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GOLackawanna

Sunday, January 1, 2012 ON THE COVER / GO LACKAWANNA FILE PHOTOS

3 NEWS

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO

Abington’s Brianna Toro blocks a shot from Dunmore’s Molly Burke during holiday tournament play. STORY: Page 17

NEWS

Page 3-5 – Revisiting biggest stories from 2011 Page 6 – Police still search for Scranton bank robber Page 8 – Departing commissioners reflect on office Page 10 – Olyphant priest celebrates century

13 ARTS Page 13 – HOWELLS: Comic greats recalled Page 15 – DEAL DETECTIVE: Save more in 2012 Page 16 – No blind ambition for Scranton band

17 SPORTS Page 17 – Holiday hoops tournament results Page 18 – ROBINSON: Review of 2011 Page 22 – Cross County basketball showdown set Page 23 – Trail among top wrestling teams

ARTS

OUR TEAM GO Lackawanna Editor Christopher J. Hughes 558-0113 chughes@golackawanna.com General Manager Paul Andrews – 558-0845 pandrews@golackawanna.com Reporter/Photographer Rich Howells – 558-0483 rhowells@golackawanna.com Advertising Representative Karen Fiscus – 970-7291 kfiscus@timesleader.com

Obituaries – 558-0113 News Tips 558-0113 news@golackawanna.com Missed Paper – 829-5000 Classified 1-800-273-7130 Advertising – 829-7101 Subscriptions – 1-800-252-5603 Hours of Operation 9a.m. – 6p.m.; M-F; 210 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton 18503

Not too many easy days in 2011 SPORTS

Inside my fairly quiet West Scranton home, there wasn’t much to complain about over the

last 12 months. We had a few stretches with a broken washing machine or dryer, but nothing came our way that could outright ruin a year. Inside the walls of the Go Lackawanna office, things were much more complicated. I’ll remember 2011 as a year where, at first, I presented myself with a new challenge that later presented me with many more. Three weeks into beginning our work at reporting on criminal court matters, the first time I had ever undertaken the task

BEHIND THE BYLINES

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES in my five-year career as a journalist, a former friend was accused of having sex with his student in Dunmore. About two months later, another West Scranton graduate allegedly used part of her body as a handbag for heroin. Then, another friend got wrapped into the alleged fight involving a Scranton police officer at a bar in North Scranton. There have been a few too many days that I would have liked to have either laid my head down on my desk or crawled underneath it. Until this year, I had largely been removed from reporting on the people I had known in

an unflattering way. Sure, colleagues would often call for coverage about a play or community project while I worked with The Abington Journal and The Times Leader. Needless to say, no one was calling to brag to me about their arrest record. Criminal court made me cringe at times, from allegations of the abuse of children to violence against women. Seeing the people I thought I knew in those files gave me pause and continually reminded me that suspects are innocent until proven guilty. It’s added to our criminal court briefs every week because of that. I’ve received the messages and phone calls that claimed I had gotten it all wrong, and I’ve invited suspects to speak

to me about their case. None took my offers. This year instilled in me a renewed belief that every story has two sides. We’ve been fortunate to tell some in the realm of local politics, particularly in covering Scranton City Council, and we hope to continue and expand that effort as long as possible. But I also hope that you’ll tell us about the good things happening in your lives, too. There will be more opportunities to do that in the pages of Go Lackawanna in the coming weeks. The stories in a newspaper tell us who we were at a given time in our lives, but that doesn’t mean it’s who we always were or always will be. I hope you learned that with me this year.

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES learned a lot this year. Email him at chughes@golackawanna.com.

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Sunday, January 1, 2012

GOLackawanna

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Top Stories of 2011

United front combatted bath salts, incense By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

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Injunctions and legislation Three Lackawanna County judges approved an injunction against six city businesses banning the sale of the synthetic drugs on March 30, paving the way for months of legislation at the state and federal level that banned specific chemical compounds commonly found in bath salts and incense. The Pennsylvania House of Representatives voted unanimously,195-0, in April to ban the sale of products including MDPV and salvia divinorum. Gov. Tom Corbett signed the legislation in late June that bans the possession, use and sale of the synthetic designer drugs. Under the law, conviction carries penalties ranging from one to five years in prison and between $5,000 and $15,000 in fines. Pennsylvania’s ban took effect in mid-August. Between April and June, Scranton and Lackawanna County officials passed similar

measures. City Council passed four ordinances in April that that were signed into law the next day by Mayor Chris Doherty. Violators of the city ban can be fined up to $300 or jailed for 30 days per offense in the city. On April 9, the Lackawanna County District Attorney’s office and police departments from Archbald, Carbondale, Dickson City, Scott Township, and Scranton, seized more than $25,000 in bath salts from county businesses. County commissioners approved an emergency ordinance regarding bath salts at their meeting on April 13. Penalties include a $1,000 fine, 10 days in jail, or both, along with costs. Most recently, the U.S. House on Dec. 8 passed the Synthetic Drug Control Act, 317-98. A similar pending measure in the U.S. Senate has the expressed support of Sen. Bob Casey, D-Scranton.

ment still occasionally encounters a suspect in possession of synthetic marijuana. “We’re not seeing the severity of incidents around that like we had with bath salts,” the chief said. In fact, Duffy said cases of synthetic drug abuse have “plummeted” in recent months. He credits the widespread collaboration that took place following the explosion of abuse cases. “You saw a united front where everyone cast aside their differences,” Duffy said. “That’s a prime example of government and the people working together and actually solving an issue concerning safety… We are so fortunate in Scranton and Lackawanna County that we were able to nip this in the bud. “Are people still using them? No doubt about it. But it went from several incidents per week to almost no incidents.”

Quiet aftermath Duffy said that the depart-

Manufacturers building cycle One shop owner reached this

“Throughout history, people have always tried to find ways o make things legal that were not socially responsible." — Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy

SPORTS

Bath salt abuse landed in the spotlight on March 9 when Scranton resident Ryan Foley allegedly broke into the St. Ann’s Monastery in West Side, attacking the Rev. Francis Landry while high on the substance. Foley is set for trial on Jan. 9, according to court records. During a press conference regarding the Ash Wednesday attack at St. Ann’s, Duffy said, “Other states have been faced with a meth epidemic. I’ve been saying for a while that bath salts is our version of meth here… The worst thing about it is there’s nothing we can charge in regards to this particular substance.” That soon changed.

TIMES LEADER FILE PHOTO

Bath salts, the mislabled products that mimicked ecstasy and cocaine, were the synthetic drug of choice in northeastern Pennsylvania in early 2011.

ARTS

he synthetic, previously legal drugs dubbed bath salts and incense that first crept into the local drug treatment community caused havoc for police departments in northeastern Pennsylvania in early 2011. Abuse of the psychoactive drugs that mimicked ecstasy, methamphetamine, cocaine, or marijuana skyrocketed between January and March, but Scranton Police Chief Dan Duffy said this week that cases disappeared as quickly as they began.

week, who wished to remain anonymous, said that within days of the passage of state legislation, distributors of bath salts and related products called to offer new items with different, still legal drug compounds available. The owner said they haven’t allowed bath salts to return to their shelves, but customers entering the shop on Wednesday morning readily purchased packages of so-called potpourri. The10 gram packages selling for $55 do not contain any of the currently illegal compounds, as indicated by a flyer displayed on the shop’s front counter. Other area businesses, the owner claimed, have begun selling new synthetic drugs under the guise of “pipe cleaner” or “jewelry cleaner.” Duffy said that it’s up to administrative entities, such as the police department and medical professionals, to identify trends in crime or patient treatment to halt another rise in synthetic drug use. Shop owners hold equal responsibility, he said. “If you’re a business that’s selling these things, you’re attracting a certain clientele and you’re attracting criminal activity,” Duffy said. “Shame on the people who are out there selling them. They know what they’re being used for… They’re putting money before public safety, and that’s wrong.” The availability of synthetic drugs will likely continue to be a problem, Duffy predicted. “Throughout history, people have always tried to find ways to make things legal that were not socially responsible,” Duffy said. “I would suspect that a cycle would continue, but it’s up to law enforcement to continue sharing information to identify certain things that pose a risk to the public.”

NEWS

Synthetic drug abuse rose, fell quickly


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, January 1, 2012

NEWS

Top Stories of 2011

Money problems plagued Scranton Administration, council battled through year RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

SPORTS

ARTS

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s the city prepares to enter 2012, many of Scranton’s operating budget issues from 2011 remain unresolved due to deficits that started as early as January while an overall financial picture of the city continues to be unclear. Scranton City Council first addressed issues within the 2011budget in March, criticizing city administration for borrowing $2.9 million from the Worker’s Compensation Reserve Account in 2009 to pay salaries and another $5 million in 2010 for the same reason, which was paid back in 2011 with Tax Anticipation Notes. TANS are meant to be used to cover the city’s bills until tax revenue arrives. By April, council discovered that an additional deficit of $6.3 million in accounts payable had appeared, spent on 2010 bills. Council’s 2011 amended budget did not account for these 2010 bills, as they claim they were unaware of them, thus developing a shortfall early on. Council’s four-member supermajority alleged that the administration has “never been truthful” about city finances and that the 2011 TANS were used to cover up holes in 2010’s budget, expressing frustration about being “left in the dark” about city finances. In May, Council Finance Chair Frank Joyce contended that the deficit was caused by an overprojection of 2010 revenue

and an underprojection of health insurance costs in 2011 by the administration, as well as the administration’s borrowing from the workers’ compensation trust fund in January. Mayor Chris Doherty, however, continually placed blame on a budget amended, passed, and supported by council with a vote overriding his veto. Safety cuts, mounting debt On July 29, Doherty announced that he would cut eight firefighters and 13 police officers, effective Aug. 29, to save the city money. The mayor’s proposed 2011 budget eliminated 32 firefighters and 10 police officers, though most of those layoffs were prevented. He criticized council for reducing real estate taxes by 10.55 percent and business privilege and mercantile taxes by 25 percent, stating that “this is a strong mayor form of government” and that council’s role is to simply vote the administration’s legislation “up or down,” not to amend and pass their own, with few exceptions. In August, Joyce railed against the mayor’s rehire of four Department of Public Works employees and granting his secretary a raise that wasn’t budgeted for. In September, council received legislation from the administration that would sell the city’s 1,200 parking meters to the Scranton Parking Authority for a one-time revenue boost of $6 million as well as legislation that would petition the Court of Common Pleas of Lackawanna County to allow $4 million of additional borrowing to fill the budget gap. At the time, the gap was then estimated to be about $6.5 million by the Pennsylvania Economy League after the city received an extra $1.7 million in state pension aid. In October, Council Vice President Pat Rogan met with Do-

herty and McGowan in a WilkesBarre coffee shop to discuss the city’s financial crisis but did not agree on a definitive plan that would please both sides. Rogan said he would not agree to sell the city’s meters nor would he consider further layoffs of public safety workers. Joyce continued to refer to budget problems as “the Doherty deficit” while the mayor defended his budget changes, saying that the DPW foremen he rehired were paid out of lifeguard salaries. Council did not place Doherty’s proposed plan on their agenda, instead introducing its own. Under the plan, the city would terminate its current agreement with the Parking Authority so that all 2012 parking revenue would come into the city, less the cost of citation issuers who would now be on the city’s payroll. The city would borrow $6.5 million with the parking meter revenue secured to pay the loan with the city’s full faith and credit as back-up. Ultimately, neither plan would be implemented. On Oct. 19, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court found in a 6-1 ruling that the distressed municipalities act, or Act 47, does not supersede Act 111, the Policemen and Firemen Collective Bargaining Act, meaning that the city could no longer delay collective bargaining awards because of the city’s economic state. No concrete figure on the full back pay award has been announced, but city and union officials continue to estimate that it will exceed $20 million. Doherty warned that the decision could lead to further layoffs, tax increases, and additional borrowing. In November, McGowan’s cash flow reports predicted a deficit of $5.4 million, though estimations by PEL placed the number closer to $6.1 million.

Budgets drafted, debated On Nov. 15, Doherty announced and forwarded to council his proposed 2012 budget. The budget would raise property taxes by 29 percent and real estate transfer taxes from 2.5 percent to 2.9 percent, restore business and mercantile taxes to their 2010 level, and eliminate 29 firefighters. Additionally, his budget would cut 15 employees from the Single Tax Office and restore six positions cut from the police department. While Doherty said his plan addressed the deficit, it would not deal with the Supreme Court decision, which he said would be met “through borrowing” with debt service over 30 years. His budget also included an injection of revenue through leasing parking meters to the SPA, as he had suggested the month prior. In December, council introduced its amendments to Doherty’s $83.9 million proposed budget, decreasing the mayor’s real estate tax increase from 29.1 percent to 4.8 percent, the real estate transfer tax from 2.9 percent to 2.8 percent, and the business privilege and mercantile taxes from 33.3 percent to 16.7 percent. Joyce said decreases would be accomplished through reductions in expenditures and the elimination of two administrative positions, four Department of Public Works administrative positions, 18 union positions, and casual DPW workers other than lifeguards for city pools, though seven cut positions were restored in the Single Tax Office. A new parking tax would bring in additional revenue, as well as a delinquent tax sale and increases in projections of nonresident taxes. $1.4 million was expected to be saved from early refinancing of debt, and approximately $51,000 was saved by re-

ducing the salaries of all department heads by 10 percent outside of the Office of Economic and Community Development, the Law Department, and the Police and Fire Departments, according to Joyce’s Dec. 12 PowerPoint presentation. Joyce also said that the city’s Tax Anticipation Notes would be paid on Dec. 31 in order to secure TANs for 2012. With $6.55 million owed on the 2011 TANs and only $6.3 million available, he continued, the city would be forced to temporarily dip into an additional fund and pay it back in 2012, though he added that all prior-year obligations amount to approximately $6.7 million dollars, which should be covered by $6.7 million of unfunded borrowing that was tabled by council and awaiting approval. Council did not restore the 29 firefighters in its 2012 budget, but in reaction to public outcry, council asked Doherty to use $600,000 from a retiree prescription savings grant to save at least 13 firefighters’ jobs. Doherty said this was only projected revenue and could not be relied upon. Passed 4-1, Council President Janet Evans said all members had an equal say in formulating the 2012 budget and felt that their budget did “the right thing for our city and its people,” while Councilman Bob McGoff cast the lone dissenting vote, citing another perceived shortfall. He argued that the 4.8 percent increase in millage does not reach $13.9 million in revenue, coming up almost $1 million short. Joyce defended his math and conversations with McGowan and PEL. Doherty ultimately agreed with McGoff’s assessment, vetoing council’s budget on Dec. 21. He alleged that council was “made fully aware” of the city’s financial status since March, receiving updates and warnings from McGowan and PEL throughout the year. See MONEY, Page 5


Sunday, January 1, 2012

GOLackawanna

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Top Stories of 2011

Convicted in June, sentencing now Jan. 30 By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

T

he money-grabbing, shake down tactics of former Lackawanna County majority commissioners Robert Cordaro and A.J. Munchak, as portrayed by Assistant U.S. Attorney Lorna Graham, were detailed in 10 days of testimony this June.

Robert Cordaro

While some business owners, like L.R. Costanzo President Louis Costanzo, said they didn’t feel that donating to the campaign to elect Cordaro, 50, and Munchak, 64, in 2003 was either bribery or extortion, others such as Luzerne County engineer Michael Pasonick said that once work dried up across the county line, he stopped handing over cash payments of at least $1,000. Major testimony was delivered from Al Hughes, the West Scranton funeral home director who acted as the so-called bag

man who delivered cash-stuffed envelopes to Cordaro on behalf of Acker Associates. The $10,000 monthly payments, he testified, ensured they would keep lucrative contracts in Lackawanna County. Acker paid Hughes as a marketing consultant, according to corporate payroll and tax records presented at the trial. Recorded phone conversations between Hughes and Cordaro were played in court. The two men continually talked over each other in the messages as Hughes pleaded with Cordaro

ARTS

The case, which detailed the pay-to-play political scheme that ensnared contracts for county business and in one instance cost Lackawanna County a federal transportation grant for a planned intermodal center, compelled a jury of six men and six women to find the former leaders guilty of nearly half of the counts levied against them after less than eight hours of deliberation.

A.J. Munchak

to speak with him about the allegations that were first revealed in a March 2010 federal indictment. “Al, stop talking about it on the (expletive) phone! Are you nuts?” Cordaro shouted in one conversation. “All I know is I gave you the money, and I’m not going down for it,” Hughes said in another. Following the guilty verdict in 18 of the 33 counts against Cordaro and eight of the 21 counts against Munchak, some of which were shared charges, attorneys vowed appeals before a pending sentencing date of Sept. 28. Sentencing was delayed until Oct. 31, but a surprise move by Cordaro late that month pushed it into 2012. Ardmore attorney Peter Goldberger filed a notice of appearance in November to represent former Lackawanna County Commissioner Robert Cordaro in his sentencing and

pending appeals, replacing Atty. William Costopoulos. Sentencing is currently scheduled for Jan. 30, with Cordaro facing a maximum sentence of 229 years in prison and $4.5 million in fines and Munchak facing up to 93 years in jail and $2 million in fines. Immediately following the verdict on June 21, Munchak resigned his position as a sitting commissioner. The county’s Republican Party picked three nominees to fill the vacancy, and Jermyn Mayor Bruce Smallacombe was selected. Smallacombe ran unsuccessfully for the seat in May 2011 primary. Scranton police and federal authorities also probed the alleged intimidation of Hughes, a government witness, shortly after the trial ended. Lt. Martin Crofton said officers were called to the Thomas J. Hughes Funeral Home, 1240 St. Ann St., Scranton, where the word “RAT” was discovered spraypainted on the front door of the building, as well as on porch furniture, company signs, a garage door and two vehicles.

