

letter goes unanswered,” Galdieri said. “It’s ignorance and apathy that we constantly are dealing with every time we call. We’ve been told personally there’s not enough votes up there to get it done. That’s not right. We’re paying taxes every year just like everybody else. We deserve to have the same opportunities that are everybody else has in this city.” At council’s March 15 meeting, Councilman Pat Rogan said a letter to the DPW from council on Pike Street received no answer. “(City Clerk) Nancy (Krake) called the DPW director and he said that the holes had been filled for a temporary fix, which is better than nothing. So I met with Mr. Galdieri to talk about the other issues in the area – blight, the drainage problems. There wasn’t one pothole that was filled,” Rogan said. “I have right here correspondence to the city dating back to 2004 from Mr. Galdieri…We’re on our third DPW director (since then), and nothing’s been done on this road. Furthermore, the head of the DPW lied to a city clerk, saying that it was filled. Nothing was filled. I was up there and have pictures on my phone.” Loscombe said that when the city releases a list of streets to be paved with city funding, he hopes to make sure that Pike Street is included. Few answers as new issues emerge While federal grants handled

by the city’s Office of Economic and Community Development are often spent on projects such as street paving and flood prevention, both Galdieri’s and Newcomb’s neighborhoods have been told that lowto-moderate-income areas are given top preference, making their issues a low priority. With the city enduring a light winter this year, residents have suggested shifting money set aside for snow removal and salting into projects like these, but it remains unclear if these longstanding issues will see any of those funds. Meanwhile, as old neighborhoods continue to be neglected, a new neighborhood is facing its own infrastructure problem. Alex Molfetas, landlord at 119 Penn Ave., delivered a petition to City Hall in late February with more than a dozen signatures from business and property owners concerned about the state of Raymond Court. The alley connects Spruce Street and Center Street between Franklin and Penn avenues. The alley, Molfetas said, is in great need of repair due in part to the injection of residents to the surrounding area. “It’s a neighborhood now,” he acknowledged, noting the recent introduction of the Lofts on Franklin. “It’s not just industrial or business anymore.” Because the alley is lightly traveled, Molfetas said it “won’t need to be paved for another 30 years” if it’s done correctly. DPW Director Mark Dougher did not return a request for comment. Mayor Chris Doherty and Business Administrator Ryan McGowan were also unavailable for comment Friday. Editor Christopher J. Hughes contributed to this story.


Sunday, March 18, 2012

FIRE Continued from page 8

MEETINGS ARCHBALD

• Borough council, Wed., March 21, 7 p.m., 400 Church St., Archbald.

CARBONDALE

• Public hearing on 2012 CDBG grant applications, Mon., March 19, 6 p.m., City Hall, 1 N. Main St.

DICKSON CITY

• Borough council special meeting, Mon., March 19, 5 p.m., borough building, 801 Boulevard Ave., to conduct general business and vote on amendment to nonuniformed employee pension plan. • Planning commission, work session, Tues., March 20, 5:30 p.m., administration building, 801 Boulevard Ave., Dickson City.

GLENBURN TOWNSHIP

• Board of Supervisors, March 19, 7:30 p.m.

LACKAWANNA COUNTY

• Bi-County Airport Board, Thurs., March 22, 10:30 a.m., WilkesBarre/Scranton International Airport. COURTESY SCRANTON FIRE DEPARTMENT / BILL BOOCK

Flames engulf 1518-20 Swetland St. as they spread to 1516 Swetland Monday morning.

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• School board meeting, Thurs., March 22, 7:30 p.m., board room,

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nently closed since the department was reduced to 100 men. “If the companies that had been permanently closed and browned out had been there, we may have had a little bit better chance – maybe not on the original house but on the exposure (to the second home),” he said. Engine 4 at fire headquarters, Engine 7 on Luzerne Street, and Truck 4 on North Main Avenue were closed, and Engine 8 on West Market Street had no apparatus, according to Floryshak. Having Engine 8 as the only active company in West Scranton was “unacceptable,” Judge said. “I think the only remedy at this point is to bring back guys to ensure that companies remain open,” Judge said. “I know the mayor, the fire chief, and the business administrator. They understand that this is not the way a fire department should operate, but they need to start taking the steps to make sure the public and my members are safe.” For Conforti, Monday’s fire was too much to return and wait for improvements in fire service. “I’ve been a neighborhood kid all my life. I was born and raised in West Side, and I want out,” he said.

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land St. was so extensive it would have to be removed. “A fix in this case is going to be a rebuild,” he said. “The home could be a complete loss.” On the first alarm, Floryshak said, every on-duty company in the city arrived. “Once we had made assignments to the on-duty companies, we still had plenty of work to be done,” he said. “Dunmore was requested, and they’re handling the rear of the building.” Despite having to call in companies from Dunmore through a mutual aid agreement, Floryshak was happy with the response Monday. “The guys did a phenomenal job,” he said. “Fire fighting is labor intensive. Those apparatus don’t put fires out. Firemen put fires out.” John Judge IV, president of International Association of Fire Fighters Local 60, said Monday afternoon that the severity of the fire was a “direct result of company closures.” Companies across the city have been browned out or perma-

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Response to Swetland fire draws criticism RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – At the March 15 City Council meeting, citizens reacted angrily to response times at a West Scranton fire that displaced 13 people. The March 12 fire consumed 1518-20 Swetland Street and extended to 1516 Swetland Street, but while John Judge IV, president of International Association of Fire Fighters Local 60, said that the fire’s severity was a “direct result of company closures,” Fire Chief Tom Davis countered that the department’s response time was just as quick. “Why are the taxpayers’ and residents’ life and safety being jeopardized because Mayor (Chris) Doherty and

‘We could not reinstate the positions because council could not violate the judge’s (manning clause) decision of August 2011 which maintained that the mayor has the authority to order public safety layoffs without consent of council.’ Council President Janet Evans Addressing criticism over council’s amended budget which eliminated 29 fire fighters

past rubberstamp city councils authorized and allowed the city of Scranton to (accumulate) over $300,000 million in debt?” Scranton-Lackawanna County Taxpayers Association member Bill Jackowitz questioned. “If you’ve got to go twoand-a-half times the distance, how can that not add added time to the response time?”

Resident Doug Miller felt the incident brings up the question of whether or not the city is adequately protected. “It’s my opinion that we are not. Response time at this particular fire scene was pretty dismal…It’s really and truly infuriating. Then when you have the mayor go on TV and spew nothing but arro-

gance, it really makes me sick to my stomach. This man has yet again jeopardized the health, safety, and well-being of residents of this city, and now all of a sudden he’s a fire expert,” Miller said. “They did their job, but it took too long….Maybe these people wouldn’t have lost everything that they owned.” Resident Les Spindler also placed blame on the shoulders of the mayor and called Davis “a puppet of the mayor.” “No pun intended, but Chris Doherty is playing with fire and people’s lives,” Spindler said. Council’s four-member “supermajority” largely agreed with the citizens’ sentiments.

“To do what has happened to the fire fighters now is like sending our boys to war and taking half their bullets and Humvees off them,” Councilman Jack Loscombe, a former city fire fighter himself, commented. “In all my years in my practice, the damage that was done to the home on the right side, that was beyond what should have been. It’s tough on the fire fighters because they feel defeated. They don’t have the adequate manpower or equipment.” Council also defended themselves from statements made by Judge saying that council allowed 29 firefighters to be laid off in the 2012 budget, saying that they had See COUNCIL, Page 15

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Council: PEL preliminary plan ‘haphazard’ COUNCIL RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

next week to work on the plan. “The Pennsylvania Economy League does not control this city. The Pennsylvania Economy League is not the elected leadership of this city. The people elected a mayor and a City Council,” Evans said, adding that she believes the city is “worse off” because of PEL’s misdirection. Councilman Pat Rogan continued to remain skeptical of the administration’s involvement in and commitment to the plan. “My concern would be the administration is going to do what they want to do and ignore the rest of the plan like they have always done in the past,” Rogan said. In other business, council did not vote on newly drafted rental registration legislation, as they felt many more amendments were needed before final passage. McGoff, a vocal advocate for the legislation, said that he would like to meet with his fellow council members during the week and finish all the amendments before their March 22 meeting so that it can be passed as soon as possible.

Continued from page 14

no choice, as the mayor would have ultimately made the decision without them. “City Council did in fact fund 13 firefighters in its 2012 budget by including $600,000 (saved) from a prescription health care savings grant. However, we could not reinstate the positions because council could not violate the judge’s (manning clause) decision of August 2011 which maintained that the mayor has the authority to order public safety layoffs without consent of council,” Council President Janet Evans said. Evans added that “no council” has worked harder to protect public safety in the city. Councilman Bob McGoff, however, questioned why there were only 19 firemen at the fire and why $100,000 set

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125 percent. Now their recommendation wasn’t to do that,” Councilman Bob McGoff clarified. “There is a need to find alternative solutions.” PEL’s suggestions include a $22 increase in the garbage collection fee; starting a “marketbased revenue opportunity program” that would place ads on city building and vehicles; increasing payments in lieu of taxes from nonprofit organizations, reviewing city license and permit fees; cutting the Parks & Recreation budget by 50 percent; cutting salaries and wages by 10 percent following the expiration of union contracts; having employees contribute to health care insurance at the conclusion of current union agreements; creating a payroll tax, amusement tax, and commuter tax; selling or leasing city assets and authorities; privatizing city services; and reducing employees. While council agreed with some of the suggestions, they stressed that they would be working to avoid tax increases, and Evans said that she and Mayor Chris Doherty will be meeting

aside for overtime was not being used. He also asked if the unions would consider manning alternatives to keep more firehouses open, though he was unsure if those terms could be negotiated. “Why don’t we create a list of substitute firemen made up of the men that were laid off? They can call them in on per diem basis in order to keep more firehouses open. Again, that’s an issue, I’m pretty sure, that the union would say, ‘It’s not contractual,’ and won’t do it,” McGoff said. “I know there may be some issue of safety with only two men on an apparatus, but I don’t think it requires more than two to get the truck, to get the apparatus to the fire. There will be other firemen coming. Why can’t we go back to three or two firemen on an apparatus in order to keep our firehouses open?” Doherty could not be reached for comment on March 16.

NEWS

SCRANTON – City Council reacted to the Pennsylvania Economy League’s Revised Recovery Plan at their March 15 meeting, saying that they would rather agree on a “feasible” and “workable” plan over a “haphazard plan that is amassed in a rush” to meet the bank agreement’s terms, according to Council President Janet Evans. Legislation passed during a special meeting of council on Jan. 30 requires council to work with the mayor and PEL, the city’s Act 47 coordinator, on a Revised Recovery Plan in order to secure a $11.5 million 2012 Tax Anticipation Note, which is currently being paid back with the city’s collected real estate taxes. The Recovery Plan, last revised in 2002, is meant to help the city out of Act 47 distressed status. PEL wrote that the city is looking at a $16 million total deficit over a three-year-period. “Their projection is if all we do is attempt to raise real estate taxes, it would require us raising it

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Auction goes green to raise green By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

IF YOU GO

CRANTON – Organizers of Scranton Prep’s annual auction, which benefits the operating budget and student body of the Catholic and Jesuit college preparatory school, said new technology at next week’s event will make it more environmentally friendly. For the first time, Prep will use the BidPal system, an interactive wireless silent auction tool, as supporters jockey for more than 700 items separate from the nearly 150 more in a live auction.

WHAT: Scranton Prep’s ‘All That Glitters’ auction WHEN: Sat., March 24. Doors open at 6 p.m., cocktail hour open to 8 p.m., dinner at 8 p.m., live auction begins at 8:15 p.m. WHERE: Scranton Preparatory School, 1000 Wyoming Ave., Scranton INFO: RSVP by Thurs., March 22. Cost is $100 per person. Call (570) 941-7743 for more information.

BidPal will offer a brief description and photo of the item, information on the donor, current top bid, and bid increments per item. It will offer participants notices if they successfully win an item or when they are outbid. Karen Minora, director of development at Scranton Prep, said the auction was resurrected about 14 years ago and has greatly benefited the school. About 550 people attended the auction in 2011. The move to an electronic silent bidding process eliminates paper bidding sheets as it provides more anonymity to those interested in the gift certificates, jewelry, furniture, fine art, and more on the block. Prep alumnus and professional auctioneer John Cowley will return once again to lead the live auction beginning at 8:15 p.m. on March 24. Doors open at 6 p.m. with the silent auction occurring throughout the event. The live auction offers bidders a chance at numerous trips, three different cars, ticket packages for the Philadelphia Phillies or a Monday Night Football game, and much more. A special group of items un-

der the theme “All That Glitters” were specially purchased in New York City. “There are all flavors of gifts,” Minora said. “Anyone who comes will find something that they want to bid on.” In addition, a live raffle will offer one of three gifts to a lucky winner: a 5-carat diamond necklace worth $14,000, or a 10-day vacation in Hawaii or week at a private home in Nantucket worth $7,000 each. Reservations are required by March 22 and can be obtained by calling (570) 941-7743.

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MEETINGS Continued from page 13

Mid Valley Secondary Center, Underwood Road, Throop. Work session at 7 p.m.

NEWS

OLD FORGE

• Zoning hearing board, Thurs., March 22, 7:30 p.m., municipal building, 310 S. Main St. Business includes variance requests for Doreen and Augustine Graziano to complete a land subdivision between Powell and Corcoran Street and for Brian and Christina McLaughlin for subdivision of a lot at 513-15 Lawrence Street.

Step By Step, Inc., a Wilkes-Barre-based non-profit corporation devoted to providing community support services to children and adults in Pennsylvania with mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and autism, celebrated Intellectual Disability Awareness Month by sponsoring reading events at various schools, libraries, and book stores in the area to increase public awareness and respect for people with disabilities. In past years, Step by Step has sponsored essay and poster contests in support of Disability Awareness. There are over 300,000 people in the state with an intellectual disability, according to the 35-year-old organization. On March 13, Step By Step employee Kim Burke read “My

SCOTT TOWNSHIP

• Board of supervisors, Tues., March 20, 6:30 p.m., Joe Terry Civic Center, 1038 Montdale Rd. Business includes proposed dog breeding facility at 345 Stone Rd. Supervisors meeting will be followed at 7 p.m. by monthly business meeting.

SCRANTON

• City council, Thursdays, 6:30 p.m., City Hall, 340 N. Washington Ave. • Parking authority, March 21, 140 Adams Ave., Scranton. • Planning commission, third Wednesday, 7 p.m., City Hall, 340 N. Washington Ave.

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Readers raise awareness

Friend Has Down Syndrome” by Jennifer Moore-Mallinos and “Best Friend on Wheels” by Debra Shirley at 9:30 a.m. at St. Stanislaus Elementary School in South Scranton to a group of 15 kindergarten, first, and second grade students. Burke also answered the children’s questions about disabilities and discussed the topics addressed in the books. “This is the first time it is being done in our school. I think it should be done more often in all schools,” said Principal Lu Ann Kaszuba. “Many times they see people with disabilities and get scared of them. This way they know that they’re just like everyone else. Everybody’s the same…They get to learn to accept them just as they are, as friends.” - RICH HOWELLS


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NEWS

WHAT: Charity dinner benefiting the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic. WHEN: Tues., March 20. Separate seatings at 5:30 and 8 p.m. WHERE: POSH at The Scranton Club, 404 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. COST: $100 per person for four-course meal. INFO: Reservations requested and available at (570) 955-5890 or www.POSHatSC.com.

“We want to highlight the different things you can come and do in downtown Scranton.”

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO

Joshua Mast, owner of POSH at The Scranton Club, will host a $100 dinner at the North Washington Avenue restaurant benefiting the NEPA Philharmonic on March 20.

Symphony of support

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CRANTON – One of Scranton’s premiere venues will continue their overwhelming support of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic next week with a special meal.

All proceeds from the $100 four-course meal at POSH at The Scranton Club, 404 N. Washington Ave., Scranton, will benefit the Philharmonic. Patrons will be able to select from a prex-fixe menu offering amuse-bouche, or bite-sized appetizers; a choice between two signature salads; entrees including fish or a surf and turf offering with filet medallions and shrimp; and a desert consisting of wine and the restaurant’s chocolate lava cake with berries. While the Tuesday, March 20 meal with seatings at 5:30 and 8 p.m. is a first, it’s a continuation of a history of shared support between the venue and the Philharmonic, according to Joshua Mast, owner of POSH and The Colonnade. “We have a great relationship with the Philharmonic. Before their events, we host a pre-concert dinner on our second floor here at POSH as a fundraiser for them. Usually, we get close to 100 people,” he explained.

Offering dinner and a show between POSH and the Philharmonic often attracts new faces to downtown Scranton. “That’s really my goal and my partner, Paul (Blackledge’s) goal, is to get people to come to downtown Scranton, and once we get them here, we want to keep them here,” he said. “We want to highlight the different things you can come and do in downtown Scranton.” Mast will also participate in the Philharmonic’s “Conductor’s Challenge” on Friday, April 13 at the Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Serving as a guest conductor, he joked, is a far cry from his days as a middle school percussionist, but he plans to have some fun leading the George Gershwin march, “Strike Up the Band.”

