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GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 14, 2012

RIVERSIDE JOINS FIGHT AGAINST BULLYING

INSIDE Page 6 – Jill Biden visits Scranton Page 11 – Obituaries Page 14 – Crossword puzzles Page 15 – Websites that will save you money Page 16 – Old Forge takes a stand against bullying

McGlynn

DuPuis

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iverside West and East Elementary Schools participated in Unity Day on Wednesday, Oct. 10. It was a day when everyone in the school came together to help put an end to bullying. All students and staff members in the Riverside School District, including Dominick DeAngelo, Grace Castro and Alex Pica, from left, were encouraged to wear orange to show their support in ending bullying. Individual classroom programs to promote anti-bullying took place at each school .

Robinson

Riedmiller

Andes

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Free clinic for uninsured extends hours. The University of Scranton’s Edward R. Leahy Jr. Center Clinic for the Uninsured is extending hours for serving patients from Lackawanna County by appointment from noon to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays Oct. 30 through Nov. 13; and Nov. 27. Appointments can be made by calling 941.6112.The clinic is also open every Thursday from 2 to 6 p.m. Services on Thursdays are provided on a walk-in basis.

West Scranton Fire Safety meeting sponsored by the Keyser Valley Citizen’s Association, will be held on Wednesday Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. in Keyser Valley Community Center at 7pm. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss the documented fact that West Scranton’s only Firehouse at 1917 Luzerne St. was closed 77 days during July, August and September or 82 percent of the time. TCCC Boys Basketball sign ups for

boys in grades second through eighth will be held Oct. 25 and 29 and Nov. 1. Final day of sign ups and tryouts will be Thursday, Nov. 8 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Taylor Community Center Main Ave, Taylor. For more information, call 499.7996. Scranton Public Library Computer Learning Lab: Monday, Oct. 15, 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.; Excel 2007 Intermediate Level 1, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 1 to 3 p.m.; Intro to Computers Level 2, Tuesday, Oct. 16, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.; Excel 2007 Intermediate Level 2, Wednesday, Oct. 17, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.; Excel 2007 Intermediate Level 2, Thursday, Oct. 18, 10 a.m. to noon; Intro to Computers Level 2, Thursday, Oct. 18, 2 to 4 p.m.; Internet Basics Level 2, Friday, Oct. 19, 10 a.m. to noon. Romar Dance Studio, 201 Sussex Street, Old Forge, is now taking registrations for its 15th season of “Mommy (Daddy) & Me.” This little gym class in creative movement, fitness and fun, is for boys and girls, 18 months to three years old. Simple coordination is introduced to students by combining fitness activities,

along with musical and rhythmic actions in a playful atmosphere. The six week fall session will begin on Saturday, October 13. Classes will be held on Saturday from 9:30 to 10 a.m. For more information, call 457.6576, or visit www.romardance.com

Scranton Cultural Center’s Up & Coming Comedy Series featuring Eric Kirkland, Chris Dubail, Improv by Here We Are in Spain, Rock 107’s Dave DiRienzo and musical opener Jane Demijohn on Saturday, Oct. 20 at 8 p.m. Cost: $16.

The West Scranton Hyde Park Neighborhood Watch will meet on Thursday, Oct. 18 at 7 p.m. at All Saints Auditorium, 1403 Jackson St., behind St. Patrick’s Church. Info: http://hydeparkneighborwatch.wordpress.com.

Master Gardener Training, Penn State Extension in Lackawanna County will be offering the Master Gardener Training Program in the fall. This program involves extensive training in the major aspects of home horticulture. In addition, candidates will commit to 50 hours of volunteer time including staffing the garden helpline. The training will be held Monday and Thursday nights beginning October 22 from 6 to 9 p.m. For more information, or an application, please call 963.6842 or email LackawannaMG@psu.edu.

The Annual Craft Fair will be held at John Adams Elementary, 927 Capouse Ave., Scranton, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 20. Vendors are needed. Call 348.3655 or visit johnadamsbulldogspta@gmail.com.

Coal Mining info sought, Carl Orechovsky, research editor of Anthracite Archives, Old Forge, is seeking information about the coal mining industry during the 1950s and ’60s in Old Forge. Info: call 702.4217.

Women’s Self Defense Workshop will be held at Symmetry Yoga Studio, 209 N. Main Ave., Scranton on Wednesday, Oct. 17 and 24 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Rob Thomas will be running the workshop. For more information, call 290.7242 or visit 570.Dojo.com.

On the cover: Michael Gowarthy, Adam Youshock and Emily Gerrity . Photo by Jason Riedmiller.

+(ISSN No. 0896-4084) USPS 499-710

Issue No. 2012-288 Newsroom

829-7242 jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com

Circulation

Jim McCabe – 829-5000 jmccabe@timesleader.com Published weekly by: Impressions Media 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA Postmaster: Send address changes to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711


Sunday, October 14, 2012

GOLackawanna

3

Residency, CTC suit roil Riverside By ROGER DuPUIS II rdupuis@golackawanna.com

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iverside Superintendent David Woods says he lives in the district that employs him, in an apartment owned by a board member, but acknowledges that he didn’t permanently reside in the area for much of his tenure despite contract provisions requiring him to do so within nine months of hiring. And, Woods said, board members were fully aware of his situation and “worked with” him as he struggled to find a district residence while his Reading-area property lost value during the housing crisis, which hit that area harder than it did Lackawanna County.

The superintendent’s frank discussion about his living arrangements came three days after his residency was the subject of heated exchanges between the administration and Taylor resident Eugene Gallagher during a school board meeting, and – in unrelated news – the same day the Career Technology Center of Lackawanna County filed suit in challenging Riverside’s August decision to pull out of what had been a ninedistrict consortium. While Woods said he could not comment about the CTC suit, he spoke freely about his residency. “I maintain a home in Berks County. My wife and family live there. I also maintain an apartment in Moosic,” Woods, who was hired in 2008, told Go Lackawanna in a Friday, Oct. 12 telephone interview. The apartment, at 411 Rear Hudson St., is owned by Riverside School Board member Timothy Lavelle, said the superintendent. Lackawanna County Assessor’s Office records show it is owned by LIFS Enterprises LLC of 524 Lackawanna Ave., Moosic, a property records show is owned by Lavelle. Efforts to reach Lavelle and confirm ownership of the apartment were unsuccessful. While Woods’ choice of residence – and the board’s tolerance of how long it took for him to move north – may be controversial, an official with the state Eth-

Riverside School District faces controversy on two fronts, with the superintendent’s residency questioned and the district sued over career-tech moves.

Woods

Gallagher

ics Commission said the agency would not issue an advisory on the rental arrangement, and a legal expert contacted by Go Lackawanna said that any alleged breach of contract would seem to be a matter for the board to pursue or permit at its pleasure. According to the district’s June 2008 contract with Woods, he agreed “to live within the Borough of Moosic or the Borough of Taylor” within nine months of the contract date. Failing that, the contract gives the board the power to terminate the deal with 180 days notice. During the Tuesday, Oct. 9 school board meeting, Gallagher, who has been a vocal critic of Woods and district policies, asked board President Robert Bennie whether Woods was in violation of his contract. When Bennie said Woods was not in violation, Gallagher asked where he was living. Bennie and solicitor Raymond C. Rinaldi, II told Gallagher that state law re-

garding personnel information prohibited them from disclosing an employee’s address. Gallagher then asked Bennie whether Woods had ever been in violation of the agreement. Bennie responded that he was not going to permit “a grand inquisition” on the contract. Gallagher later asked Woods the same question. “Mr. Gallagher, I’ve got nothing to say to you,” Woods replied. A 1999 Riverside graduate and former assistant coach in several sports, Gallagher acknowledged to a reporter that he plans to run for school board next year. With the district facing troubled times – this year witnessed eight teacher furloughs and the battle surrounding Woods’ August lawsuit to sever Riverside’s ties with the Career Technology Center of Lackawanna County over a CTC building project – Gallagher said retaining a superintendent who continued to live outside the district for so long sends the wrong signal. He hopes the board will seriously consider whether to renew Woods’ five-year contract, which expires June 30, 2013. Shortly before the new school year began, Riverside filed suit on Aug. 21 to cut ties with CTC, seeking a judgment that it has the right to pull out under terms of a

1968 agreement and contending that the district “does not agree with the majority of the participating (CTC) members … that it is appropriate to incur debt of $18.1 million in order to reconstruct or rehabilitate the building housing the center.” Woods then made arrangements to send Riverside’s career technology students to the Wilkes-Barre Area Career and Technical Center in Plains Twp. – a move he said will save Riverside more than $36,000 in the first year alone due to reduced tuition and transportation costs. CTC’s Friday, Oct. 12 countersuit challenges the validity of both actions. A message left for Bennie through district offices was not immediately returned on Friday. The superintendent did return a reporter’s call, and regarding his personal issues was more forthcoming when asked the same question Gallagher posed at the meeting. “I did not do that,” Woods said of meeting the nine-month residency clause. “Right now I am in compliance with my contract.” Woods, currently paid $109,000 per year, said he tried unsuccessfully for years both to sell his Berks County home and to find appropriate accommodations in

the district. One rental property where he was living for a time was unsuitable for several reasons, among them the need to find a place that would accept his six dogs. At other times, Woods said, he stayed with relatives in Scranton. “I’ve done my due diligence. I’ve tried to get up there in the past, several times,” he said. When those efforts failed, Woods said he commuted between Berks and Lackawanna counties, spending between $800 and $1,000 on gas each month. Now, Woods said, he stays in Moosic from Monday to Friday, heading back to Berks County on the weekends. “This board and prior boards have worked with me,” he added. “They understood.” Contacted on Friday, attorney Rinaldi said he would reserve comment until he could speak with district officials. Melissa Melewsky, media law counsel with the Pennsylvania Newspaper Association, said that so long as there are no statutory requirements for Woods to live in the district, “it falls to the school board to enforce” its contract, but “there’s no law that requires the district to pursue the issue.” But See RIVERSIDE, Page 6


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 14, 2012

Walk brings suicide ‘out of the darkness’ By ROGER DuPUIS II rdupuis@golackawanna.com

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ark T. McGrath would have loved the neon green

shirts. That was the verdict as the sun shone on Courthouse Square in Scranton, with Heather McGrath and several other nieces joking about their “bright” uncle – bright as in smart, but also as in colorful – like the matching “MTM” T-shirts they sported during a brisk morning walk through the city.