NEWS

Sentencing pending for ex-commissioners

Sentencing is currently scheduled for Jan. 30, with Cordaro facing a maximum sentence of 229 years in prison and $4.5 million in fines and Munchak facing up to 93 years in jail and $2 million in fines.

MONEY Continued from page 4

back with cash, though now he was suggesting more borrowing. Council overrode the mayor’s veto at their Dec. 27 meeting with another 4-1 vote, effectively signing their own budget into law. Council then unanimously voted to take legislation off the table that would approve borrowing $6.7 million to close the city’s 2011 budget deficit and amended it to not exceed $9.85 million before final passage to cover TAN-B and other 2011 debt. Doherty said that the city will work “work harder with less” and make coun-

cil’s budget work, but they will face the same challenges next year because “we’ll still have that same structural deficit.” Numbers still vague Estimations regarding the budget and city debt remained murky throughout the year, with officials still unable to cite specific numbers by year’s end. Revenue generators council budgeted for, such as a StreetSmart Technology parking meter system estimated to bring in $300,000, were never implemented, and an oft-delayed 2010 audit was never completed in

2011. The city’s Home Rule Charter calls for the audit to be completed and published by May 31, but independent auditor Robert Rossi & Co. was forced to wait on outstanding items from several city departments before it could be finished, some of which are still outstanding. The city’s authorities, which the city is also financially responsible for, also continued to suffer from their own debt issues in 2011. The Scranton Redevelopment Authority defaulted on a $1.56 million loan from Pennstar Bank in May while the SPA requested in November that council budget for $1.6 million to pay the authority’s 2012 loan obligations. When council did not receive requested information on usage of the funds, they did not approve their budget.

SPORTS

At council’s Dec. 20 meeting, they blasted the administration for proposing to again take $5 million out of the workers’ compensation trust fund for 2011 bills council was allegedly unaware of until after the amended 2012 budget was passed. Evans said this was “orchestrated in an attempt to conceal the true finances of this city from the banking community and to force City Council to raise taxes by 26 to 29 percent.” Joyce brought up a Dec. 7 meeting with McGoff and council solicitor Boyd Hughes during which Doherty discussed obtaining 2012 TANs with several banking institutions. He said the mayor told all present that TAN-B would be paid

Doherty criticized council this year for reducing real estate and business privilege and mercantile taxes, stating that “this is a strong mayor form of government” and that council’s role is to simply vote the administration’s legislation “up or down.”


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, January 1, 2012

Search still on for bank robber

POLICE BLOTTER The following criminal complaints were filed in Lackawanna County Court between Dec. 23 and 26. All accounts are derivative of police affidavits, all charges are pending until the respective preliminary hearings, and all suspects are innocent until proven guilty.

ARTS

NEWS

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

SCRANTON – City police are still on the lookout for the man who walked into the Wells Fargo bank branch at 101 N. Main Ave., Scranton, on Friday, Dec. 23, slipped a note to a teller demanding money, and walked off with an undisclosed amount of cash. He then fled out of the bank, running west up Jackson Street towards North Hyde Park Avenue. The suspect who entered the bank branch at 11 a.m. is described by Scranton police as a white male between the ages of 25 and 30. He’s approximately six feet tall with a thin to medium build. One the day of the robbery, he was wearing a white knit hat with a brim, a black hooded sweatshirt, and blue jeans. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Scranton Police Department at (570) 348-4139 or Detective Michael Schultz at (570) 558-8307.

en’s clothing. She was found with 10 Diazepam pills. Ptlm. Robert Hegedus was the arresting officer. Melanson was arraigned on Dec. 24 on charges of retail theft, possession of drug paraphernalia, and possession of a controlled substance. She was released on $5,000 unsecured bail, and a preliminary hearing is scheduled for Jan. 3.

DICKSON CITY • RETAIL THEFT CHARGES were filed on Dec. 24 against Sharon Ann Boykin Williams, 49, of Madison Avenue, Scranton, after allegedly stealing clothes worth a total of $142.44 from the Target in Dickson City. Williams allegedly had four prior retail theft arrests. Officer Kathleen Fallon was the arresting officer. Williams-Boykin was arraigned on Dec. 24 on one count of retail theft and released on $5,000 unsecured bail. A preliminary hearing is set for Jan. 3.

SCRANTON • DRUG CHARGES were filed on Dec. 24 against Natalie Graziano, 28, of Donnely Court, Scranton, after police found needles, small plastic baggies, and a spoon with residue from suspected heroin use on it. She first told police her name was Melissa Graziano and gave a false Social Security number. Ptlm. Paul Reed was the arresting officer. Graziano was arraigned on Dec. 24 on charges of false identification to law enforcement and possession of drug • DRUG AND THEFT CHARGES paraphernalia. were filed on Dec. 24 against Steffany She was released on $5,000 unsecured Melanson, 22, of Fair Haven, Mass., after bail, and a preliminary hearing is schedpolice allegedly found valium in her purse uled for Jan. 3. when she was caught during a retail theft. • DISORDERLY CONDUCT Melanson was being held at a Wal-Mart CHARGES were filed on Dec. 26 against David Miller, 18, listed as homeless, after allegedly stealing $142.80 of wom-

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Sunday, January 1, 2012

GOLackawanna

7

COUNCIL OVERRIDES BUDGET VETO NEWS ARTS RICH HOWELLS PHOTO

City Council voted 4-1 to override the mayor’s veto of their amended budget on Tuesday, with Councilman Bob McGoff, far left, casting the dissenting vote.

Group also increases borrowing to $9.8M to cover 2011 debt By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

C

2012 budget on Dec. 13. “The use of worker’s comp funds should never have been concealed because the administration is dipping into the mandatory 75 percent funding level, which is far more serious than raiding excess funds and demands reimbursement as soon as possible,” Evans argued. “Now more than ever people can’t afford the Doherty debt and Doherty gamesmanship.” Councilman Bob McGoff, who cast the lone dissenting vote, said he had been “ridiculed” stuck by his assessment that council’s numbers did not add up, contending that the 4.8 percent increase in millage does not reach $13.9 million, falling short about $800,000. He also believes council’s DPW cuts are “too extensive” and will “diminish services” and said the salary reductions were “absolutely and

totally unnecessary.” Council Finance Chair Frank Joyce, “confident” in his work on council’s budget, responded directly to Doherty’s veto letter, which agreed with McGoff that a financial shortfall would be created under council’s budget. Joyce reiterated that his numbers were based on calculations and suggestions received from Business Administrator Ryan McGowan and the Pennsylvania Economy League. After the veto override, council unanimously voted to take legislation off the table that will petition the Court of Common Pleas of Lackawanna County for permission to borrow unfunded debt not to exceed $6.7 million to close the city’s 2011 budget deficit and amended it to not exceed $9.85 million before final passage.

“As you know, on Dec. 7 at the meeting at Fidelity Bank, Mayor Doherty lied to a roomful of bankers and stated that he wouldn’t have to borrow money to pay back TAN-B from this year,” Joyce said. “What I’m doing tonight is raising the amount of the unfunded borrowing so we can pay TAN-B and, therefore, clean up another mess that Mayor Doherty created.” “The reason we were in that situation is because they lowered the taxes. That’s the bottom line. That’s where you get the shortfall. We sent legislation to council in September for unfunded debt and they ignored it. They’re the ones that caused the crisis at the end, but it’s passed and now we move on,” Doherty responded when See COUNCIL, Page 12

SPORTS

ity Council overrode Mayor Chris Doherty’s veto of their amended 2012 budget with a 4-1 vote on Tuesday and unanimously approved unfunded borrowing of up to $9.85 million to cover remaining 2011 debt. Council’s amendments increase real estate taxes by only 4.8 percent, raise the real estate transfer tax to 2.8 percent, and the business privilege and mercantile taxes by 16.7 percent.

Council’s budget eliminates two administrative positions, four Department of Public Works administrative positions, casual DPW workers other than lifeguards, and 18 union positions. Seven of the 15 positions cut by the mayor were restored in the Single Tax Office and six were reinstated in the police department. Twentynine firefighters Doherty remain out of the current budget. Council President Janet Evans said that the mayor’s Dec. 21 veto letter contained “flawed statements and false conclusions” regarding council’s budget. She accused the mayor of covering up his plan to borrow $5 million out of the Worker’s Compensation Reserve Account to pay back Tax Anticipation Notes and other 2011 expenditures until after council passed its amended


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, January 1, 2012

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS END TERMS

Washo departs with few regrets

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

As Lackawanna County Commissioner Mike Washo packed up the final boxes in his corner office on the top floor of the county administration building on Adams Avenue this week, he admitted that he has mixed feelings about his time in office but doesn’t regret his decision to leave. Washo, 67, has changed professions many times over the years, starting out teaching history as a graduate student. He then became a deputy historian for state of Michigan before he was recruited by an architectural firm to work in historic preservation. He got into marketing and management at a construction materials testing company and eventually served in the cabinets of Scranton Mayors James McNulty, David Wenzel, and Jimmy Connors. He also worked in his family’s paving and excavating business from 1994 until May 2005, when he was appointed to replace Democratic Commissioner Randy Castellani, who resigned. “I’ve always been interested in politics…When I lived here for six years, I ran in 1989. Forty-six thousand votes were cast and I lost by about 600 votes, and I thought that was the end of it, that it was out of my system,” Washo recalled. “When Randy decided to leave the office, I said, ‘I’m going to try for that,’ and it was the shock of my life.” This shock came from a “total lack of civility” from Republican Majority Commissioners Robert Cordaro and A.J. Munchak, who he said regularly left him out of meetings, county gatherings, photo opportunities, and berated him publicly. His major concern, however, was his own lack of voice of a minority commissioner for over two years. “I was appalled by the hiring methods. Generally speaking, jobs weren’t advertised. I was appalled by the lack of involvement of the minority commissioner in the decisions that were being made. I was appalled that we were making

Progress for Smallacombe By RICH HOWELLS rhowells@golackawanna.com

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO

Commissioner Mike Washo said his only regret in leaving office is not negotiating a better contract for the management rights over the area’s AAA baseball franchise.

contracts with people to do managerial functions at the nursing home that already bankrupted facilities elsewhere…I was appalled when the county commissioners sold Montage Mountain without any requests for proposals,” Washo explained. “I was appalled by the contracts they entered into with Charles Costanzo, a man that had some very serious charges against him of a domestic nature. Mr. Cordaro had represented him and still put him in charge of the worker’s compensation fund. I was appalled by the spending, and I talked about it all the time.” Cordaro and Munchak were later found guilty in June 2011 of public corruption charges by the federal government, but by then, the damage had already been done. “When they arrived here, there was about $85 million worth of indebtedness. When they left, there was over $200 million after four years,” he commented. While he gave serious thought to not running for a full term, he ultimately joined fellow Democrat Corey O’Brien in his successful 2007 election bid, ousting Cordaro. They made a conscious effort, he said, to run a more bi-partisan county government, keeping many Republicans in their cabinet, and they would greatly revamp the hiring process – a source of great pride for the commissioner. “We needed to empower our See WASHO, Page 9

Lackawanna County Minority Commissioner Bruce Smallacombe only had 187 days in office to achieve his many goals for the position, but as he packed up his office on Thursday, he believes he accomplished what he set out to do. Smallacombe, 58, was appointed to fill the seat of former Republican Minority Commissioner A.J. Munchak, who was convicted on eight counts of public corruption in federal court and stepped down on June 22. “It’s always the people and not the party…There’s good and bad in every party and good and bad in every aspect of life. Hopefully what I’ve done here is restored some of the faith in the Republican Party from the local Republicans and some of the Democrats,” Smallacombe said. “I know it has because I’ve had hundreds of people that have come up to me and were thrilled that I was here. They said if I ever run again, they were going to vote for me, and a lot of Democrats were thrilled with what I did here. I think if you put your heart and soul into the job and don’t look at it politically and accomplish the job, you’re going to be wellliked for what you’ve done.” He was most proud of the fact that he was able to reach out to a majority of county employees by visiting their departments to make suggestions and receive feedback. “I also reached out to a lot of the boroughs and townships. I went to the meetings and gave them some insight on where they can look for some grants through the state and federal government and how to apply for grants. They were very appreciative. That’s something I think the commissioners should be doing,” he suggested. “When I was the mayor of Jermyn, I didn’t know we even had a Roads and Bridges department in Lackawanna County until we had the flood in 2003 when they came up to

Democratic Commissioners Mike Washo and Corey O’Brien often pledged at commissioner meetings to allow the minority commissioner to have a more active role in decisions made, but Smallacombe said that some closed-door conferences with the commissioners and JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO other officials occurred, leavBruce Smallacombe will return ing him with a feeling that many things were already deto Jermyn for a third term as mayor. He leaves county office cided before he entered the with connections that will help room. the borough and a sense that “There was some political he highlighted important issues rhetoric to it, but I think we in county governemtn. probably got more accomplished with the minority commissioner having some say and help.” The biggest challenge of the input than they’ve had in the job, he said, was the formula- past, which is a step in the right tion of the county’s 2012 bud- direction. The county needs to get, where he ultimately voted have input from three commisagainst its passage. He felt that sioners,” he acknowledged. “The system here will work if more spending could have been cut out and foresees more bor- you do it that way. If it works like Washington, where you rowing in the county’s future. “We spent almost $500,000 have two political sides and on a lobbyist, and that’s half a they argue all the time, it million we could have saved doesn’t work. You have to disand did the work ourselves. We agree when somebody is doing had an intergovernmental something wrong, but you can’t cooperation person making ve- disagree just to disagree.” Despite this, he still feels acry good money here with benefits, and I don’t see any accom- complished and found that he plishments of that position,” he was able to “change their minds said, adding that he examined of a few issues, and they sat and what other counties are doing listened.” “In the end, they did change to raise revenue, including offering advertising space on the way they were looking at buildings and vehicles and ask- some things, and I think it was for the better.” ing for park sponsorships. He said he supports incomHe was also disappointed with the county’s recently-ap- ing Minority Commissioner proved contract with concert Pat O’Malley and hopes he will producer Live Nation to contin- follow the same path of producue holding concerts at the tivity and cooperation. “I know Pat is a hard worker Toyota Pavilion at Montage Mountain with an annual loss and very energetic. I think he’ll to the county of $110,000 and do a good job,” he added. Smallacombe will be sworn with the sale of the Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre Yankees manage- in for his third term as mayor of ment rights to SWB Yankees Jermyn on Jan. 3, taking back LLC – a partnership of the New with him his six months of exYork Yankees and Mandalay perience in another form of Baseball Properties – for $14.6 government. “The connections that I’ve million. “I think, in the long run, made here with some different we’re going to end up with an organizations are going to help empty stadium down the road Jermyn,” he noted. “We’re because, without a franchise, working on the possibility of a you have no guarantees,” he train station museum already said. “There’s always ways to through the Lackawanna Heritage Valley Authority.” get out of a contract.”


Sunday, January 1, 2012

GOLackawanna

WASHO Continued from page 8

Leaving on his terms When it came time to run for re-election, Washo said he simply didn’t want to raise the money again. “I don’t want to ask anyone for money. I did it, and I held my nose doing it. I think

there’s too much money in politics and it’s polluting our system. I think that campaigns should be 100 percent publicly financed. I don’t think there should be any special interest money,” Washo said. “I think it’s wrong. I think that it creates expectations between the giver and the receiver…It creates a discomfort level.” He also liked the idea of leaving on his own terms, making his surprise announcement in January 2011. “It was one of the few secrets kept around here. I called a handful of people at a quarter to four and I announced it at four o’clock. I was happy it was a secret. It was kind of my way of going. I like leaving on my own,” he said. Despite his years of experience, he said wouldn’t give any advice to the incoming administration “because it’s their time now, and I want to be respectful of that.” While Washo emphasized his love of travel and staying active in the community, his own agenda remains a new page on which he has yet to write. “I have no plan. None whatsoever,” he insisted, though he added that he would not retire. “I’m not talking to anyone until after January. I want to leave here with a clear conscience that I didn’t try to use this office in any way to catapult myself into a position. “I don’t know what’s on the horizon.”