“I conduct that one song, and I can do whatever I want with it,” Mast said, noting his time on stage may include local dancers for some added entertainment. “We’ve got lots of great ideas planned.” Offering support to one of the region’s top cultural organizations, whether it’s through fundraising events or guest appearances, is crucial, Mast said. “The Philharmonic is a great thing to have in this area. We have the Philharmonic, the Broadway Theatre League, and the Scranton Cultural Center. We have a great downtown, and there’s so much that this area has to offer that if you lost one of those things, it would be a huge loss. “We want to do whatever we can to support and keep the Philharmonic here,” he said.

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Sunday, March 18, 2012

ARTS CALENDAR VISUAL ARTS

CONCERTS F.M. Kirby Center for the Per-

forming Arts. The Fresh Beat Band, Wed., March 21, 3 and 6 p.m. Cost: $25, $35. Malt Shop Memories, Fri., March 30, 7:30 p.m. Cost: $29.50, $39.50, $49.50. New Visions Studio and Gallery. Griffin Pond Animal Shelter benefit, featuring Small Town Rebellion, Filthy Gentlemen, Breathe Easy, Sonny and Greg, and The Gunther Brown Eye Manifestation, Fri., March 23, 7 p.m. Cost: $5. Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 344-1111, www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. Listen Local series, featuring Red, Blue, Green and AAYU, Fri., March 30, 6 p.m. cocktail hour, 7 p.m. show. Cost: $10.

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COMEDY F.M. Kirby Center for the Per-

forming Arts. Best of Second City, Fri., March 23, 8 p.m. Cost: $28. Scranton Cultural Center. Up and Coming Comedy series, Sat., March 24, 7 p.m. cocktail hour, 8 p.m. show. Cost: $16.

LITERARY ARTS New Visions Studio and Gal-

lery. Writers Showcase, Sat., March 31, 7 p.m., with national SLAM poet William James, Keith Gilman, Charlie O’Donnell, Reena Renells, Rachael Goetzke, and Sandee Gertz Umback. Submit your events to news@golackawanna.com, via fax at (570) 558-0854, or over the phone at (570) 558-0113.

SPORTS

THEATER

F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts, 32 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Info: (570) 826-1100, www.kirbycenter.org. Cirque D’Or, Sun., March 25, 3 p.m. Cost: $21.50, $31.50, $41.50, $61.50. ‘Fish Face: The Kids of Polk Street School,’ Tues., March 27, 10 a.m. Cost: $6.50. Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 344-1111, www.scrantonculturalcenter.org. ‘South Pacific,’ Fri., March 23, 8 p.m.; Sat., March 24, 2 and 8 p.m.; Sun., March 25, 1 and 6 p.m. Cost: $37, $47, $57. F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts. ‘The Goonies,’ Sat., March 31, 2 and 6:30 p.m. Cost: Free.

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AFA Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 969-1040, www.artistsforart.org. Paintings by Heather Martyak and Annmarie Ciccarelli. ArtWorks Gallery and Studio, 503 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 207-1815, www.artworksnepa.com. Works of David Bender, through March 29. Beko Sushi and Grill, 414 Spruce St., Scranton. Info: (570) 341-0205, www.bekosushi.com. ‘Paint the Town,’ paintings by Sheila Sankar. The Bog, 341 Adams Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 3416761, www.thebogscranton.com. ‘Coal Country,’ photographs of Moira Hauer. Camerawork Gallery, 515 Center Street, Scranton, (570) 3443313, www.cameraworkgallery.org. ‘Factorium: A Pictorial Essay of American Factories,” photographs of Rebecca Battle, continues to April 2. The Fanciful Fox, 342 Adams Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 558-3001, www.fancifulfox.com. ‘Personal Works of Derek Zielinski,’ charcoal and oils. Glen Oak Country Club, 250 Oakford Rd., Clarks Summit. Art auction, benefiting Rotary Club of the Abingtons, Fri., March 23, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Cost: $10. Info: Donald Myer at (570) 586-1317 or Norbert Mayr at (570) 335-2467. Laura Craig Gallery, 307 Linden St., Scranton, (570) 9637995. ‘Open Your Heart,’ small works to benefit the American Heart Association. Marquis Art & Frame, Scranton, 515 Center St., Scranton, (570) 344-3313, www.marquisartframe.com. ‘Shine,’ paintings by Leigh Pawling. New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton. Info: (570) 878-3970, www.newvisionsstudio.com. ‘All About Art,’ three-week class, Sat., March 24-April7, 3-5 p.m., ages 10-15. Classes in drawing, painting, and sculpture. Cost: $100. Adult figure drawing, four-week class, Wed., March 28-April 18, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost: $100. ‘Nature’s Finest Art,’ works of Dana Gabel, Mark Charles Rooney, Amy Lynn Wyman, and Bethel Wyman, continues to March 30.

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Sunday, March 18, 2012

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Earning gift cards with Swagbucks Sweet sampling of culinary treat While one of the most common ways to save money is through using coupons and visiting rebate sites, there’s one secret that some bargain hunters don’t know about. Just by searching the Internet, you can accumulate Swagbucks, a term used to refer to “digital dollars” that readers can accumulate and redeem for exclusive prizes on www.swagbucks.com. Swagbucks.com allows users to earn gift cards just by completing everyday tasks online like searching the web, shopping, completing surveys, and participating in special offers. This is the only place on the web that you can earn gift cards without spending any money. Over the last year, I have been able to earn a dozen Amazon gift cards as well as Target gifts cards to give as gifts. The gift cards or digital codes are usually emailed within a week of cashing in the Swagbucks online. By downloading the Swagbucks toolbar and using the affiliated search engine, you are randomly awarded Swagbucks. Fridays are Mega Swagbucks days where readers can earn double bucks on searches. The search engine gives you the same results as Google, so you won’t miss any important results when using the toolbar. Using the free Swagbucks toolbar is effortless. Search for what you would normally need on a standard search

DEAL DETECTIVE JENNA URBAN site, and a pop-up appears telling you how many Swagbucks that you earned for that search. Not every search earns Swagbucks, but it is fun when they do. As long as you are signed into your account, the computer will register the Swagbucks, which you can either use immediately or accumulate to buy all of your gift cards at once. My favorite is a $5 Amazon gift card, which only costs 450 Swagbucks. There are also days when you can earn extra bucks just by finding swag codes on the Swagbucks blog or Twitter page. These are usually posted on Facebook or shared on other frugal blogs. As you can see, this is a great way to earn gift cards with a minimal effort. Just by joining, you will be rewarded with 30 Swagbucks. You can also earn Swagbucks by taking part in trusted surveys, searching the web, watching videos, inviting friends to join, shopping, voting in daily polls, finding swag codes, or completing special offers. To get started visit www.swagbucks.com and download the free toolbar. Keep us posted at www.facebook.com/ golackawanna about how many “bucks” you’ve earned.

A well-established culinary treat with roots in the 18th century will be celebrated with a special program next week. The Anthracite Heritage Museum will present a program on making maple syrup on Sunday, March 25, at 2:30 p.m. The program, presented by curator and maple syrup maker John Fielding, will include a history of making maple products from the Native Americans to the present day, how to identify maple trees, and the techniques used in making maple syrup and other maple products such as maple sugar candy. Those attending the program will have the opportunity to sample maple syrup and maple cream at the conclusion of Fielding’s presentation. The program coincides with the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission’s 2012 annual theme “The Land of Penn and Plenty: Bringing History to the Table” and invites all residents and visitors to sample and share the richness and diversity that Pennsylvania offers. The snow date for this program is Sunday, April 1 at 2:30 p.m. Native Americans taught European hunters and trappers how to produce maple syrup. By the late 18th century, maple sugaring was an established industry in Pennsylvania. It was an important “crop” to farmers in the

MINING HISTORY JOHN E. FIELDING winter season. A sugar maple tree could produce two to three gallons of liquid sap per day. Farmers collected the liquid into horse-drawn tanks. The sap was boiled over a fire to create maple syrup, which was important in sweetening or curing food. For museum visitors who wish to try maple syrup with recipes from Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission sites and museums, the Anthracite Heritage Museum store is selling the “Pennsylvania Trail of History Cookbook.” The cookbook contains historic recipes such as Lumberjack Pancakes from the Pennsylvania Lumber Museum, raised buckwheat griddle cakes from the Daniel Boone Homestead, and burnt sugar cake and maple sugar pie from Somerset Historical Center. The Pennsylvania Anthracite Heritage Museum is located in McDade Park, off Keyser Avenue, in Scranton The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. For more information, call (570) 963-4804 or visit www.phmc.state.pa.us or www.anthracitemuseum.org.

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Sunday, March 18, 2012

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GOLackawanna

Taking cowardly stance on ‘Doonesbury’ strip RICH HOWELLS

to be, but I guess we only enforce that made-up “must always be funny” rule when the jokes don’t fit our political leanings. Strips like “Dick Tracy” and “Prince Valiant” tell serious action and adventure stories, so those must be eliminated by these standards as well. Truth be told, Garry should be used to this by now. He’s been writing the comic as a daily strip since 1970, and over the years, his cartoons have been pulled for talking about homosexuality, drugs, and other touchy topics, often for being ahead of their time. What legitimizes his work isn’t just his timeliness, however, but his ability to craft decades

of ongoing storylines involving evolving characters, adding layers not often seen in mainstream comic strips. His groundbreaking efforts earned him a Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning in 1975, the first strip-style comic to be honored with the award. Maybe those involved in the Watergate scandal didn’t find the winning comic to be very funny, but that doesn’t make it any less culturally important. Just as newspaper articles serve as an important historical record of that time, so does its art. In this day and age, when comic art is being displayed in museums and graphic novels are being placed on TIME Magazine’s “Top 100 Novels”

list, the debate on its legitimacy is becoming a tougher case to make. In a March 11 interview with The Washington Post, Trudeau said that Republicans chose “to re-litigate reproductive freedom, an issue that was resolved decades ago,” and to ignore this “would have been comedy malpractice,” so he addressed a subject he usually backs away from. And we should all be thankful that he did. Not only has he got us talking about the matter at hand, he’s done in it in a way that solidifies comics’ place at the artistic table. Now if only more papers would just recognize it.

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publishes editorials on a regular basis. While they may not be as funny as “Doonesbury,” they certainly discuss many of the same issues Trudeau addresses using many of the same words he uses. In other words, it’s perfectly acceptable to type these opinions out in text, but when you surround this text with a word bubble and draw a person next to it, it’s “inappropriate” and going “too far” over “the boundaries of good taste.” Even straight news articles have used the term “slut” frequently, sometimes in headlines, when reporting on the recent Rush Limbaugh controversy that Trudeau was touching on. Single-panel political cartoons cover controversial topics every day, but strips are apparently forbidden from treading the same ground because of a fabricated rule about what comics can and cannot be. And to new organizations like The Herald in South Carolina, who were “concerned about the graphic content” that was never shown, I must ask how papers can publish grisly scenes of war, fires, funerals, and grieving victims, yet they cannot even comprehend showing readers a drawing of a woman lying on an examination table that simply hints at a basic medical procedure that almost all mothers reading a “family newspaper” have endured. I think this bias against cartoonists doing what writers do every day stems from that outmoded term you still hear from seniors – “the funnies.” This implies that all comic strips are meant to be funny all the time, but if that were true, why do they continue to print “Mallard Fillmore” next to “Doonesbury”? Should they not print “The Family Circus” every time it depicts the dead grandfather looking down on the family from heaven? Personally, I don’t find that funny at all, nor is it supposed

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2012. Like any effective political comic strip, people are still talking about the “Doonesbury” series that ran from March 12-17, a satire of a recently passed law in Texas that requires women seeking an abortion to first undergo a sonogram. It’s a controversial topic requiring some controversial humor, but several newspapers across the country weren’t laughing as the pulled the strip from their publications. Thankfully, this was not the case in our local daily papers, and the strips have been shared online so much now that anyone who wished to read them has probably done so and allowed full-grown adults to make meaningful discussion of real-life issues – you know, one of the main reasons the news media exists. Whether you agree with creator Garry Trudeau’s take or not, his jokes in these strips are pretty biting and well-executed. Given a form attached to a clipboard emblazoned with a scarlet “A,” a woman must sit in “the shaming room” and wait for a “middle-aged, male state legislator” to call her a “slut” before a doctor continues to lay on the guilt. I’m not here to debate politics, abortion, or women’s rights in a pop culture column. Rather, I’m here to question why, in 2012, we still can’t accept political commentary in the form of sequential art. You see, many papers refused to publish the comic simply on the basis that it is a comic. The Reporter in California wrote that Trudeau expressed his opinion “in a manner that skirts, if not crosses, the boundaries of good taste expected in a family newspaper,” for example. While I can’t say I’ve read The Reporter or some of the other papers expressing their disgust with the serious topic on the funny pages, I’d venture to say that each of them likely

INFINITE IMPROBABILITY

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When will comics finally be accepted as a true, respected art form? Apparently not in


GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 18, 2012

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COURTESY PHOTO

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Burn Halo stops at Three Kings on March 21.

Starting over builds band identity RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

Singer James Hart will be the first to admit that the 2007 break-up of his previously successful metalcore band, Eighteen Visions, wasn’t his idea, but he’s slowly bouncing back with hard rock outfit Burn Halo. After recording five studio albums and 12 years of climbing to the top of the scene, Hart wasn’t ready to give up all that he had worked for and immediately landed a record deal with Island/Def Jam to begin the next chapter in his career. “Unfortunately, a couple of the other guys in the band just kind of were over it and I felt like moving forward with that band without them would just not be the same after doing so many recording and creating a specific sound and having the fans that we did and connecting with those fans as a group and as a unit. I don’t think it would have been right to move forward without them,” Hart felt. “It gave me an opportunity to do something new and basically I just wanted to start a band and make an album that was more I think along the lines of stuff that

I was into when I was growing up, which was ’80s and ’90s rock, which for the most part I was able to accomplish with the first Burn Halo record.” Working with songwriter Zac Maloy, formerly of The Nixons, on the band’s debut self-titled album, he was finally able to showcase his vocal and musical range and write with more freedom than he ever had before, though it wasn’t all smooth sailing from there. After completing the record, his A&R manager was let go and the deal fell through, but he was fortunately allowed to keep the record and release it independently. “It was tough to start over. Eighteen Visions had really built this brand and we were just starting to really, really take off on the international level as well, getting to go over to Japan and Australia, Europe, and the UK and touring over there and being successful,” Hart recalled. “It’s completely starting over and rebuilding, and yes a lot of the fans followed me over to Burn Halo, but it’s just not something you can expect when starting a new band that’s something totally different than what you

IF YOU GO WHAT: Burn Halo WHERE: Three Kings, 603 Scranton/Carbondale Hwy, Mayfield WHEN: March 21, doors 6 p.m., show 7 p.m. COST: $12

were doing in your previous outfit. So it’s a bit hard, but you just have to be patient.” While proud of his first release, Hart’s 2011 follow-up, “Up from the Ashes,” helped define the band’s current sound and direction, which he believes is the perfect blend of Burn Halo and Eighteen Visions. “What was coming naturally was great, heavier, more metaldriven guitar riffs, and we said to ourselves, ‘Why hold back these great parts? Who cares? We don’t need to cater to a certain audience. We need to cater to ourselves first. We need to write the record that we’re going to be happy with.’ “So we kind of flipped the script and started writing heavier songs and what came out of it was ‘Up from the Ashes,’” he said. Being independent, however,

isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. The last few months have been particularly rough for the band, parting ways with both their management and their booking agent. “I think the main problem for us, and it’s been a nagging problem with these two records, is that we’re not on a real record label where there’s a bunch of promotion going on for different artists on that label, so we don’t get looked at quite as much and everything’s kind of more on the independent, DIY game plan,” he continued. “It makes it hard. I think we rely too heavily on radio and airplay to carry the band, and that’s something I’ve never believed in. I believe radio’s a great tool, but I don’t think that you should rely on it for selling records and a fan base. I think that that’s what touring is for.” Now, though, Hart feels they’re moving in a more positive direction as they continue to be embraced by fans old and new and rebuild his past success. “My favorite of this whole thing since day one was probably going out on tour with

Avenged Sevenfold and getting the opportunity to play arenas and play to that type of audience. I don’t know that we would be in the same position we are if we hadn’t done that tour. That tour did wonders for us and our fan base immediately, so that was a huge accomplishment and probably something I’ll never forget,” he related. On tour again now, the band’s next stop will be at Three Kings, 603 Scranton/Carbondale Hwy, Mayfield, on Wednesday, March 21 with local supporting acts to be announced. “For people that have seen us before, they’re going to see a side of the band that they haven’t seen before. We bring out a lot of the stuff off the new album, which is the heavier side of it, the more aggressive side of it, which is going to show them, I think, a side of me that maybe they haven’t seen since I was in Eighteen Visions onstage,” Hart emphasized. “For people that haven’t seen us before, I think they’re going to be impressed with a very entertaining, crowd-engaged, energetic show.”


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Blakely native’s film about unlikely superhero aided by largely local crew

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – In front of the camera, Blakely native John Kilker is bringing to life his story of how one man overcomes fear to unlock a part of his mind that gives him superpowers. Behind the scenes, he’s unlocking the potential of a new breed of filmmakers and crew members from northeastern Pennsylvania.