The eye-catching apparel and friendly banter underscored the cause which brought hundreds out onto the streets this chilly Oct. 13: raising awareness of suicide, to which McGrath’s family lost the 52-year-old attorney in July 2009. If their participation raises awareness and spares even one other family from the pain of losing a loved one to suicide, “it’s worth it,” Team McGrath captain Heather McGrath said. Nearly 500 pre-registered for Out of the Darkness Community Walk, a three-mile walk, which already had generated more than $19,000 in donations for the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention by Saturday morning, according to the AFSP website. A few hundred more walkers showed up on the day of the event. More than 38,000 Americans died by suicide in 2010, according to AFSP statistics, with nearly 1,600 of those deaths in Pennsylvania. For Kathy Wallace, chairwoman of the Greater Northeast Pennsylvania chapter of AFSP, Saturday’s turnout demonstrated the power of love, as well as the number of lives and families touched by suicide. “There isn’t even a word that can capture how important this is,” said Wallace. “I just hope that anyone who is thinking about ending their life knows how important they are,” she added. “And please know that See WALK, Page 11

ROGER DUPUIS II PHOTOS / GO LACKAWANNA

Relatives of Mark McGrath- Mandi Boyanoski, Heather McGrath, Grace McGrath, Jamie McHugh, Maggie Boyanoski, J.J. Perrone, Mariah McMullen, Kristi McMullen and Judy Jones, gather on Courthouse Square after their walk to remember the Scranton attorney who died in 2009.

Kathy Wallace, chairwoman of the Greater Northeast Pennsylvania chapter of the American Foundation of Suicide Prevention, discusses a display of photos submitted by relatives.

Scranton High School musicians perform for walkers outside district headquarters on North Washington Avenue.


Sunday, October 14, 2012

GOLackawanna

Zombies on the RUN

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Neighborhood Watch hosts zombie themed fundraiser

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By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

his weekend, West Scranton may look a bit like a classic horror movie, with zombies running down Main Avenue, but passersby shouldn’t worry, these zombies won’t be hunting for brains, but rather first-place gold.

The West Scranton Hyde Park Neighborhood Watch is sponsoring West Side Zombie Escape Route, a 5K run/walk on Saturday, Oct. 20, in Allen Park, located on the corner of Main Avenue and Price Street in Scranton. For an admission price of $25, for those who pre-register, or $30 the day of the event, runners can enter the run as a survivor, zombie or an ordinary runner/walker. “They can wear costumes other than a zombie if they want to,” said Neighborhood Watch President Karin Foster, who organized the 5K. Foster said the Neighborhood Watch had been looking for another fundraiser to do, and the idea for the run came out of a brainstorming session.

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Adam Youshock, Emily Gerrity and Michael Gowarthy are ready for West Side Zombie Escape Route, a 5K run/walk.

“A group of us were working in the (Hyde Park Community Garden), and we were thinking, what can we do for another fundraiser. It was right after the Dirty Girl (Mud Run) event, and we had some members that did that, and one silly idea after another came out,” said Foster. “I happened to see examples of zombie runs on the Internet and I thought, with Halloween coming, it would be a fun alternative to the traditional run. I ran it by Karin and here we are,” said Hyde Park Community Garden Chairman Tom Borthwick. “People are excited. It’s a novelty, and it’s a neighborhood affair. People are all about supporting West Side.” See ZOMBIES , Page 8


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 14, 2012

Jill Biden applauds volunteers

RIVERSIDE Continued from page 3

By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

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he United States president and vice president don’t get elected by themselves, it takes the work of a lot of people behind the scenes to get that job done. And, earlier last week, Jill Biden, Ed.D., the wife of United States Vice President Joe Biden, took a moment to show her appreciation to all those who have volunteered their time for this upcoming election.

DON MCGLYNN/GO LACKAWANNA

Mary and Kevin Magner meet Jill Biden in Scranton on Monday, Oct. 8.

speak and go,” said Scranton resident Kevin Rutkowski. “She has to be somewhere else, I know that, but she actually stood here and talked to people, and I got my picture with her. So, hey, I’m happy. I got her autograph, I’m happy with that. It was a good day.” For some in attendance, Monday’s event brought back memories of candidates they met in campaigns past. Like for Patrick Joyce, a Moosic resident and retired Riverside High School teacher. “In 1968, Hubert Humphrey was running for president against Nixon,” recalled Joyce. “I was a high school sophomore in Pitt-

ston Area, living in Avoca, and I remember walking up to the airport, of course I had to put on my best suit, which is what we did then. I walked up to the airport and as Vice President Humphrey was descending the stairs onto the tarmac, I greeted him, shook his hand, walked him to the car, opened and closed the door, and I still have the campaign button he took off his jacket and gave to me.” “That really got me going as a young adult, and then later on I worked for just about every Democratic candidate that I had time to work for.” Now that he’s retired, Joyce

joked that he practically lives at the Scranton field office and has found ways to incorporate his other interests into the campaign. A cyclist, Joyce has started to cycle to different campaign offices throughout the state, including offices in Hazleton, State College, Lewisburg, Williamsport and Stroudsburg, to bring attention to the campaign. “If you want to bring your message out, sometimes a different venue (helps),” said Joyce. “When you’re coming by on a high performance bike with Obama signs on the side, it gets people’s attention.”

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The second lady paid a visit to the Scranton and Hazleton campaign field offices on Monday, Oct. 1, as part of a two-day visit to Pennsylvania that was part of a voter registration drive in advance of Tuesday’s voter registration deadline. Biden acknowledged and thanked all the volunteers for the hard work they’ve put into this campaign in support of her husband, Joe Biden, and President Barack Obama. “I want to start by thanking everyone here,” said Biden. “I’ve been out the last few weeks, and I’ve seen all the energy and the enthusiasm that’s out there this year for this election, just like is in this room today. And, I know that this election is connecting with people in a real way. It’s about people’s lives, and it’s no different for me either. Even if Joe’s name were not on the ballot, I would still be working hard for this election.” Biden went on to encourage volunteers to continue working hard during the crucial weeks ahead. “After the registration deadline, go out and talk to your friends, go out and talk to your neighbors, sign up to volunteer, to canvass, to make phone calls. Whatever it is, we have to keep moving this country forward, and you’re going to do that for us,” said Biden. Following her comments, Biden took a moment to meet and pose for photos with anyone who was interested. “I thought she was just going to

any contract amendments should be put in writing for residents to see, she added. Rinaldi did not immediately recall any public discussion on amendments or the residency clause by the board, and said he could not comment on whether the issue was discussed in executive session owing to attorney-client privilege. Regarding the Moosic apartment, Woods said he called the state Ethics Commission for advice, and was advised to submit a request for a formal written advisory on the question. In lieu of that, he believes the arrangement “is above board.” John Contino, the commission’s executive director, explained that the advisory process is intended to “encourage individuals to seek out answers before they act.” Robin Hittie, chief counsel for the ethics commission, said the agency received an advisory request that appeared to be from Woods in the mail on Friday, Oct. 12. “I will not be issuing an advisory because it appears from the request that the question that is being asked involves conduct that is already ongoing,” Hittie said. Wherever Woods lives, Bennie’s statements during Tuesday’s meeting made clear his view of the superintendent’s performance. “We hired him to be the CEO of the Riverside School District … not to attend social events,” Bennie said. “We hired him to be a CEO, and I think he’s doing a terrific job.”

570-212-8390


Sunday, October 14, 2012

GOLackawanna

7

SCRANTON SCHOOL BOARD

Air quality test returns positive results

By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

Following the discovery of mold at William Prescott Elementary School in mid-September, it seemed inevitable that students would be forced to leave the school for at least part, if not all, of the school year. The results of a recent air quality test, however, have created a small possibility that the students may be able to stay where they are. Joseph Guzek, of Guzek Associates, the district’s consulting environmental engineer, was in attendance for the Scranton School Board’s monthly meeting held on Tuesday, Oct. 9, at Scranton High School. Guzek Associates recently conducted a room by room air quality test of the Prescott Elementary School, and reported to the board that there has been no amplification in any of the rooms in the school, including the cafeteria.

“The air quality came back very acceptable,” said Guzek of Prescott. The students at Prescott were scheduled to start attending classes at the Nativity School on Hemlock Street later this month, pending the results of an air quality test at that school. Guzek Associates went through Nativity earlier last week and pointed out issues in the building that needed to be addressed, which the district’s maintenance staff has taken care of. Superintendent William King said following the air quality test at Nativity he hopes to be able to meet with the parents’ group at Prescott to discuss the report and, if necessary, a plan, should a situation occur where Nativity’s air quality test results do not come back at levels that are acceptable. “One of the thoughts would be could the stu-

dents possibly stay at Prescott, and maybe we could come up with some alternatives for health and phys ed classes. We’ve already explored some of those avenues, and possibly, maybe, we could utilize some of the other rooms,” said King. Parent Matt Barrett, who was in attendance on Tuesday, requested that whatever the board decides to do they keep the lines of communication open with the parents and the public. The board assured Barrett that the district would be getting information out to the parents. In addition to King, Inventory Control Technician Justin MacGregor will be acting as a liaison between the superintendent and the parents. The board approved MacGregor’s new job title, community liaison, during the meeting; the new position does not come with a pay increase.