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ARTS

Role of county ‘relates to people’ “This has been a very interesting job. Fewer than 50 people in the last about 130 years have held this position, so it really is an honor. I’m grateful that I’ve had the opportunity to do it,” he remarked. “I think about all the things that I would have like to have done more of or better as I reflect on the job, but one thing I know for sure – the most important branch of government at the local level is the county unit…So much of what we do relates to people…It’s only the county that has the resources for those who do not have resources.” Those people include children, seniors, veterans, and those suffering from drug or alcohol addiction, the latter being an issue Washo championed throughout his tenure, funding “scores of social

Pride and regret As a self-proclaimed “fiscal conservative,” Washo stood by his decision to lay off or eliminate about seven percent of the county’s workforce in the first two years of his administration and to sell the Lackawanna County Health Care Center in March 2010 to reduce the workforce by another 24 percent, though he found that was still not enough to balance future budgets due to the historical debt. He also touted county investments of over $8 million in pavilions, trails, fields, and the “boundless” playgrounds” for children of all levels of physical ability at various sites. Washo feels the county was able to “turn the corner” with issues at the Lackawanna County Prison by hiring a new warden and forming of a new command structure at the prison. Additionally, he was satisfied with the recently-passed bi-

county plan with Luzerne County and hopes to see more bi-county cooperation in the future, leading to more regional governments with less taxes and less government entities. One regret he shared, however, was not coming to a better agreement when selling the management rights of the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees to SWB Yankees LLC – a partnership of the New York Yankees and Mandalay Baseball Properties – for $14.6 million. While he believes it was a better deal than the one reached by the previous administration, he said he was assured by the county’s attorney that the Yankees would deal with any financial shortfalls, but this did not happen. “I’m very disappointed that we have given a greater priority to dealing with issues than the Yankees have…I just think it’s too good a deal for the Yankees,” Washo lamented. “I feel shortchanged….As I look at the final agreement, I fear that the stadium can still become a rusting hulk unless there’s more Yankee participation, and that’s not now part of the conversation…I leave angry about it all, quite frankly.”

NEWS

managers, those that knew how to do it and those who had to learn how to do it, because this is a big organization and somebody has got to be managing it every hour of the day,” Washo noted, adding that no employees were ever directed to sign a petition, work a polling station, or make any political contributions, as had been done in the past.

and human service agencies” that otherwise would have to limit their work. “Unfortunately, we live in a society that’s more willing to build prisons than it is to invest in treatment centers, and that is a tragedy. Informed people know that alcoholism and drug addiction are illnesses, and they need to be treated in the same way that we treat heart disease or cancer or diabetes. I’ve talked about it for four years,” he said, adding that county events held in the building are now alcohol free.

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Sunday, January 1, 2012

ARTS

NEWS

Faithful gather for 100th birthday of Msgr. Stephen Hrynuck

CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES PHOTO

Congregants of Ss. Cyril and Methodius Ukrainian Catholic Church gather to celebrate the 100th birthday of Msgr. Stephen Hrynuck, center, on Tuesday, Dec. 27.

‘100 years God has given me’

SPORTS

By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

O

LYPHANT – The church bells rang out at precisely 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 27, at Ss. Cyril and Methodius Ukrainian Catholic Church for a celebration a century in the making. Congregants filled the church at135 River St., Olyphant, to honor the 100th birthday of their longtime pastor, the Very Rev. Mitred Arch-Priest Msgr. Stephen Hrynuck.

Born Dec. 27, 1911 to Michael and Anastasia (Chesak) Hrynuck, the monsignor was inspired to become a priest following the ordination of his brother, John. In April 1938, Hrynuck was ordained by the late Bishop Alexander Yevreinow. He served parishes in Minneapolis, Minn.; Stratford, N.Y.; Chester, Pa.; New York, N.Y.; Stamford, Conn.; and Washington, D.C., before arriving in Olyphant in 1952, where he has since served the faithful. He served as pastor for 57 years until his retirement and the appointment of the Rev. Nestor Iwasiw in 2009. “One hundred years God has given me,” Hrynuck said. “I’ll be

grateful until the end of this life that 100 years ago God called me to this world, and 73 years ago God gave me the grace to become a priest.” Hrynuck expressed his thanks to congregants for their constant care and compassion over the years. “Without you, I have nothing,” he said. Hrynuck first organized services to the “Mother of Perpetual Help” in 1952 that he continues to lead each Wednesday. Iwasiw, 46, said that Hrynuck was the only priest many parishioners had known until his recent appointment as pastor. In working with the monsignor, Iwasiw

said he has learned more about the importance of faith and to love the people who are called to worship. Diocese of Scranton Bishop Joseph Bambera joined Tuesday’s celebration. Bambera served “in tandem” with Hrynuck in the Mid Valley as the previous pastor of both the Church of St. Thomas Aquinas in Archbald and the Church of St. Mary of Czestochowa in Eynon that now make up Christ the King Parish. “One of the things that has most struck me about him… was the incredible joy that emanates in and through his life,” Bambera, See BIRTHDAY, Page 12


Sunday, January 1, 2012

GOLackawanna

By GERARD HETMAN For Go Lackawanna

hen it comes to law enforcement apparel, colors such as black, grey, and tan tend to set the standard, and the Scranton Police Department won’t be bucking the trend anytime soon. But for off-duty officers and citizens looking to help out a charitable cause, a new color is making an appearance in the halls of police headquarters on North Washington Avenue: pink.

Dolly Woody, executive director of Susan G. Komen for the Cure of Northeastern Pennsylvania. “We appreciated Chief Duffy reaching out to our organization to participate in the ‘Be Part of the Solution’ campaign,” Woody said. “Whether it’s making a difference in your community through law enforcement or fighting breast cancer, our mission is the save: to save lives. “Law enforcement has always been a part of our activities, such as our Race for the Cure, which is entering its 22nd consecutive year. This partnership is taking that cooperation to a new level.” Duffy said the pink T-shirt campaign, which started with an initial order of 72 shirts, will continue as long as he is police chief. Citizens can also purchase grey and black shirts with the same design, with all proceeds from those sales going to support “Be Part of the Solution” activities. Similar T-shirts are available in different languages to suit special occasions, such as La Festa Italiana and an upcoming version in Gaelic for the annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade. All shirts are $15. For more information, call Scranton police at (570) 558-8301.

Community donations keep cops well-equipped By CHRISTOPHER J. HUGHES chughes@golackawanna.com

later found at a home in Hawley. “We are fortunate that we don’t have many critical incidents. However, when the time comes, I want our guys to be equipped with what they need to get the job done.” Duffy said a local group that asked to remain anonymous donated the equipment after hearing about another recent donation. Citizens Concerned About Taxes purchased four automated external defibrillators worth nearly $5,000 in mid-December. “It’s the best feeling as the police chief when you see people from the public come forward to help the agency,” he said. Duffy said those collabo-

rations continue with the pending introduction of a North Scranton precinct for traffic operations this winter. City Council unanimously approved the $1 annual lease agreement for the new substation on North Keyser Avenue in November. A West Scranton precinct that houses the juvenile division and K-9 unit was introduced in May. “For the public to know that we’re now a little more effective and a little more efficient than we were yesterday, that’s a good feeling,” Duffy said. The animal snares will be deployed to each section of the city. Sgt. Rob Celuck was working Wednesday to place bolt cutters in each patrol vehicle.

Turnpike tolls climb Jan. 1 HARRISBURG — Tolls are going up again for drivers paying in cash on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Under the new tolls that take effect Sunday, drivers paying with E-ZPass won’t see an increase. The five-member Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission approved the toll hike in July as part of an effort to generate money needed to help pay off bonds that fund highway improvements and mass transit systems around the state. This year’s hike marks the fourth straight annual boost by the commission to pay off the bonds, and will raise approximately $23 million in new revenue next year. The new rates will mean the most common cash toll for passenger vehicles will increase from $1.10 to $1.25. The commission said nearly two-thirds of turnpike travelers already use E-ZPasses. - ASSOCIATED PRESS Unemployment numbers hold steady The unemployment rate in the WilkesBarre/Scranton region was unchanged in November, but remained the highest in Pennsylvania by a wide margin. The rate climbed in half of the state’s 14 metro areas and fell in two of them. The Lehigh Valley area had the second-highest unemployment rate, 8.6 percent. The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton reporting area that includes Luzerne, Lackawanna, and Wyoming counties remained unchanged from October at 9.2 percent. The rate climbed in half of the state’s 14 metro areas and fell in two of them. The Lehigh Valley area had the second-highest unemployment rate, 8.6 percent. The local region’s unemployment rate is down six tenths of a percentage point compared to November 2010. - ANDREW M. SEDER / THE TIMES LEADER

SPORTS

Donations from the community continue to improve the efficiency of the Scranton Police Department, helping Chief Dan Duffy fulfill his goals for 2012 slightly ahead of schedule. “One of my initiatives for 2012 is to improve our level of readiness,” Duffy said. That got a little easier Wednesday, as Duffy announced the recent donation of 30 bolt cutters and four animal control snares worth a total of nearly $1,000. The need for bolt cutters in patrol vehicles was highlighted during a training session Duffy had attended in November, the chief said. The tools can prove crucial during an active shooter in-

cident, Duffy said of the worst case scenario, or in less severe situations such as investigating a domestic dispute or serving a search warrant. “There might be a medical emergency, and there could be a large dog in the house that we’ll have to control,” he added of the animal control poles. Duffy said an animal snare would have been helpful in November when police searched the Price Street home of Blaise Melofchik and encountered a large German Shepherd. Melofchik allegedly walked out of Community Medical Center while still wearing police leg shackles after being treated for a possible drug overdose and driving under the influence. He was

Pa. wins $41M in federal ed money PHILADELPHIA - Pennsylvania won more than $41 million in education funding in the competitive federal grant program known as “Race to the Top,” a portion of which state officials want to use for new evaluation systems for teachers and principals. Gov. Tom Corbett said in a statement on Dec. 23 that the state plans to pilot new assessments for principals beginning in the next academic year. He is also pushing for statewide implementation of a teacher evaluation system now being tested in more than 100 districts. The grant announced Dec. 22 will also be used to improve science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. Half the funding - which will be allocated over the next four years by Education Secretary Ronald Tomalis’ department - will be appropriated to local education agencies, such as school districts and intermediate units. - ASSOCIATED PRESS

ARTS

Teaming up with the local offices of Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Chief Dan Duffy and his staff announced the latest branch of their “Be Part of the Solution” campaign on Thursday, Dec. 22. Duffy unveiled a line of pink Tshirts bearing the “Be Part of the Solution” logo, with all proceeds from the sale benefiting the public-private partnership and activities of the local Komen branch. “Our ‘Be part of the Solution’ campaign is all about getting our message out there as a law enforcement agency, and in our community, we all know

someone who has been affected by cancer,” Duffy said. “While the focus of our two organizations is different, this program gives our department a chance to come together with Susan G. Komen for the Cure in a way that helps benefit the community.” The “Be Part of the Solution” slogan has been featured on bumper stickers, billboards, and television public service announcements since Duffy started the initiative shortly after becoming chief in Sept. 2010. The pink shirt sales are his latest attempt to partner with citizens in taking the program to a higher level. “I came up with the idea of the pink T-shirts around the time of our 5K race for our K-9 unit,” Duffy added. “I knew that it would be a good seller because people want to represent the police department by wearing our insignia, but for us to make a difference in society by partnering with a community agency that could use some help is something special. “It’s the intangibles that these shirts bring that are unique. You can never realize how far the good that comes from this program can go.” When Duffy needed a charitable partner for the campaign, he found a willing and motivated collaborator in

NEWS BRIEFS

NEWS

‘Solution’ campaign goes pink W

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SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

COMMUNITY CALENDAR ‘It Gets Better’ project, filming at JVW, Inc., 515 Center St., Scranton, Tues., Jan. 3, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Info: itgetsbetter@gaynepa.com. 15th annual Ski for Lupus Day, Sun., Jan. 8, 12:304:30 p.m. or 4:30-10 p.m., Elk Mountain. Tickets are $25, are in limited supply, and must be purchased in advance. Info: 1-888-99LUPUS or (570) 558-2008. Malanka meeting, Tues., Jan. 10, 7 p.m., Paul Wanas’ 6 East Restaurant, Scranton Carbondale Highway, Dickson City. Final meeting before Ukrainian New Year dinner dance at St. Vladimir Parish Center on Seventh Avenue, Scranton, set for Fri., Jan. 13. Info: (570) 383-9487. Lackawanna Audubon Society meeting, Sun., Jan. 15, 2:30 p.m., Anthracite Heritage Museum, McDade Park, Scranton. Info: Bill Speare at (570) 586-8343. Thursday Talks! Beer and Wings, Thurs., Jan. 19, 7-9 p.m., Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Cost: $7. Pocono Chapter of Emergency Nurses Association, Fri., Jan. 20, 5 p.m., Community Medical Center professional building, 315 Colfax Ave., Scranton. Info: Deborah Clark at (570) 969-8123 or debbie.clark@cmchealthsys.org. Delaware River Eagle Watch, with Lackawanna Audubon Society, Sat., Jan. 21. Meet at Interstate 84 rest stop at 8:30 a.m. or Milford Beach at 9 a.m. Info: Gene Gallagher at (570) 586-5156. ‘The View’ with a Scranton Attitude: Let’s Hear it from the Girls, Fri., Jan. 27, 7 p.m. Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton.

BIRTHDAY Continued from page 10

55, said. “It’s a joy that comes because of his priesthood and a joy that’s rooted in the life of God.” Much has changed in the world since 1911, but Hrynuck said there is one constant in his life: “To try to be a faithful priest to the Lord.

Sunday, January 1, 2012

MEETING NOTICES ARCHBALD

• Borough council, reorganization, Tues., Jan. 3, 7 p.m., 400 Church St., Archbald. • Planning commission, Thurs., Jan. 5, 7 p.m., 400 Church St., Archbald.

BLAKELY

• Planning commission, Wed., Jan. 4, borough building, 1439 Main St., Peckville.

CARBONDALE

• School board special meeting, Wed., Jan. 4, 6:45 p.m., Carbondale Area Elementary School gymnasium, 103 Brooklyn St., Carbondale. Business includes adoption of real estate taxes for 2012-13.

CLIFTON TOWNSHIP

• Supervisors meeting, Tues., Jan. 3, 7 p.m., township municipal building. • Auditors meeting, Wed., Jan. 4, 5 p.m., township municipal building. • Zoning board, Thurs., Jan. 5, 6:30 p.m., township municipal building.

DICKSON CITY

• Borough council, work session, Tues., Jan. 3, 7 p.m., administration building, 801 Boulevard Ave., Dickson City. • Public hearing, Tues., Jan. 10, 6:45 p.m., borough building, 801 Boulevard Ave., Dickson City. Business includes transfer of liquor license to 316 Main St., Dickson City. General meeting follows at 7 p.m.

LACKAWANNA COUNTY

• Commissioners meeting, Tues., Jan. 3, 10 a.m., sixth floor, 200 Adams Ave., Scranton.

MOOSIC

• Borough council, reorganization meeting, Tues., Jan. 3, 6 p.m., borough building, 715 Main St., Moosic. Regular meeting follows, and business includes adoption of taxes for 2012.

NORTH POCONO

• School board work session, Mon., Jan. 9, 7 p.m., North Pocono Intermediate School library, 701 Church

“When I was ordained as a priest, I promised that to the end of my life I would share the glory of God for the good of the people. God has given me his grace for 100 years,” he said. Hrynuck said he never thought he would reach his 100th birthday and that he is the only priest still living of the nine ordained with him in 1938. “Why? Nobody knows. Only

St., Moscow.

OLYPHANT

• Borough council, reorganization and meeting, Tues., Jan. 3, 7 p.m.

RANSOM TOWNSHIP

• Board of supervisors, reorganization meeting, Tues., Jan. 3, 7 p.m., municipal building, Hickory Lane. Regular monthly meeting follows.

RIVERSIDE

• School board work session, Thurs., Jan. 5, 7 p.m., Riverside Jr-Sr High School library, 310 Davis St., Taylor.

SCOTT TOWNSHIP

• Supervisors meeting, Tues., Jan. 3, 7:30 p.m., Joe Terry Civic Center, 1038 Montdale Rd., Scott Twp. Business includes adoption of taxes for 2012.

SCRANTON

• Recreation authority, Tues., Jan. 3, 7 p.m., Weston Field House, 982 Providence Rd., Scranton. • Housing Authority commissioners, Mon., Jan. 9, 5 p.m., 400 Adams Ave., Scranton. • City council, public hearing, Thurs., Jan. 12, 6 p.m., City Hall, 340 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Business includes amending the zoning ordinance. Public meeting follows at 6:30 p.m.

SOUTH ABINGTON TOWNSHIP • Supervisors meeting, Tues., Jan. 3, 7 p.m., municipal building, 104 Shady Lane Rd., Chinchilla. Business includes amending the township sewer rental ordinance.

THROOP

• Borough council, work session, Tues., Jan. 3, 6:30 p.m., municipal building, 436 Sanderson St., Throop. Reorganization meeting follows.

VALLEY VIEW

• School board, Tues., Jan. 3, 6:30 p.m., board conference room.

WEST ABINGTON TOWNSHIP • Meeting, Tues. Jan. 3, 7 p.m., Dalton Fire Company.

God knows,” he said. A celebration of the monsignor’s life continued at a special dinner Tuesday night at Fiorelli’s in Peckville.