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS

John Kilker, center, the writer/director of ’The Paragon Cortex,’ and first assistant director Michael Belardi, right, set the stage on the set Wednesday afternoon.

LOCAL SUPPORT Vendors and individuals aiding production of ‘The Paragon Cortex’ include The Clarion Hotel, Scranton; Production Inc., Stirna’s Restaurant; Kris Jones; Blu Wasabi; and Global Truck Parts.

MEET & GREET WHAT: Meet the cast and crew of ‘The Paragon Cortex’ WHEN: Fri., March 23, 5-7 p.m. WHERE: The Clarion Hotel, 300 Meadow Ave., Scranton INFO: Interact with writer/director John Kilker, producer Joe Van Wie, and all available cast and crew members of the film currently being shot in northeastern Pennsylvania

Kilker said, has supported the project. The importance of the experience certainly isn’t lost on Kevin Regan and Marissa Von Laibach. Regan, a 24-year-old Old Forge resident who is serving as the script and continuity advisor, learned of the off-camera opening through a friend. “It’s awesome,” he said of his first time on a live set. “It’s basically getting up early every day and loving what you’re doing. I’m having a blast.”

Crews comprised of residents and school students from northeastern Pennsylvania run cables to different sets created inside Holy Rosary School for ’The Paragon Cortex.’

Regan was recently accepted into USC’s program for writing for screen and television, a move he’ll make later this year with the eventual goal of selling scripts for film and television. He’ll walk into class with more experience than most. “This gives me the best perspective of the film industry that I could possibly have,” he said. Lackawanna College educator Andy Kurilla informed Von Laibach, 20, about the local film project. “Thanks to him, I’m here, and I’m very happy about that,” she said.

A 2009 graduate of Webutuck High School in Amenia, N.Y., and current Peckville resident, Von Laibach said she was surprised to hear about productions like “The Paragon Cortex” happening in the area. She operated a boom mic on Wednesday while working with an international crew drawing talent from Scotland, Germany, and other countries to gain once-in-a-lifetime experience as a student. “I feel like I’m really helping out. I’ve never gotten any other opportunity like this… to be a part of something that’s going to be really great in the end.”

SPORTS

With 20 days of production planned over the four-week shoot comprised of six-day weeks and12-hour days, the goal is make a great film and offer professional experience to those interested in the industry. Kilker said he doesn’t want people from the area to have to wait for a “bombshell” moment like he did when he learned years ago that you can make movies for a living. The opportunity was never truly realized until he attended and later graduated from the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts. “It’s hard to state just how important it is (to hire local talent),” Kilker, a Green Ridge resident since 2008, said. “My entire life, there were always people that for whatever reason said, ‘We’ll give you an opportunity.’ “Because of Christian and my and Joe’s experience in making movies, we’re running this in the same way you would run a $200 million set. It’s less crew, but it’s the same professionalism being brought to it. Anyone who leaves here will not be clueless and that, to me, means the world,” he said. As a college student, if he had been given the opportunities that he’s now creating in the area, Kilker said, “I would have been all over it like a fat kid on a cupcake. “To share that with the area that has raised me and treated me incredibly well, there will never be enough ways for me to say ‘thank you.’” Those thanks go out to local vendors and businesses offering services and locations to film “The Paragon Cortex” and to local elected officials who have offered overwhelming verbal support. No government funding,

ARTS

Kilker, 39, began filming Monday on “The Paragon Cortex.” The story follows Val Durant, a secluded attorney who hasn’t left his home in years with the exception of precisely planned trips. Durant falls one night after attending an unexpected party, hitting his head and unlocking a part of his brain that gives him incredible powers that he can use only in the confines of his home. The cortex is surrounded by parts of the brain that register fear, Durant learns, inhibiting his abilities. “Just like ‘Shaun of the Dead’ is a romantic comedy told against zombie beats, this is a story about a guy who needs to connect to the world told against comic book beats,” Kilker explained. The Water Gap Pictures film is financed entirely through private equity and is being produced by Christian Huennebeck and JVW Inc. CEO Joe Van Wie. Shooting will take place at the former Holy Rosary School in North Scranton, a private Wilkes-Barre townhouse, Global Truck and Parts Export in Archbald, Comics on the Green, the former Capitol Records Building in Scranton, Blu Wasabi in Dickson City, and Stirna’s Restaurant in Scranton, among other locations in the region, according to Van Wie. With local scenery providing a backdrop, many of the nearly 60 crew members providing transportation, lighting, and grip services to the film are also from the area. “We went above and beyond our means to hire local production companies,” Van Wie said. “We felt that if we were making films here, the money should be left in the community.”

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Sunday, March 18, 2012

Joyce Bonaddio of Olyphant

Claire Van Beek and her daughter, Francesca, 4, of Dunmore.

Lauren Telep of Olyphant displays a basket of Pysanky eggs.

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From left, Lauren Wlliams, 12, Throop; Alexis Killino, 13, Throop; Francesca Creavey, 13, Olyphant; David Slachtish, 11, Olyphant; Mateo Lopez, 11, Olyphant.

GOLackawanna

CARRYING ON TRADITION S

Meadow Killino, 9, of Throop

Sonia Masalar of Dickson City teaches Neena Beggin, 12, of Olyphant.

Yellow dye envelops the eggs created in Olyphant on March 11.

SPORTS

Michele Uhranowsky of Throop, Sharon Demboski of Olyphant, and Marian Borsuk of Clarks Summit

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BRADLEY LANPHEAR PHOTOS

Completed Pysanky eggs are often elaborate in their design.

.S. Cyril and Methodius Ukrainian Catholic Church in Olyphant conducted part of its second annual round of Pysanky egg-dying classes on March 11. The series of four classes filled quickly, according to church spokesperson Lauren Telep, of Olyphant. One hundred twenty people attended the series of four classes, and Telep said a waiting list for classes in 2013 is already taking shape. Pysanky eggs are dyed using a wax-resist process with a stylus and various colors of dye, working from the lightest tints to the darkest shades. Once the dying process is complete, the wax is melted away using the side of a candle flame. Many who attended the classes in February and March recalled dying eggs using the elaborate process as children and wished to share it with their children, Telep said. For more details on the process, visit www.learnpysanky.com.


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Outstanding display from Lauren Carey HAZLETON – Lauren Carey was unaware that her point total had climbed past 30 for the first time ever and eventually reached 40. Carey did not notice the standing ovation when she left the floor. The Old Forge sophomore’s attention was anywhere but the official scorer’s table and the bleachers behind it. Carey spent Wednesday night’s state Class A quarterfinal girls’ basketball game finding every gap, no matter how small, in the interior of the Lebanon Catholic defense. Dribbling through the Lady Beavers, Carey created space and drew fouls. And, the few times Lebanon Catholic used an extra defender to impede her progress, Carey wisely stopped her drive and found open teammates for baskets almost as easy as the repeated layups she created for herself. The stunning, break-out performance put Old Forge in Saturday’s quarterfinals by pounding what had been considered one of the state’s best Class A teams into submission. “It was an awesome display,” Old Forge coach Tom Gatto said. Indeed. Carey took over a state tournament game with the type of effort normally reserved for established all-staters and major college recruits. This one was hard to see coming. Carey has had a fine season as the leading scorer on a district championship team that also put up a strong fight while going10-4 in Division 2 of the Lackawanna League while playing nothing but larger schools. Still, Carey had never approached the type of dominance she produced against the District 3 champions, who were ranked sixth in the state among Class A teams, according to the Harrisburg Patriot-News. Carey went 14-for-23 from the floor, including making her only 3-pointer, and 11for-13 from the line. She also had 10 rebounds, four assists, a steal, and a blocked shot. The Lady Devils ran out to a 35-12 halftime lead with the help of 22 points by Carey. “You don’t expect to do that,” said Carey, who also produced a game-high 17 points and five steals in a 40-27, first-round win over Morrisville. “It’s not like you going out trying to. “It just happens.”

BILL TARUTIS

Old Forge’s Lauren Carey, right, drives to the hoop as Morrisville’s Katherine Brown defends in the opening round of the girls PIAA Class A tournament at Marywood University on March 10.

KEEPING SCORE TOM ROBINSON It started happening early. Carey converted her own rebound 48 seconds in to open the scoring. She had the game’s first four points and all of Old Forge’s scoring in a 6-1 start. By making all six free throws, she was able to score 12 points in the first quarter to key a shocking, 17-5 start. Lebanon Catholic appeared to be

mounting a comeback when it got within 44-33 in the opening seconds of the fourth quarter. Carey put an end to those thoughts with consecutive three-point plays on the way to the first eight points in a 14-point streak by Old Forge. She had a total of 10 points and assisted on another basket during the game-clinching run. “I saw a lot of gaps,” Carey said. “A lot of teams don’t try to play us man because we have players who can drive.” There are none who do it better than Carey.

The three-point plays were a continuation of a trend in which Carey started at the foul line and made strong moves to the basket. After going left repeatedly for three quarters, she alternated going left and right throughout the fourth as Lebanon Catholic tried unsuccessfully to adjust. “She’s probably better with the left hand going to the basket, even though she’s right-handed,” Gatto said. Whichever direction she needed to take, Carey produced a memorable night by repeatedly finding the path that led the Lady Devils deeper into the state tournament.

“You don’t expect to do that... It just happens.” Old Forge sophomore Lauren Carey On her 17 points and five steals in a PIAA Class A opening round win over Morrisville.


Sunday, March 18, 2012

GOLackawanna

31

Abington out of PIAA play with OT loss

SPORTS

See ABINGTON, Page 35

ARTS

ALLENTOWN – When Abington Heights contained two explosive weapons, Boys Latin Charter located two more. Carlos Taylor scored 20 of his 32 points after halftime and freshman Tymir Watson added six while playing only the final 1:06 of overtime Friday night to lift the Warriors to a 76-72 victory over the Comets in the state Class AAA boys’ basketball quarterfinals at Parkland High School. “(Maurice Watson) broke Wilt Chamberlain’s scoring records in Philadelphia, (Yahmir Greenlee) is another 1,000point scorer,” Abington Heights coach Ken Bianchi said. “But, the kid who really hurt us was (Taylor). “We were just not fast enough to cover everyone they have.” Tymir Watson and Taylor teamed on the decisive fivepoint play propelled Boys Latin to victory. Tymir Watson, a freshman who had appeared in only four games all season, entered the game in a confusing substitution situation while J.C. Show was hitting two free throws to give Abington Heights its last lead. When Maurice Watson fouled out, coach Maurice Watson had originally inserted Pasquale Dimascio into the lineup. After one foul shot, the coach went with his younger son instead. One referee originally sent Tymir Watson back to the bench, saying he could not enter at that point, before another correctly allowed him into the game. Coach Watson said he was not sure of the right ruling at the time and remained uncertain after it was all sorted out. He was ready to accept Tymir Watson not be allowed in the game. “I’m not 100 percent sure at this point,” he said after the game. “If I was 100 percent sure, I would have argued it until they gave me a technical or I was blue in the face. “Because, I was not sure, I

had to go with it.” On the ensuing possession, Tymir Watson hit a 3-pointer from 25 feet while Taylor was being fouled under the basket with 46.6 seconds left. Taylor hit both free throws for a 73-70 lead and the Warriors held on from there when Tymir Watson hit three of four free throws. “He’s a pure shooter,” coach Watson said of Tymir. “My oldest son tells me all the time that he’s ready.” Taylor heated up, beginning with the play that made him the third 1,000-point career scorer on the Boys Latin roster. Abington Heights led by five late in the third quarter when Taylor connected from the left wing, starting a closing run in which he scored 21 points in a little over 13 minutes. “My son Maurice takes so much attention that Carlos is underrated,” coach Watson said. The Warriors were able to overcome a 35-point effort by J.C. Show. Abington Heights held Maurice Watson to 14 points, more than eight below his average. They held Greenlee to just two points after he scored 15 in the first half. After Taylor pushed Boys Latin into the lead, Abington Heights surged back in front, 52-47, with five minutes left. The lead changed hands five times in the last four minutes of regulation before Jason Bamford found Mike Vassil on a the press-break for the final points with 1:28 left. Both teams missed chances, including Taylor’s 3-point attempt for the last shot of regulation. Abington Heights was ahead or tied throughout overtime, with the help of seven points by Show, until the five-point play. Bamford finished with 17 points. The District 2 champion Comets entered the state tournament unranked. Before falling to Boys Charter, the thirdranked Class AAA team in the

NEWS

TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Abington’s JC Show drives the lane Tuesday at Hazleton Area High School while he is defended by Central Catholic’s Chris Warren.


32

GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 18, 2012

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

Holy Cross last county team left TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

HAZLETON – Holy Cross overcame being held to a single field goal in the first half Saturday to advance to the state Class AA boys’ basketball semifinals. The Crusaders, the last Lackawanna County team alive in the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association basketball tournament, scored the last 12 points of the third quarter and went on to beat Pine Grove, 37-31, in a state quarterfinal at Hazleton Area High School. Josh Kosin finished with 12 points and Connor Callejas went 6-for-6 from the line in the fourth quarter to lead Holy Cross, the District 2 runner-up. Pine Grove opened a 10-1 lead before Rob Heyen hit two free throws with 6.8 seconds left in the first quarter for Holy Cross. Casey Gaughan scored the only field goal of the half for the Crusaders to cut the deficit to 10-7 with 3:20 left in the second quarter. Pine Grove extended a 15-7 halftime lead to 21-12 before Holy Cross went on its run to end the third quarter. Five players scored during the 12-point streak. Connor Jones hit a 3-pointer from the left corner with two seconds left after Holy Cross held the ball for the final minute of the quarter with the score tied. Kosin’s dunk with 3:18 left put Holy Cross ahead, 30-25. The Crusaders then went 5for-7 from the line the rest of the way to hold on. Holy Cross reached the quarterfinals by outlasting Communications Tech, 58-56, in double overtime Tuesday after handling Southern Columbia, 62-47, in the first round March 10. Kosin scored 28 points, including the game-winning free throws with four seconds left in the second overtime. He had eight points in the fourth quarter and eight more in the overtimes. Gaughan added 10 points, including four in overtime. Tony Parker had 24 points

Central Dauphin’s Amanda Stauffer steals the ball from Abington’s Lauren Hoyt during Tuesday’s game. JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

GO ONLINE To find out about the next step for the Holy Cross boys, go to www.golackawanna.com/ sports.

and Terrance Brown 10 for Communications Tech. The Crusaders closed with a 20-7 fourth quarter against Southern Columbia. Kosin had 15 points, Connor Jones 14 and Rob Heyen 12 in that win. MORE CLASS AA BOYS Riverside found itself in a pair of games that were decided late. The Vikings edged Loyalsock Township, 52-50, on Nico Munley’s 19-footer off a tipped inbounds pass at the buzzer in the first round March 10. Bishop McDevitt then rallied from 10 points down in the fourth quarter Wednesday to eliminate the Vikings, 61-55, in overtime. CLASS A GIRLS Marian Catholic took advantage of 32 turnovers and Old Forge foul trouble to eliminate the Lady Devils with a 44-39 victory in Saturday’s quarterfinals at Hazleton Area High School. “We just had too many turnovers,” Old Forge coach Tom Gatto said. “The kids played hard, like they did all year, but, at inopportune times, we threw

the ball away.” Kelly Shober had 11 points and five steals while Gabby Green had four steals for the Fillies, but Gatto described many of the turnovers as “unforced.” “I told the kids they should be proud,” Gatto said. “They hustled all over the floor. “Nobody plays harder than they do.” Kaysi McLaughlin matched Shober with 11 points. Morgan Malia led Old Forge with 11 points, six rebounds and two blocked shots. She battled foul trouble throughout and eventually fouled out. Lauren Carey, who scored 40 points in Wednesday’s 66-43 victory over Lebanon Catholic, sat out the final 8:55 of the first half and more than two minutes of the third quarter with foul trouble. She finished with five points. Malia, Carey, and Taylor Nemetz, who also fouled out, were all on the bench in the third quarter when the Fillies put together a 7-2 run for the game’s biggest lead, 25-17. Gatto went back to his starters and Old Forge rallied to take one last lead. Nemetz hit a 3-pointer from the left corner and followed it up with a layup after a backcourt steal by Teri Vieira for a 31-30 lead with 3:01 left. McLaughlin answered with a 3-pointer and Marian Catholic held on by hitting just enough See ROUNDUP, Page 33


Sunday, March 18, 2012

GOLackawanna

33

ROUNDUP Continued from page 32

DON CAREY

Jerry Kincel of Riverside tries to evade Bishop McDevitt defender Kenyatta Long during an overtime period of a game Wednesday in Bethlehem.

title. Three of their five losses came against state semifinalists. Lackawanna League Division 3 and District 2 champion Montrose, which beat Dunmore twice, is the only team representing the league and district in Tuesday’s state semifinals in any class. The Lady Meteors used two huge efforts from Dallas Ely to get past Carver Engineering & Science, 55-49, and Delone Catholic, 52-50. Ely had 41 points against Carver then 27 points against Delone. In the quarterfinal game, she made her last 15 foul shots, including the two winning free throws with 11 seconds left. CLASS AAAA GIRLS Precious Martin scored eight of her 10 points in the second half and Amanda Stouffer worked inside to hit the gamewinning basket in the final minute as Central Dauphin defeated Abington Heights, 29-27, Tuesday in Hazleton. Central Dauphin limited Abington Heights to seven points or less in each of the first three quarters. The Lady Rams held on despite shooting just 6-

PIAA SCORES (March 10-16) (involving District 2 teams) Class AAAA Boys Delaware Valley 56, Chambersburg 45 Easton 54, Delaware Valley 50 Class AAA Boys Abington Heights 56, Berks Catholic 53 Boys Latin Charter 76, Abington Heights 72 (OT) Class AA Boys Meyers 63, Athens 42 Holy Cross 62, Southern Columbia 47 Riverside 52, Loyalsock Township 50 Imhotep Charter 66, Meyers 51 Holy Cross 58, Communications Tech 56 (2OT) Bishop McDevitt 61, Riverside 55 (OT) Holy Cross 37, Pine Grove 31 Class AAAA Girls Central Dauphin 29, Abington Heights 27 Class AAA Girls Nanticoke 41, Shamokin 36 Villa Maria Academy 41, Nanticoke 20 Class AA Girls Montrose 55, Carver E&S 49 York Catholic 54, Dunmore 41 Montrose 52, Delone Catholic 50 Class A Girls Old Forge 40, Morrisville 27 Forest City 45, Delaware County Christian 42 Old Forge 66, Lebanon Catholic 43 Steelton-Highspire 63, Forest City 44 Marian Catholic 44, Old Forge 39

for-14 from the line in the fourth quarter and 7-for-19 for the game. The Lady Comets went 8for-12 at the line, but did not manage enough other offense. Katherine Rosencrance had

10 points, including all six that Abington Heights scored in the third quarter. Catie Nealon came off the bench to hit a 3pointer that helped the Lady Comets rally to lead briefly in the fourth quarter.