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 14, 2012

Forget politics, fund roads, panel urges

VIKINGS STAY SAFE

By ROGER DuPUIS II rdupuis@golackawanna.com

are deemed structurally deficient. The national average is 8 DICKSON CITY -- With more percent, he added. The declaration means some than 400 structurally deficient state bridges in Northeastern key element of a bridge needs to Pennsylvania alone, creation of be repaired or replaced, but “it a dedicated funding source is es- doesn’t mean you can’t drive on sential to maintaining aging in- it or it’s not safe,” Roberts told frastructure, state and local offi- the group at Genetti Manor. An August 2011 report by the cials said. State Sen. John Blake, host of governor’s 40-member Transthe Oct. 10 regional transporta- portation Funding Advisory tion summit, and other partici- Commission found the state’s pants expressed hope the state transportation needs were facLegislature’s next session that ing a $3.5 billion funding gap as opens in January will take up the of 2010. Left unchecked, that gap recommendations of a 2011 gubernatorial committee on trans- would more than double to $7.2 billion by portation fund2020. The reing -- a prospect BY THE NUMBERS port recomsome acknowlmended cost edged is politi- $3.5 billion: Funding gap for cally sensitive statewide transportation needs in savings and additional fundbecause those 2010 ing sources to recommenda$7.2 billion: Estimated gap by raise an extra tions could 2020 if no action is taken $2.5 billion raise fees and $2.5 billion: Added revenue within five fines. years -- not “At the end of generated within five years if legislators approve measures enough to the day, it is far recommended in a 2011 report close the gap, more imporbut a solution tant for us to 2,063: Number of state-owned that would besolve this prob- bridges in PennDOT’s District 4 gin addressing lem than pro- 429: Number of those bridges chronic shorttect our politi- deemed structurally deficient ages driven by cal careers,” said state Rep. Mike Carroll, D- aging infrastructure, rising Avoca, who sits on the House costs and declining fuel-tax revenue as vehicles become more Transportation Committee. Transportation planners as efficient. The committee’s package of well as airport, railroad and public transit officials from Luzerne, proposals included increasing Lackawanna and Monroe coun- vehicle and driver fees to keep ties spoke about the importance pace with inflation, as well as of transportation to economic hiking motorist fines and lifting a cap on the state’s Oil Company growth. “There’s no place where it Franchise Tax. Under the plan, doesn’t connect with the eco- the average driver would pay an nomic vitality of the region,” additional 70 cents per week in Blake, D-Archbald, said of the the first year, rising to an addiregion’s web of roads and rail- tional $2.54 per week by year five. ways. A PennDOT spokesman in But first, officials said, the state must create a reliable Harrisburg said Republican stream of money to maintain ex- Gov. Tom Corbett recognizes the need for action, as well as isting roads and bridges. George Roberts, state Depart- the need to shield Pennsylvania ment of Transportation Engi- motorists from sticker shock. “There is not a question if neer for District 4, said the agency is responsible for 2,063 more funds are needed,” Steve bridges in Luzerne, Lackawan- Chizmar said. “The governor na, Wyoming, Wayne, Pike and must weigh what will place a Susquehanna counties. Of minimum amount of burden on those, 429, or about 21 percent, taxpayers.”

In recognition of National Fire Prevention Week, which was Oct. 7 through 13, volunteers from Taylor Fire & Rescue and Ladder 95 paid a visit to Riverside Elementary West School in Taylor to present a fire safety program for the students. The students learned the importance of fire safety, and got a chance to tour a fire truck. The students presented each fire company with a $50 donation to say thank you. In attendance for the safety program, first row from left, Hunter Jones, Gary Mrozinski, Trevor Balzak, Emma Byrne, Alanna Galonis, second row, Wes Jones Sr., John Tigue, Mike Harti, Steven Shubrick and Tom Bracey.

ZOMBIES Continued from page 5 Zombies

Some in the area are already somewhat familiar with a Zombie 5K, having participated in the one held in Taylor during Infect Scranton in September. While both runs are zombie themed, the West Side Zombie Escape Route is unique in that it is not a an obstacle course, but rather a traditional run around West Scranton. “The logistics of a regular 5K make more sense for us. On top of that, they have their brand and we have ours,” said Borthwick. And the Neighborhood Watch’s brand seems to be appealing to many in the area. Foster said a number of runners have already registered and many have called to inquire about the race. This early excitement is at least partially due to the work of TwentyFiveEight Productions, who produced a commercial advertising the event after Borthwick and Foster approached Mark Dennebaum, See ZOMBIES , Page 10

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Shannan Grenda puts the finishing touches on Emily Gerrity’s zombie make up.

IF YOU GO What: West Side Zombie Escape Route: 5K Run/Walk When: Saturday, Oct. 20, race day packet pickup and registration begins at 7 a.m., run starts at 9 a.m. Where: The race begins in Allen Park at the corner of Main Avenue and Price Street, Scranton. Cost: $25 for those who pre-register, $30 the day of the run. Team rates of $20 per team member are also available. The first 100 entries are guaranteed a T-Shirt. Info: email info@ws-zombie-escape-route.org, or visit zombieescaperoute.wordpress.com.


Sunday, October 14, 2012

GOLackawanna

9

MOOSIC BOROUGH COUNCIL

Council accepts bid on Main Street property

By MIKE VERBICKAS For Go Lackawanna

MOOSIC- Moosic Borough Council opened bids on a property located at 1402 N. Main St., Moosic during its monthly meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 9. Council President Joe Mercatili said the property was abandoned by the homeowner and was underwater on the mortgage. Officials spent $8,000 to condemn the property, and $2,000 to purchase it from foreclosure sale. “The property was just in horrible condition. We had to do something,” solicitor John Brazil said. Council accepted a bid of $10,900 from the owners of 1400 N. Main St., Moosic to purchase the adjacent property. In other business, council unanimously approved a tentative 2013 fiscal budget, which includes no new tax increases.

TAYLOR BOROUGH COUNCIL

Sewer project nears completion By MIKE VERBICKAS For Go Lackawanna

TAYLOR- The solution to a flooding problem in Taylor’s Greenview section may be just three weeks away. A $140,000 storm sewer improvement plan -- which includes a new 30 inch pipe installation along the route and installation of 17 new catch basins to protect residents from flooding -should reach completion by the end of the month. Area residents, including Jim Raniello, expressed concerns about if the project will work. Chairman Ken Micavicz said the project has undergone months of planning and survey work and uses project specifications based on the area’s needs. Micavicz said he’s visited residents’ homes along the route and has seen the impact of basement flooding. “(Our) residents have suffered. It’s a catastrophe to see what you’ve had to endure,” said Micavicz.

Crews from Old Forge Ladder 93 cut into an overturned car.

A red Chevy, crews sliced open, on display for the public.

Emergency Services Night draws a crowd By ROGER DuPUIS II rdupuis@golackawanna.com

O

LD FORGE -- Firefighters swarmed intently around the Ace Hardware parking lot Wednesday night, armed with tools as they prepared to peel the roof off of a red Chevrolet. At this stage, few even seemed interested in a white Chevy standing on its side a few feet away.

If there was no real rush, that’s because there also was no blood, no fire and no need for ambulances during this Oct. 10 extrication demonstration, the main attraction during Old Forge Emergency Services Night. It was staged in recognition of national Fire Prevention Week, which was Oct. 713. “Our biggest thing was to let the public know what we’re capable of, and what we’re here for,” said Eagle McClure Hose Co. Captain Sal Luzio, who explained the process to crowds of onlookers as crews methodically went about tearing into one car, then the other. Police and firefighters were on hand to greet the 100 or so visitors, and many left armed with giveaways including smoke deSee EMERGENCY, Page 10

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ROGER DUPUIS II PHOTOS / GO LACKAWANNA

Members of Old Forge Ladder 93 demonstrate how to use hydraulic extrication tools to remove a car’s roof.

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GOLackawanna

ZOMBIES Continued from page 8 Zombies

co-owner of TwentyFiveEight Productions. “Mark is a West Sider and a really talented filmmaker. He’s got a beautiful movie studio in town and he loves supporting this area. In zombie parlance, that’s a no-brainer,” said Borthwick. Dennebaum was just as excited to be working on the project as Borthwick and Foster were to have him. “It’s just cool. Everything these guys are doing is just cool, and just to be a part of it is an honor,” said Dennebaum. “I think the most im-

Sunday, October 14, 2012 portant thing about this is that it brings community and commerce together.” TwentyFiveEight Productions isn’t the only business that shares Dennebaum’s feelings. Foster said a number of area businesses have gotten involved in the 5K in different ways, either by donating food and drinks to the runners, participating in the sidewalk sale or open house that will be held the day. The Lackawanna Historical Society has also gotten involved, and will be conducting a Places of Worship tour beginning at the Church of Christ, located at 137 S. Main Ave., Scranton at noon. The tour will focus on places of worship located in the Hyde Park section of Scranton. The outpouring of support is mak-

ROGER DUPUIS II / GO LACKAWANNA

Members of Old Forge Ladder 93 cut into an overturned car during the Oct. 10 demonstration.