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COUNCIL Continued from page 7

reached for comment on Thursday. Doherty had suggested in his veto letter that council increase this number to $11.7 million, but Joyce said that in the original $6.7 million, he had already accounted for $1.2 million to reimburse the city’s last payroll, a number he said he confirmed with PEL. Additionally, he said if the mayor refuses to use $600,000 in projected savings through a retiree prescription savings grant next year to reinstate 13 firefighters, that could also go towards 2011 debt. The mayor said on Thursday that the city was prepared to

work with council’s budget and will “work harder with less.” “That’s the way our government works. The role that council has is to influence the finances for the upcoming year, and we’ll make it work. That’s our job,” Doherty said. “We’ll be fine. We’ll get through the year, but we face these same challenges next year because we’ll still have that same structural deficit…We planned for this inevitability, and we’ll make it work.” In other city business, the mayor announced that DPW deputy director Mark Dougher will replace will replace Jeff Brazil as director in 2012. Brazil has taken a position as a facilities and grounds director in the Scranton School District. “With Jeff leaving, he’s the natural person to assume that job,” Doherty said.


Sunday, January 1, 2012

GOLackawanna

13

Farewell to two comic greats NEWS

INFINITE IMPROBABILITY RICH HOWELLS

Jerry Robinson, co-creator of famed Batman villain The Joker, died Dec. 7.

spangled Avenger the icon he is today. Simon and Kirby’s first issue sold about 1 million copies, unheard of even by today’s standards, mainly because the Captain was portrayed on its cover punching Adolf Hitler himself square in the jaw…one full year before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that would thrust the country into World War II. It’s hard to imagine today that anyone would have objected to this symbol of pure evil getting pummeled by the title character, but the pair actually received hate mail and death threats from fascist sympathizers and isolationists who couldn’t foresee what history would have in store. They soldiered on for 10 revolutionary issues, including issue #3, which would be fondly remembered as Stan Lee’s first published work in comics. The two-page filler text story, “Captain America Foils the Traitor’s Revenge,” also introduced Cap’s trademark ricocheting shield-toss, now

recognized through the 2010 release of “Captain America: The First Avenger,” a fine modern-day adaptation of this Golden Age in comics. Speaking of the Golden Age, the other creator I wish to recall that broke ground during that time was Jerry Robinson, who passed on Dec. 7 at the age of 89. While Joe gave us one of the greatest four-color heroes of all time, Jerry delivered one of the greatest villains that comics, and now movies and television, has ever known – the Joker. Released in the spring of 1940 by DC Comics, Batman #1 was the first time that the world was introduced to the Clown Prince of Crime. Batman creator Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger first laid eyes on him when a young Robinson showed them a sketch of a Joker’s card, his eerie smile accompanied by a basic concept for the character and a story outline. Finger remarked that the jester looked like silent film

star Conrad Veidt in the 1928 classic “The Man Who Laughs,” an image which would soon serve as another visual inspiration for Batman’s arch-nemesis. Kane would later claim that he and Finger co-created the Joker alone, but many comic historians recognize Robinson’s version of the story – where all three played a role – as the most accurate. While he was meant to be killed off in his second appearance, an editor had the foresight to spare the character at the last minute, allowing him to escape death again and again and haunt our hero for decades to come, most recently in the 2008 blockbuster “The Dark Knight” and bestselling “Batman: Arkham Asylum” and “Batman: Arkham City” video games. Both men made many other great artistic contributions in their lifetimes. Simon helped create the Boy Commandos, the Newsboy Legion, Sandman, and Brother Power the Geek and founded and edited

“Sick” magazine; Robinson named Batman’s sidekick “Robin” after Robin Hood and had a hand in the creation of Bruce Wayne’s famous butler, Alfred, as well as villains like the Penguin and Catwoman. Their two most famous characters represent a literary tradition that they helped originate by taking comic characters seriously, as art that was more than just entertainment. Cap served as a symbol of something greater than just a guy in red booties beating up Nazis. His main weapon is a shield, and I think Simon saw America itself as the great protector, standing up for truth and justice and defending those who couldn’t defend themselves. The Joker gave us a villain more complex than a simple gangster or bank robber. He is dangerous because of his sheer lack of solid goals and predictability, the perfect antithesis to the cold and logical Batman, embodying chaos and the sheer heartlessness with a smile. He escapes death because an idea can’t die, and what an inspired idea he was. I’ll miss these guys for more than just their creations, as they both seemed like kind and appreciative gentlemen, but I’m sure it was comforting to them to know that their legacies would live on through their characters, even if the public isn’t always fully aware of the facts behind the fiction.

SPORTS

Many years before, however, Kirby collaborated with another influential writer who was also an artist in his own right – Joe Simon, who passed away on Dec. 14 at the age of 98. Working as a freelance artist since high school, Simon first teamed up with Kirby in 1940 on the largely forgotten superhero Blue Bolt, but their next major work could not be overlooked. Published by Timely Comics (later Marvel), Captain America Comics #1, cover-dated March 1941 but sold in December 1940, marked the first appearance of Steve Rogers in all his red, white, and blue glory. Comics would never be the same since. A patriotic superhero was nothing new at the time, but a combination of political fortitude, eye-catching cover art, and timing made the star-

Captain America led the cocreation of Captain American in 1940.

ARTS

As we say hello to 2012, I would be remiss as a comic book fan and pop culture junky if I did not say goodbye in this column to two brilliant and innovative creators we lost within a week of each other in December. Anyone even vaguely familiar with comics history knows the dynamic duo of Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, co-creators of the Fantastic Four, the Hulk, the Avengers, the X-Men, and practically all the rest of the Marvel Universe.


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NEWS

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, January 1, 2012


Sunday, January 1, 2012

GOLackawanna

A New Year’s resolution

T

his is the time that most of us resolve to eat less, lose weight, exercise more, and in other ways generally make the new year better than its predecessor. As most of us of a certain age realize, the life expectancy of the average resolution is usually measured in days if not hours.

books, and we will be glad to show you how to download material if you are unfamiliar with the technology. March down to the library and get some books to help you with your income tax return. Not only do we have the latest copies of all the usual titles, we also can provide you with just about any form you need. This is also a great time to begin planning your garden, or summer vacation. Having gotten those taxes out of the way, you will have some free time to join us in April as we celebrate National Library Week with special programs, displays, and even refreshments. May is big at the Albright. Join us on the Friday of Memorial Day weekend as we welcome the return of summer with our third annual “Swingin’ On Vine” block party. Good food, good music, good company, and a great time are assured. While you enjoy the summer sunshine, remember that June, July, and August are great months to catch up on

ARTS CALENDAR

your reading. Maybe you want to read or re-read a classic that you passed over in earlier years or explore an author or subject that has long been of interest. In September, pick up some how-to videos to help you get your home and car ready for the return of winter. This is also a good time to get books and DVDs on canning and preserving some of the summer’s rich harvest. October marks the 11th year of “Scranton Reads!,” a month-long celebration of reading and community. Stop at the library to get your free copy of the chosen book and a list of the many book discussions and related events scheduled throughout the city. As the days become noticeably shorter and the air takes on a menacing chill, make your November visit to the library to stock up on some great titles to enjoy by the fire. In December, stop by to see the great train display. Pick up some Christmas classics – certainly Dickens’ “Christmas Carol” comes to mind - and perhaps some holiday CDs. Finally, resolve to visit the library even more often in 2013. You’ll already have a wonderful start.

THEATER

CONCERTS

VISUAL ARTS

F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing

F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing

Arts. ABBA: Arrival, Sun. Jan. 8, 7 p.m. Cost: $24, $34. Darius Rucker, Fri., Jan. 20, 8 p.m. Cost: $52, $62, $92. The Keys, 244 Penn Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 650-2578. Blinded Passenger, CD release show for ‘The Wheels,’ Fri., Jan. 6, 10 p.m. Cost: $5. New Visions Studio and Gallery. A Fire With Friends, Left Coast Envy, Drew Breeze, Eye On Attraction, The Riot, and Jay Wirth, Sat., jan. 21, 7 p.m. Cost: $5. Scranton Cultural Center. Bobby Davis and the Smartest Man with Harmony Constant, Listen Local series, Fri., Jan. 13, 8 p.m. Cost: $10. The Bog, 341 Adams Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 341-6761, www.thebogscranton.com.

DEAL DETECTIVE

JENNA URBAN month. Use the time wisely and develop a small plan for the week. Plan your meals, create a grocery list, and search for up to five coupons that you can use for the week. Don’t just buy an item because you have a coupon, but search for coupons for products that you need and that are on sale that week. Each month, select up to three items that you would like to save money on. In our house, we go through a ton of cereal, so that item is a must buy when it’s on sale. Pair the sale with a few coupons and create a small stockpile of cereal. Even if you have one item that you’re not paying full price for, you are saving a ton of money throughout the year. Remember to watch for sale cycles and buy when the items are at their lowest price. Sale cycles usually happen every six weeks when a product will have a low cost and a high cost. For example, chicken will go on sale for $1.69 per pound one week and back to up to $2.99 per pound within the following weeks. Take note of when the chicken reaches the low point again, which is usually around six weeks, and purchase enough to last you through the sale cycle. What is your New Year’s Resolution? Share them with us at www.facebook.com/ golackawanna.

Slowdance and Cherokee Red, Sat., Jan. 21, 9 p.m. Cost: $5.

COMEDY

F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts. Jerry Seinfeld, Fri., Jan. 13, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Cost: $65, $80. Kathleen Madigan, Fri., Jan. 27, 8 p.m. Cost: $27. Scranton Cultural Center. Tony Deyo and Chad Shapiro, Up and Coming Comedy Series, Sat., Jan. 14, music and cocktails at 7 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Cost: $16.

LITERARY ARTS

New Visions Studio and Gallery. Writers’ showcase, Sat., Jan. 14, 7-9 p.m. Cost: Free.

SPORTS

AFA Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 969-1040, www.artistsforart.org. ‘Visual Truths,’ Sally Wiener Grotta and Niko Kallianiotis, opening reception, Fri., Jan. 6, 6-9 p.m., exhibit continues through Jan. 28. New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton. Info: (570) 878-3970, www.newvisionsstudio.com Art in an Instant and works by Matthew Mroz, opening receptin, Fri., Jan. 6, 5-9 p.m., exhibit continues through Jan. 27.

Arts, 32 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Info: (570) 826-1100, www.kirbycenter.org ‘Charlotte’s Web,’ Sun., Jan. 29, 2 p.m. Cost: $14.50. Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Info: (570) 344-1111, www.scrantonculturalcenter.org ‘Are You My Mother?’, Sat., Jan. 14, 11 a.m. Wiggles and Giggles Workshop at 10 a.m. Cost: $8 for show, $4 more for workshop. ‘Shrek: The Musical,’ Fri., Jan. 20, 8 p.m., Sat., Jan. 21, 2 and 8 p.m., Sun., Jan. 22, 1 and 6 p.m. Cost: $37, $50, $60. ‘In The Mood,’ Thurs., Jan. 26, 7-9 p.m. Cost: $32.50, $39, $49.

Jan. 1 always seems like the perfect time to start something new. After all, the most popular question during the next week will be, “What is your New Year’s Resolution?” It’s a good idea to write down your resolution where you will see it every day. Once you have the resolution written down, develop a plan on how you are going to stick with the resolution. Aim for the stars, but be realistic. Rather than pronounce that you are going to save $5,000 this year using coupons, try to start small. In the past, I have tried to limit my credit card purchases to online only. Give yourself a reasonable budget, too. What is it that you want to save for? If you set a reward, you will be more inclined to stick to your resolution. This can be a family vacation, kids’ college fund, the 2012 holiday season, or for anything that is out of your price range to start the New Year. Pull out a piggy bank, bucket, or change bowl - whatever your heart desires that you can toss in your extra coins. If you save money at the store using a coupon or store reward card, place half of that money into your savings fund. Dedicate 10 to 15 minutes a week or one hour a month to saving money, but really make it part of your regular calendar. I always love using Saturday nights to prepare myself for the week or the first of the month to prepare for the entire

ARTS

This year, make a resolution that can last for 12 months and beyond. Resolve to make better and more frequent use of the wonderful libraries Lackawanna County has to offer. In January, stop by the library to get a card if you don’t already have one or renew a card that might have expired. Get your “PIN” so you can reserve books, renew items, and access eBooks and more, all from home. In February, pick up some recorded books to make that time on the treadmill or jogging path pass more quickly. Hundreds of titles are available, including fiction, nonfiction, and instructional

500 VINE

Resolve to save more in 2012

NEWS

YOU CAN KEEP

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NEWS

16

GOLackawanna

Family event notes Festival of Lights

Sunday, January 1, 2012

Blinded Passenger hosts second EP release party

Hanukkah observance features marshmallow roasting and music

SPORTS

ARTS

By STEVEN FONDO Times Leader Correspondent

The Festival of Lights was celebrated at a special holiday event on Sno Mountain on Dec. 25 as part of The Jewish Discovery Center’s Hanukkah observance. The eight-day celebration of Hanukkah is to commemorate a seminal event in Jewish history when a number of Jews were besieged by hostile forces and lit an oil lantern to rededicate their desecrated temple. The evening event featured the ceremonial lighting of a special Menorah, marshmallow roasting, live music and a complete kosher Chinese buffet, as well as a variety of outdoor winter activities. “This is a fun-raising event for us,” said organizer Rabbi Benny Rapoport. “We wanted to organize a fun event that the whole family could enjoy.” Rapoport said he hoped to attract families from throughout the region for the holiday event. “It’s our goal when planning an event to partner with local business,” he said. “We want to work with other organizations in the community.” Several slopes and lifts were in operation during the holiday weekend with snow-making machines at the local resort working to cover the slopes with man-made snow in preparation for the upcoming season. “We’re having tons of fun today,” said two young boys from Waverly, as they stood bundled in the man-made snow. “We’ll be alright so long as our feet stay warm.” For further information about upcoming activities, contact the center in Clarks Summit at www.jewishdiscoverycenter.org.

COURTESY PHOTO

Blinded Passenger - Kevin Stone, Pat McGlynn, Steve Werner, and Stefan Ogonosky - will release ’The Wheels,’ a new EP, this week. Absent from photo is Mike Borthwick.

MUSICAL MISSION By MATT MORGIS For Go Lackawanna

B

linded Passenger has one goal in mind: to release its music as quickly as possible. On Friday, Jan. 6, at The Keys, 244 Penn Ave., Scranton, the group continues that mission when it conducts the release party for its second EP titled “The Wheels.”

“Full length albums take a long time,” lead singer and guitarist Patrick McGlynn said. “The goal of our band is to release music quickly to people who want to hear it. So we wrote and recorded a few songs and released

them.” The intention of Blinded Passenger was to release a longer record with a minimum of nine songs, but an injury suffered by the band’s drummer, Steve Werner, put that on hold. The band then decided to put out the material they had already completed. Blinded Passenger, which is rounded out by Michael Borthwick (piano), Kevin Stone (bass), and Stefan Ogonosky (guitar), formed in Scranton in 2006 and has a variety of different influences. McGlynn described the sound of the band as Tom Petty meets Foo Fighters. “The Wheels” is a follow up to “The Man in the Cannon.” With the previous EP, filled with upbeat tunes and catchy lyrics, Blinded Passenger was able to gain a following among local fans.

The band has played popular local venues and has even taken part in other acts’ CD release shows. “We play The Keys a lot, and it just fit to have our release there,” McGlynn said. “We like the environment and the people - it’s comfortable.” “The Wheels” was recorded at Sound Investment studios in Old Forge. The song writing process was standard compared to other bands. McGlynn said he would develop the basic song structure, the band would collaborate on it as a whole, and the finished product would be a Blinded Passenger song. Friday’s performance begins at 9 p.m. and features opening acts Rafael Pimentel, A Fire With Friends, and A Social State. Admission is $5 and includes a copy of “The Wheels.”