SPORTS

Megan Klunk added 15 points and 12 rebounds. Carly Marks had four points and 11 rebounds, including grabbing three missed York Catholic foul shots in the fourth quarter and converting two of them into her only baskets. Molly Burke led Dunmore with 18 points, including nine in the second quarter when the Lady Bucks went from down five to a 24-21 halftime lead. “I thought Dunmore did a great job in the first half dictating the pace of play and the style of the game,” York Catholic coach Kevin Bankos said. Alexa Gerchman added seven points, nine rebounds and four assists. Gerchman’s 3-pointer gave Dunmore a 31-23 lead with 4:06 left in the third quarter. York Catholic scored the final seven points of the third quarter and the first six of the fourth to move ahead to stay. “I’m extremely proud of the way our team, especially the seniors, conducted themselves this year, both on and off the court,” Dunmore coach Ben O’Brien said. The Bucks went 24-5 and won their seventh straight Lackawanna League Division 2

ARTS

CLASS AA GIRLS District 3 champion York Catholic used a combination of defensive pressure and offensive rebounding to rally from an eight-point, third-quarter deficit and spoil Dunmore’s hopes of returning to the state championship game with a 5451 win Tuesday night in Pottsville. The Fighting Irish, who will play Montrose Tuesday for a spot in the final, had been to five straight finals before being replaced by Dunmore as the eastern representative last year. Karli McFartridge went 12for-14 from the line in the fourth quarter to finish with 20 points and made three of her four steals in the second half to lead York Catholic (28-3).

NEWS

free throws (9-for-16) down the stretch. Nemetz finished with eight points, three assists and three steals. Vieira had five steals and three assists. Old Forge had opened the state tournament March 10 with a 40-27 victory over Morrisville behind 17 points and five steals by Carey. Forest City won the same day, following up a preliminary round victory. After knocking off District 1 champion Delaware County Christian, 45-42, in the first full round of state play, the Lady Foresters took a halftime lead on defending state champion Steelton-Highspire. They eventually fell, 63-44, in the Wednesday game at Hazleton. Malia Tate-DeFreitas, a junior with more than 2,000 career points, had 34 for SteeltonHighspire. Foul trouble also contributed to Forest City’s downfall. Cassandra Bendyk, the team’s second-leading scorer, fouled out in the third quarter. Katelyn Zembrzycki, another starter, fouled out 1:06 into the fourth quarter. Carly Erdmann had 21 points, eight rebounds and five blocked shots in the loss. Erdrmann had three 3-pointers and Morgan Saul two to give Forest City a 25-23 halftime lead.


34

GOLackawanna

Sunday, March 18, 2012

LOCAL COLLEGE SPORTS ROUNDUP

Royals’ run ends at elite eight

ARTS

NEWS

GL ONLINE

For daily roundups of local college sports, including results from Saturday’s action, see www.golackawanna.com/sports.

TOP STORY

The University of Scranton finished the season as one of the final eight National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III men’s basketball teams and Lackawanna College remains alive as one of the final 16 National Junior College Athletic Association Division II women’s basketball teams. Scranton’s season came to an end March 10 when the Royals fell one step short of the Final Four during a 78-58 loss to Cabrini College in Middlebury, Vt. The Royals finished 23-8, including three national tournament wins. Corey Lemons scored 20 points to lead fifth-ranked Cabrini, while freshman Aaron Walton-Moss came off the bench to add 17 points and 10 rebounds. Tommy Morgan had 19 points for Scranton while Ross Danzig, a freshman from Abington Heights, added 11. The NJCAA brings its final 16 teams to Illinois Central College in East Peoria. Lackawanna is the 15th seed and will play second-seeded Cincinnati State Community College Tuesday at 8 p.m. The Lady Falcons clinched a national berth when they reached the finals of the District N-O Playoffs by beating Community College of Rhode Island, 73-65, March 10. Monroe College defeated Lackawanna, 80-56, in the district final March 11. The Lackawanna men fell one game short of nationals when they lost, 97-63, to CC of Rhode Island in the District 11 championship game March 10.

College both took 7-2 overall records into the weekend while Marywood was at 2-8. Marywood is expected to improve as conference play begins. The Pacers were picked third out of 12 teams in a preseason poll of conference coaches. Baptist Bible was picked fifth and Keystone eighth. Centennary is the favorite.

SEASON HONORS

Lackawanna’s Terika Turner was named first-team, All-Region XIX in women’s basketball for the second straight season. The Scranton High graduate finished sixth in the region in scoring and fifth in rebounding. She has averaged 15.8 points and 13.2 rebounds for her two seasons with the Lady Falcons. Scranton’s Travis Farrell was named second-team, all-Middle Atlantic Region by D3hoops.com while Luke Hawk gained a similar honor from the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

WEEKLY HONORS

Keystone College’s Blaine O’Brien was named NCAA Division III National Pitcher of the Week by the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association. O’Brien was also named CSAC Pitcher of the Week and one of Keystone’s Athletes of the Week after throwing a no-hitter March 9 in a 2-0 win over Penn State-Behrend. The first no-hitter for Keystone since 2005 included 12 strikeouts and three walks in nine innings. Keystone athletes claimed three CSAC awards. In addition to O’Brien, Abby Cohen was Player of the Week and Karissa Worobey was Pitcher of the Week in softball. Marywood’s Daniel Pfafman was the CSAC men’s tennis Player of the Week. Scranton’s Danzig was named to the Mia Collarini, a Landmark Conference National Jesuit Honor Roll for all-star outfielder last season, is back men’s basketball. with the University of Scranton but Marywood’s Sarah Caughy and Sam this time as coach of the softball Trill were part of the CSAC Honor team. Rolls in men’s and women’s laThe Lady Royals take a 5-1 record into a crosse. doubleheader at Drew today to open the Landmark season. Ashley Vosilla was a first-time Landmark all-star last season when the Jilliana DePaolera and Emily Goss Royals went 18-14 overall. She is scored three goals each Thursday hitting .533 (8-for-15) with a teamto lead Scranton to a 9-7 women’s high six RBI. lacrosse victory over Denison Kaitlyn Frazza is hitting .556 (10-for-18). University in Hilton Head. S.C. Moravian is the unanimous conference Diana D’Achille had six goals and an favorite. assist Tuesday as Marywood Baptist Bible College is the early Colopounded defending champion nial States Athletic Conference Gwynedd-Mercy College, 17-7, in a leader with a 2-0 start while most of rematch of last year’s CSAC womthe league play has not begun. en’s lacrosse championship game. The Lady Defenders and Keystone - Compiled by Tom Robinson

SPORTS

SEASON PREVIEW

TOP GAMES


Sunday, March 18, 2012

GOLackawanna

35

NEWS JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS / FOR GO LACKAWANNA DON CAREY

Adam Phillips of Elk Lake swims the butterfly leg of the 200 individual medley at the state championships in Lewisburg Friday.

Staff reports

The three contenders went at it from the first event. Central Columbia set a state record of 1:46.98 in the opening 200-yard medley relay. Scranton Prep was second and Villa Maria third. Mia Nonnenberg, Rebe-

GO ONLINE

For Saturday’s results from state swimming at Bucknell, see www.golackawanna.com/ sports.

kah Campo, Katie Voitik, and Maria Telincho finished second for the Classics in 1:48.45. The same combination took fourth place in the day’s final event, the 200 freestyle relay, with a time of 1:39.62. Four individual events were contested between the relays, and Scranton Prep managed second-place finishes in two of those events. Campo was second in the 100 butterfly to a state-record performance by Margaret Gruber of Mars. Gruber finished in 53.50 seconds. Campo’s time was 55.97. Nonnenberg took second in the 200 individual medley in 2:06.11 after qualifying second with a time of 2:05.97. Marie Georger of Mercyhurst Prep won it in 2:01.30.

Voitik finished last in the field of 32 in the 200 freestyle qualifying, which was conducted right after the opening relay.

CLASS AA BOYS Scranton Prep’s Ryan Castellani reached the consolation final and finished 12th in the 100 butterfly Friday. The Scranton Prep medley relay team was disqualified. CLASS AAA GIRLS Two Abington Heights relay teams were eliminated during preliminaries early Wednesday when the PIAA Swimming and Diving Championships opened. The Lady Comets finished 21st out of 24 teams in the opening 200 medley relay with a time of 1:55:32. The 200 freestyle relay team finished last among the 24 entries in 1:44.59. Abington Heights freshman Sydney Gualtieri was 30th out of 32 entrants in the 100 breaststroke Thursday.

Continued from page 31

state, according to the Harrisburg Patriot-News, they advanced by defeating the eighthranked team. Abington Heights reached the quarterfinals when Show scored 27 points Tuesday night in a 56-53 win over District 3 champion Berks Catholic at Hazleton Area High School. Marquis Marshall hit his fourth and fifth 3-pointers of the game with 1:13 and :48 left to cut what had been a 10-point deficit in the third quarter and an eight-point deficit in the fourth to 55-53. T.J. Murray answered at the line each time for Abington Heights. He hit both ends of a one-and-one with 1:02 left for a five-point advantage. Then, he made the front end with 4.8 seconds left meaning that Marshall’s failed 3-point attempt at the buzzer was only for the tie, rather than the win. Marshall, the son of former NBA player Donyell Marshall, had 20 points. He had 11 in the first quarter when the Saints took a 19-10 lead. Show, who had 10 points, and Patrick Calvey each hit two 3-pointers in the second quarter when the Comets raced back to take a 33-26 lead. Donovan Jack, a 6-foot-9 center, added 19 points for Berks Christian. The Saints finished 28-3.

TJ Murray is defended by Donavan Jack on Tuesday.

Abington’s Jason Bamford takes a shot while defended by Central Catholic’s Donavan Jack and Nick Lentz.

“We knocked down our shots and never got rattled when they made a big shot,” Show said.

SPORTS

The Scranton Prep girls used the first half of the PIAA Swimming and Diving Championships Friday at Bucknell University to secure their first four medals, including three silvers for finishing second. Scranton Prep went into Saturday in third place in the team standings behind Villa Maria Academy from District 1 and Central Columbia.

ABINGTON ARTS

Prep lands three silvers at states

Abington Heights players storm onto the floor to celebrate Tuesday’s win.


PAGE 36

FAMILY CIRCUS

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

STONE SOUP

THE ARGYLE SWEATER DRABBLE

CLASSIC PEANUTS


Sunday, March 18, 2012

GOLackawanna

Steamers go 3-1 this week TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Abington Heights graduate Cory Spangenberg is 0-for-2 with a run scored in five appearances with the San Diego Padres during spring training in Arizona. Spangenberg, a second baseman, was a first-round draft pick by the Padres last season.

Pens fall to Admirals

The Norfolk Admirals ran their American Hockey League winning streak to 16 games

Former Lady Buck key for Delaware

Dunmore graduate Lauren Carra is the second-leading scorer on the University of Delaware women’s basketball team, which

ting 48.2 percent from the floor, 42.9 percent from 3point range and 88.0 percent from the line. opens NCAA Tournament action today at 5 against host Arkansas-Little Rock in the Des Moines Regional. Delaware is 30-1 and ranked seventh nationally as it seeks its first NCAA Tournament win in a game that is expected to be part of ESPN2’s coverage of the tournament. Carra, a junior guard, averages 10.3 points and leads the team in 3-pointers made with 48.

MICHAEL MUSKAL Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES _ Pennsylvania may be a political battleground state, but when it comes to some things - like football - voters have a somewhat clearer, if still nuanced, message: Former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno deserves to be honored. According to a Quinnipiac University Poll released Friday, voters in the Keystone State said they favor renaming Penn State’s Beaver Stadium after the late iconic coach by a 46 percent to 40 percent margin. Paterno was fired in November by the university’s board of trustees for failing to act aggressively enough in dealing with the child sexualabuse charges against former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky. But the overall number masks some interesting divisions. For example, voters who identified themselves as football fans backed honoring Paterno by 55 percent to 37 percent. Those who were not fans said they opposed renaming the stadium by 44 percent to 37 percent. Age also seems to be a factor in support for Paterno, who died in January of lung cancer at age 85. According to the survey, those 65 and older strongly backed Paterno by 51 percent to 32 percent. The poll was conducted by telephone and cellphone from March 7 to March 12, and 1,256 its debut Thursday at 7:30 at the Lackawanna College Student Union. Lackawanna College was also the site of the fifth meeting that sent Dunmore on to the state championship game. The showing of the film by Johnny Braz is free to the public. However, donations for the Boys and Girls Club of Northeastern Pennsylvania will be accepted at the door.

Local hoops rivalry documented AD gets another role

“Play it Again,” a documentary about the 2010-11 Dunmore-Mid Valley girls’ basketball rivalry, which culminated in a meeting in the state semifinal, will make

Athletic director George Roskos has taken on added duties as the baseball coach at West Scranton. This will be the first high school

registered voters were contacted. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.8 percentage points. “There is lingering respect for Joe Paterno,” Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, said in a statement. “One has to wonder: If the Sandusky scandal had never happened whether support for renaming the stadium would have approached 100 percent,” he said. Sandusky, 68, is awaiting trial on charges that he sexually abused at least 10 boys over a 15-year period. In one incident, Sandusky, who was no longer a coach at the time, was allegedly observed with a young boy in the showers of a Penn State facility. The graduate coach who said he saw Sandusky took the matter to Paterno. Paterno contacted his superior, but neither one of them called the police. The board of trustees later fired Paterno and the university president for failing to act forcefully enough. Meanwhile, the skirmishing in the Sandusky case continued Friday, with a defense attorney filing a motion seeking juvenile records about the boys in the case, which is scheduled to go to trial in mid-May. The defense argued that it needs the records to see if the boys’ memories might have been affected by drug or alcohol use. head coaching assignment for Roskos, who spent five years as a manager in the Collegiate Summer Baseball League and Tri-County League before spending the last eight as manager of the West Scranton American Legion team.

State silver for Laytos

Lackawanna Trail senior Eric Laytos finished second in the state in Class AA wrestling at 220 pounds. Laytos won the state title in 2010 and finished eighth last season. He suffered his only loss of the season to three-time state champion John Rizzo of Richland, 12-3, in the state final.

SPORTS

Spangenberg goes 0-for-2

Wednesday night with a 4-1 victory over the Wilkes-Barre/ Scranton Penguins. Bryan Lerg gave the Penguins a 1-0 lead 8:47 into the game. The Penguins, who managed a season-low 13 shots, had a five-game road losing streak come to an end. Wilkes-Barre/Scranton is home today at 3:05 against the Binghamton Senators.

A recap of Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Steamers games played March 10-16. DATE: March 10. RESULT: Win, 132-112, over the host Dayton Air Strikers. HIGHLIGHT: Vinny Simpson scored 39 points. KEY STATS: The Steamers shot 44-for-69 (63.8 percent) from the floor and 14-for-21 (66.7 percent) from 3-point range for just their second win in seven games. DATE: March 11. RESULT: Win, 123-108, over the host Dayton Air Strikers. HIGHLIGHT: Lionel Armstead scored 26 points. KEY STAT: The Steamers had a season-high eight players score in double figures. DATE: March 15. RESULT: Win, 116-114, over Lake Michigan Admirals at home. HIGHLIGHT: Chris Commons broke out of a slump with 32 points and 12 rebounds. KEY STAT: Vinny Simpson had the first of two straight 13-assist games. DATE: March 16. RESULT: Lost, 129-117, to Lake Michigan Admirals at home. HIGHLIGHT: Jason Underwood’s 29 points and nine rebounds helped overcome a 33-point game by Commons. KEY STAT: Three of Lake Michigan’s four wins have come against Scranton/WilkesBarre. DATE: March 17. SCHEDULED: Played Rochester RazorSharks in Saturday night home game that ended after the deadline for this edition. MORE INFORMATION: See www.golackawanna.com/sports for details on the game.