EMERGENCY Continued from page 9

tectors. But the busted-up cars held center stage as dusk fell. Shards of the side windows crunched under foot, saws whirred and metal buckled and gave way as the uniformed men concentrated on cutting their way into the passenger compartment of the battered red sedan. Even as the front windshield came out largely in one piece, Luzio noted that protective gloves are essential for anyone who might come in contact with the razor-sharp glass. Solemn as pallbearers, a group of firefighters hoisted the detached roof off the car and gently set it down on the ground a safe distance behind while others demonstrated how hydraulic spreaders are used to pry crumpled components apart to free crash victims. Promoting safety was the main goal, but generating interest in the volunteer department also didn’t hurt. Luzio, a structural engineer, acknowledged that volunteering can be a hard sell for many busy residents.

“It’s hard, especially if you have a family. There are a lot of obligations.” For some, though, it also becomes a lifelong passion. Luzio already has 16 years of experience, having started when he was just 15. While Luzio worked the crowd, Mike Piccoletti was among the crews working on the two wrecked cars behind him. Like Luzio, he got involved at a young age: Just 19, he already has about five years of experience under his belt. “I had friends who were into it. I needed something to do, and it kept me out of trouble,” Piccoletti said. And he meant that literally, citing the horrific aftermath of DUI crashes, for example “When you see it firsthand like that, it really scares you,” Piccoletti said. “It gives me insight into a different side of life that most other people don’t get to see.” To that end, Wednesday’s demonstration was as much a training exercise for the firefighters as it was educational for the public – including some younger members who may not have had much exposure to extrication. “It’s better for them to experience it first like this than out on Main Street at 2 o’clock in the morning,” Luzio said.

ing the Neighborhood Watch optimistic about the future of the event, as they hope to make the run a yearly tradition. “Our goal next year is to have it a little bit closer to Halloween

and have, perhaps, a parade afterwards and costume competition with it,” said Foster. To view TwentyFiveEight Productions’ promo, or for more information, visit

www.zombieescaperoute.wordpress.com. For more information on the Places of Worship tour, call 344.3841.

OKTOBERFEST

GENETTI’S, WILKES-BARRE Friday, October 26 • Saturday October 27

Friday, Oktober 26th

Dr. Dirty Oktoberfest Celebration w/ national entertainer

DR. DIRTY JOHN VALBY

Serving traditional beer & Oktoberfest seasonal beer $20 VIP in advance or $25 at the door $15 General admission in advance or $20 at the door. doors open @ 8:30 p.m. advanced tickets available at ticketsalesnow.com call Mark @ 570-825-0000 or 570-905-7334 for VIP

Saturday, Oktober 27th

Oktoberfest Celebration 3 p.m.-2 a.m. $20 unlimited beer and food package All day-night pass for unlimited beer and select food $20 in advance & $25 at door - tix available online @ ticketsalesnow.com, at Genetti’s and all Gallery of Sounds or call 570-825-0000 for more info 3-7 p.m. GEORGE TARASEK ORCHESTRA, GSO, GERMAN & POLKA MUSIC, OOM PAH MUSIC, TAP THE KEG, AUTHENTIC FOODS, DESSERTS - FEAT. SUSQUEHANNA BREWING CO.’S OKTOBERFEST & PEACH PUMPKIN ALE 7-midnight

ERIC RUDY OF TRIBES, SUBNOTICS, BAD HAIR DAY & M-80 midnight - 2 am.. ELECTRONIC DANCE MUSIC(EDM) - LASER LIGHT SYSTEM, DJ MC FEATURING TRIBUTE to Deadmau5 presented by Rittenhouse Entertainment Inc.,

783593

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Sunday, October 14, 2012

GOLackawanna

OBITUARIES GENEVIEVE ‘JENNIE’ GRECO October 7, 2012

G

enevieve "Jennie" Greco, 73, of Old Forge, died peacefully Sunday, October 7, 2012, at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. She was married to John J. Greco. The couple celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on Sept. 1. Also surviving are three daughters, Lisa Zakreski and husband Bob, Madison Township; Maria Tagliaferri and husband Jim; Gina Wargo and

ROBERT MICHAEL JASUTA October 8, 2012

R

obert (Rob) Michael Jasuta, 42, Moosic, died Monday, Oct. 8, 2012, after a brief illness. Surviving are his beloved wife of 15 years, Kim Manley Jasuta; daughter, Lian Jasuta; brother, Leonard W. Jasuta Jr. and wife Mary Anne; several nieces and nephews.

VIOLET S. NAVICH October 10, 2012

V

iolet S. Navich, age 80, of Moosic, died Oct. 10, 2012. Born on March 11, 1932, daughter of the late William and Violet Webb Sibley, Violet was a graduate of the former Taylor High School, Class of 1950. Above all else, she will be remembered as a loving and devoted wife who will certainly be missed. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by a sister, Alice Sibley

MADELINE ‘MADGE’ SIRKO PREATE

M

adeline "Madge" Sirko Preate, 80, lost a three-year battle with metastatic breast cancer Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, in the home of her daughter, Carla. Surviving are daughters, Carla Preate-DeCarli, Joanne Preate Owens and husband Anthony, Jessica Aldubayan; son, Gregory and Melissa Preate; 13 grandchildren; many nieces and nephews.

ROBERT J. VASICAK October 9, 2012

R

obert J. Vasicak, 68, Scranton, died Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, in Allied Skilled Services. Born Sept. 28,1944 in Luzerne, he was a son of the late Joseph P. and Mary P. (Adamshick) Vasicak. He is survived by a brother, Michael, and his wife, Shirley; several nieces, nephews and cousins. He was preceded in death by three sisters, Adele Feldman, Louise Lada, Ber-

husband Dave, of Old Forge; eight grandchildren, Alex, Derek, Jared, Jimmy, Michael, Nicole, John, Brett; two sisters, Gina Macaravage, Plains; Betty Ann Parri, Plains; one brother, Harry Parri and wife Sharon, Miners Mills; nieces and nephews. The funeral was held Wednesday, Oct. 10 from the Louis V. Ciuccio Funeral Home, 145 Moosic Rd., Old Forge, followed by a Mass at the Prince of Peace Parish-St. Mary’s Church, West Grace and Lawrence streets, Old Forge.

Blessing services, with the Rev. Francis L. Pauselli, pastor of Divine Mercy Parish, were held Saturday, Oct. 6 in Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old Forge. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Rob’s name to the American Diabetes Association, P.O. Box 11454, Alexandria, VA 22312. Please visit www.KearneyFuneralHome.com for an online condolence.

Owens; and a brother, William Heyer. She is survived by her beloved husband of nearly 55 years, Vincent Navich; nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will be at 10 a.m. Monday, Oct. 15 in St. Mary’s Church at Queen of the Apostles Parish, Hawthorne Street, Avoca. Friends may call from 5 until 7 p.m. Sunday in Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old Forge. Please visit www.KearneyFuneralHome.com for directions or to leave an online condolence.

A Mass of Christian Burial was held Friday, Oct. 12 in the Cathedral of St. Peter’s, Scranton, with the Rev. Philip A. Altavilla, pastor, and the Rev. Joseph F. Cipriano. Entombment was in the Cathedral Cemetery, Scranton. Arrangements are by the Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old Forge. Memorial contributions may be made in her memory to the American Cancer Society online, www.cancer.org, or by phone 1.800.227.2345.

nadine R. Rogers; two brothers, infant, Joseph, and John Vasicak. Interment with graveside blessing services will be at the convenience of the family in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Wyoming, with services by Fr. Jeffrey Tudgay. Arrangements are to be made by Jennings-Calvey Funeral and Cremation Service Inc., 111 Colburn Ave., Clarks Summit. For more information, or to send an online condolence, please visit www.jenningscalvey.com.

WALTER JOSEPH HORBINSKI October 12, 2012

W

alter Joseph Horbinski, 93, of Pittston, died Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, in Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, Plains Township. He was the widower of Violet M. Horbinski, who died Oct. 29, 2007. Born in Scranton on Jan. 17, 1919, he was a son of the late John and Josephine Ellard Horbinski. He attended Scranton schools and was a U.S. Army veteran serving during World War II. He was a member of St. Joseph Marello Parish, Pittston. Prior to retirement, he was employed by the local mining industry, Capital Records, Medico Industries and Tobyhanna Army Depot. He was preceded in death by brothers, Henry Horbinski, John Herbinski, Ernest Herbinski; and sister, Mildred Baranowski. He is survived by his loving daughter, Sharon Horbinski, with whom he resided; several nieces, nephews and cousins. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Monday, Oct. 15 in St. Joseph Marello Parish, William Street, Pittston, at 9:30 a.m. Interment will be in St. Rocco’s Cemetery, Pittston Township. There will be no public calling hours. Visitation will be conducted privately at the request of the decedent. Funeral arrangements are entrusted to the Peter J. Adonizio Funeral Home, 251 William St., Pittston. Online condolences may be made at www.peterjadoniziofuneralhome.com.

HENRIETTA ROSE October 6, 2012

H

enrietta Rose, age 69, a resident of Pittston Manor and formerly of Taylor, passed away Saturday, October 6, 2012. She is survived by many friends, including Angelo Bufalino of Pittston. Private arrangements are under the care of the Thomas P. Kearney Funeral Home Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old Forge. Condolences may be sent at www.kearneyfuneralhome.com.

11

Keystone College invites public to breast cancer awareness march Members of the Keystone College Rotaract and SIFE (Students in Free Enterprise) clubs will conduct an inaugural breast cancer awareness march on Friday, October 19, at 6:30 p.m. The march, which is open to Keystone students and the public, will begin on campus and proceed on College Avenue to the Factoryville Fire Co. All proceeds will be donated to the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute. Registration begins at 5:30 p.m. at the Keystone College Green. Registration fee is $5 and participants will receive a gift basket raffle ticket, a breast cancer bracelet and pink glow stick, while supplies last. The Rotary Club is sponsoring a party after the march . There will be food and beverages for sale, with festivities beginning after the march and continuing until 10 p.m. Raffle tickets distributed at registration will be put into a bucket upon arrival at the fire hall, with drawings taking place throughout the evening. For more information or to register, call 241.7771 or visit www.eventbrite.com/event/4297905150.