Sunday, January 1, 2012

GOLackawanna

LYNETT MEMORIAL GIRLS’ BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

A

Abington Heights handled both, on consecutive days, to win its fourth championship while playing in its seventh straight final in the ninth annual Lynett Memorial Tournament. Tiffany O’Donnell and Breanna Toro were part of a balanced offense and contributed to a strong defensive effort that carried Abington Heights to a 39-29 victory in

assignment to Alexa Gerchman in the man-to-man defense. Gerchman drew a third foul on Lauren Hoyt by posting up and continued to set up down low, forcing Abington Heights coach Vince Bucciarelli to acknowledge that it would be dangerous to keep Hoyt there defensively. “We felt like (Tiffany) would be a little stronger down there and she didn’t have the three fouls,” Bucciarelli said. O’Donnell held Gerchman, Dunmore’s all-tournament representative, without a field goal for the final 13 minutes. She matched Katherine Rosencrance for the Abington Heights scoring lead with eight points and was named as the tournament’s Most Valuable Player. Gerchman had nine of her game-high 14 points in an 11point Dunmore streak that brought the Lady Bucks within 23-20 early in the second half. She scored five points in the final 22 seconds of the first half, then added the first basket of the third quarter with one lowpost move before drawing the

foul on Hoyt with another. “I had never guarded the post before,” O’Donnell said. “I just had to kind of fight my way around it.” Gerchman, who also had a game-high four steals, managed just one point the rest of the way. Dunmore needed some inside help from her while playing the entire tournament without starting post player Courtney Murray because of an injury. “They didn’t have Murray,” Bucciarelli said. “She could have made a big difference with all her experience from the state tournament.” Freshman Jill Korgeski contributed 10 points and six rebounds for Dunmore, but Abington Heights often controlled the inside play. Breanna Toro, an all-tournament choice, and Melanie Coles added seven points each while helping the Lady Comets to a 32-23 rebounding edge. Toro had 11 rebounds and four blocked shots. Coles had seven See TOURNEY, Page 24

TAYLOR – Nanticoke turned back persistent comeback efforts from West Scranton and Riverside to claim the girls’ championship of the 25th annual Taylor Lions Tournament. Tournament Most Valuable Player Katie Wolfe carried the Trojanettes past West Scranton, 54-50, in Monday’s first round. Alex Brassington made the plays down the stretch for a 53-51 victory over host Riverside in Wednesday’s final. The Trojanettes (6-1) have the best overall record among Wyoming Valley Conference Division 3 teams heading into the start of conference play. Riverside fell to 5-3 and West Scranton to 4-4. Brassington had five of her 13 points in overtime and partially blocked Riverside’s last shot attempt in the championship game. Nanticoke had an eight-point lead until Riverside scored the last seven points of the first quarter, a nine-point lead until the Lady Vikes scored the last six of the half, and a six-point lead with five minutes remaining. The teams then battled through six ties and four lead changes in the final three minutes of regulation and the four-minute overtime period. Brassington was involved in most of the key plays down the stretch. One of her drives with 12 seconds left in regulation forced overtime and another with 26 seconds left in the extra period put the Trojanettes ahead to stay. Cassie Yalch and Brassington ended a streak of 12 straight missed 3-pointers by Nanticoke by hitting consecutive bombs less than a minute apart midway through overtime. “We had some foul trouble, but the girls who came in stepped up and made big plays like Yalch’s three in overtime,” Nanticoke coach Alan Yendrziewski said. Wolfe, one of three starters to foul out, finished with 11 points, 10 rebounds and three steals in the final. All-tournament choice Samantha Gow had 15 points, including hitting one of two free throws with 4.9 seconds left in overtime for the game’s final points. All-tournament choice Rebecca Mekilo led Riverside with her second straight 17-point game. She hit three 3-pointers. Sam Donahue had 10 points and 10 rebounds while Taylor Berto added nine rebounds and three steals for the Lady Vikes. Wolfe scored 27 points in the win over West Scranton and spent the game trading control with Lady Invaders center Katie Hart. Wolfe had eight points in the first quarter to help Nanticoke to a 16-7 lead. Hart had eight in the second to close the gap to 22-20 at halfSee ROUNDUP, Page 24

SPORTS

bington Heights will see Scranton Prep again, quite possibly to decide the Lackawanna League Division 1 championship. The Lady Comets had one chance to face Dunmore to make their case in a debate that may continue about which is the best girls’ basketball time in the entire Lackawanna League.

Tuesday’s final. The game matched the two Lackawanna League teams with the best overall records this season and the most impressive recent histories. Dunmore, the last unbeaten from the league, suffered its first loss since last season’s state Class AA championship game. The Lady Bucks (6-1) have won the last six Lackawanna Division 2 and District 2 Class AA titles. Abington Heights finished the night on a six-game winning streak and with the best overall record among league teams at 7-1. The Lady Comets had won four straight Lackawanna Division 1 titles before falling short last season when they still managed to win a second straight district title, claiming the Class AAAA championship. The Lady Comets opened the tournament with a fourthquarter rally for a 48-34 victory over defending champion Scranton Prep. They locked up the title by shutting down a Dunmore rally, thanks to a defensive adjustment that changed O’Donnell’s

ROUNDUP

ARTS

AH girls top Lynett Tournament

HOLIDAY TOURNAMENT

NEWS

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Abington’s Melanie Coles takes a rebound from Dunmore’s Alexa Gerchman during Tuesday’s final.

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, January 1, 2012

NEWS

18

Scranton Coach Mike Strong became the winningest coach in Division 3 women’s hoops.

Matt McGloin stayed under center for the Nittany Lions.

Scranton native Mike Munchak became head coach of the Tennessee Titans.

ARTS

BIGGEST STORIES OF 2011

GO LACKAWANNA FILE PHOTO

SPORTS

Fans packed the Lackawanna College Student Union last March for yet another showdown between the Lady Bucks and Mid Valley Spartanettes.

P

layers certainly did their share, but 2011 in Lackawanna County sports will go down largely as a year when coaches with ties to the county again made a major impact. Pro Football Hall of Famer and Scranton native Mike Munchak be-

KEEPING SCORE TOM ROBINSON

came a National Football League head coach and Dunmore’s Vic Fangio once again made himself a candidate to follow that path while University of Scranton women’s coach Mike Strong

and Rider men’s coach Tommy Dempsey, from Dunmore, set records in basketball. Here is one opinion of the top 10 stories of 2011 and the best of the rest for sports involving a direct connection to Lackawanna County. See ROBINSON, Page 19


Sunday, January 1, 2012

GOLackawanna

19

ROBINSON Continued from page 18

NEWS FILE PHOTO

Abington Heights grad Cory Spangenberg was picked 10th overall in the June 2011 MLB draft.

One Abington Heights graduate, Kaitie Notarianni, scored the first goal in the entire country in Division I field hockey for Quinnipiac University while another, Julie Hubbard, was among the first scorers in the country in Division I women’s soccer with the first goal by the University of Connecticut on Opening Day. First-time marathoners Renee Skelly and Samantha Snead, a 23year-old Marywood University graduate student from Moscow, finished 1-2 among women at the Steamtown Marathon. North Pocono finished third in the state in boys’ team golf while Scranton Prep’s Danielle Dalessandro finished eighth in girls’ individual play. The Scranton School District announced the return of Thanksgiving Day high school football with Scranton and West Scranton to meet in 2012. The Electric City Chargers were unbeaten champions of the Regional American Football League before losing in the Metro Bowl to finish 14-1. The West Scranton wrestling program produced its 500th all-time victory in the 2011-12 season opener.

Moosic resident and Wyoming Seminary graduate Kat Sharkey made Team USA in field hockey, making her a candidate for the 2012 Olympics in London. Valley View defenseman lineman Mike Galantini and linebacker Nyeem Wartman in Class AAA; Lakeland defensive back Alex Filarsky in Class AA; and Old Forge offensive specialist David Argust made allstate in football. Professional basketball returned to Scranton with the Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre Steamers, who were prepared to make their Premier Basketball League Debut Saturday night in Rochester, N.Y., under cocoaches John Bucci and Dennis Mishko. West Scranton had three graduates preparing for college football bowl games in the early days of 2012 after their 2011 efforts. McGloin and Eric Shrive are with Penn State while Hubie Graham is playing for Pittsburgh. 10. LL BASKETBALL DOMINANCE The Lackawanna League dominated the District 2 basketball tourSee ROBINSON, Page 25

SPORTS

(seventh in discus), and Tom DeBlasio of Mid Valley (eighth in javelin) also medaled. Keystone College advanced all the way to the NCAA Division III World Series in its fourth straight trip to the NCAA baseball playoffs. The Giants were one of the last four teams alive at the World Series in Appleton, Wisc. The University of Scranton men’s basketball, men’s lacrosse and women’s soccer teams also advanced to NCAA Division III national tournament play along with the Marywood University men’s tennis team. Marywood won the Colonial States Athletic Conference President’s Cups as the most successful overall, men’s and women’s all-sport performances during the 2010-11 school year. Valley View outscored its first two state softball opponents by a total of 25-2 and was unbeaten until falling, 1-0, to Manheim Central in the state Class AAA semifinals. Alex Rodriguez stopped at PNC Field in Moosic for two games of his injury rehabilitation stint. He struggled at third base with the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees but went 2-for-5 with two walks at the plate before returning to New York.

ARTS

BEST OF THE REST Dempsey set a record by being the coach to win 100 games the fastest at Rider University, a Division I program in Lawrenceville, N.J., when the Broncos defeated Maryland-Baltimore County, 73-66, in overtime Dec. 17. Dempsey (101-76) had matched his own school record of 23 wins during the 2010-11 season. Harry Armstrong resigned as head coach at Riverside, his alma mater, months after leading the Vikings to the 2010 state Class A football championship game. Rebekah Campo earned an individual silver and another state medal while helping Scranton Prep finish10th in the state in Class AA girls’ swimming. Earlier, Campo had won four gold medals – two individually and two in relays – in less than 2 ½ hours during the District 2 Championships. Ryan Holmes finished fifth in the state in the 50 freestyle for the Scranton Prep boys, earning the county’s only other swimming medal. Lackawanna Trail’s Eric Laytos followed up his 2010 state championship with a seventh-place finish in wrestling. Dunmore’s Ben O’Brien was named state Class AA Coach of the Year in girls’ basketball while Ashley Murray was a first-team, all-state selection. Mid Valley’s Danielle Terranella was a second-team choice. Scranton’s Terry Turner (second team, Class AAAA) and Riverside’s Jerry Kincel (second, Class AA), and Tommy Armillay (third, Class AA) were all-state in boys’ basketball. Valley View moved up from Division 2 to Division 1 but still extended its Lackawanna Track Conference boys’ streaks to 41 straight wins and six straight division titles. Trail sprinter Lauren Ellsworth claimed two medals, including a silver, at the PIAA Track and Field Championships. Riverside pole vaulter Vanessa Munley also earned a silver while medaling for the third straight year. Emily Hughes of Holy Cross (fourth in javelin), Jenn Slagus of North Pocono (fifth in discus), Peter Calderone of North Pocono


PAGE 20

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108 S. State St., Clarks Summit • 587.4677 Serving Breakfast and Lunch From 6am - 3pm Mon.-Sat. and Breakfast Sunday 7am - 2pm

The Summit Diner Staff would like to thank you for allowing us to serve you and hope to serve you again in the future.

Happy New Year! From Go Lackawanna


22

GOLackawanna

SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

SPORTS BRIEFS Steamers open versus PBL champs The Rochester RazorSharks, who will provide the opposition when the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Steamers make their home debut Friday night at the Lackawanna College Student Union, are the defending champions of the Premier Basketball League. Keith Friel, Jerice Crouch, and Eric Walton are back after starting on the championship squad. The RazorSharks and Steamers were scheduled to face each other in the season opener Saturday night, after press time. For information on that game, go to www.golackawanna.com/ sports. Pens jersey auction aids cancer society The Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins are teaming up with the American Cancer Society to raise awareness in the fight against breast cancer. The Penguins will wear pink jerseys that will be auctioned off during their Saturday night American Hockey League game against the Syracuse Crunch. Cesare Award to McCarthy Scranton High School’s Joe McCarthy is the recipient of the Fiore Cesare Award from the Scranton Chapter of PIAA Football Officials and Penn Security Bank. The award honors the senior Lackawanna Football Conference player who best combines academics, ability, and attitude. McCarthy, a University of Virginia baseball recruit, led the Division 1 co-champs in rushing with 1,091 yards and 15 touchdowns on 153 carries. He also hit three of six passes for 38 yards, caught 12 passes for 132 yards and a touchdown and returned a kickoff 85 yards for a score. The senior also spent time on defense where he was in on 13 tackles and broke up two passes.

Sunday, January 1, 2012

Elite-level training aids Gibbons ON CAMPUS

BILL ARSENAULT

M

egan Gibbons has had a standout career with the Hamilton College women’s swim team, but the senior wants to end that career on a higher note. Gibbons (Abington Heights) has earned Division III All-American honorable mention the past two seasons but is gunning to drop the honorable mention from her All-American status.

“Megan had some really great training this summer,” coach T.J. Davis said. “She did a great deal of swimming in the ocean and training along side some elite-level competitive lifeguards. She also did a ton of push-ups, sit-ups and got some

Megan Gibbons

great aerobic work. It’s already paying off.” Gibbons was named New England Small College Athletic Conference Swimmer of the Week after posting three victories and setting three pool records at a quad meet at Ithaca. In the final meet before the holiday break, she accounted for 137 points as the Continentals captured the five-team, three-day Cardinal Invitational in Wesleyan, Conn. “Megan is already ahead of her times from last year and is set up to compile some excel-

lent personal lifetime best times as the season progresses,” Davis said. “At Wesleyan, she anchored all five winning relays and her split times again were ahead of those posted last season.” Gibbons also won the 100 (53.71) and 200 (1:57.75) freestyle, finished second in the 1,650 (18:09.70) and fourth in the 50 breast (32.34). “Meg has developed into a tremendous leader,” Davis said. “She speaks softly but sends a very positive and focused message to her team. She demands toughness, hard work and precision on the water. But she wants everyone on the team to laugh, have fun and enjoy the experience of being on this great team.” GRAHAM GOES BOWLING Red-shirt junior Hubie Graham (West Scranton) will be seeing action when the Pittsburgh football team takes on SMU in the Compus Bowl Saturday at 1 p.m. in Birmingham, Ala. Graham, a 6-foot-4, 230pound tight end, has played in

all 12 games for the 6-6 Panthers and has 27 receptions for 307 yards and three touchdowns. The scores were a 12yarder in a 44-17 victory over South Florida, a 3-yarder in a 15-12 loss to Notre Dame and a 4-yarder in a 26-23 setback to Cincinnati. He’s averaging 11.4 yards per reception and his longest thus far has been for 29 yards, that coming in a 35-20 Big East victory over Connecticut. The game will be seen on ESPN. Graham is number 83.

DANZIG COACHING SON Veteran Scranton men’s basketball coach Carl Danzig is having the pleasure of coaching his son Ross this season. And, Ross is making the coach proud. Ross Danzig (Abington Heights) was named Scranton Athlete of the Week after helping the Royals post a 2-1 record in a loss to Cabrini and a pair of victories in the Daytona Beach Shootout in Florida. The 6-foot-4, 200-pound freshman See ARSENAULT, Page 25

LOCAL COLLEGE SPORTS ROUNDUP

Cross County basketball challenge set at Marywood GL ONLINE

For daily roundups of local college sports, see www.golackawanna.com/sports.

TOP STORY

Marywood University will host the first PNC Cross County Challenge Monday and Tuesday, bringing King’s College and Wilkes University in to play the host Pacers and the University of Scranton on consecutive nights. The action begins Monday with Scranton (6-4) playing Wilkes (6-2) at 6. Marywood (4-6) faces King’s (4-5) at 8. Marywood will face Wilkes Tuesday at 6 before Scranton and King’s play each other at 8. Tuesday’s games will be broadcast on WQMY MyNetwork TV and MyFoxNEPA.com. Travis Farrell, Luke Hawk, Ross Danzig, Matt Swaback, and Tommy Morgan are all averaging between nine and 15 points while four players have at least nine 3-pointers for Scranton, which is coming off two wins last week in Daytona Beach, Fla. Farrell averages a team-high 15.0 points and 6.1 rebounds while Tim Lavelle, a junior from Scranton Prep comes off the bench to lead the team in 3-pointers, going 14-for-31. Danzig, a freshman from Abington Heights

averages 10.8 points and a team-high 2.5 assists. Swaback, a 6-foot-8 senior forward from Wyoming Seminary, is second on the team in 3-pointers while averaging 9.4 points. Wilkes won five straight at one point and is averaging 79.4 points per game. Senior guard Matt Mullins averages 16.9 for the Colonels while Paul Huch adds 15.4 and Kendall Hinze and Jourdon Wilson are each over 12. Marywood has lost three straight. The Pacers are led by Brent Keyes, a 6-foot-6 senior forward who averages 12 points per game. Matt Lepri adds 11 points and a team-high 6.7 rebounds. Pierre Bakinde is averaging 10.4 points. James Lavan, a Coughlin graduate, will get a chance to face the two Wilkes-Barre schools. He has started every game for Marywood, averaging 6.4 points while posting a team-high 22 assists. Kyle Hammonds leads King’s with 11.9 points per game while Kyle Stackhouse and Matt Fiorino each average more than 10. The Cross County Challenge features the first meetings between Scranton and either Wilkes or King’s since the Royals left their former rivals behind when moving from the MAC to the Landmark Conference in 2007. The event is scheduled to rotate each year

and will be played in Luzerne County at either King’s or Wilkes next season.

TOP EVENT

Mariah Schaeffer led four Marywood University players in double figures with 18 points as the Pacers handed Vassar College its first women’s basketball loss, 73-68, Wednesday afternoon in the Land of Magic Classic in Orlando, Fla.

WEEKLY AWARDS

University of Scranton junior Katherine Torto was named Landmark Conference women’s basketball Player of the Week for the period ending Dec. 25. Torto had 21 points, 14 rebounds, five assists, and three steals when the Lady Royals split games at the Puerto Rico Classic. She is tied for eighth in the Landmark with 2.7 assists per game. Danzig was named Scranton’s Athlete of the Week for the period ending Dec. 22. The 6-foot-4 freshman helped Scranton go 2-0 by averaging 11.7 points, 5.0 rebounds, 3.0 steals and 1.3 assists. He had 15 points and six rebounds in a 71-68 loss to 11th-ranked Cabrini College. - Compiled by Tom Robinson


Sunday, January 1, 2012

GOLackawanna

23

LACKAWANNA LEAGUE WRESTLING PREVIEW

By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

E

ric Laytos, Marvess Rosiak, and Caleb Darling combined forces in a physical backfield that helped produce a playoff football team for Lackawanna Trail. They are together again this winter as part of a strong group of upperweights that make the Lions the top threat to defending champion Western Wayne in Division 2 of the Lackawanna League.