ARTS

SPORTS BRIEFS

BUSY WEEK

Poll: Name PSU field after Paterno NEWS

SCRANTON – Lionel Armstead’s shots were off the mark. Then, Armstead was off to the races. Armstead got to loose rebounds of his own misses for the final two baskets, then beat the clock for scores Thursday night when the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Steamers edged the Lake Michigan Admirals, 116-114, in a Premier Basketball League game at the Lackawanna College Student Union. “He knew it was going to miss,” Steamers coach Dennis Mishko said. “He follows it right up. “He’s strong for a kid his size. He goes to the basket hard.” The 5-foot-11 guard from West Virginia University made sure the Steamers did not let the game get away in the fourth quarter. Scranton/Wilkes-Barre opened a 111-106 lead with 2:38 left by going on an 18-5 run. Brandon Tunnell had seven points in the run, including ending it with a defensive rebound that he took coast-tocoast. The Steamers struggled offensively from there. Armstead sent a shot off the side of the backboard from near the left corner, but retrieved it and hit a five-footer from a tough angle at the shotclock buzzer for a 113-108 lead with two minutes left.

“I didn’t really have a read on the first one,” Armstead said. “I didn’t expect it to go off the side of the backboard.” Lake Michigan scored the next six points to move ahead, 114-113, with 26.2 seconds left. Unlike, the first miss, Armstead was close on his attempt at the lead. His 3-pointer seemed to be halfway down before rattling out. The rebound bounced out to the foul line where Armstead picked it up and hit a fall-away jumper for the winning shot with six seconds left. “I could see the clock before I shot,” Armstead said. “I knew I had time, but that was a pretty comfortable shot for me so I took it.” Amstead has had an increasing impact on the Steamers offense since joining the team after the Charleston, W. Va. franchise disbanded early in the season. “I was discouraged,” Armstead said. “I’ve been on plenty of teams that have folded. But, at the same time I was eager. “I was hoping somebody would pick me up.” The Steamers were among those Armstead hoped for. He joined Toledo-area players Chris Commons and Darrion Griffin on the roster and filled a need by giving the Steamers an additional perimeter shooter. Thursday’s effort, his third straight game over 20 points, helped push Armstead’s scoring average to 13.9 in 11 games with the Steamers. He is hit-

37


PAGE 38

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15 Pearl Dr., Spring Brook Twp.

Coldwell Banker Town & Country

Dir: Rt 29S, left on Rt 292E at Citgo Station. Home is 1.1 mile on left. MLS#11-4160

1-2:30PM

$279,000 12-2PM

1014 Whippoorwill Dr., Clarks SUmmit

ERA Brady Associates

12-1:30PM

12-1:30PM

$250,000 2:30-4PM

1232 Tonwin St., Archbald Prestige Realty Group

Dir: MAIN ST. ARCHBALD,PAST ROSSI RESTAURANT (ON Dir: From Morgan Hwy, turn right onto Shady Lane Rd, LEFT),TAKE RIGHT ONTO LINE ST. CONT ST THRU STOP go 1/2 mile, home on right. From N Blvd, turn onto Shady BEAR RIGHT ON SINAWA LEFT ON WADDELL TO STOP.TAKE Land Rd, go about 1 mile, home on left. MLS#12-713 RIGHT ON TONWIN 2ND HOUSE ON RIGHT. MLS#12-385

$109,900 2:30-4PM

824 Brook St., Scranton Realty Network

$199,800

9124 Valley View Dr., Clarks Summit Coldwell Banker Town & Country

Dir: Pittston Ave to Brook St (McCa- Dir: From Morgan Hwy(307, Turn left on Country Club Road. Left on Forest Acres rthy Flowers). Go all the way to the top. and turn left on Valley View Drive. Home is Sign. MLS#12-820 on right. MLS#12-622

Visit timesleader.com & Click “Buy A Home” to see the most up to date list of Open Houses


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012

MARKETPLACE golackawanna.com

100 Announcements 200 Auctions

300 Personal Services 400 Automotive

500 Employment 600 Financial

700 Merchandise 800 Pets & Animals

PAGE 39

900 Real Estate 1000 Service Directory

To place a Classified ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@golackawanna.com 150 Special Notices

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 110

Lost

WANTED ALL JUNK CARS & TRUCKS HEAVY EQUIPMENT DUMPTRUCKS BULLDOZERS BACKHOES

Highest Prices Paid!!!

FREE REMOVAL Call Vito & Ginos Anytime 288-8995

LOST Silver Crufix Cross in Mountain Top area. Sentimental value. 570-436-7475

380

PAYING $500 MINIMUM DRIVEN IN

Full size 4 wheel drive trucks

ALSO PAYING TOP $$$

for heavy equipment, backhoes, dump trucks, bull dozers HAPPY TRAILS TRUCK SALES 570-760-2035 542-2277 6am to 8pm

310

Attorney Services

Bankruptcy $595 Guaranteed Low Fees www.BkyLaw.net Atty Kurlancheek 825-5252 W-B

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

468

468

Auto Parts

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

120

Found

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 AND UP

$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN, DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!

570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

FOUND GIFT CARD: in Vicinity of South Main Street, W-B. Call to describe. 570-675-6475

AUTOMOTIVE SALES CONSULTANTS

FOUND young adult cat, long hair, top 1/2 grey bottom 1/2 white, gold eyes. Kingston 570-2883153 after 2 pm

Valley Chevrolet is seeking individuals who are self-starters, team-oriented and driven. (No experience necessary)

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We Offer: • Salary & Commission • Benefits • 401k Plan • 5 Day Work Week • Huge New & Used Inventory

FOUND. Schnauzer gray & white. Male. Black collar and flea collar. Very well groomed. Call SPCA

LOOKING FOR

We Need Your Help!

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Anonymous Tip Line 1-888-796-5519

others who booked a trip going to England, Netherlands & Belgium May 1828. Anyone with information as to the status of the trip or how to obtain a refund please contact me at stomko @verizon.net Your help is greatly appreciated.

412 Autos for Sale

Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

412 Autos for Sale

Auto Parts

NOBODY Pays More LOST Tan & white Sheltie. Answers to Buddy. Last seen in Laurel Run Estates. 570-977-0508

Travel

Apply in person to: Blake Gagliardi, Sales Manager Rick Merrick, Sales Manager

2012 SUBARU

LEGACY 2.5i $0 Down Payment $0 Security Deposit $269 1st Month Payment $125 Registration Fees

$394 Total Due at Signing

• Automatic • All Wheel Drive • 31 MPG Highway • Alloy Wheels • Heated Seats

$

269

CAB-11

PER MONTH LEASE 36 MONTHS 30,000 TOTAL MILES

570-346-4641 1-800-982-4054

www.minookasubaru.com

HOURS: MONDAY THRU THURSDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 8:30 P.M. FRIDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 5:00 P.M. SATURDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 2:00 P.M. • CLOSED SUNDAY 601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre

EPA estimated fuel economy for 2012 Legacy 2.5i CVT models. Actual mileage may vary. Tax not included. Financing contingent on lender approval. Other lease terms available. Call for details.


PAGE 40

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 412 Autos for Sale

HONDA ‘01 CIVIC

Sedan, gold exterior 5-speed great on gas comes with a 3month power train warranty $ 4,500.

SPRING STREET AUTO

409

Autos under $5000

LEO’S AUTO SALES 92 Butler St Wilkes-Barre, PA 570-825-8253

‘01Pickup FORDTriton F150V8, XLT

auto, 4x4 Super Cab, all power, cruise control, sliding rear window $6,250.

570-825-3313

HONDA ‘05 CIVIC

Sedan, red exterior, 102k, automatic, reliable & economical car comes with a 3-month power train warranty Clean title. $5,999.99

SPRING STREET AUTO 570-825-3313

HYUNDAI ‘04 ‘04 CHEVY MALIBU Black ELANTRA exterior, automatic , 4-door, power doors, winCLASSIC dows, mirrors R-title 4 door, 4 cylinder, auto, good condition. 120k. $3,250 Current Inspection On All Vehicles DEALER

412 Autos for Sale

BMW `99 M3

Convertible with Hard Top. AM/FM. 6 disc CD. 117 K miles. Stage 2 Dinan suspension. Cross drilled rotors. Cold air intake. All maintenance records available. $11,500 OBO. 570-466-2630

$4,500

SPRING STREET AUTO 570-825-3313

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’ DODGE `02 DURANGO s a showroom in print! Classified’s got SPORT 4.7 V8, 4WD, 3rd the directions! row seat, runs good, needs body HYUNDAI ‘04 work 570-902-5623 FORD `95 SONATA Maroon exterior, CROWN VICTORIA V-8, power windows & seats, cruise control. Recent inspection. Asking $1,000. Call 570-604-9325

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG

GTRedCONVERTIBLE with black

top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $17,500 570-760-5833

HONDA `09 CIVIC LX-S Excellent condition

inside & out. Garage kept. Regularly serviced by dealer, records available. Option include alloy wheels, decklid spoiler, sport seats, interior accent lighting (blue), Nose mask and custom cut floor mats. Dark grey with black interior. 56K highway miles. REDUCED! $13,300. Call 570-709-4695

spoiler, power windows,doors, r-title $4,999.99

SPRING STREET AUTO 570-825-3313

JAGUAR `00 S TYPE

4 door sedan. Like new condition. Brilliant blue exterior with beige hides. Car is fully equipped with navigation system, V-8, automatic, climate control AC, alarm system, AM/FM 6 disc CD, garage door opener. 42,000 original miles. $9,000 Call (570) 288-6009

MERCEDES ‘99 BENZ S320exterior, Silver loaded r-title. $6,999.99

SPRING STREET AUTO 570-825-3313

MERCURY ‘03 SABLE White exterior, 48k

miles R-Title. $4,500.

SPRING STREET AUTO 570-825-3313

412 Autos for Sale

TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT

112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air, power windows/locks, CD/cassette, Keyless entry, sunroof, new battery. Car drives and has current PA inspection. Slight rust on corner of passenger door. Clutch slips on hard acceleration. This is why its thousands less than Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO. Make an offer! Call 570-592-1629

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VOLKSWAGEN ‘00 BEETLE 2.0 automatic, air 67k miles $6400. 570-466-0999

VOLKSWAGEN ‘04 TOUREG 95k, V-8 , HID Headlights, 1 owner never in accident, loaded super clean, $13,999.

SPRING STREET AUTO 570-825-3313

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

MERCEDES 1975

Good interior & exterior. Runs great! New tires. Many new parts. Moving, Must Sell. $1,300 or best offer 570-362-3626 Ask for Lee

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. Reduced price to $26,000. Call 570-825-6272

MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR

6 cylinder automatic. 52k original miles. Florida car. $1500. 570-899-1896

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT

CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE $49,000

FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD

All original $12,000

MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL $24,000

MERCEDES ‘29

Kit Car $9,000 (570) 655-4884 hell-of-adeal.com

CHEVY ’77 CORVETTE Red & red, all

original. Non hits, restoration. Rides and looks new. Exceptionally clean. A/c, pb, ps, pw, 51K $12,900 OBO 570-563-5056

FORD `52 COUNTRY SEDAN CUSTOM LINE

STATION WAGON V8, automatic, 8 passenger, 3rd seat, good condition, 2nd owner. REDUCED TO $6,500. 570-579-3517 570-455-6589

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

Must Sell! Appraised for $9,200 • All original

45,000 miles • 350 Rocket engine • Fender skirts • Always garaged Will sell for $6,000 Serious inquires only 570690-0727

421

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

439

Motorcycles

BMW ‘07 K1200 GT Low mileage. Many extras. Clean. $9,000 (570) 646-2645

BMW 2010 K1300S

Only 460 miles! Has all bells & whistles. Heated grips, 12 volt outlet, traction control, ride adjustment on the fly. Black with lite gray and red trim. comes with BMW cover, battery tender, black blue tooth helmet with FM stereo and black leather riding gloves (like new). paid $20,500. Sell for

$15,000 FIRM.

Call 570-262-0914 Leave message.

HARLEY 2011 HERITAGE SOFTTAIL

Black. 1,800 miles. ABS brakes. Security System Package. $16,000 firm. Warranties until 2016 SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY 570-704-6023

HSoft ARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80 riding FLH. King of the Highway! Mint original antique show winner. Factory spot lights, wide white tires, biggest Harley built. Only 28,000 original miles! Never needs inspection, permanent registration. $7,995 OBO 570-905-9348

Boats & Marinas

MIRRORCRAFT ‘01 FISHING BOAT LOADED. 30 hp

Johnson, Bow mounted trolling motor, 2 fish finders, live well, bilge, lights, swivel seats and trailer. Garage kept. $6500.

Call Chuck at 570-466-2819

SUZUKI ‘02 INTRUDER VS 800 CRUISER

Mileage 6,300 $3000 388-2278

439

Motorcycles

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

442 RVs & Campers

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC NOW BACK IN PA.

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, , awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986 WINNEBAGO ‘02 ADVENTURER 35 Foot, double slides, V-10 Ford. Central air, full awnings, one owner, pet & smoke free. Excellent condition and low mileage. $68,000. Call 570-594-6496

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD2V6. ‘04Clean, EXPLORER

Clean SUV! $5995 WD. Extra cab. Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

BUICK ‘04 Rendezvous

Heritage Edition, leather, sunroof, 3rd seat 1 Owner, local trade $7495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

CADILLAC `99 ESCALADE 97k miles. Black

with beige leather interior. 22” rims. Runs great. $8,500 Call 570-861-0202

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

CHEVROLET ‘02 BLAZERexterior, Maroon

4wd , looks & runs great, 58k r-title. $4,500.

SPRING STREET AUTO 570-825-3313

CHEVROLET ‘05 TRAILBLAZER EXT LS White exterior,

entertainment package, front & rear heat & A/C 119k RTitle $8,999.99.

SPRING STREET AUTO 570-825-3313

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘04 MONTE CARLO Silver with Black

Leather, Sunroof, Very Sharp! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHRYSLER `02 TOWN & COUNTRY

CHEVROLET ‘10 COLORADO automatic, 2wd,

great on gas, clean $6,999.

SPRING STREET AUTO 570-825-3313

CHEVY `99 SILVERADO

Auto. V6 Vortec. Standard cab. 8’ bed with liner. Dark Blue. 98,400 miles. $4,999 or best offer 570-823-8196

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘03 SILVERADO

4x4. Extra clean. Local new truck trade! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘05 SILVERADO

2WD. Extra cab. Highway miles. Like new! $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY 99 SILVERADO 4X4

Auto. V8. Bargain price! $3,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

Luxury people mover! 87,300 well maintained miles. This like-new van has third row seating, power side & rear doors. Economical V6 drivetrain and all available options. Priced for quick sale $6,295. Generous trade-in allowances will be given on this top-of-the-line vehicle. Call Fran 570-466-2771 Scranton

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHRYSLER ‘02 TOWN & COUNTRY

V6. Like new! $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

FORD ‘02 EXPLORER

Red, XLT, Original non-smoking owner, garaged, synthetic oil since new, excellent in and out. New tires and battery. 90,000 miles. $7,500 (570) 403-3016

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘02 F150

Extra Cab. 6 Cylinder, 5 speed. Air. 2WD. $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

PAGE 41

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

Find your next vehicle online.

GMC `05 SAVANA 1500 Cargo Van.

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘04 RANGER Super Cab

FORD ‘06 ESCAPE XLT

4x4. Sunroof. Like new. $6,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

One Owner, 4x4, 5 Speed, Highway miles. Sharp Truck! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

To place your ad call...829-7130

AWD. V8 automatic. A/C. New brakes & tires. Price reduced $10,250. Call 570-474-6028

To place your ad call...829-7130

JEEP ‘97 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

4.0-ATM, 4WD, 128,000 miles, full power, minor body & mechanical work needed for state inspection. Recent radiator & battery. $2,500. OBO. 570-239-8376

timesleaderautos.com

BEAUTICIAN SERVICES

Styl-N-Stylz Salon 310 Lackawanna Ave. Olyhant, PA • 570-489-9461

A Full Service Salon • Walk-Ins Welcome

We offer Paul Mitchell, ISO and Wella Hair Products

Highlight Special

$60 Full $45 Partial

$50 Winter Color and Cut Special Visit us on the web at www.styl-n-stylz.com

Chimney Repair Call Now and $ave

Parging • Brick and Block Repair • Stucco • Animal Removal

1-800-943-1515

20% OFF Any Competitors Estimate

SENIOR CUSTOM CITIZEN METAL DISCOUNTS SHOP

JACOBY EXCAVATING

Spring Hill Chimney Will Not Be Undersold!!