WALK Continued from page 4

help is out there.” Saturday’s route around downtown and surrounding areas wasn’t just scenic, Wallace noted, but designed to take the walkers past several facilities that are home to high-risk groups – namely college students, the elderly and veterans. That message resonated with members of the Lackawanna College Pride group, who raised $500 for the cause, member Roan Montalvo said, adding that they took to the pavement “to stand up for people who feel lost,” including many gay and lesbian youth. “There is a lot of LGBT teen suicide,” said Pride group President E.J. Abramowitz, who echoed the day’s essential message: “there are people to help.” For Judy Neri, chief operating officer of Lourdesmont Youth and Family Services, that message is vital not just to those who may be considering suicide, but to anyone who may have had someone else confide such thoughts to them. “It’s important they tell someone,” said Neri, adding that she hopes events like the walk will break down the stigma which for many still surrounds discussion of suicide. For more information on AFSP, visit www.afsp.org.


PAGE 12

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012

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14

GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 14, 2012


Sunday, October 14, 2012

GOLackawanna

ARTS CALENDAR

Vintage Theater, 326 Spruce St., Scranton. Info: scrantonsvintagetheater.com NEPA Writers Collectives’ annual Dead Poets Night, featuring openmic poetry, on Thursday, Oct. 18 ArtWorks Gallery and Studio, 503 at 8:30 p.m. Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. An evening of readings and disInfo: 207.1815, www.artworksnepacussion with local authors Amye .com. Archer, Jason Lucarelli, Dawn The Robert Stark Retrospective. Lea, Rich Howells and Brian New Visions Studio and Gallery, 201 Fanneli on Friday, Oct. 19 at 7 p.m. Vine St., Scranton. Info: Cost: $3 to $5 sliding scale. 878.3970, www.newvisionsstuBreaking Ground Poets Slam with dio.com. special guest, Lauren Zuniga, one "Nightmare on Vine Street II," horror of the top five ranked female themed exhibit, through October poets in the world, on Saturday, 27, featuring artists Tom Gates, Oct. 27 at 7 p.m. Cost: $5 Ashley Gries, Jay Salerno and Adam Weitzenkorn. Vintage Thea- Staged reading of Ted LoRusso’s “A Lie Is A Venial Sin” on Sunday, ter, 326 Spruce St., Scranton. November 11. Info: scrantonsvintagetheater.com ‘Steampunk exhibit,’ October 5 to 31, features numerous artists using various mediums, painting, sculpNew Visions Studio and Gallery, ture, jewelry and fashion. 201 Vine St., Scranton. “Rock, Paper, Scissor” will run NoInfo: 878.3970, www.newvisionsstudio.com. vember 2 to 29, with an opening New Visions Studio & Gallery will reception on First Friday Novemhold the first ever Scranton Horber 2, 6 to 10 p.m. ror Film Fest 2012, a Halloween themed film event on Sunday, Oct. 28. New Visions is currently

VISUAL ARTS

FILM

THEATER

accepting submissions for the event. Video artists can submit the following themes for consideration: horror, surrealism, mystery, expressionism and similar. The deadline for submission is Friday, Oct. 19 and can be received by mail or dropped off at the gallery. For more information, visit http://www.newvisionsstudio.com/horrorfest.

CONCERTS

Vintage Theater, 326 Spruce St., Scranton. Info: scrantonsvintagetheater.com Parlours will perform on Monday, Oct. 15. Doors open at 6 p.m., music begins at 7 p.m. Cost: $5 DEEP SQUAD will be the featured act in the first night of hip-hop/ rap in our new home on Saturday, Oct. 20. Doors open at 7 p.m., music at 8 p.m. Cost: $6. Masquerade Dance Party: The Vintage will host an all ages masquerade, featuring performances by The Great Party and Shayfer James on Friday, Oct. 26. Doors open at 7 p.m., music begins at 8 p.m. Cost: $8.

VIKINGS ARE UP TO THE ‘CHALLENGE’

Every year, the Challenge Program, in cooperation with the Robert E. Moffat Charitable Trust and Riverside High School, awards students in grades 10 through 12 for their achievements in school in the areas of attendance, academic improvement, academic achievement and community service. There are four winners per grade level, one in each of the four categories. Each student is awarded $250. Winners honored at Riverside High School are, first row, from left, Aaron Janczak, grade 12, academic improvement; Jonna Boyda, 11, academic achievement; Ariel Kimes, 11, community service; Brandy Hernandez, 11, academic improvement; second row, Samantha Wesnak, 12, community service; Valeriya Kazysta, 12, academic achievement; Stephanie Evans, 12, attendance; and Ashley Fuentez, 11, attendance.

15

Five money saving websites to watch

Ebates Ebates is a rebate website that offers cash back from online purchases. When you sign up for an account you receive a $5 bonus, or a $10 gift card sign up bonus when you register a new account and spend $20 online within 60 days of signing up for the services. With the holidays approaching, it will be very easy to spend $20 online. You can choose to get a Target, Home Depot, or Magazines.com $10 gift card instead of the $5 cash. After signing up at Ebates.com, you will be able to search for the store you are looking to shop at, like Gap, Crocs, and Old Navy. Each store offers a different amount of cash back, and some even offer double on certain days. Ebates also offers coupon codes that can be used in conjunction with the cash back rewards. I once purchased ink online through Ebates and received 40 percent cash back from my purchase. The website that I purchased through was already discounted, so it was like a double dip of savings. Ebates pays every three months; you will receive a big, fat check in the mail with all your rebates. You won’t receive your first check until your account reaches $20.

Groupon It seems like everywhere you look there is an ad for a new daily deal site. Facebook is even starting to cash in by allowing business pages to promote offers through its newsfeed . Regardless of the number of daily deal sites available, consumers still love the discounts. The most used daily deal site has to be Groupon, offering discounts from facials to exotic vacation packages and making a presence in every city. In the past, I have gotten 50 percent off at the Gap and Old Navy, discounted diapers, Eco friendly toys, and photo deals from national websites. The national vouchers usually have a coupon code that can be used online. The vouchers can be printed and used like any other coupon. It’s recommended to sign up for daily emails from Groupon to take advantages of deals in your city.

DEAL DETECTIVE JENNA URBAN

Coupons.com When looking for coupons, one of the top search results will bring you to Coupons.com, one of the first available sources for printing online coupons. Weekly coupons vary by zip code and that is why people down south may receive different coupon inserts than the people up north. One tip for using Coupons.com is that you can search for coupons in different zip codes by clicking on the “local” tab, typing in a zip code -two popular zips are 90210 or 33104click search, and then back on the “coupons” tab. This will result with high value coupons that may not be available through your zip code. Coupons have a limit of two per person meaning that if there is a high value coupon for milk, you may only print it twice. Food on the Table FoodontheTable.com is a free budget meal planning service designed to help make meal planning easy, organize grocery list by department, cut the cost of grocery budget and offer quick and easy dinner recipes. Restaurant.com One of the pioneers in discounted online vouchers is Restaurant.com. The service offers discounts of up to 80 percent from local restaurants, but with a minimum purchase requirement. When you sign up for emails from Restaurant.com, you receive updates on current coupon code ranging from pay $10 for $25 certificates to pay only $2 for $25 certificates. You will have to spend a total of $35 before alcohol and the tip is usually added in as well. Dinner for two can cost as low as $10. Check out Bucktownbargains.com for more money saving tips. Do you have any tips on money saving websites? Share them with us at facebook.com/golackawanna.


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GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 14, 2012

Uniting Old Forge Students encouraged to stop bullying By DON MCGLYNN dmcglynn@golackawanna.com

M

ore put-ups and fewer put-downs. That was the message Old Forge Elementary School Principal Nicole VanLuvender was hoping her students in kindergarten through sixth grade left the Old Forge High School auditorium with on Wednesday, Oct. 10. The elementary school held an assembly on the effects of bullying in observance of Unity Day.

“October is National Bullying Awareness Month, and (today)… is Unity Day, so we decided that we would come together…and the administers had asked our teachers to incorporate lessons throughout the month of October on bullying, bullying awareness and uniting,” explained Old Forge High School Assistant Principal Regina Krieger. In honor of the national campaign, both the high school and elementary school held assemblies and hosted other activities on Wednesday. For the elementary school, VanLuvender tried to explain the effects and dispel some of the myths of bullying. “Sometimes I think bullying gets stereotyped into the very big kid standing over the little kid saying, ‘Give me your lunch money,’” VanLuvender said to her students. “That’s a bold stereotype that really isn’t typical of bullying behavior anymore. Not to say that doesn’t happen, but today bullying takes so many more forms. It could be physical…it could (also) be verbal, meaning using your words to put someone down. Put-downs, those wounds….those emotional wounds, you can’t see them, because they hurt us on the inside. They’re very painful.” VanLuvender and the sixthgrade peer mediators gave a

demonstration of the way putdowns can hurt a child, and the assembly closed with the students taking a pledge to stand up against bullying. “I think it was good,” said Nathan Cieslak of the program. “I think it really educated the students about bullying, and how it is bad, and how it affects people.” The subject of bullying is one that’s near and dear to Cieslak’s own heart. The 10-year-old, fifthgrade student began selling Tshirts featuring a logo of his own design, and the slogan “Only You Can Prevent Bullying” this summer in an effort to create an awareness to the bullying problem. When he first decided to print the shirts, Cieslak was hoping to sell them to family and friends, but when word got out, the orders started pouring in, and the Old Forge resident has already sold close to 1,000 shirts, exceeding all of his expectations “I’m very surprised. It escalated to a whole new level. We have people, it (hasn’t) really gone national, but we have people from Texas wanting to buy a shirt, which is pretty cool,” said Cieslak. Word of his project made its way to the high school, where seniors Brian Finnerty, Derek Drasba, John Vols and David Ru-

dalavage decided to team up with Cieslak and sell some of the shirts as part of their senior project. “No matter who you are…everyone at one time or another has dealt with bullying,” said Finnerty as to why he got involved with the project. Cieslak said he’s hoping that the involvement of the seniors, and programs like the one held on Unity Day, will help draw more attention to the problem and hopefully have a positive effect on it. “I think we’re just getting the word out, and it’s just starting, but I hope to see the numbers of bullying go down,” said Cieslak. One way to see numbers go down is keep reminding students why bullying is wrong. This is one of the reasons why Finnerty, Drasba, Vols and Rudalavage will be visiting the elementary school throughout the year, to continue to spread awareness. “It’s not going to be for just one day or one month, they’re going to do it throughout the year,” said Krieger. For more information on Unity Day, visit www.pacer.org/bullying/nbpm/unity-day.asp. To order an “Only You Can Prevent Bullying” T-shirt, email Lirpacat1@yahoo.com or gcsweats@aol.com.