ARTS AMANDA HRYCYNA/ FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Eric Laytos of Lackawanna Trail tries to pin Dillon Ropietski of Hanover Area on Dec. 22.

The rest of league teams wrestle their openers Wednesday when the schedule includes Valley View at Montrose at Elk Lake at Scranton Prep in Division 2 and Abington Heights at West Scranton and Scranton at Wallenpaupack in Division 1. Valley View returns 285pound district champion Mike Galantini and three others who placed either fourth or fifth in Class AA – John Joyce, Mike Cipilewski, and Troy Uhrin. Scranton Prep, the secondplace team last season, returns Pat Creedon, who was third in the district. The Cavaliers also have Griffith Walters, Kenny Sebastianelli, and Ryan Rudalavage back after they placed fifth. Blue Ridge, which has added wrestlers from last-place Susquehanna in a new cooperative sponsorship, returns a district champion from each program. Dalton Church won for the Raiders last season when Tom Maby

took a title for Susquehanna. Montrose and Elk Lake round out the division. DIVISION 1 Delaware Valley is loaded with returning starters, including top-level wrestlers like state qualifiers C.J. Palmer and Marc Wagner. C.J. Palmer and Jalen Palmer are defending district champions and Anthony Colletta was a 2010 district champion. “Delaware Valley is going to be tough for anyone to beat,” West Scranton coach Paul Fox said. Honesdale and Wallenpaupack were second and third in the division last season. West Scranton will use as many as 10 freshmen and sophomores at a time, but Fox said, “I feel like the lineup is just as strong, if not stronger.” The key returnees are seniors Tom Hendry and Jon Kobryn-

ich. Hendry is at 126 or 132 after going 38-5 and finishing second in District 2 Class AAA at 112 pounds. Kobrynich went 28-6 and was fourth at 140 pounds. Mike Toye also placed last season, finishing fifth at 125 pounds. “Our junior high team did very well so most of them are experienced,” Fox said. “All of our young guys have a lot of wrestling experience, of course it’s not varsity experience.” Kyle Kroptavich and Jason Manning won district junior high titles while helping the team finish second. Abington Heights coach Chris Calder is looking for improvement after a winless season in the division. “Our goals for this season are to compete for league and district titles,” Calder told The Abington Journal. The Comets have to replace state qualifiers James Fruehan

and Morgan Craig, who graduated. Dylan Berardelli was fourth in the district at 215. Josh Slocum, Nick Senuk, Mike Carr, Greg Pascale, and Matt Carr also return. Scranton returns several experienced wrestlers, including defending district champion Mark Granahan. RULE CHANGES There are still 14 weight classes, but they have been bumped up slightly. The new weight classes start at 106, three pounds higher than has been the case since 1989. The rest of the weights are 113, 120, 126, 132, 138, 145, 152, 160, 170, 182, 195, 220, and 285, up from 112, 119, 125, 130, 135, 140, 145, 152, 160, 171, 189, 215 and 285. JOE BARESS also contributed to this report.

SPORTS

Laytos finished seventh in the state at 215 pounds last season after making a surprising run to a state title in his sophomore season. This year’s new weight classes allowed Laytos to grow into the 220-pound class. The Lions graduated just one senior from the team that tied for third in the division last season, but Western Wayne also has an experienced lineup back. Laytos, Darling, Rosiak, and Ben Lehman, one of the top linemen on the football team, give the Lions an experienced group of seniors at the top of the lineup. “This group of seniors has been together for a very long time, since first grade,” coach Jeff Stauffer told The Abington Journal. “This is a big year for them and it’s their last hurrah.” Rosiak finished third in District 2 Class AA at 171 pounds last season and is at 182. Darling is at 195 and Lehman at 285. The Lions also return Billy Lee and Jeremy Greenley, who were third in the district last season at 119 and 152. Freshman Cooper Rosiak, who was third in the junior high district tournament, is a strong addition to the lineup at 145. The Lions won the only match that was contested in the league so far, beating Blue Ridge, 51-24.

NEWS

Trail brings several strengths back to mat


SPORTS

ARTS

NEWS

24

GOLackawanna

Sunday, January 1, 2012

TOURNEY

ROUNDUP

Continued from page 17

Continued from page 17

rebounds.

time. Hart had 10 points and Wolfe had nine in the third quarter when the teams matched 17 points each. Wolfe then scored eight more in the fourth. Hart, who finished with 22, and Jane Joyce, who had 12, went on to make the all-tournament team for West Scranton. Riverside defeated Lackawanna Trail, 53-26, in the first round on the way to a second-place finish. Madison Haduck had seven of her 13 points and Kellie Nash had six of her 17 to help Riverside take an 18-9 lead after one quarter. The Lady Vikes were up 28-12 at the half, then ran away with a 19-6 fourth quarter. Mekilo, who also had three assists and three steals, had nine points in the fourth quarter. Hart had 17 points to lead West Scranton to third place with a 43-25 victory over Lackawanna Trail Wednesday. Hart had six points and Marissa Pazzaglia had five of her nine in the first quarter when the Lady Invaders opened a 16-4 lead. Natasha Pacholec, who had five points, made the all-tournament team for Lackawanna Trail.

Reaching the final Hoyt provided three assists after scoring a gamehigh 14 points and making three steals in the semifinal win over Scranton Prep. Tricia Byrne scored all nine of her points when Scranton Prep used a 17-5 advantage to erase a 10-point halftime deficit and take a 3129 lead into the fourth quarter Monday. Abington Heights outscored Scranton Prep, 19-3, in the fourth quarter, holding the Classics scoreless for the final 4:27. O’Donnell had seven of her nine points in the fourth quarter, including a 3-pointer and a three-point play a little over a minute apart for a 3934 lead. Toro added nine points, eight rebounds and six blocked shots while Coles grabbed 14 rebounds, including nine on the offensive end. Maura Byrne had nine points and four steals for Scranton Prep while Tricia Byrne had nine points and three assists. Dunmore reached the final with a 44-23 victory over Scranton in Monday afternoon’s opener. The Lady Bucks shot 13for-27 (48.1 percent) in the first half to take a 32-14 lead. Molly Burke went 5-for-9 from the floor and hit all three of her free throws while scoring 14 points. Kayleigh Semion added nine points and three steals; Korgeski had eight points, seven rebounds and four assists; and Gerchman had six points, 12 rebounds and seven assists. Mackenzie McAndrew had seven points while Kayla Foster had six points and three assists for Scranton. Prep beat Scranton, 47-33, Tuesday for third place. Tricia Byrne had 20 points, six rebounds, three assists and three steals on her way to an all-tournament selection. Freshman Jessica Genco made four steals as Scranton Prep turned 29 Scranton turnovers into 24 points. Foster, her team’s all-tournament choice, had 11 points and six steals for the Lady Knights.

LYNETT MEMORIAL BOYS’ BASKETBALL

SCRANTON – Terry Turner and Malik Draper again led Scranton to the Lynett Memorial title at the Lackawanna College Student Union. For the second straight season, Turner was named MVP, Draper joined him on the all-tournament team and Scranton rolled over Dunmore in the final. The Bucks made it more competitive this time around, but eventually fell, 68-49, in the championship game. The Knights scored the first 18 points of last year’s final and led by 37 at halftime on their way to a 77-47 romp. Turner, who had 25 points in Monday’s 59-41 win over Scranton Prep in the first round, had 16 points, three assists, and three steals in the final. Draper had 16 points, six rebounds, four steals, and three assists against Scranton Prep then scored a game-high 19 points in the final while dishing out another three assists. Turner and Draper helped Scranton shoot 58 percent from the floor in the final. Turner finished 7-for-12, Draper 8-for-14, Andrew Moran 5-for-7, and Joe McCarthy 3-for-3. Karlon Quiller had 12 points and six assists. Moran finished with 11 points. Dunmore got 12 points from Jor-

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTO / FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Scranton’s Terry Turner dunks the ball on a fast break after stealing the ball from Dunmore’s Matt Clark. dan Dempsey and 11 each from Mike Boland and John Rinaldi. Rinaldi also had five assists. Boland made the all-tournament team. Turner had eight of the points during a 15-point streak to end the first half and start the second half of the win over Scranton Prep. The streak gave the Knights a 34-17 lead with 5:04 left in the third quarter. Turner finished with 16 secondhalf points. Matt Knowles led Scranton Prep with 15 points. Dunmore reached the final by holding Holy Cross to one point for almost seven minutes to start the fourth quarter of a 49-44 victory. Matt Clark scored 14 points while Rinaldi had 13 points, eight rebounds, and six assists in the win. All-tournament selection Josh Kosin led the Crusaders with 15 points and nine rebounds. Connor Callejas added 11 points, Connor Joyce had 10, and Ryan

McGoff had four assists. Scranton Prep took third place Wednesday when all-tournament choice James Fives scored 23 points in a 57-45 victory over Holy Cross. Matt Knowles added 13 points while Mike McDonald had 11 points and eight rebounds and Matt Walsh provided eight steals. Kosin had 16 points, three steals, and two blocked shots for Holy Cross.

OTHER BOYS’ BASKETBALL

TAYLOR – West Scranton and Riverside advanced to the final of the Taylor Lions Tournament for the eighth straight year by winning Tuesday’s semifinals. Tyvon Moore scored 15 points, including four free throws in the final 1:02, to lift West Scranton over Lackawanna Trail, 42-38, in the opener. Jerry Kincel’s 12 points led a balanced attack that carried Riverside to a 75-34 rout of MMI Prep in the second game. Lackawanna Trail’s Steve Miller,

who scored 13 of his 18 points in the second half, converted offensive rebounds three times in the final 1:45 to bring the Lions within two points. Malcolm Sweeting had nine of his 12 points in the first half when the Invaders took a seven-point lead. Matthew Donahue and Jaron Vishnesky scored 11 points each and Michael King had 10 for Riverside, which took a 36-12 lead at halftime. Old Forge reached the final of the Angelo Schifano Memorial Tournament at Wyoming Area before falling to Dallas, 49-31, in Wednesday’s championship game. Brian Tomasetti had nine points and 11 rebounds for the Blue Devils. Tomasetti also led the way in Monday’s first round when he scored 19 points in a 47-19 romp over Wyoming Area. Tournament MVP James Hawk had 11 points Monday to lead Tunkhannock to a 43-33 victory over Forest City in the championship game of the Forest City Rotary Tournament. Austin Yanora scored 10 points and made the all-tournament team, along with Matt Nevins and Dylan Walsh of Forest City, Joel Madas of third-place Mountain View, and James Berger of Western Wayne. Noah Fedak hit five 3-pointers to finish with 17 points for Forest City, which rallied from 18 down to within six in the fourth quarter before falling short. Mid Valley and Valley View reached the final of the Peter Turonis Classic with victories Tuesday. Mid Valley downed Carbondale, 46-43, and Valley View defeated Lakeland, 75-65. Abington Heights defeated Nanticoke, 56-39, Tuesday to reach the final of the Christmas Classic against host Meyers.

OTHER GIRLS’ BASKETBALL

Danielle Terranella scored 18 points to lead Mid Valley past host Valley View, 37-25, in Wednesday’s Lou Camoni Memorial Tournament championship game. Old Forge beat Carbondale, 53-29, for third place. In the semifinals, Mid Valley routed Carbondale, 70-20, and Valley View defeated Old Forge, 42-29. Tournament MVP Amanda Reach hit the winning free throw to lead North Pocono to a 34-33 victory over Holy Cross in the championship game of the North Pocono Boosters Tournament. North Pocono edged Wyoming Valley West, 37-35, and Holy Cross defeated Pocono Mountain East, 54-51, in Monday’s semifinals. Wallenpaupack defeated Forest City, 47-30, Tuesday in the opening game of the Honesdale Jaycees Tournament.


Sunday, January 1, 2012

GOLackawanna

ROBINSON Continued from page 19

nament. In addition to winning seven of the eight titles for the third time in four seasons, the league had its best season ever in terms of claiming state berths, taking 14 spots, compared to five by the rival Wyoming Valley Conference. 9. STATE FOOTBALL SHOOTOUTS Valley View mixed it up with defending state champion Allentown Central Catholic before losing, 61-54, in a state Class AAA opener while Old Forge was falling, 45-34, to sixtime state champion Southern Columbia in Class A. Valley View scored more points than any losing team in state playoff history.

6. STRONG SETS RECORD

Strong was not on the bench when he became the all-time leader in NCAA Division III women’s basketball coaching victories with 758. He had been ejected for the first time in his career for two technical fouls in the 46-43 Dec. 17 victory at Cabrini College. 5. DUNMORE-MID VALLEY SEMIFINAL About 4,000 fans packed the Lackawanna College Student Union for the biggest girls’ basketball game in county history. Dunmore continued its dominance over Mid Valley with a 51-46 state Class AA semifinal victory before losing in the state championship game at Penn State three days later. The matchup was made possible when Mid Valley – which was 25-0 against everyone else and 0-5 against Dunmore – used 34 points by Terranella to knock off unbeaten York Catholic in

the quarterfinals, 57-56. 4. McGLOIN TAKES OVER McGloin’s rise from former walk-on to starting quarterback at Penn State was the county’s top story in 2010. McGloin stayed in the news as part of the biggest Penn State football controversy prior to the sex abuse scandal involving former defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky and the resulting firing of head coach Joe Paterno. After rotating much of the season despite outperforming Rob Bolden, McGloin eventually took over the quarterback job again. The year ended with McGloin still in the news after a scuffle with a teammate that left the West Scranton graduate with a head injury, making his TicketCity Bowl game status unclear. 3. YANKEES LEAVING FOR YEAR As the 2011 season was com-

1. MUNCHAK COACHES TITANS Scranton Central graduate Mike Munchak was named head coach of the Tennessee Titans Feb. 7. The NFL lockout deprived Munchak of much of the preparation time with his team for his first season. “I’ve been around the game so long, but you never know until you walk in the shoes of the head coach really what that’s all about,” said Munchak, who spent his entire career as a player and assistant coach in the Houston Oilers/Tennessee Titans organization. The Titans take an 8-7 record and slim playoff hopes into the finale. Munchak ended the year being identified as at or near the top of Penn State’s list to be the next head coach, although, to date, he has publicly stated that he is not interested.

Munchak ended the year being identified as at or near the top of Penn State’s list to be the next head coach, although, to date, he has publicly stated that he is not interested.

guard is averaging 10.8 points and 4.9 rebounds a game and leads the team in assists (25) and steals (23). “As you can imagine it is a very special thing to be able to not only coach my son but to see him on a day-to-day basis,” Carl Danzig said. “I count my blessings that I have this bonus time with him. I’ve been very pleased with his play thus far.” Junior Tim Lavelle (Scranton Prep) is a steady performer for the Royals, 6-4 overall and 1-0 in Landmark Conference play. He’s averaging 7.0 points and 2.4 rebounds with 16 assists and 13 steals. He had a teamhigh 13 points in a 64-62 victory over North Central, Ill., in the Daytona Beach tourney. FRUEHAN SURPRISES COACH Freshman Maggie Fruehan is seeing action off the bench for the powerful Johns Hopkins women’s basketball team. Fruehan (Abington Heights), a 5-foot-11, forward/guard is averaging 16.5 minutes a game but has been seeing more action of late. She had eight points and four rebounds in 26 minutes in a 76-51 victory over Dickinson prior to the holiday break. On the season, she’s averaging 5.9 points and 3.9 rebounds with seven assists and three steals for the Blue Jays, who are 7-1 overall and 3-1 in the Centennial Conference. “Maggie has been a wonderful surprise,” coach Nancy Funk said. “We all liked her as a high school prospect, but we were not sure we had room for her. So she decided to come to JHU and wait and see.” Fruehan later filled one of two open spots on the roster. “Maggie has a great feel for the game and solid fundamentals,” Funk said. “She will give you her best effort to the point of exhaustion. She has shown us early and often that she is ready to play at the pace of our game. She’s a good spark off the bench and her quickness on defense as a forward really helps us on our press. This should be a good year for her to gain some valuable experience.”

SPORTS

7. REACH ON TOP Moscow resident Nicholas Reach, who had just finished high school in Florida before starting a career at the University of Georgia, won the world’s most prestigious junior golf event over a field of 54 top players in Graniteville, S.C. Reach shot an opening 62 to tie the course record, finished 20-under par and received his championship blazer from PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem after winning by six shots.

FILE PHOTO

Defensive Coordinator Vic Fangio of the San Francisco 49ers, a Dunmore native, helped contribute to the team’s successful 12-3 record.

Continued from page 22

ARTS

8. FANGIO BACK IN NFL Dunmore’s Fangio returned to the role of NFL Defensive Coordinator after one season in the college game at Stanford. Fangio’s San Francisco 49ers defense went into the final weekend as the toughest to score on in the league while contributing to a 12-3 record that was tied for second best in the NFL. Because of the effort, Fangio’s name is beginning to resurface as a candidate for future head coach openings.

2. SPANGENBERG DRAFTED 10TH Cory Spangenberg, a 20-yearold from Clarks Summit, was picked 10th overall by the San Diego Padres in the June Major League Baseball Draft out of Indian River, a Florida junior college. Spangenberg was leading the Northwest League in several categories before leaving the Eugene Emeralds with a .384 average in the first 25 games of his pro career. The second baseman batted .471 in six Midwest League playoff games with the Fort Wayne TinCaps to close the season.