ALL TYPES OF REPAIRS & INSTALLATIONS

No Job T oo Masonry, Tile, Fencing, Roofing, Siding, Etc.. Small

Licensed & Insured

Tatulli & Associates, LLC

Accurate ~ Efficient ~ Reliable 570-207-3345 www.tatulli.com HOME IMPROVEMENT

• Flat Roofs • Shingles • Siding • Replacement Windows Free Estimates - Licensed & Insured

HARTH & SON’S I

WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED ROBERT SMITH, WEST PITTSTON

• Painting • Additions • Kitchen & Bath • Carpentry • Flooring Remodeling • Drywall • & More

655-6710

HIC# PA-005521

To Advertise

Call Anne 1-800-273-7130

570-561-7796 or 570-587-1494 ABINGTON PRO SERVICES

Winter Special - New Kitchen or Bath BARGAIN BUNDLES

Complete & Installed Baths from $3,700. Kitchen makeovers - $4,700 for 18 linear feet of counter space. All cabinets, tub, sink and flooring included

PET GROOMING

TAX SERVICES

Tax Preparation

SMITH & MILLER ROOFING, INC.

Snow Removal

Call Jeff For Details at 570-877-3601

Call 570-815-1227

Tax Time is here! Call us... We are Ready to Help!

PREFERRED CONTRACTOR SINCE 1976

Septic and Basement Water Problems-SOLVED!

KITCHEN & BATH REMODELING

REPAIRS

Accounting, Tax & Financial Consulting

ROOFING

member Northeastern & Central PA

EXCAVATING

CHIMNEY REPAIRS

HOME MPROVEMENTS

Specializing In Interior Remodeling ng g

www.harthandsons.com

570-815-8294 • 1-800-460-6286

HOUSE CLEANING

HOUSE CLEANING AND/OR SENIOR CARE Experienced and References Call Sally 570-604-9539

Shear Pawfection pet grooming

(570) 587-3569 Ruthann Austin

We are 4 Paw Rated!

25 Years Professional All Breed Certified Master Groomer

Off Exit 197, Rte. 81

Located in Scott Twp/Waverly, PA

Puppies to Seniors All Breeds Welcome

ROOFING & SIDING

KHS ROOFING & SIDING

Home Improvement Interior Remodeling Kitchens, Baths, Basements Licensed & Insured. Call for free estimates

570-351-2714

MASONRY

AFFORDABLE & HONEST

Masonry, Bathrooms, Remodeling Specializing in Retaining Walls, Concrete and Foundation Repairs

CALL JOE 570-815-3864 masonryplus.net

LANDSCAPING

MARTIRANO OUTDOOR SERVICES Lawn Care, Clean Ups, Hedge Trimming and Removal, Retaining Walls, Gravel, Stone, Soil, Mulch, Planting Curb Stone, New Lawns, Seeding, Pressure Washing, Drainage, Grading, Plus Much More

Call 570-766-1785


PAGE 42 451

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

522

MERCURY `03 MOUNTAINEER 503

AWD. Third row seating. Economical 6 cylinder automatic. Fully loaded with all available options. 93k pampered miles. Garage kept. Safety / emissions inspected and ready to go. Sale priced at $7595. Trade-ins accepted. Tag & title processing available with purchase. Call Fran for an appointment to see this outstanding SUV. 570-466-2771 Scranton

MITSUBISHI `11

OUTLANDER SPORT SE AWD, Black interi-

or/exterior, start/ stop engine with keyless entry, heated seats, 18” alloy wheels, many extra features. Only Low Miles. 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty. $22,500. Willing to negotiate. Serious inquires only - must sell, going to law school. (570) 793-6844

RANGE ROVER ‘07 SPORT

Supercharged 59,000 miles, fully loaded. Impeccable service record. $36,000 570-283-1130

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 468

Auto Parts

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H

FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

Accounting/ Finance

UPHOLSTERER

Benco Dental Company is the nation’s largest independently owned distributor of dental supplies and equipment. We are seeking a conscientious, detail-oriented Upholsterer for our Pittston repair shop. The successful candidate will disassemble and restore dental chairs and stools involving tasks such as cutting, sewing, replacing snaps and zippers, painting, and gluing. Position requirements Include the ability to communicate effectively. Experience working with vinyl and leather, as well as pattern cutting and sewing experience preferred. Must be willing to travel when needed. We offer an excellent compensation package, including a flexible benefits plan with three health insurance options, dental, vision, short/long term disability and life insurances, paid time off, a generous 401(k) retirement plan and a company profit sharing plan. If you enjoy working for a growing company that is family oriented, community minded and values hard working individuals, please consider joining our family! Go to www. benco.com/About /Careers.aspx to apply. An Affirmative Action Employer M/F/V/D

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

518 Customer Support/Client Care

ANSWERING SERVICE 2nd shift and week-

ends. 20-25 hours. Apply in person from 10AM-6PM at Action Telephone; Rear 58 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top.

Education/ Training

548 Medical/Health

566

Sales/Retail/ Business Development

600 FINANCIAL

Home School Teacher

Full time position. Degree in Elementary Education required. Federal & State Criminal Background check, Child Abuse Clearance & fingerprinting required. Call 570-235-5997

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Part-Time/ Full-Time Dental Assistant/EFDA Immediate opening. Benefits package available. X-ray certification is required. EMAIL RESUME TO CASEYDENTAL@ COMCAST.NET

CDL-A DRIVER

Gas field/landscape drivers plus hands on labor required. Operate dump trucks & load equipment on lowboy. Deliver to job site. Must operate skid steer excavator, hydro-seed truck, etc. Will plow in winter. Must have clean driving record and pass drug test. Top Wages Paid. Call Harvis Interview Service @ 542-5330. Leave message. Will send an application. Or forward resume: varsity.harvis@ gmail.com Employer is Varsity, Inc. No walk-ins. EOE

Drivers CDL-A: Local Hazleton dedicated route! Home every night! Great Pay, Benefits! Estenson Logistics Apply: www.goelc.com 1-866-336-9642

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

To place your ad call...829-7130

Part-Time Orthodontist Assistant Immediate opening 3 days per week. X-ray certification is required. EMAIL RESUME TO CASEYDENTAL@ COMCAST.NET

Social Work Consultant P

ART TIME TO WORK WITH ADOPTIVE PARENTS AND PREGNANT WOMEN & OUTREACH IN SCRANTON/ WILKES-BARRE. HOME STUDIES, POSTPLACEMENT VISITS, AND INFORMATION MEETINGS. BSW/ MSW REQUIRED. ADOPTION EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. MUST HAVE FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE. FAX RESUME AND HOURLY REQUIREMENTS TO (610) 642-7938 ATTN: JEANNE OR EMAIL JEANNEM@AFTH.ORG

EOE

R EQUIREMENTS : 2 years Truck Driving Experience, able to drive 20’ box truck, must be able to meet DOT requirements, must be able to work flexible hours, must be able to meet physical requirements. Pay based on experience. Standard benefits available to include medical, dental and vacation. Apply at: U’SAGAIN RECYCLING 486 S. EMPIRE ST. WILKES-BARRE 570-270-2670

WE’RE

SALES

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! Other

BE A RIVER GUIDE!

Friendly outdoor people needed to guide whitewater raft trips on the Lehigh River. Mostly weekends in the Spring, Summer and Fall. Some weekday work available in July & August. Experience helpful but not necessary. Contact Marc S. Brown 570-443-9728 OR Check out our website at: www.whitewater challengers.com

610

EXPANDING TO MAKE ROOM FOR PEOPLE LIKE YOU.

CMS East, Inc. one of the largest family owned and operated cemetery corporations in the country is looking for qualified individuals to service new and existing accounts. To be considered for this position, you must be self motivated and sales oriented with a positive attitude. We provide: $35-$45K first year & more in future years. Paid Training Life Insurance Hospitalization/ Dental Pension Plan, etc. Call Rick for a personal interview Monday-Friday 9am-4pm. (570) 675-3283. Visit our website www.CMSEAST.com Fax your resume to (570) 675-5749

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

551

TRUCK DRIVER Full Time

706

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE LLEADER. LEA E DER D . timesleader.com

569 Security/ Protective Services

Business Opportunities

“WORK FOR YOURSELF” INVEST IN YOURSELF WITH JAN – PRO

*Guaranteed Clients * Steady Income *Insurance & Bonding * Training & Ongoing Support * Low Start Up Costs *Veterans Financing Program * Accounts available through 0ut Wilkes-Barre & Scranton

570-824-5774

Janpro.com NEPA FLORAL & GIFT SHOP Including delivery van, coolers, all inventory, displays, computer system, customer list, website and much more. Turn key operation in prime retail location. $125,000 For more information Call 570.592.3327

630 Money To Loan “We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

SECURITY OFFICERS

Join Vector Security Patrol and become a name on a winning team. We have career opportunities for Security Officers or for those wishing to begin a career in the security field with openings for Part Time/Weekend hours in WilkesBarre and Nanticoke. Previous security experience a plus! EOE 800-682-4722

OIL PAINTINGS 3 are framed in gold wood, carved beautifully. Stone bridge over a lily pond. Never used. 28 “XL 32” w. $55. Beach scene & sea grass $55. Street scene of France & the arch of trumph in background. 25”x29” $30. 570-826-0830

708

FIRE YOUR BOSS!!!!

Arts/Crafts/ Hobbies

Antiques & Collectibles

ANTIQUES 3 piece Mahogany stack bookcase with drawer, 6ft x 20” hand carved Hitler made of pine, Dersuhrer carved on bottom signed by carver Gallagher. Needs some repair. Tiffany style lamps with stained glass shades, caramel in color. 1912 Gustave Stickley rocking chair with new rush seat, tag on bottom. Jewelry armoire, (4) 1912 chairs, original paint with newly rushed seats. 12 OldPA metal hunting licenses, 1927 & up. Two Oak bow china closets, one very ornate. Lots of smalls. 134 Route 11 Larksville, PA 570-283-3987 570-328-3428 BICYCLE. Schwinn, Chopper. Red with chrome. $100. 570-855-7197 DEPARTMENT 56 VILLAGES & accessories for 1/2 price $18 each for most buildings, $10 for most accessories. We’ll be moving and cannot take this large collection with us. Call 868-5886 DOLL CARRIAGE, WICKER for sale for $250. Great for antique collector or your favorite doll lover! Call (570) 655-5419 HANDMADE SCOTTIE rocking “horse” toy. Sturdy enough for toddlers to ride for hours. Unusual design features a Scottie dog instead of a horse. Definitely a must see! $200 Call (570) 655-5419 RECORDS 78 RPM in good condition many, different artists total of 177 records all for $100. 570-735-6638

Air Conditioners

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

AIR CONDITIONER Frigidaire 110 volt new, 10,000 btu $60. OBO 570-383-2527

VANITY, ANTIQUE 4 drawers, mirror, detailed, good condition $100 obo 570-793-9192

700 MERCHANDISE 702

710

Appliances

DRYER, gas, Maytag, bisque, commercial quality, super capacity, quiet series, intellidry sensor, 7 cycle, $250. GE MICROWAVE over the stove bisque, 1 cu. ft. Spacemaker XL 1800 $100. Water cooler Sunbeam, white, 3 temperature options, 3 or 5 gallon bottles, bottom refrigerator, $35. All excellent condition. 451-1612

GENE’S RECONDITIONED APPLIANCES 60 Day Warranty Monday-Friday 8:00PM-5:00PM Saturday 8:00AM-11:00AM Gateway Shopping Center Kingston, PA

(570) 819-1966 REFRIGERATOR Used as overflow fridge. FREE 570-675-8262 WASHER Estate Whirlpool $170. DRYER Queen $170. both negotiable. 570-883-9454 or 570-468-6520 WASHER, Maytag $75. Maytag Gas Dryer $75. 570-760-9518

712

Baby Items

BIKE small Boys $25. Bassinet $25. Infant swing $20. Exersaucer $20. Travel system stroller with infant car seat & extra base $75. Ocean Wonders Aquarium for crib $10. Infant playmat $10. 570-696-3458 CRIB F.P. 3 In 1 travel tender crib or playpen $20. 570-654-4113 CRIB MATTRESS $20 used for one child.570-825-0569

714

Bridal Items

WEDDING GOWN size 9-10 used once, preserved in box $30. 825-0569

720

Cemetery Plots/Lots

CEMETERY PLOTS

(3) together. Maple Lawn Section of Dennison Cemetery. Section ML. $450 each. 570-822-1850

726

Clothing

COAT

KENNETH COLE Beige, size 6, hardly worn. $75. 570-855-5385


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 726

Clothing

COMMUNION SUIT boys, worn twice, black. size 14 $30. 570-654-4113 HANDBAG Miche. 5 handbags in one! You keep interior base & change the outside “shells” to the color & style you want. Barely used & most shells are now retired! Retail $250. Sell $120 OBO 288-2949. WOMEN’S CLOTHING size 14, 3 pair slacks & 2 skirts $ 10. Size large 10 tops & 1 skirt $20. Size medium 8 Tops $10. Men’s Clothingsize large & X-large, camouflaged coat plus 18 other items $20. 474-6028

730

Computer Equipment & Software

DELL DESKTOP Dimensions E510 with monitor, speakers, keyboard, etc. Windows XP plus more software. $190 OBO. 570-542-3215

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! LAPTOP Fujitsu t4010 laptop/touchscreen tablet/ereader:P4 centrino,new hard drive. fresh new xp pro factory tablet install,office 2010 professional corporate edition,burning software, e-reader software & library, antivirus & more! has cdrw+dvd+ stylus. comes with good battery & ac cord. free delivery. $200..XP Pro P4 custom tower with cdrw/dvd. has fresh antivirus, office 2010,keyboard & mouse $75. Older xp pro mini towerloaded. has cd only. good for internet/ etc. keyboard& mouse $40. IBM P4HT/1.0 gb ram/80 gb hd small desktop with dvdrw, windows 7, office 2010 antivirus & more. All fresh clean installs, comes with lcd monitor, keyboard, mouse, speakers $175. 862-2236

732

Exercise Equipment

734

Fireplace Accessories

CORNER HEARTH PAD for a gas or a coal stove. I paid $300 and never used the stove. My price - $90! Great deal! Must be seen to appreciate. Call (570) 655-5419 FIREPLACE MANTLES, GREAT condition, $100 for both obo. 570-793-9192 PEA COAL, 4 tons, valued $800. will sell for $200. you remove, easy take away in yard. Also 1 ton chestnut $50. 570-383-2527 STOVE VENT: I had a gas stove removed without even using it! Snorkel Termination Cap was $400. My selling price - $199! Call (570) 655-5419

738

Floor Care Equipment

STEAM CLEANER: Selling a new, never used Oreck Steamer Carpet Cleaner. Signature Series. $190 Call (570) 655-5419 VACUUM Oreck XL high speed, upright. $150. 825-6086

742

Furnaces & Heaters

HEATER, electric, portable, $20 or best offer. Yale fireproof safe 13x17.5 asking $50 OBO 570-825-5847

744

Furniture & Accessories

ALL NEW Queen P-Top Serta Made Mattress Set, still in original plastic. Must sell. $150. Can Deliver 570-280-9628 BEDROOM SET medium oak, dresser, end table, headboard, mirror $295. OBO. Japanese coffee table with inlay glass figures, mint condition $200 OBO. Solid oak coffee table with 2 matching end tables, mint condition all for $200. 570-829-3483 COFFEE TABLE walnut wood based, kidney shaped, glass top, excellent shape $35. Glass top for round table 42” $10. 779-3844

TREADMILL GOOD condition, $100 obo. 570-793-9192

DINETTE SET for sale. Solid wood with a fruitwood finish. Oval table with 2 leaves, 6 upholstered chairs, triple hutch and server. Excellent value. Must be seen! $750 Call (570) 655-5419

UNIVERSAL WEIGHT SYSTEM. Multiple stations. Includes 200 lbs of weights. Good condition. $275 OBO. 570-474-0753

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Parker House, solid oak 58”w, 50”h, 21”d, 32” RCA TV excellent condition $200 570-262-3967

EXERCISE MACHINE: Pilates 4 cord exercise machine with stand for $225. Call 0 570 655-5419

PAGE 43

744

Furniture & Accessories

FURNISH FOR LESS

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607 FURNITURE 6 piece bedroom set with mirror, $199 OBO Maple dining room set with 4 chairs & inserts 60”x36” $199 OBO. 570-824-7314 FURNITURE SALE Virginia House -very old all wood 6 piece set. Maple finish with Maple Leaf design. Needs refinishing $600. Small Light color round table 2 chairs $75. Sage couch approximately 6’L 2 matching throw pillows $225. 2 Lamps, pair of sage drapes,coffee table $75. Free rust color swivel chair with purchase.TAKE ALL FOR $900. 570-299-7563 PATIO SET, 5 piece, outdoor table chairs, & umbrella base light brown, must sell $30. 570-383-2527 ROCKER, wood/tapestry, $75. RECLINER, Burgundy velour cloth, $125. SOFA, chair, ottoman, 3 tables, great for den. Wood and cloth, all in excellent condition. $450. Call after 6 PM 570-675-5046 STORE CREDIT: FOR SALE Plymouth PA, Furniture Store Credit. Value $2,539.70. Selling for $2,000.00. Cal (570) 313-6784 TODDLER BEDwhite plastic with metal mattress frame. Takes crib mattress. Excellent condition. $25. 570-706-1819