Old Forge Elementary School Principal Nicole VanLuvender.

The staff of Old Forge Elementary School participates in Unity Day


Sunday, October 14, 2012

Hannah Lisowski, Jeremy Zaykowski, Nathan Cieslak, Jonathan Nicholoff, Zack Uhrin and Lindsey Welsh wore their ‘Only You Can Prevent Bullying’ T-Shirts, designed by Cieslak, on Unity Day.

GOLackawanna

Liza Beviglia, and the sixth-grade peer mediators, give a demonstration on the ways put-downs can hurt a child.

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

on Wednesday, Oct. 10.

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GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 14, 2012

Maturing McGloin thrives in final season KEEPING SCORE TOM ROBINSON Matt McGloin went out in the 2011 season and, as unlikely as it may have been, won the Penn State starting quarterback job over and over until there was finally no way to keep it from him any longer. McGloin is stringing together unlikely wins again in 2012. The West Scranton graduate already was playing the most important position on the field for the Nittany Lions. Now, he has become one of their most important players because of his performance as well. McGloin can’t be accused of simply filling the role of managing the game for a program that once relied on its defense and running game. In the aftermath of the Jerry Sandusky scandal, having fewer weapons -- in particular receivers -- with which to work, Penn State should not be winning in the Big Ten against unbeaten and nationally ranked teams when it could not win its first two non-league games of the season. But that is exactly what the Nittany Lions did last week, when McGloin went 13-for-15 passing in the fourth quarter to lead the comeback in a 39-28 win over Northwestern. McGloin’s passing to an inexperienced group of receivers, including emerging star Allen Robinson, has helped Penn State put together the improbable four-game winning streak it carried into the midseason break with this weekend off. McGloin threw a touchdown pass to Robinson for the first of three touchdowns in a 22-0 Penn State fourth quarter. He continued his knack for making the most of limited running skills by picking his spot for a game-winning, 5-yard touchdown run. The two drives McGloin led with his team in a fourth-quarter hole covered 82 yards in 18 plays and 85 yards in 15 plays. McGloin’s rise from former walk-on, and Penn State’s obsta-

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Through six games, Matt McGloin has completed 61.5 percent of his passes while throwing 12 touchdowns .

cles after NCAA sanctions that have made a bowl trip impossible this year, have been well-documented. What was left of the Penn State offense and the way it has performed, particularly at the quarterback position, make McGloin’s dramatic, ongoing improvement every bit as impressive as him getting any shot at this job in the first place. “He’s a great kid, fun kid to coach,” first-year Penn State coach Bill O’Brien told reporters after the Northwestern game. “I love coaching competitive people

and he’s a very competitive guy.” He’s a very competitive guy who has thrived since being given undisputed control of the new-look Penn State offense by O’Brien. McGloin will leave State College among the leaders in career passing in most categories. Those numbers get a boost each week in a stellar senior season. Through six games, McGloin has completed 61.5 percent of his passes while throwing 12 touchdowns and just two intercepSee MCGLOIN, Page 24

Penn State coach Bill O’Brien is a fan of Matt McGloin’s competitive spirit.


Sunday, October 14, 2012

GOLackawanna

19

STEAMTOWN MARATHON

Byrne, Peoples post milestone victories By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

S

CRANTON – Being a parent of a small child has a way of altering one’s life. It has barely slowed down Matt Byrne and Heidi Peoples. The two Scranton runners could not match their career-best, but they still posted milestone victories by significant margins Oct. 7 when the 17th annual Steamtown Marathon made its way from Forest City to downtown Scranton.

And, when they arrived at Courthouse Square, Byrne and Peoples had special people waiting to share the victory. Byrne was met immediately by his wife Sommer, who handed him their two-month-old daughter Vella Marie before he began receiving congratulations from others near the finish line. Peoples, just catching her breath and beginning to do postrace interviews, had other thoughts on her mind. “I just want to hold my kids right now,” she said. “I want to find them and hold them.” Moments later, 3-year-old son Liam and 11-month-old Caroline arrived to greet Peoples, who won in the first marathon she entered since Caroline was born late last year. Byrne became the first person to win three Steamtown titles overall. “I’ve been wanting numberthree for a while,” said Byrne, a 37-year-old who also won in 2004 and 2006 and was the runner-up last year. “It feels great to finally get it.” Peoples has won every Steamtown Marathon she entered. By claiming her third women’s title, she matches Charlene Lyford of Greene, N.Y., who won the first three titles. Peoples alSee VICTORIES , Page 24

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/ FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Matt Byrne of Scranton is congratulated by his wife, Sommer, and daughter, Vella Marie, after winning the 17th annual Steamtown Marathon.

RESULTS Top 5 Overall Finishers 1, Matt Byrne, 37M, Scranton, 2:29:06 2, Jeffrey McCabe, 29M, Exeter, 2:30:37 3, Chris Heisey, 23M, Philadelphia, 2:30:54 4, David Hryvniak, 27M, Charlottesville, Va., 2:33:12 5, Pat Casterline, 22M, Scranton, 2:35:42 Top 5 Women Finishers 1, Heidi Peoples, 32F, Scranton, 2:50:00 2, Samantha Snead, 24F, Moscow, 2:57:00 3, Caitlin Gaughan, 26F, Scranton, 2:59:07 4, Dara Steele-Belkin, 37F, Atlanta, Ga., 3:06:25 5, Sara Belles, 31F, Brookfield, Conn, 3:07:41 Top 5 Lackawanna County Finishers

1, Matt Byrne, 37M, Scranton, 2:29:06 2, Pat Casterline, 22M, Scranton, 2:35:42 3, Jeremy Evans, 23M, Scranton, 2:48:27 4, Kevin Yates, 41M, Olney, Md., 2:48:32 5, Heidi Peoples, 32F, Scranton, 2:50:00 Top 5 Moosic Finishers 1, Todd Monahan, 37M, 3:04:15 2, Shana Keeler, 30F, 3:30:22 3, Kevin Smith, 43M, 3:52:16 4, Shandra Keeler, 30F, 3:54:55 5, Robin Mancinelli, 51F, 4:06:23 Top 5 Old Forge Finishers 1, Tim Walsh, 42M, 3:16:56 2, Michelle Mariotti, 34F, 3:35:48 3, Jason Schwass, 34M, 3:49:29 4, Justin Rubal, 27M, 3:57:37 5, Joe Kerrigan, 52M, 4:22:58 Taylor Finishers 1, John Nicodem, 48M, 4:50:53 2, Gary Mrozinski, 47M, 4:45:02

Heidi Peoples wins the Steamtown Marathon’s women’s title.

Matt Byrne of Scranton wins the Steamtown Marathon.


20

GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 14, 2012 OLD FORGE 35, LACKAWANNA TRAIL 14

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Jorden Sekol and Shane Schuback take down Lackawanna Trail’s quarterback Zack Goodrich in the Blue Devils’ win.

Big first half carries OF over LT By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Lackawanna Trail ultimately outscored Old Forge in the second half Friday night. That fact was made irrelevant when the unbeaten Blue Devils once again virtually put the game away with their first-half effort. Brian Tomasetti rushed for three first-half touchdowns to help Old Forge remain unbeaten with a 35-14 road win. Old Forge opened a 29-point halftime lead in the showdown between two of the top teams in Division 3 of the Lackawanna Football Conference and the District 2 Class A playoff race. The Blue Devils have out-

scored their last six opponents, 203-7, in the first half since struggling early in their season opener against Lake-Lehman. District 2’s highest-scoring offense was stopped in three plays on the game’s opening possession but did not need long to get started. “We missed some plays in that first series,” Old Forge coach Mike Schuback said. “We tried to jump out early. It’s a little uncharacteristic of us to sling the ball around in the first series.” Brenden Wahl missed on his first two attempts, but went 7for-9 for 182 yards and two touchdowns the rest of the way. “We had a feeling we could

BY THE NUMBERS • Tomasetti has 22 touchdowns, including 18 rushing. • Manetti caught two passes for 60 yards. • Old Forge is averaging 43.9 points per game. • Lackawanna Trail did not complete a pass in the first half.

throw the ball to loosen up the run,” Schuback said. “We figured if we threw the ball early it might back them off.” Tomasetti carried eight times for 167 yards in the first half on the way to a 14-carry, 205-yard effort that moved him to 1,200 yards rushing on the season. Lackawanna Trail used a penalty and a big third-down sack to stop Old Forge’s second possession, but the Blue Devils got

the ball back quickly. Anthony Piccolini’s interception on second down led to the game’s first score. Tomasetti ran 29 yards for the touchdown and added a 47-yard score before the quarter was over for a 12-0 lead. Old Forge extended its lead with 17 second-quarter points. Tomasetti went 83 yards on the first play of the quarter and Piccolini scored on a 53-yard

pass from Wahl. Just when Old Forge appeared ready to run out the clock from its own 5 late in the half, the Blue Devils put together a drive that produced Matt Mancuso’s 33-yard field goal with no time left. Wahl hit Jake Manetti for 40 yards to get the drive started. Lackawanna Trail scored on the first possession of the second half, but needed more than eight minutes to do so on a drive that was extended by a fake punt near midfield. Jeremy Greenley scored on a 1-yard run. “I was surprised by that thirdSee OF, Page 21


Sunday, October 14, 2012

GOLackawanna

21

WEST SCRANTON 40, WALLENPAUPACK 35

Invaders stop comeback attempt West Scranton defeats Wallenpaupack By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

West Scranton scored the only two touchdowns of the first quarter Friday, but the Invaders needed to put two more scores together – in the final two minutes – before finishing off host Wallenpaupack, 40-35, in a wild Lackawanna Football Conference Division 1 game. Jordan McCloe’s 57-yard touchdown pass to Lou DiBileo with 1:57 to play rallied West Scranton into a 33-28 lead.