ARSENAULT NEWS

ing to an end, it was also becoming clear that the Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre Yankees were headed elsewhere. The Yankees announced a schedule that would split their 2012 International League home games with 37 games in Rochester, 10 games in Syracuse, eight games in Allentown, seven games in Batavia, N.Y., and four games each in Buffalo and Pawtucket while waiting for the proposed reconstruction of PNC Field in Moosic.

25


PAGE 26

FAMILY CIRCUS

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 2012

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

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FORD ‘02 MUSTANG

GT CONVERTIBLE

Red with black top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $17,500 570-760-5833

To place your ad call...829-7130 HONDA `07 ACCORD

V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1 owner with maintenance records. Slate blue with leather interior. Sunroof. Asking $12,500. Call 570-239-2556

468

Auto Parts

EAGLE `95 TALON

Only 97,000 Miles. Full custom body kit, dark green metallic with gray interior. Dual exhaust, 4 coil over adjustable struts. All new brakes, air intake kit, strut brakes, custom seats, custom white gauges, 2 pillar gauges, new stereo, alarm, custom side view mirrors. 4 cylinder automatic, runs excellent. $8,500. Call 570-876-1355 or 570-504-8540 (evenings)

412 Autos for Sale Excellent condition inside & out. Garage kept. Regularly serviced by dealer, records available. Option include alloy wheels, decklid spoiler, sport seats, interior accent lighting (blue), Nose mask and custom cut floor mats. Dark grey with black interior. 56K highway miles. REDUCED! $13,300. Call 570-709-4695

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

468

BUYING JUNK VEHICLES $300 AND UP

$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN, DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!

NOBODY Pays More 570-760-2035

Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!

Chimney Repair Call Now and $ave

Parging • Brick and Block Repair • Stucco • Animal Removal

1-800-943-1515

20% OFF Any Competitors Estimate

timesleaderautos.com

Auto Parts

SENIOR CITIZEN DISCOUNTS

CUSTOM METAL SHOP

To Advertise Call Tara 1-800-273-7130

Spring Hill Chimney Will Not Be Undersold!!


PAGE 28 412 Autos for Sale

JAGUAR `00 S TYPE

4 door sedan. Like new condition. Brilliant blue exterior with beige hides. Car is fully equipped with navigation system, V-8, automatic, climate control AC, alarm system, AM/FM 6 disc CD, garage door opener. 42,000 original miles. $9,000 Call (570) 288-6009

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 2012

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

JAGUAR ‘94 XJS CONVERTIBLE

Mint Condition Magnolia red, with palomino beige leather interior. This car rates a 10 in & out. 4 new tires and services. Florida car. $13,300. 570-885-1512

LEXUS `98 LS 400 Excellent condition,

garage kept, 1 owner. Must see. Low mileage, 90K. Leather interior. All power. GPS navigation, moon roof, cd changer. Loaded. $9,000 or best offer. 570-706-6156

VOLKSWAGEN `04 Beetle - Convertible

GREAT ON GAS! Blue. AM/FM cassette. Air. Automatic. Power roof, windows, locks & doors. Boot cover for top. 22k. Excellent condition. Garage kept. Newly Reduced $14,000 570-479-7664 Leave Message

VOLKSWAGEN ‘00 BEETLE 2.0 automatic, air 67k miles $6400. 570-466-0999

VOLVO `06 XC90

All wheel drive, navigation, 2 DVD’s, white/beige leather seats. Heated front seat, 7 passenger, all power options, power moon roof. 70,000 miles. Balance of 100,000 mile warranty. Must see to appreciate! $19,850. Trade welcome. (570) 829-3929

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE $49,000

FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD

All original $12,000

MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL $24,000

MERCEDES ‘29

Kit Car $9,000 (570) 655-4884 hell-of-adeal.com

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

FORD ‘28 MODEL A Sport Coupe.

OLDSMOBILE `68 DELMONT

Rumble Seat. Professionally Restored. Ford Blue with tan canvas top. $15,225 570-339-1552 after 5:00pm

Find the perfect friend. The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L E DER D . ONLY LEADER. timesleader.com

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE L LEA E DER D . ONLY LEADER. timesleader.com

FORD SALEEN ‘04 281 SC Coupe

1,000 miles documented #380 Highly collectable. $28,500 570-472-1854

DESOTO CUSTOM ‘49 4 DOOR SEDAN

3 on the tree with fluid drive. This All American Classic Icon runs like a top at 55MPH. Kin to Chrysler, Dodge, Plymouth, Imperial Desoto, built in the American Midwest, after WWII, in a plant that once produced B29 Bombers. In it’s original antiquity condition, with original shop & parts manuals, she’s beautifully detailed and ready for auction in Sin City. Spent her entire life in Arizona and New Mexico, never saw a day of rain or rust. Only $19,995. To test drive, by appointment only, Contact Tony at 570-899-2121 or penntech84th@ gmail.com

FORD `52 COUNTRY SEDAN CUSTOM LINE

STATION WAGON V8, automatic, 8 passenger, 3rd seat, good condition, 2nd owner. REDUCED TO $6,500. 570-579-3517 570-455-6589

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

MERCEDES 1975

Good interior & exterior. Runs great! New tires. Many new parts. Moving, Must Sell. $2,300 or best offer 570-693-3263 Ask for Paul

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. $28,000. Call 825-6272

MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR

6 cylinder automatic. 52k original miles. Florida car. $1500. 570-899-1896

Must Sell! Appraised for $9,200 • All original

45,000 miles • 350 Rocket engine • Fender skirts • Always garaged Will sell for $6,000 Serious inquires only 570690-0727

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

439

442 RVs & Campers

FLAGSTAFF `08 CLASSIC NOW BACK IN PA.

Super Lite Fifth Wheel. LCD/DVD flat screen TV, fireplace, heated mattress, ceiling fan, Hide-a-Bed sofa, outside speakers & grill, 2 sliders, aluminum wheels, , awning, microwave oven, tinted safety glass windows, fridge & many accessories & options. Excellent condition, $22,500. 570-868-6986

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! SUNLINE SOLARIS `91

25’ travel trailer A/C. Bunk beds. New fridge & hot water heater. Excellent condition. $3,900. 570-466-4995

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

BMW 2010 K1300S

$15,000 FIRM.

Call 570-262-0914 Leave message.

DAELIM 2006

150 CCs. 4,700 miles. 70 MPG. New battery & tires. $1,500; negotiable. Call 570-288-1246 or 570-328-6897

HARLEY 2011 HERITAGE SOFTTAIL Black. 1,800 miles. ABS brakes. Security System Package. $16,000 firm. SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY 570-704-6023

HARLEY DAVIDSON `03

100th Anniversary Edition Deuce. Garage kept. 1 owner. 1900 miles. Tons of chrome. $38,000 invested. A must see. Asking $18,000. OBO 570-706-6156

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

FORD `04 EXPLORER Eddie Bauer Edition

59,000 miles, 4 door, 3 row seats, V6, all power options, moon roof, video screen $12,999. 570-690-3995 or 570-287-0031

GMC `05 SAVANA

1500 Cargo Van. AWD. V8 automatic. A/C. New brakes & tires. Very clean. $10,750. Call 570-474-6028

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matic, four wheel drive, $6,500. (570) 237-6979

06 CHEVY COLORADO CREW CAB Z71 78K MILES. NEWER 31-10-15 HANKOOK TIRES. 4WD, AUTO, POWER WINDOWS LOCKS. TRUCK RUNS LIKE NEW. 5 CYLINDER GREAT ON GAS HAVE LEER CAP & NERF BARS AND BED LINER, CD, AIR LIGHT BLUE WITH BLUE INTERIOR. $14,500 570-5752-5087 OR 570-718-1834

NISSAN `10 ROGUE SL AWD. Gray. Sunroof. Bose stereo system. Black, heated leather seats. Sunroof 6,800 miles. $24,000 (570) 696-2777

RANGE ROVER ‘07 SPORT Supercharged

59,000 miles, fully loaded. Impeccable service record. $36,000 570-283-1130

CADILLAC `07 ESCALADE ESV Black with extended

cab. Fully loaded. Low miles. Extra set of tires & rims. Leather interior. $32,000. (570) 357-1383

CADILLAC `99 ESCALADE 97k miles. Black

with beige leather interior. 22” rims. Runs great. $8,500 Call 570-861-0202

Find that new job.

The Times Leader Classified section.

JEEP `03 LIBERTY

SPORT. Rare. 5 speed. 23 MPG. 102K highway miles. Silver with black interior. Immaculate condition, inside and out. Garage kept. No rust, maintenance records included. 4wd, all power. $6,900 or best offer, trades will be considered. Call 570-575-0518

JEEP `04 CHEROKEE 135,000 miles, auto-

Motorcycles

Only 460 miles! Has all bells & whistles. Heated grips, 12 volt outlet, traction control, ride adjustment on the fly. Black with lite gray and red trim. comes with BMW cover, battery tender, black blue tooth helmet with FM stereo and black leather riding gloves (like new). paid $20,500. Sell for

451

503

Accounting/ Finance

BOOKKEEPER

Part time for accounting office. Knowledge of QuickBooks, and payroll preparation necessary. Send Resume to: 561 N. Main St. Suite 2, Pittston, PA 18640

503

Accounting/ Finance

TAX PREPARER

No experience necessary. Enroll in a FREE 1-week training class. Focus on providing quality service to Liberty Tax customers. Day and evening classes available. Seasonal job opportunities. Pittston & Plains 883-7829 Edwardsville & West Pittston 288-4007 Wilkes-Barre & Hanover Twp 208-1096 Dallas 675-2240

TAXWANTED PREPARERS

Call 829-7130 to place an employment ad. ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L E DER. ONLY LEADER. timesleader.com

503

Accounting/ Finance

COLLECTIONS SPECIALIST

Local company located in Hazleton is seeking a full-time Collections Specialist in their expanding Credit Department. The ideal candidate will have a to work 9:30 to 6pm, have experience making collection calls, resolving A/R disputes, and investigating deductions and chargebacks. This is a high visibility position that requires excellent analytical, communication, and organizational skills. Professionalism and assertiveness are an absolute must. SAP experience a definite plus. We offer a competitive salary and excellent benefit package. Qualified applicants should submit their resume and salary requirements by fax to HR Dept. 570-450-0231 or e-mail to donna.reimold@ forbo.com or mail to D. Reimold, Box 667, Hazleton, PA 18201.

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Part time. Knowledge of individual - partnerships - corporation tax returns. Send Resume to: 561 N. Main St. Suite 2, Pittston, PA 18640

506 Administrative/ Clerical

ADMINISTRATIVE/ CLERICAL

New car dealership is seeking full time employee. Experience only. Must have excellent phone etiquette and good ability to multi-task. Excellent pay and benefits including 401k plan. Send resume to: c/o Times Leader Box 2875 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

COOPER’S SEAFOOD WATERFRONT

Now Hiring Full & Part Time experienced LINE COOKS for 2nd shift. Good starting wage. Good working conditions. Apply in person after 3pm at 304 Kennedy Blvd. Pittston

542

Logistics/ Transportation

NEEDED IMMEDIATELY FORKLIFT OPERATORS AND EXPERIENCED CLAMP TRUCK Must have 1 year experience. $11.50 to start raise after 90 days and 180 days. Benefits after 90 Days. Paid holidays, vacation after 1 year. Overtime available. Apply in person East Coast Logistics & Distribution 140 Industrial Drive (old Techneglas building) Pittston, PA


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 2012 545

Marketing/ Product

Find the MARKETER perfect friend.

Audition to be our famous Lady Liberty. Male or Female. Energy and Enthusiasm a must! Earn income being a Liberty Tax Marketer. Pittston & Plains 883-7829 Edwardsville & West Pittston 288-4007 Wilkes-Barre & Hanover Twp 417-4814 Dallas 675-2240

To place your ad call...829-7130 548 Medical/Health

PITTSTON HEAVENLY MANOR

Needs kind & dedicated Caretakers/ Aides. No experience needed. Med Techs & Detailed Housekeeper. Needs GED or HS diploma. Apply 9-2. 51 Main St., Pittston.

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 Other

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

in the life of a child by becoming a foster parent. Full time and weekend programs are available.

FCCY 1-800-747-3807 EOE

The Classified section at timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE LLEADER. LEA E DER D . ONLY timesleader.com

600 FINANCIAL 610

Business Opportunities

TAX REFUND COMING?

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

timesleader.com

554

Production/ Operations

TRANSLOAD OPERATOR

Rapidly growing business has a need for self-motivated individuals to fill the fast paced position of Transload Operator at our Pittston, PA site. Mechanical and computer skills are a plus and excellent communication abilities are a must. The position requires multi-tasking and shift work along with respect for safety and customer service. The successful candidates must be able to manipulate levers from scaffolding and possess a valid driver’s license. Competitive Wage and Benefit Package. Submit Resume to: Human Resources PO Box 726 Sheffield, PA 16347

Toplaceyour Find the adcall. .829-7130

perfect friend.

712

The Classified section at timesleader.com

ONL NLY NL L ONE N LE LLEADER. LEA E DER D . ONLY

551

PAGE 29

573

INVEST IN YOURSELF WITH JAN – PRO Quote from current Franchisee, “I started with a small investment & I have grown my business over 600%. It definitely changed my life and I would recommend Jan-Pro.” * Guaranteed Clients * Steady Income * Insurance & Bonding * Training & Ongoing Support * Low Start Up Costs * Accounts available throughout WilkesBarre & Scranton

570-824-5774

Jan-Pro.com

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 630 Money To Loan

“We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

Warehouse

LIGHT WAREHOUSE/ EQUIPMENT ROOM WORKER

Light Warehouse worker needed. Must be dependable and able to lift 20 to 50lbs. Experience preferred but will train the right candidate. Selfmotivated individual with a dedicated sense of follow thru. Competitive starting rate. Company offers a voluntary Health Benefits Package and 401K Plan. Pleasant environment. Must be reliable. Please call Stefanie at 888-5148883 or fax resume to attn: Stefanie at 570-517-5003.

700 MERCHANDISE 708

Antiques & Collectibles

WAGON. Radio Flyer. 34x15. Needs restoration. New in mid 1940’s. $35 570-823-2505

To place your ad call...829-7130 710

Appliances

DISHWASHER, Portable, Kenmore, Black with Butcher Block top, $200. 570-333-4494

Baby Items

BABY GLIDER brand new, cherry /tan. $100. 570-970-9243 BABY TRAVEL SYSTEM $50. Jumparoo $35. 2 infant car seat Bases $20. each. 570-417-2940

730

Computer Equipment & Software

TOWER Gateway Pentium 4 Tower. 3ghz cpu with hyperthread. 1gb ram, new mainboard & 80gb harddrive, card reader, dvdrw. $75. 570-905-2985.

758 Miscellaneous TRUCK CAP. Fiberglass A.R.E. with sliding screen windows and locking door. 76x62. $600 STEPCLIMBER, 425i Tunturi, $200. FLASHING, copper 3x8, $200 570-674-0680

SCREEN DOOR. 4x8 for 8’ patio door. New in box. $75 570-823-2505

LINE UP To place your A GREAT DEAL... ad call...829-7130 IN CLASSIFIED!

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

AERO Pilates Performer 298 exercise chart, DVD’s cardio rebounder $200. 288-3634

716

Building Materials

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

720

Cemetery Plots/Lots

MEMORIAL SHRINE CEMETERY

6 Plots Available May be Separated Rose Lawn Section $450 each 570-654-1596

MEMORIAL SHRINE LOTS FOR SALE

6 lots available at Memorial Shrine Cemetery. $2,400. Call 717-774-1520 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY

724 Cellular Phones

APPLE IPHONE 4 S Brand new with

732

732

Exercise Equipment

Exercise Equipment

PULL UP/ DIP POWER TOWER/ Weider, excellent condition. $200. 570-970-9243

To place your ad call...829-7130 744

Furniture & Accessories

BRAND NEW P-TOP QUEEN MATTRESS SET!! Still in bags! $150!! MUST SELL!! Call Steve @ 280-9628!!

FURNISH FOR LESS

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607

756

Medical Equipment

64GB Memory and Apple iPad 2, 64GB with wifi-3g this are factory unlocked with Complete accessories (Well packed & sealed in original company box) and can be used with any network provider of your choice Email: order@tradebitlimited.com or skype: wg.fields for more information.