748 Good Things To Eat FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR. SIGN UP NOW

C.S.A. www.hails familyfarm.com 570-721-1144

754

Machinery & Equipment

REFRIGERATOR 06 Kenmore 29 cu. ft.t side by side, water ice on door. Stainless steel finish on front. Used 2 years & sat. Needs freon charge. Paid $1300. will sell $200. OBO 570-383-2527

756

Medical Equipment

POWER CHAIR Invacare Pronto M51 ,excellent condition, used only 2 months, dark navy, 2 rechargeable batteries. $600. 570 881-3806

758 Miscellaneous AUTO PAINT BASE COAT, 1 gallon 6M rally red Corvette color sell for $100. obo. 570-883-7007`

BATHTUB. White clawfoot tub & toilet with fixtures (reproduction). Was $3,200, now $1,800. 2 ladders, 28’ aluminum $150, 16’ ladder, $60, & a tile cutter $40. 570-714-2032 570-852-9617 BEDDING/HOUSE Items King comforter set, new, ivory color $35 Glass coffee table $25. Wilton Cake Pans $1 each 570-443-8310 CHRISTMAS TREE 7 1/2’’ used 3 times asking $50. 570-825-0569 COFFEE MAKE green 12 cup $5. Green toaster $5.4 cup coffee maker $5.Tea for two maker $5. Extra Large George Forman Grill $5. Country bench $12. Large assortment of sunflower items, from $1. to $10. each. Large assortment of pine trees for village decorating $.50 each. Under counter mount TV with remote $10. Under counter mount Radio & cassette with clock $10. 570-868-5275 DEHUMIDIFIER GE used about 5 hours $50. OBO 570-383-2527 FIREPLACE INSERT By Moravian model 101 /Quaker State BTU50,000 H-25” X W29”Xdepth 14” w with overhand 321/2” brass doors, bricks & cast iron faceplate paid $1150. asking $400. Hardly used call 570 751-8425/ 636-1320 MEDICINE CABINET Triple cabinet white frame, tri-view mirror, adjustable shelves, surface mount. 48x30x4 1/4 $35. Vanity top-cultured marble, pink with white veining, single bowl with backsplash, 60x 22 $45. 570-735-5147 MEDICINE CABINET. Oak. 30x30.3 mirrored doors. 4 lights. 3 shelves. Excellent condition $25. 606-6624 MOTOR 2005 Mercury Outboard bought new in ‘06 used 10 times. $800. 570-829-1541

758 Miscellaneous

780

MOVIE POSTERS: genuine $15. 33 RPM records classical, movies etc $4. each. IBM typewriter electric $80. 570-280-2472

TV Sony Wega 42” $75. All in excellent condition, moving must sell. 760-9518

PERFIT incontinence underwear Size X-L 14 per package $5 each. Adult incontin underwear XL size 14 per package $5. each. 570-288-9940 RELIGIOUS ITEMS Rosaries, $5. each, Medals $2. each. Statues starting at $45. each. Records LPS, 78s,45s, 19601990 $1. each. 570-829-2411 SEWING machine Singer in cabinet, attachments + 18 discs for various patterns $50. 570-474-6028 TIRES SUV/Truck Goodyear Rugged Trail t/a 8000 miles 265/75r16. $500. 570-406-5857 TRUCK CAP. Fiberglass A.R.E. with light. Forest green sliding screen windows & locking door. 76x62. $250 OBO. Stepclimber, 425i Tunturi, $100. 570-574-0680

762

Musical Instruments

KEYBOARD, Casio, Model CTK-558. $50. Like new. (570) 287-0023 ORGAN Thomas needs tuning $375. 570-654-4113

PIANO. Kawai. Excellent condition. Asking $1,500. 570-899-3390

784

GOLF CLUBS Adams idea tech v3 hybrid golf clubs set 1 year old all 8 clubs are senior flex graphite shaft, 4-7 iron are hybrids 8gap wedge are forged. New $800+ tax, asking $575. 570-287-0005

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

Tools

WORK TABLE \wooden table with cabinets & drawers 8.5’X4’ $500. OBO. (570) 829-3303

91

%

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today? Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

Wanted: WANTED ALL JUNK CARS, TRUCKS & HEAVY

HAND PUPPETS Alf hand puppets with records. $10. each (new). RODNEY & FRIENDS $30. 570-779-3844

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

Carol is paying

TOP DOLLAR

For your gold and silver, gold and silver coins, rings, bracelets, scrap jewelry Guaranteed highest prices paid. Also Makes Housecalls 570-855-7197

533

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

Dogs

PAWS TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE

EQUIPMENT

Call 829-7130

DUMPTRUCKS

Place your pet ad and provide us your email address

BULLDOZERS BACKHOES

Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995

To place your ad call...829-7130

timesleader.com

786 Toys & Games

815

VITO’S & GINO’S

ONLY LEADER. ONL NL ONE NLY N LE LEA L E DER D .

776 Sporting Goods BASKETBALL HOOP free standing $25. 570-474-6028

Televisions/ Accessories

800 PETS & ANIMALS 805

Birds

Now is the time for all good men and women to come to the aid of their country.

Now is the time for all good men and women to come to the aid of their country. some fmore trest

557

Project/ Program Management

This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

BEAUTIFUL LAB PUPS

AKC, Nice Pedigree. 8 weeks March 16. Black Females and Males avail. $350 Limited, $500 Full Reg. 570-250-4977.

SHIH-TZU PUPPIES

Pure Bred & Mixes $400 and up 570-250-9690

845

Pet Supplies

TANK with FISH hood, pump, heater, all accessories $25. 570-287-0023

557

Project/ Program Management

ASSOCIATE, MEMBERSHIP SERVICES

Girl Scouts are looking for an individual to assist with maintenance at its camp property in Kingsley, PA. Candidates should have experience in construction trades, be able to operate power tools and machinery, and work independently. Candidates must be able to lift up to 100 lbs, be comfortable working on elevated surfaces, and traverse rough terrain. This is a seasonal position working 32 hours per week.

Premier non-profit is seeking an individual to develop and implement plans to recruit and retain girl members and adult volunteers in Lackawanna County. Responsibilities include developing programs and trainings, conducting outreach programs at area schools, and fostering community partnerships. Demonstrated abilities in planning, management, evaluation, and analysis of youth programs are required. Candidates must have excellent motivational and organizational skills along with being able to work with diverse teams. Some evenings and weekends are required. Candidates must have a valid driver’s license to carry out assignments.

Please visit our website at www.gshpa.org/aboutus/careers to complete an application.

Please email resume, cover letter, and salary requirements to careers@gshpa.org

MAINTENANCE


PAGE 44

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 912 Lots & Acreage

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 906 Homes for Sale Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

BACK MOUNTAIN Centermorland

529 SR 292 E For sale by owner Move-in ready. Well maintained. 3 - 4 bedrooms. 1 ¾ bath. Appliances included. 2.87 acres with mountain view. For more info & photos go to: ForSaleByOwner.com Search homes in Tunkhannock. $275,000. For appointment, call: 570-310-1552

WATERFRONT LAND LIQUIDATION!

March 31st! 7 acres – 400 ft Riverfront $69,900 Cooperstown, NY! Nice woods, gorgeous setting! $5,000 off for cash! Free kayak! Call now! (888) 793-7762 www.NewYorkLandandLakes.com

915 Manufactured Homes

EAST MOUNTAIN RIDGE (Formerly Pocono

Park) and San Souci Park. Like new, several to choose from, Financing &Warranty, MobileOneSales.net Call (570)250-2890

HUNLOCK CREEK

Very nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath double wide in quiet country setting. $20,000. Financing available Call 717-439-7716

To place your ad call...829-7130

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

BEAR CREEK

SHAVERTOWN

105 Summit Street Fire damaged home. Sold as is. 60’ x 235’ lot. Public sewer, water & gas. $34,500 Call 570-675-0446, evenings.

SUGARLOAF REDUCED!!!! 2 houses. Must sell

together. Each has its own utilities on 2.5 + acres. 3 car garage with 3 large attached rooms. For Sale By Owner. $239,900 Call (570) 788-5913

909

Income & Commercial Properties

NANTICOKE

4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 unit apartment buildings. Fully occupied. City license and occupancy permits issued. Very well maintained. Some have new windows, roofs, coinop washer/dryer. 570-736-3125

Available April 1 New 3 room apartment. All utilities included except electric. No smoking & no pets. $650 + security and references. Furnished or unfurnished. Call 570-954-1200

30+ DAY

BEING REMODELED

FORTY FORT FIRST FLOOR EFFICIENCY / 1 BEDROOM, BRAND NEW FLOORING, CARPETING, MODERN/APPLIANCES, ELECTRIC/GAS FIREPLACE. APPLICATION/EMPLO YMENT VERIFICATION “being considered” NO PETS/SMOKING 2 YEARS @ $500+ UTILITIES. MANAGED!

America Realty Rentals

288-1422

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

HARDING Renovated 1st floor,

2 bedroom apartment. New carpeting and paint. Fridge & stove. Water Included. $600 + security & utilities. Call 570-240-6620 or 570-388-6503

GRACE LUXURY APARTMENTS Hughestown

Be the first to live in this colossal luxury apartment. Hardwood floors, massive tiled kitchen, granite counters, stainless steel appliances, large laundry room, and elevated ceilings. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Central air – gas heat. Storage room provided. Off street parking. Maintenance free living with clean grounds. No smoking – No pets. Utilities not included. $1,500 / month 570-760-7326

KINGSTON

72 E. W alnut St. 3rd floor, located in quiet neighborhood. Kitchen, living room, dining room, sun room, bathroom. 2 large and 1 small bedroom, lots of closets, built in linen, built in hutch, hardwood floors, fireplace, storage room, yard. New washer/ dryer, stove & fridge. Heat and hot water included. 1 year lease + security. $950 570-406-1411

KINGSTON

Available Now Beautiful 1 bedroom apartment in nice neighborhood. Wall to wall carpeting. Plenty of closet space. All kitchen appliances, including dishwasher & garbage disposal. Nice pantry area off kitchen. Washer / dryer hookup. No pets. No smoking. $450 + utilities & security. Call 570-406-9243 Leave Message All Calls Returned Same Day

KINGSTON

E.Light, WALNUT ST. bright, 1st

floor, 2 bedrooms, elevator, carpeted, security system. Garage. Extra storage & cable TV included. Laundry facilities. Air Conditioned. Fine neighborhood. Convenient to bus & stores. No pets. References. Security. Lease. No smokers please. $765 + utilities. Call. 570-287-0900

944

Commercial Properties

Center City WB

NANTICOKE

1st floor. 1 bedroom, electric water and heat included. Off street parking. Freshly painted, w/d hookup. $575/mo., lease and security required. NO PETS 570-477-6018 leave message

PARSONS SECTION

2nd floor 2 Bedroom, Washer/Dryer hookup, Off street parking water included, freshly painted $525/mo plus utilities. lease & security required. No pets. 570-328-1875

PLYMOUTH

2 bedroom apartment. Heat, water, stove & fridge included. Near bus stop. $600/month No smoking or pets. Credit and background check, security & references required. Call (570) 592-2902

WEST PITTSTON

2nd floor, 5 rooms, wall-to-wall carpeting, window dressings, stove, refrigerator, & garbage disposal. Washer/ dryer hookup, offstreet parking. No pets, no smoking. $650/month + security. Heat, water & sewer included. Call 570-574-1143

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! WYOMING

Wyoming Ave 2nd floor, large newly remodeled, 2 bedroom 1 bath. All appliances, w/d hardwood floors. $615/mo + utilities. No pets, security and references . 570-954-2972

FREE HIGH SPEED INTERNET! Why pay extra for

internet? Our new leases include a FREE high speed connection! Affordable modern office space at the Luzerne Bank Building on Public Square. Rents include internet, heat, central air, utilities, trash removal, and nightly cleaning all without a sneaky CAM charge. Parking available at the intermodal garage via our covered bridge. 300SF to 5000SF available. We can remodel to suit. Brokers protected. Call Jeff Pyros at 570-822-8577

542

Half Doubles

KINGSTON

3 bedroom, 1.5 bath on quiet street; kitchen with range, refrigerator; 1st floor laundry; storage space; off street parking; credit check, lease, and security; $660 month; call 570-575-9936

551

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly. ***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT (12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week) ***75 cent night shift pay differential offered. ***Pay increase based on skill development. Take charge...LEARN AND EARN!

To place your ad call...829-7130 950

Logistics/ Transportation

Other

XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is seeking experienced Forklift Operators - MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL TIME EXPERIENCE - with great employment history to work at their Mehoopany, PA location. The following skills are necessary for these positions. • High School Diploma/GED • Computer Skills • Valid Driver’s License • Criminal Background Check • Pass Pre-Employment Drug Screen & Physical All full-time positions come with the following benefits: medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after 1 year, and paid vacation. Pay increases based on skill development.

EVERY THURSDAY IN MARCH from Noon-4pm at the Tunkhannock Public Library

Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com. Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs. 551

Other

551

Other

551

Other

USM AEROSTRUCTURES CORP

USM Aerostructures Corporation is looking to fill the following positions: MACHINE PROGRAMMER – SWISS, CNC, LATHE MASTERCAM, SOLIDWORKS EXPERIENCE A MUST! CNC SETUP PERSON QUALITY CONTROL INSPECTOR FOR METAL FABRICATED PARTS ASSEMBLY PERSON FOR MECHANICAL ASSEMBLY OF METAL FABRICATED PARTS BENEFITS INCLUDED: MEDICAL, DENTAL, 401K, PAID HOLIDAYS, VACATIONS

SEND RESUME TO R.DELVALLE@USMAERO.NET


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012 950

Half Doubles

Find it every Sunday at these locations.

WILKES-BARRE EAST END

Clean and freshly painted. 3 bedrooms, spacious kitchen, hardwood floors, near amenities. Full basement, stove & refrigerator, washer/dryer hookup, no pets. $625/month, + utilities & security. Call 570-328-3516 570-825-0046

For home delivery, call 1-800-252-5603.

953 Houses for Rent

HARVEYS LAKE

2 small bedrooms, all appliances, security & 1st. Available 4/1. NO PETS. 570-762-6792

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

HARVEYS LAKE

2.5 bedrooms, 2 baths, all appliances, hardwood floors, gas fireplace, washer/dryer on premises, single car attached garage. No pets. $1,100/month + security. Water, sewer & garbage paid. Call 570-855-2687

NANTICOKE Desirable

Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms $936 + electric only

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

962

PAGE 45

Rooms

WEST PITTSTON

Rooms for rent in large, furnished Victorian Home. Hardwood floors. Modern kitchen, bath & laundry. Off street parking. $500 + security. All utilities, cable & internet included. Month to month lease. Call 570-430-3100

Wings Cafe - Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Airport Uni-Mart - Birney Ave., Moosic Moosic Mini Mart - Birney Ave., Moosic Osmolia’s Gulf - Birney Ave., Moosic Genotti’s - Main St., Moosic Convenient Food Market - Moosic Rd., Old Forge Gerrity’s - Birney Ave., Moosic Turkey Hill - Birney Ave., Moosic Uni-Mart - Davis St., Moosic Convenient Food Market - Davis St., Moosic CVS - Davis St., Scranton Stange’s - Birney Ave., Scranton Convenient Food Market - Pittston Ave., Scranton Mr Z’s - South Washington, Scranton Convenient Food Market - Cedar Ave., Scranton Uni-Mart - Franklin & Mulberry St., S. Scranton Frank’s News - N. Washington Ave., Scranton Markowitz Bros. - Wyoming Ave., Scranton Rite-Aid - N. Washington Ave., Scranton Speedy Shop - Wyoming & Spruce St., Scranton Kwik N Ezy - S. 7th Ave., Scranton Redner’s Market - 7th Ave., Scranton Turkey Hill - N. Main St., Scranton CVS - S. Main St., Old Forge Manley’s - Main Ave. & Jackson St., Scranton A Plus - Main Ave., W. Scranton Turkey Hill - Merridian Ave., Scranton Pantry Quik - Washburn St., Scranton Gerrity’s - S. Main Ave., Scranton CVS - Main Ave., Scranton Mascot Petroleum - S. Main St., West Scranton Price Chopper - Main St., Taylor Turkey Hill - S. Keyser Ave., Taylor Uni-Mart - S. Main St., Taylor Convenient Food Market - N. Main St., Old Forge Turkey Hill - N. Main St., Old Forge