Joe Devine then stopped Wallenpaupack’s comeback attempt with his second interception of the Devine night. Devine returned it 71 yards to the Buckhorns 11. “Joe Devine made some great special teams plays and interceptions,” West Scranton coach Joe Gerek said. See INVADERS , Page 23

RIVERSIDE 49, HONESDALE 21

Passing game fuels Riverside blowout By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Nick Dranchak threw five first-half touchdown passes, with the help of some brilliant efforts from his receiving corps, Friday night to lead Riverside to a comfortable, 49-21 Lackawanna Football Conference Division 2 victory over host Honesdale. Dranchak went 11-for-15 for 253 yards with all but one 10-yard pass coming in the first half when Riverside opened a 42-7 lead to assure that the entire second half would be played under the Mercy Rule. Jaron Vishnesky and Nico Munley each caught two touchdown passes. Vishnesky made a diving grab in the end zone for a 30-yard touchdown pass. He also made a sharp cut for a 10-yard touchdown on a screen pass. Three of Riverside’s touchdowns came on screen passes. Munley weaved through the defense for second-quarter touchdowns of 65 and 37

yards on two different screens. The Vikings (2-0 in Division 2 and 5-2 overall) got the scoring started even before the offense took the field for the first time. Jim Tucker watched the opening kickoff bounce around before picking it up on the left side and making it to the right sideline on his way to a 93-yard touchdown. Matt Lucas made the first of seven straight extra points. Dranchak completed all five first-quarter passes for 74 yards and the two touchdowns that made the lead 21-7. He stepped away from pressure to find Vishnesky in the end zone. After Alex Evanitsky ran 53 yards for a Honesdale touchdown, Dranchak threw his second touchdown pass to Vishnesky. Between Munley’s touchdowns, Dranchak hit Michael Loftus on a post pattern for a 40-yard touchdown See RIVERSIDE, Page 24

JASON RIEDMILLER PHOTOS/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Shane Schuback heads to the end zone for an Old Forge touchdown.

OF Continued from page 20

quarter drive,” Schuback said. “I was a little disappointed in that. I thought we had the momentum after getting the field goal right before the half. “They ended up scoring and then they almost got the on-side kick. I was disappointed that we didn’t get them on the ground in the third quarter.” The Blue Devils restored their four-touchdown lead just 1:31 later when Wahl passed 47 yards to Shane Schuback for a touchdown. Warren Welsh had a fourth-quarter interception for Old Forge before Lackawanna Trail added another score on a 2-yard Greenley touchdown run. The Lions fell to 1-1 in the division and 5-2 overall.

Brian Tomasetti rushed for three first-half touchdowns.

LOOKING AHEAD Old Forge (2-0, 7-0) has Homecoming Friday against Carbondale (2-1, 3-4) in a Division 3 game. The 1987 team, which went 10-0 in the regular season to win the Suburban Conference title in its first year after leaving the Big 11, will be honored in pregame ceremonies. Schuback was a two-way lineman on the 1987 team. The Blue Devils are tied for the division lead with Susquehanna.


22

GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 14, 2012

DISTRICT 2 GIRLS TENNIS ROUNDUP

Croker, Reilly advance to doubles semifinals By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

Scranton Prep’s Kendra Croker finished second in the District 2 Class AA girls tennis singles tournament earlier in the week, then teamed with Grace Reilly Thursday, Oct. 11 to breeze into the doubles semifinals. Croker, an Old Forge resident, and Reilly, a Moosic resident, will go after the doubles title Monday, Oct. 15. The semifinals are scheduled for 1 p.m. and will be followed by the finals. Monday’s action is tentatively set for Kirby Park, weather permitting. Croker-Reilly, the top-seeded team, won three matches Thursday. They lost one game in the first set of the day and another in the last. They won four straight sets by 6-0 scores in between. Scranton Prep’s other team, Annie Tressler-Emily Jonsson, started in the preliminary round and won three straight matches before falling to thirdseeded Amber Jadus-Carly Young from Valley View in the quarterfinals. Croker-Reilly will face fourthseeded Fallyn Boich-Nell Chmil from Holy Redeemer in Monday’s semifinals while JadusYoung play second-seeded Anita Ghosh-Madison Nardone from Wyoming Seminary. Both Riverside teams, Ashley Fuentez-Kelsey Shaughnessy and Kayla Creedon-Kristina Maxfield, were eliminated in straight sets in the first round. Fuentez-Shaughnessy took Tunkhannock’s Marlena Chesner-Becky Mills to a tiebreaker in the first set. CLASS AAA DOUBLES Allie Pusateri of Abington Heights also lost in the singles final, then reached the doubles final as part of the top-seeded team. Pusateri-Cierra Buck will play Monday in the District 2-4 Class AAA semifinals against the unseeded team of Briane

Brewer-Sara Donley from District 4. Abington Heights also has Katie Decker-Rachel Mertz, the sixth seeds, playing in the semifinals against Williamsport’s Maggie Manchester-Amanda Hampton, the second seeds. Sarah Skoritowski-Emily Graziano won once for West Scranton before losing. Kaylee Zarick-Coletta Rempe lost in their first match. CLASS AAA SINGLES Tyra Abdalla defeated Pusateri, 6-1, 6-0, in the all-Abington Heights championship match Monday at Birchwood Racquet Club. The two Lady Comets had combined to lose just three games in four sets during the semifinals. Abdalla downed North Pocono’s Cara Perotti. CLASS AA SINGLES Wyoming Seminary’s Nathalie Joanlanne came from behind in a lengthy match and won the final five games to prevent Croker from repeating as champion with a 3-6, 6-4, 6-4 victory Monday. Both semifinals matched Scranton Prep players against Wyoming Seminary. Joanlanne defeated Reilly, 6-0, 6-1. Croker downed Ghosh, 7-5, 6-3. TEAM Abington Heights and Williamsport in Class AAA and Wyoming Seminary and Scranton Prep in Class AA received byes into Tuesday’s semifinals at Kirby Park. Class AAA semifinals are scheduled for 11:30 a.m. with the finals at 2 p.m. Class AA semifinals are 12:30 p.m. and finals are 3:30 p.m. Scranton fell to Delaware Valley, 3-2, in a tiebreaker to determine the sixth seed in District 2-4 Class AAA. Valley View was scheduled to host Montrose Friday for a chance to play Scranton Prep in the Class AA semifinals.

DISTRICT 2 GOLF

CHAMPIONS CROWNED By TOM ROBINSON For Go Lackawanna

D

anielle Dalessandro of Scranton Prep and Selena Cerra of Holy Cross finished 1-2 in District 2 last year before the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association separated golf by enrollment classification. That split led to championships for both after they again had the top two girls scores in the district tournament. Dalessandro, a Moosic resident, shot 80 to win Class AAA while Cerra shot 81 to win Class AA at Fox Hill Country Club.

Mariano Medico of Holy Redeemer produced the day’s best score with a 68 for the Class AA boys title. Wyoming Valley West’s Chris McCue won Class AAA boys with a 72. Nick Johnson, another Moosic resident playing for Scranton Prep, shot 73 to finish second behind McCue. The top six boys in each classification moved to the PIAA East Regional Tuesday at Golden Oaks Golf Club in Fleetwood. The top three girls in Class AAA advanced along with the top two in Class AA where no other players were able to meet the qualifying standard of 100. Lackawanna County had three of the six qualifiers in Class AAA boys. Chris Cerminaro of team champion Scranton Prep was fourth with a 75 and Abington Sebastianelli of Abington Heights took the sixth spot by shooting a 77, then winning a playoff. Scranton Prep’s Evan Joyce, another Moosic resident, finished tied for eighth with a 78.

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

Scranton Prep’s Danielle Dalessandro, a Moosic resident, shot 80 to win the District 2 Class AAA title.

Two Lakeland players and one from Holy Cross followed Medico in Class AA. Greg Reeves of Lakeland shot 76 and won a tiebreaker from Tom Dzwonczyk of Holy Cross. Lakeland’s Mike Thomas shot 77. Cerra will be joined in Class AA girls by teammate Emily Okrepkie, who shot 98.

At Golden Oak Tuesday, players will be trying to land berths in the PIAA Championships, which will be held Oct. 22 and 23 at Heritage Hills Golf Course in York. The East Region will send 24 Class AAA boys, 16 Class AA boys, 12 Class AAA girls and eight Class AA girls to the state individual tournament.