AQUARIUM - 20 gallon with oak finish stand, clean & excellent condition pump, filter, hoses, light, & many accessories. $99. 570-824-3310

726

BIRD CAGES $25. each. 570-417-2940

Clothing

COAT

KENNETH COLE Beige, size 6, hardly worn. $75. 570-855-5385

Designer Clothes at Discount prices. Your favorite current styles. Convenient, local fashions, with no shipping or return hassles. 100 Wyoming Ave. Wyoming, PA

SCOOTER PRIDE MOBILITY good condition. $350. 570-350-4298

758 Miscellaneous

HELMET motorcycle Outlaw brand, size large, new in box, 1/2 helmet style ,3 snap visor, leather look with skull embroidery. Retails for $120 sell for $50. OBO. 822-6258 KNIVES Kitchen Worthy the premium collection 10 total including cleaver— $40. 570-489-2675 SNOW BLADE 46” for John Deere 110, 120, 130 or 140. all attachments including weights, tire chains, operators manual, excellent condition. For all $125. 333-5394

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

780

Televisions/ Accessories

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER with 27” tv, hardly used. $80. 570-287-0023

786 Toys & Games HOCKEY TABLE. Sportscraft professional grade Turbo. Black lights and electronic scorer. Excellent condition. Sold for $325 new, sacrifice $85. 570-675-4777

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

PAYING TOP DOLLAR for Your Gold, Silver, Scrap Jewelry, Sterling Flatware, Diamonds, Old High School Rings, Foreign & American Paper Money & Coins. WE WILL BEAT PRICES! We Buy Tin and Iron Toys, Vintage Coke Machines, Vintage Brass, Cash Registers, Old Costume Jewelry, Slot Machines, Lionel Trains & Antique Firearms. IF YOU THINK IT’S OLD BRING IT IN, WE WILL GIVE YOU A PRICE. COME SEE US AT 134 RTE. 11, Larksville 570-855-7197 570-328-3428

800 PETS & ANIMALS 810

Cats

CATS Free to good homes. Help! Living in country & caring for approximately 15 strays, 3 months to 2 years. Health issues are forcing me to find good homes for them. References required. 333-4164

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 815

Dogs

Highest Prices Paid!! FREE PICKUP

288-8995

906 Homes for Sale Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

FALLS/MILL CITY

10 acres with gas lease. Out of flood zone. 3 bedrooms. 2 baths. Living room. Dining room. Family room. Kitchen. $130,000. 570-333-1456 Leave a Message KINGSTON

SHIH-TZU PUPPIES

Parents on premises Shots Current. $500 570-250-9690

Collect Cash. Not Dust. Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

Completely remodeled, mint, turn key condition, 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, large closets, with hardwood, carpet & tile floors, new kitchen & baths, gas heat, shed, large yard. $134,900, seller will pay closing costs, $5000 down and monthly payments are $995 / month. Financing available. Call Bob at 570-654-1490

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 MOUNTAIN TOP Laurel Lakes Section. Beautiful colonial on 2 private acres. 4 bedrooms, large kitchen, big family room with fireplace and builtins, spacious living room and dining room, 2.5 baths, oversized 3 car garage. Priced to sell at $279,000. Call 610-295-9550.

VITO’S & GINO’S Wanted: Junk Cars & Trucks

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Call 829-7130 to place an ad. ONL NLY L ONE N LE LEA L E DER. ONLY LEADER. timesleader.com

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!


PAGE 30

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 2012

906 Homes for Sale PLAINS

KEYSTONE SECTION 9 Ridgewood Road

TOTAL BEAUTY 1 ACRE- PRIVACY Beautiful ranch 2

bedrooms, huge modern kitchen, big TV room and living room, 1 bath, attic for storage, washer, dryer & 2 air conditioners included. New Roof & Furnace Furnished or unfurnished. Low Taxes! Reduced $115,900 FINANCING AVAILABLE

570-885-1512

To place your ad call...829-7130 906 Homes for Sale

SCRANTON

RUNDLE STREET

Nice ranch in very well maintained, quiet neighborhood with finished basement, hardwood floors, and big, fenced back yard with deck. REDUCED PRICE $94,900 MLS# 11-4025 Joseph P Gilroy Real Estate (570) 288-1444 Ask for Holly Kozlowski (570) 814-6763

WYOMING

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

Great location, 1 bedroom apartment in residential area, all utilities included. $600/month + security. 908-482-0335

KINGSTON

Cozy 1st floor, 1 bedroom apartment Heat, hot water & electric included. Laundry in basement, non-smoking, no pets. Off-street parking available. $650. + 1 month security, lease & $40 credit check required. Call for appointment 570-762-3747 KINGSTON MODERN!

PARKSIDE APARTMENTS on the park

between Market & Pierce Bridges. 1 Bedroom Available Now $555/mo + electric 2 Bedroom Available March $600 Mo + electric Washer/dryer Air, Dishwasher, Parking, Storage. We allow pets! Call Jeff at 570-822-8577

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NANTICOKE

Brick home for sale. 2 Car Garage. For more info, call 570-856-1045

603 Hanover St 2nd floor, 1 bedroom. No pets. $500 + security, utilities & lease. Photos available. Call 570-542-5330

PITTSTON

2nd floor, 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, refrigerator & stove provided, washer/ dryer hookup, pets negotiable. $525/ month, water and sewer paid, security and lease required. Call 570-237-6277

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

DALLAS

 Large 3 bedroom 2nd floor. No pets. Off street parking. Call Joe 570-881-2517

DUMORE bedroom

Two 1 bathroom apartment on Apple St. $600/month + utilities. Available 1/15. (570) 815-5334

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

SHAVERTOWN TOWNHOUSE

173 E Overbrook Rd. 2 large bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, parking for 2 cars, washer /dryer hookup, storage area $735/mo includes sewer and garbage. Small pets OK. Owner is Real Estate Agent. Available immediately. 570-871-0779

To place your ad call...829-7130

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

WILKES-BARRE 155 W. River St.

1 bedroom, some utilities & appliances included, hardwood floors, Pet friendly. $600/month. Call 570-969-9268

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE 264 Academy St

1.5 bedrooms, newly renovated building. Washer & dryer available. $600/per month includes heat, hot water and parking. 646-712-1286 570-328-9896 570-855-4744

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

91

%

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section.

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE

“GENERAL HOSPITAL” VICINITY

Super Clean, remodeled compact 3 rooms, laundry, appliances, off street parking 1 car. $470 + utilities. EMPLOYMENT, CREDIT, LEASE REQUIRED. NO PETS/SMOKING. Managed Building!

AMERICA REALTY 288-1422 To place your ad call...829-7130 WILKES-BARRE NORTH 815 N Washington Street, Rear 1 bedroom, wall to wall carpet, new paint & flooring, eat in kitchen with appliances, enclosed front & back porch, laundry facilities. heat, hot water and cable included. $520 + electric & security. No pets. Call 570-814-1356

941

apartments. Starting at $440 and up. References required. Section 8 ok. 570-332-5723

WYOMING

Monument Avenue 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, all appliances provided, washer/dryer on premises, offstreet parking, no pets, $595/month, plus utilities & security deposit. Call 570-954-2972

Commercial Properties

*2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today? Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONL NL ONE NLY N LE LEA L E DER D . ONLY LEADER. timesleader.com

Half Doubles

KINGSTON

3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, new wall to wall carpeting, freshly painted, partial A/C, gas heat, large fenced in yard, walking distance to Kingston Corners. All appliances, off-street parking, no pets. $700/month, plus utilities, & 2 months security. Application & references. Call 570-639-4907

KINGSTON Sprague Ave.

315 PLAZA

750 & 1750 square feet and NEW SPACE 3,500 square feet OFFICE/RETAIL 570-829-1206

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1156

Insurance

NEPA LONG TERM CARE AGENCY

Charming, Spacious 6 room, 2 bedroom duplex, includes 2nd and 3rd floor. Convenient to Wyoming Ave. Washer/dryer hook-up, basement storage, $550 / month + utilities, security & lease. NO PETS.570-793-6294

Long Term Care Insurance products Reputable Companies. 570-580-0797 Free Consult www.nepa longtermcare .com

953 Houses for Rent

Over 47,000

LAFLIN

2 bedrooms, 1.5 car garage. Appliances. 1st month rent, security & references. $625 + utilities. 570-332-9355

Apartments/ Unfurnished

WILKES-BARRE SOUTH SECURE BUILDINGS 1 & 2 bedroom

944

950

MOUNTAIN TOP AREA

NEAR LILY LAKE AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 3 bedrooms, 1.5 bath, Farm house. Modern kitchen, hardwood floors. $950/month + security & 1 year lease Call 570-379-2258

people cite the The Times Leader as their primary source for shopping information.

Selling your ride?

We’ll run your ad in the classified section until your vehicle is sold.

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

ON NLY ON NE L EADER. ONLY ONE LEADER. timesleader.com

*2008 Pulse Research

What Do You HaveTo Toplaceyour Sell adcall. .829-7130 Today? NANTICOKE Desirable Lexington Village Nanticoke, PA Many ranch style homes. 2 bedrooms 2 Free Months With A 2 Year Lease $795 + electric

Find a newcar online at

timesleader.com

SQUARE FOOT RE MANAGEMENT 866-873-0478

SALEM TWP. 3 bedroom home on 24 acres with 1000 ft of creek. Private, secluded, next to state game land. Kitchen with appliances. Laundry room. 2 bedrooms, full bath on 1st floor. Master bedroom, bath on 2nd floor. Enclosed hot tub, opens to deck. 2 car garage. Electric fence for dogs. Water, sewer included. Berwick School District. 10 minutes from Berwick Power Plant. $1500 month. 570-542-7564

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

ONL NL LY ONE N LE LEA L E DER D . ONLY LEADER. ONL NL LY ONE N LE LEA L E DER D . ONLY LEADER. timesleader.com

timesleader.com


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 2012

PAGE 31


PAGE 32

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, JANUARY 1, 2012

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N S C AN H ERE FO R S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S

NO W TA KING R ESER VA TIO NS FO R TH E A LL NEW A LL

ELEC TR IC NISSA N LEA F

2012 2 012 N NISSAN ISSAN S SENTRA ENTRA 2.0SR 2.0SR STK#N 21301 M O D EL# 12112 M SR P $20,320

S SPECIAL PECIAL E EDITION DITION

5

A T TH IS P R IC E

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, Na viga tio n , M o o n ro o f, Blu eto o th, Allo ys , S p o iler, F o g L ights & F lo o rM a ts

$

B U Y FO R

16 ,9 9 5

*

W / $10 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

$

OR

L EAS E FOR

*

159 P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$159 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r. Res id u a l= $12,395.20; m u s t b e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $1750 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u ity. Plu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l @ d elivery= $1953.50

O FFER S EN D J A N U A R Y 3R D

2012 2 012 N NISSAN ISSAN A ALTIMA LT I M A 2.5S 2 . 5 S SEDAN SEDAN

S TK #N 20533 M O D EL# 13112 M S R P $23,820

A L L IN S TO C K A LTIM A S 2 0 % O FF M S R P

O NLY 24 M O NTH L EA SE

O V ER

50

A VA I IL LA B LE 4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, AM / F M / CD , PW , PD L , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

20 % W

/ $50 0

C A P TIV E C A S H

O FF EV ER Y A LTIM A IN S TO C K !

& $50 0

C U S TO M ER

L EA S E FO R A S LOW AS

OR

B ON U S

CAS H

$

179

*

P ER M O.

* $179 Per m o n t h, 24 m o n t h lea s e, 12K p er yea r . Res id u a l= $15,721.20 m u s tb e a p p ro ved t hru N M AC @ T ier 1. $1499 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u it y + regis t ra t io n f ees . T o t a l @ d elivery= $1702.50. $350 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t e in clu d ed & $500 Cu s t o m er Bo n u s Ca s h. In clu d es $1250 N is s a n Reb a t e.

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN MAXIMA MAXIMA S SV V w/ w/ Sport Sport Package Package STK#N 20831 M O D EL# 16211 M SR P $37,825

V-6, CVT , L ea ther, M o o n ro o f, Pa d d le S hift& S p o rt S u s p en s io n , 19” W heel, Xen o n Hea d lights & M o re

$

LA S ST T 2011 2011 M A X IIMM A !

B U Y FO R

3 0 ,9 9 5 W

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN R ROGUE OGUE S A AWD WD STK#N 20928 M O D EL# 22211 M SR P $23,905

O N LLYY EFT FT @ 3 LE T THH IIS S P R IC IC E

*

OR

P lu s Ta x.

/ $ 2 5 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 N M A C C A P TIV E C A S H

$

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, AM / F M / CD , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

L EAS E FO R

30 9

*

P ER M O.

$

P lu s Ta x.

B U Y FO R

2 0 ,9 9 5 W

/ $50 0

N IS S A N

R EB ATE

2 6 ,4 9 5

*

OR

$

W / $2 5 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $5 0 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

L EAS E FO R

299

*

P ER M O.

550 0 O FF M S R P

$

P lu s Ta x.

* $299 Perm o n th p lu s ta x. 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; w /$1999 + $203.50 regis tra tio n fees = $2202.50 d u e a td elivery. Res id u a l= $15,101 in clu d es $1375 L ea s e Ca s h. S a le Price + T a x & T a gs . In clu d es Nis s a n Reb a te. M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC T ier1.

2012 2 012 N NISSAN ISSAN X X-TERRA -TERRA P PRO4X RO4X 4 4X4 X4 STK#N 21281 M O D EL# 24412 M SR P $33,100

V-6, Au to , L ea ther, Allo ys , PW , PD L , O ff Ro a d L ights , F lo o rM a ts

$

6 BLL E A V A IILL A B @T TH H IISS PR RICE ICE S A V E OV E R $3700 $3700 O F FF F M SR RPP

/ $ 1,0 0 0

2 9 ,4 3 0

N IS S A N

*

*S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs . In clu d es $2000 Nis s a n Reb a te.

2012 2 012 N NISSAN ISSAN T TITAN ITAN S SV V 4X4 4X4 KING KING CAB CAB

$

*

R EB ATE

W

$

B U Y FO R

2 4 ,9 9 5

W

/ $250 0

N IS S A N

*

OR

$

R EB ATE

L EAS E FO R

*

229 P ER M O. P lu s Ta x.

*$229 PerM o n th, 39 M o n th L ea s e, 12K p eryea rw / $1999 + $203.50 regis tra tio n fee= $2202.50 d u e a td elivery. Res id u a l $18,941. S a le p rice + T a x & T a gs in clu d es N is s a n Reb a te. M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC T ier1.

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN MURANO MURANO CROSS CROSS CABRIOLET CABRIOLET C CONVERTIBLE ONVERTIBLE STK#N 20839 M O D EL# 27011 M SR P $48,020

3

TTOO CHOOS CH O O S E FR O M FROM B U Y FO R

2 7,9 9 5

/ $20 0 0

N IS S A N

R EB ATE & $ 13 5 0

*

VA L U E TR U C K

P K G

*S a le Price + ta x & ta gs . In clu d es Nis s a n Reb a te + Cu s to m erBo n u s Ca s h.

* S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs .

As k

$

S A L E P R IC E AS L OW AS

V8, Au to , A/ C, F o g L ights , Allo y W heels , Blu eto o th, Po w erS ea t, K eyles s E n try & M o re

B U Y FO R

W

*

STK#N 21270 M O D EL# 34412 M SR P $34,880

2 9 ,3 9 5

P lu s Ta x.

V-6, Au to , A/ C, Prem Utility Pkg, PW , PD L , Cru is e, T ilt, AM / F M / CD , F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

8

B U Y FO R

P ER M O.

STK#N 21245 M O D EL# 31412 M SR P $29,595

STK#N 21000 M O D EL# 25211 M SR P $34,930

TO C H O O SE FR O M

$

19 9

*

2012 2 012 N NISSAN ISSAN F FRONTIER RONTIER S SV V 4X4 4X4 CREW CREW CAB CAB

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN PATHFINDER PATHFINDER 4X4ʼS 4X4ʼS

2011 2 011 N NISSAN ISSAN MURANO MURANO S A AWD WD

OR P lu s Ta x.

L EAS E FO R

*$199 Per M o n t h, 39 M o n t h L ea s e, 12K PerY ea r w / $2302.50 + $203.50 regis t ra t io n f ee = $2506 d u e a td elivery. Res id u a l= $12,669. In clu d es $1000 L ea s e Ca s h. S a le Price + t a x& t a gs in clu d es N is s a n Reb a t e. M u s tb e a p p ro ved t hru N M AC T ier 1.

* $309 Per m o n t h p lu s t a x. 39 m o n t h lea s e; 12k p er yea r; Res id u a l= $18,534.25; M u s t b e a p p ro ved t hru N M AC @ T ier 1; $2699 Ca s h D o w n o rT ra d e E q u it y + regis t ra t io n f ees ; T o t a l @ d elivery = $2902.50. $1900 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t e In clu d ed .

STK#N 21273 M O D EL# 23211 M SR P $32,130

$

*

V6, CVT , N a viga tio n , Hea ted L ea therS ea ts , AM / F M / CD , F lo o rM a ts , M u ch, M u ch M o re!

$

B U Y FO R W

3 9 ,9 9 5

/ $ 2 ,0 0 0

N IS S A N

*

R EB ATE

*S a le Price p lu s ta x & ta gs . In clu d es Nis s a n Reb a te.

* Ta x a nd Ta g a d d it io na l. Pr io rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gr a phic a l Er r o r s . A ll r eb a t es & inc ent ives a pplied . * *0 % A PR in lieu o f r eb a t es . fo rd et a ils . * * As perN is s a n M o nt hly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f O c t2 0 11. A ll Pr ic es b a s ed o n im m ed ia t e d elivery in s t o c k vehic le o nly. A ll o ffer s ex pir e 1/3 /12 .

Th

K

e

N

#1 N

E N

is s a

n

De

a

le

rin

P O L L O CK

IS

S

A

N

N

.E.

PA

1- 8 6 6 - 70 4 - 0 6 72

229 M U N DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

w w w .ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om

®


Go Lackawanna 01-01-2012  

Go Lackawanna 01-01

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