Michelle’s Deli Express - Oak St., Old Forge Rite-Aid - S. Main St., Old Forge Rossi’s Market - Lawrence St., Old Forge Nicki’s Hoagies - Lonesome Rd., Old Forge USA Minimart - Montage Rd., Moosic Rite-Aid - S. Washington Ave., Scranton Linden Mini Mart - Linden St., Scranton Brunetti’s Super Market - N. Main Ave., Scranton Walgreens - S. Main Ave., Scranton Gerrity’s - Meadow Ave., Scranton USA Minimart - Meadow Ave., Scranton Convenient Market - Meadow Ave., Scranton CVS - Meadow Ave., Scranton Sunoco Snack Shop - Moosic St., Scranton Turkey Hill - Mulberry St., Scranton Gunsmoke - N. Washington Ave., Scranton Joe’s Kwik Mart - N. Washington Ave., Scranton Scotts Grocery - Mulberry St., Scranton Sacred Grounds - W. Olive St., Scranton Convienent Food Mart - Wyoming Ave., Scranton Price Chopper - Monroe Ave., Dunmore Joe’s Kwik Mart - Wheeler Ave., Dunmore Monsours Market - Prescott Ave., Scranton Convenient Food Mart - Prescott Ave., Scranton T’s Corner Store - Providence Rd., Scranton Garcia’s Market - Pittston Ave., Scranton Turkey Hill - S. Blakeley St., Dunmore CVS - Blakely St., Dunmore Rite Aid - S. Blakely St., Dunmore 1st National Com. Bank - Drinker St., Dunmore The Fast Lane - E. Drinker St., Dunmore Joe’s Kwik Mart - E. Drinker St., Dunmore Brown’s A Plus Sunoco - O’Neil Hwy., Dunmore Price Chopper - O’Neil Hwy., Dunmore Sheetz - O’Neil Hwy., Dunmore Joe’s Kwik Mart - N. Blakely St., Dunmore

971 Vacation & Resort Properties

HARVEY’S LAKE

LAKEFRONT fully furnished. Wifi, cable. Weekly, monthly. Season 2012 starting June 570-639-5041

QUAIL HOLLOW VILLAGE TIME SHARE

Beech Mountain Lakes, Drums PA. Great Price! Call 570-954-8795

golackawanna.com

Ideal Cafe & Market - W. Drinker St., Dunmore Riccardos Market - S. Blakley St., Dunmore Dunmore Cigar - E. Drinker St., Dunmore Top Notch Tobacco - N. Blakley St., Dunmore Convenient Market - Scranton Blvd., Scranton Burke’s Pharmacy - E. Market St., Scranton Greenridge News - Greenridge St., Scranton CVS - Greenridge St., Scranton Convenient Mart - Main & Wood St., Scranton Joe’s Quik Mart - N. Main Ave., Scranton Gerrity’s - N. Keyser Ave., Scranton Rite-Aid - N. Keyser Ave., Scranton Town & Country Store - N. Keyser Ave., Scanton Joe’s Kwik Mart - Keyser Ave., Scranton A Plus Mini Mart - Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit Convenient Chinchilla - Rte 6 & 11, Clarks Summit Weis - S. State St., Clarks Summit Rite Aid - State St., Clarks Summit Sheetz - Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit Joe’s Kwik Mart - State St., Clarks Summit Convenient Mart - Highland Ave., Clarks Summit Gerrity’s - Old Lackawanna Trail, Clarks Summit Costas Drug Store - Old Lack. Trail, Clark Summit Don’s Market - Winola Rd., Clarks Summit CVS - S. Abington Rd. Clarks Summit Waverly Deli - Clinton St., Waverly Dalton Country Store - Main St., Dalton Ray’s Supermarket - College Ave., Factoryville Joe’s Kwik Mart - Rt. 11, Factoryville Stange’s Country Mkt.- Red BarnVillage,ClarksSummit Village Grocery - Morgan Hwy., Clarks Summit Gulf Station - Keyser Ave., Scranton Tobacco Road X - Old Forge Tobacco Road XII - Washington Ave., Scranton Moosic Mini Mart - Birney Ave., Moosic Brunetti’s Market - Main Ave., Scranton


PAGE 46

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012

974 Wanted to Rent Real Estate

Kingston, Forty Fort or Bear Creek Area Responsible couple. Non-smokers. Seeking to rent a single home or half double. Call 570-822-8361

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1135

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Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

1156

Insurance

NEPA LONG TERM CARE AGENCY

Long Term Care Insurance products/life insurance/estate planning. Reputable Companies.

1165

Lawn Care

SPIKE & GORILLA’S LAWNCARE

Silly Name, Serious Results! Residential & Commercial Services Available.

570-702-2497

1183

Masonry

JAMES ATHERTON MASONRY Free Estimates All phases of masonry, foundations, brick, concrete, chimneys & roofs 570-417-7688

Selling your ride? We’ll run your ad in the classified section until your vehicle is sold.

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NL N L LY ONE N LE LEA L LEADER. E DER D . timesleader.com

1297

Tree Care

ZOMERFELD TREE SERVICE, INC.

www nepalong termcare.com

Tree removal, trimming, stump grinding. Demolition Hauling & excavating. 570-574-5018

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

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39 Prospect St • Nanticoke


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012

PAGE 47

V isitus 24/ 7 a twww.v a lleyc hev r o let .c o m

TH E W E SE L L M O R E TH AN P R E -O W N E D CH E V Y’ S

TO P D O L L A R FO R TRA DE -I N S

C ars • Trucks • R V’s • M otorcycles • A TV’s • C om m ercial

2006 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4

2007 CHEVY CO BALT LT Sedan O N LY 46K M ILES

2007 CHEVRO LET IM PALA LS

2009 PO NTIAC V IBE

O N LY 37K M ILES

ONE O W N ER ONE O W N ER

$

10 999*

$

,

2007 SATURN AURA XE

11 999*

$

,

O N LY 37K M ILES

$

13 999*

$

,

$

,

14 999*

SU N RO O F

#11812A ,4 C yl.,6 Speed M anualTransm ission,A ir C onditioning,Leather,A lloy W heels,PW ,PD L,49K M iles

$

14 999*

2008 FO RD ESCAPE XLT AW D

G RAND CHERO KEE 4X4

15 888* ,

2007 SUZUKI XL7

2010 JEEP W 4W D

RANG LER SPO RT

15 900* ,

2009 FO RD EDG E SEL AW D O N LY 26K M ILES

$

21 500* ,

2007 FO RD RANG ER SUPERCAB 4W D

$

14 999* ,

2007 CHEVRO LET CO LO RADO 2009 N ISSAN RO G UE SL AW D EXTENDED CAB 4W D Z71 ONE O W N ER

ONE O W N ER

#Z2505A ,3.7LI5,A utom atic,D eep Tinted G lass,O ffRoad Pkg., #12069A ,6 C yl.,A uto,A ir,Fog Lam ps, Rear Jum p Seats,C D /M P3,PW ,PD L,47K M iles Insta-Trac 4x4,PW ,PD L,A ir,C astA lum inum W heels,46K M iles

$

15 999* ,

2010 H O NDA CRV EX-L SPO RT 4W D

$

17 999* ,

2009 TO YO TA V ENZA W AG O N AW D

#12287A ,A utom atic,A /C ,Sunroof,Leather,PW ,PD L, C ruise,A lum inum W heels

$

19 999* ,

2007 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER SS 4X4 O N LY 34K M ILES

SUN RO O F

#11735A ,V6,A utom atic,A ir,Leather, A M /FM /C D ,C hrom e W heels

$

#Z2582,3.5LA utom atic,A ir,PW ,PD L,A lum inum W heels, C D ,Bedliner,Fog Lam ps,O nly 42K M iles

O N LY 33K M ILES

ONE O W N ER

ONE O W N ER

#12221A ,V6 6 Speed M anualTransm ission,A /C , Prem ium W heels,H ardtop,PW ,PD L,C ruise,23K M iles

,

2006 G M C CANYO N

,

ONE O W N ER

#12004A ,V6 A utom atic,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Tilt, C ruise,A lloy W heels

$

14 999*

ONE O W N ER

14 999

,

O N LY 37K M ILES

$

$

SL R EG CAB 4x4

#12305A , V6 A uto., A ir, PW , PD L, Traction C ontrol, A lloy W heels, Luggage Rack, 45K M iles $ *

14 999*

AW D

#12195A ,V6,Suroof,A utom atic,A ir, A lloy W heels,PW ,PD L

#12131A ,V6 A utom atic,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Pow er Seat, RoofRack,A lloy W heels,A M /FM C D

SU N RO O F

#Z2663, 2.2L A uto., A /C , PW , PD L, O nStar, Traction C ontrol, C D , Luggage RoofRails

$

,

2006 PO NTIAC TO RRENT

,

2005 M INI CO O PER S 2011 CH EV Y H H R LT 2005 JEEP O N LY O N 46K E OW N MER ILES

,

ONE O W N ER

#12172A A , A uto, A ir, PW , PD L, Keyless Entry, A M /FM /C D , 1 O w ner

13 999*

12 999*

AW D

O N LY 24K M ILES

#Z2592A ,Vortec 4200 A utom atic,C lim ate C ontrol,Bose Stereo,Keyless Rem ote D oor Lock,Running Boards, 17” A lum inum W heels,PW ,PD L,Pow er H eated M irrors

$

,

Sedan

LS 4W D

#Z2436,3.5LV8 A utom atic,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Pow er Seat w /Lum bar A djustm ent,Steering W heelC ontrols,1 O w ner

12 999*

2010 H O ND A CIVIC LX

2005 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER

O N LY 39K M ILES

#12266A , 1.8LD O H C A uto., A ir, PW , PD L, Rem ote Keyless Entry, 45K M iles

#Z2402, V6 A utom atic, A /C , PW , PD L, C ruise, O nStar, Pow er Seat, SteelW heels, 1 O w ner

#Z2596A , 3.7L V6 A utom atic, A /C , PW , PD L, A M /FM /C D , A lloy W heels, O N LY 42K M ILES

#12136A ,2.2LA uto.,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Spoiler, C D ,Traction C ontrol

21 999* ,

#12541A ,4 C yl.,A utom atic,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Tinted W indow s,Leather,FrontC aptain C hairs,31K M iles

$

22 900* ,

#12205A , 2.7L4 C yl., A utom atic, A ir, Fog Lam ps, PW , PD L, Tinted W indow s, A lloy W heels, Pow er Seat, 30K M iles

$

22 987* ,

*Prices plus tax & tags. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. XM and OnStar fees applicable. Low APR to well qualified buyers.Not responsible for typographical errors.

K E N W A L L A CE ’S

745041

•1-800-444-7172 V A L L E Y 821-2772 601 K id d e rS tre e t, W ilke s -Ba rre , P A CH E V RO L E T

#Z2664,V8 A uto.,C lim ate C ontrol,Rem ote Keyless Entry, D eep Tinted G lass,Bose 6 D isc C D Stereo & M ore

$

26 900* ,

Scan From M obile D evice For M ore Specials

Mon.-Thurs.8:30-8:00pm; Friday 8:30-7:00pm; Saturday 8:30-5:00pm

EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.


PAGE 48

M A S S I V E • M A R K D O W N • M A R C H

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 2012

TH E NU M BER 1 NISSAN D EAL ER I N TH E NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGI O N* *

2012 N IS S A N

JU K E S V

S TK #N 21664 M O D EL# 20362 M S R P $22,490

B U Y FO R

$

2 0 ,9 9 0

FW D

6S P E E D

T u rb o 4 Cyl, 6 S p eed , A/ C, All Po w er, S electa b le D rive M o d es , A Bla s tT o D rive!!

SA VE O N A L L J U KES IN STO C K 10 A VA IL A B L E!! NO W !!

*

E V I S VI GS N S A ! SA

W / $5 0 0 N M AC C A P TIV E C A S H

O ’G T O A P S ’ E R TH E

*Price is p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .

IN G R U D UR O

M

S TK #N 21107 M O D EL# 13112 M S R P $23,960

2012 N IS S A N ROGUE 50 R O G U ES IN STO C K S FW D M O R E A R R IV IN G D A ILY !

A L TIM A

SA VE $5500 O N A NY IN STO C K 2012 A LTIM A NO W !

IN STO C K O NLY

J ST JU US ST T A C AN NN NO OU UN N CED CE ED D

500 5 0 0 5 0 0 S ST .PATRI C CK AY ST T. .P PA AT TR RI I CK K’ ’S SD DA AY Y

4 Cyl, CVT , PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, I-K ey, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

B U Y FO R

*

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE, $ 75 0 N M A C C A P TIV E C A S H & $ 5 0 0 S T. P ATR IC K S D AY B O N U S C A S H

OR

$

L EAS E FO R *

179

W E E B W EEK EE EK KEN EN ND D BO BO ON NU US S CA C S CA ASH SH H! ! $

PP luERs TaM x.O.

2012 N IS S A N S E DA N

M A XIM A 3.5S

B U Y FO R

*

$

OR

L EA S E FO R

259

2012 N IS S A N A RM A DA S V SA VE $7000 O R M O R E O N A L L 2012 4X4 A R M A DA ’S IN STO C K O NLY !! 10 A VA IL A B L E W H AT A L EA SE!!

B U Y FO R

3 8 ,4 9 5

*

OR

$

W / $ 2 0 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $5 0 0 S T. P ATR ICK S D AY B O N U S CAS H

L EAS E FOR

48 9

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$489 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $20973.70; M u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. In clu d es $500 S t. Pa tricks D a y Bo n u s Ca s h.

As k

L EAS E FO R *

18 9

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$189 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12,216.50; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1,999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. $1000 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te & $500 S t. Pa tricks D a y Bo n u s Ca s h in clu d ed .

M URA N O S

A W ESO M E L EA SE!!

V-6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PD L , Cru is e, T ilt, S p la s h Gu a rd s & F lo o rM a ts !

B U Y FO R

*

P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

OR

$

L EAS E FO R

*

2 8 9 P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$289 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,913; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. In clu d es $725 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te & $500 S t. Pa tricks D a y Bo n u s Ca s h.

2011 N IS S A N P A THFIN DE R O NLY 4 2011’S L EFT!! SA VE $7000 S V 4X4 O R M O R E O N A NY IN STO C K 2011!

S TK #N 21048 M O D EL# 25211 M S R P $35,160

$

*

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 S T. P ATR IC K S D AY B O N U S C A S H

W H AT A L EA SE!!

B U Y FO R

2 8 ,16 0

2012 N IS S A N TITA N K C SA VE O VER $6000 O FF M SR P S V 4X4 IN STO C K O NLY !! S TK #N 21429 M O D EL# 34412 M S R P $35,180

V6, Au to , A/ C, PW , PD L , P. S ea t, AM / F M / CD , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts , M u ch M o re

V8, Au to m a tic, 8 Pa s s en ger, Rea rAir, Ba cku p Ca m era , F o ld in g S ea ts , All Po w er, M u s tS ee!!

OR

$

M A SSIVE SA VING S O N A L L IN STO C K 2012 M U R A NO S!

*$259 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $18,881.25; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1,999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. $1000 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te a n d $500 N is s a n S t. Pa tricks D a y Bo n u s Ca s h.

$

*

STK#N 21472 M O D EL# 23212 M SR P $32,525

W / $ 15 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 S T. P ATR IC K S D AY B O N U S C A S H

STK#N 21418 M O D EL# 26212 M SR P $45,595

B U Y FO R

19 ,4 9 9

2012 N IS S A N

IN STO C K O NLY

V-6, CVT , M o o n ro o f, Pw rS ea t, Allo ys , A/ C, PW , PD L , Cru is e, T ilt& F lo o rM a ts

2 7,4 9 5

4 Cyl, CVT , AC, AM / F M / CD , PW , PD L , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

You r A W D Pen n sylva n ia M ASSIV E $ IN V EN TO RY! 2 7,4 9 9

W H A T A DEA L ! L EA SE O R B U Y NO W

STK#N 21280 M O D EL# 16112 M SR P $33,125

IN STO C K O NLY

30 IN STO C K

W / $ 75 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 S T. P ATR IC K S D AY B O N U S C A S H

*$179 PerM o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12,459.20; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1,999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery $2,202.50. $1330 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te & $500 S t. Pa tricks D a y Bo n u s Ca s h in clu d ed .

$

S TK #N 21519 M O D EL# 22112 M S R P $23,050

$ $

18 ,4 6 0

T

0 0 O CK TFORO M ! T 3 S N I R S O V E VEH ICLE CH O O SE

50 IN STO C K

$

O LD

H N C E R V A E

M

2012 N IS S A N 2.5S S E DA N

N GS AV I S F O

*

OR

W / $ 2 5 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE

$

L EAS E FO R

*

2 9 9 P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14415.60; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1999 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; T o ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $3950 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .

V8, Au to , A/ C, PW , PD L , Cru is e, T ilt, Va lu e T ru ck. Pkg., F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

B U Y FO R W

$

2 8 ,19 5

*

/ $ 2 0 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE, $ 13 5 0 VA L U E TR K P K G C A S H & $ 5 0 0 S T. P ATR IC K S D AY B O N U S C A S H *Price p lu s ta x a n d ta gs . In clu d es $500 S t. Pa tricks D a y Bo n u s Ca s h.

* Ta x a nd Ta g a d d it io na l. Pr io rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gr a phic a l Er r o r s . A ll r eb a t es & inc ent ives a pplied . * *0 % A PR in lieu o f r eb a t es . fo rd et a ils . * * As perN is s a n M o nt hly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f O c t2 0 11. A ll Pr ic es b a s ed o n im m ed ia t e d elivery in s t o c k vehic le o nly. A ll o ffer s ex pir e 4 /2 /12 .

Th e

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229 M U N DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

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®

M A S S I V E • M A R K D O W N • M A R C H


Go Lackawanna 03-18-2012