The top six boys in each classification moved to the PIAA East Regional Tuesday at Golden Oaks Golf Club in Fleetwood. The top three girls in Class AAA advanced along with the top two in Class AA where no other players were able to meet the qualifying standard of 100.


Sunday, October 14, 2012

GOLackawanna

INVADERS Continued from page 21

Adam Warren was one of nine Minor League Baseball players to receive the 2012 Rawlings Gold Glove Award.

SWB Yankee wins award

S

cranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees pitcher Adam Warren was named the Minor League Baseball Rawlings Gold Glove Award winner for defensive excellence at his position. The other selections were Charlotte catcher Josh Phegley, Huntsville first baseman Hunter Morris, Richmond second baseman Ryan Cavan, West Michigan shortstop Eugenio Suarez, Mississippi third baseman Joe Leonard, Omaha left fielder Derrick Robinson, Frisco center fielder Engel Beltre and Jupiter right fielder Marcell Ozuna. The honorees were selected among qualifying players from the 10 domestic-based, full-season Minor Leagues.

SPORTS BRIEFS Morgan on Bellator card West Scranton Mixed Martial Arts fighter Dave Morgan is scheduled to make an appearance on the Bellator Fighting Championships 77 card Oct. 19 in Reading. Morgan, who is a 5-1 as a professional, will face Matthew Lozano (2-0). Royals ranked in soccer The University of Scranton used an unbeaten start through 10 games (9-0-1) to move into the National Soccer Coaches Association of America top 25 as the No. 22 team among NCAA Division III men. Scranton earned the ranking after beating No. 15 Susquehanna, 1-0.

MORE ONLINE

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award is modeled after the award given to MLB’s top defensive players.

For coverage of the Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre Penguins and their American Hockey League season opener in Binghamton Saturday night, visit golackawanna.com/ sports.

Holy Cross defeated Valley View, 330-459, in Class AA. Moosic resident Danielle Dalessandro shot 81 to lead Scranton Prep. Selena Cerra shot 2-under-par, 70 to lead Holy Cross.

Scranton Prep wins girls golf Scranton Prep and Holy Cross won District 2 girls golf team championships Tuesday at Scranton Municipal Golf Course and qualified to play in the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association team championships Oct. 24 at Heritage Hills in York. Scranton Prep, playing uncontested, won the District 2 Class AAA championship by shooting 372. The Classics needed to shoot 400 or better while winning the district to advance into state play.

Division soccer titles decided Five of the seven Lackawanna League division soccer titles have been decided. Abington Heights and Delaware Valley, both 11-1, have clinched the Division 1 and 2 boys championships. Mountain View is 10-0 and has clinched at least a tie in Division 3. Wallenpaupack is 10-1 in Division 2, Lakeland is 10-1 in Division 3 and Mountain View is 10-0-1 in Division 4 to clinch girls titles. Scranton Prep leads Abington Heights in the race for the Division 1 championship.

“That interception was key and then we were able to push that one in.” Marquis Brownlee ran it in from the 6 for a 40-28 lead. Will Hendel hit David Pabst with a touchdown pass for the second time in the game, this time from 20 yards, to give Wallenpaupack a late score. “I’ve got to give ‘Paupack a lot of credit,” Gerek said. “They were down right from the beginning but they fought hard. “They’re a good team. They’re better than what their record is.” West Scranton used the win to climb back over the .500 mark to 4-3 overall while leveling its division record at 2-2. Wallenpaupack is 0-4 in the division and 2-5 overall. The Invaders opened a 13-0 lead in the first quarter on a 6-yard touchdown run by Brownlee and a 32-yarder by Demetris Garcia. Hendel passed 8 yards to Pabst for the first Wallenpaupack score. Brownlee’s 24-yard touchdown run made it 19-7 West Scranton before Wallenpaupack used special teams to make things interesting. Dom Basilicata returned the kickoff 82 yards for a touchdown to cut the deficit to 19-14 at halftime. Basilicata then ran back the second-half kickoff 86 yards to give Wallenpaupack its first lead, only to have West Scranton’s Brandon Oleski follow with a 64-yard touchdown on the ensuing kickoff. “We eventually were smart enough to squib it,” Gerek said. John Jones ran 3 yards for a touchdown to put Wallenpaupack up 28-25 heading into the fourth quarter. The Buckhorns had a chance to add to their lead, but Devine made the first of his interceptions on a fourthdown play. The two late scores then helped the Invaders escape with a victory. “We dodged a bullet,” Ge-

23

BY THE NUMBERS • Brownlee finished with 126 yards and three touchdowns rushing on 21 carries. Garcia added 75 yards on eight carries. • McCloe completed five of eight passes for 88 yards but was intercepted twice. • Cullen Fanning was the only Invader with two catches. He had 10 receiving yards. • Fanning also led the West Scranton defense by making 10 tackles, assisting on five others and forcing a fumble. • Devine had eight tackles and four assists to go along with his two interceptions. • Garcia added seven tackles and three assists. • Devine had a 54-yard kickoff return and a 21-yard punt return.

rek said. West Scranton is home Friday night against Abington Heights. AROUND THE LFC Scranton and Delaware Valley remained unbeaten to set up their meeting Friday at Delaware Valley for the LFC Division 1 lead. Scranton handled North Pocono, 54-12. Delaware Valley trailed three times in the first half before scoring the game’s final 35 points in a 49-18 victory over Valley View. Dunmore defeated Lakeland, 22-17, to come out of the night tied for the Division 2 lead with Riverside. Daiqwon Buckley’s 57yard, third-quarter touchdown run broke a 15-15 tie for the Bucks, who have lost only to Old Forge. In another Division 2 game, Mid Valley edged Western Wayne, 20-18. Cole Mallery ran for three touchdowns and Austin White intercepted a pass in the end zone on the game’s final play to allow Susquehanna to escape with an 1814 victory over Montrose and maintain a share of the Division 3 lead with Old Forge. Montrose was attempting to break a losing streak which has now reached 35 games. Carbondale scored the first 34 points on the way to a 34-16 victory over Holy Cross.


24

GOLackawanna

Sunday, October 14, 2012

MAKING AN IMPACT

MCGLOIN

RIVERSIDE

Continued from page 18

Continued from page 21 Riverside

tions. He is 136-for-221 for 1,499 yards, producing a 134 efficiency rating on the NCAA scale where 100.0 is average. Along the way, McGloin has even run for a team-high five touchdowns. O’Brien said there were reasons McGloin could lead the secondhalf comeback against Northwestern. “Matt’s done a really nice job of coming in at halftime and staying relaxed and calm and taking the coaching from Charlie (Fisher) and myself,” O’Brien said. “He understands the things we talk about at halftime -- we have to do this better or that better. “He understands it’s a 60-minute game. He’s grown up a lot. When you’re a senior and playing your last few games here at Penn State, that means a lot to him.” McGloin’s performance is a big reason why Penn State can still be looking ahead to those final few games of the season with optimism.

during the 21-point second quarter. Nick Killino’s interception on the first play of the second half led to a 10-play, 48-yard drive for Riverside’s final score. Sam DeStefano ran 3 yards for the score. Honesdale (0-2, 2-5) hit two touchdown passes in the fourth quarter. Riverside is home Friday against Mid Valley (1-1, 4-3).

VICTORIES Continued from page 19

so won in 2008 and in 2010 when she set the women’s course record. The margins of victory were large, but the latest wins were not comfortable for either Byrne or Peoples. “I ran into a little trouble later on,” said Byrne, who finished in 2:29:06, 1:31 ahead of Jeffrey McCabe of Exeter. “It was cool enough that I didn’t think I would run into any trouble, but at about 20 miles I did.” By then Byrne was well in front. “I think I separated around nine miles,” he said. “I felt relaxed and just kept going along at 5:25, 5:30 a mile.” The recognizable face running out ahead of the rest of the field brought cheers along the marathon route. “There’s nothing like it,”

TEAM STATISTICS Riverside had 13 first downs to 11 by Honesdale. The Vikings had 359 yards, including 106 rushing. The Hornets finished with 290 yards, including 187 rushing. Riverside scored its six first-half touchdowns despite running just 22 plays while Honesdale was running 33.

JASON RIEDMILLER/FOR GO LACKAWANNA

West Scranton graduate Eric Shrive comes out of the tunnel before the start of Penn State’s homecoming game against Northwestern on Saturday, Oct. 6. Shrive is getting the most consistent playing time of his Penn State career this season. Shrive is serving as a back-up at multiple positions in the offensive line, rotating through the lineup in each game.

Byrne said. “I heard them yelling my name since Simpson.” Peoples, a former state champion runner at Riverside where she now teaches, was seven minutes ahead of Moscow’s Samantha Snead when she finished in 2:50:00. The 32-year-old was at a better pace before stopping for less than a minute twice and slowing to a walk another time late in the race. “It was a tough race for me today,” Peoples said. “I tried my best, but I had a rough day. “I think I just went out too fast, but I was glad to be ahead by that far when I had some trouble.” A total of 1,927 runners finished the race, breaking last year’s record by 66. The age group winners included Boston Marathon age group champion Tony Cerminaro of Jermyn, who won the 70-and-over men’s division to remain unbeaten in his age group in the race’s 17-year history.

OFFENSIVE STATISTICS Dranchak led Riverside in

rushing with 33 yards on six carries. Thomas Navich added 28 yards on six carries. Loftus caught four passes for 76 yards and Munley caught three for 112 yards. Honesdale’s Kyle Carney caught four passes for 86 yards and a touchdown. DEFENSIVE STATISTICS Navich led the Riverside defensive effort. He had five tackles, including one for a loss, and four assists. He also forced a fumble and broke up a pass. Mark Donaghey, Loftus and Dave Sweetman also had strong games defensively. Donaghey had six tackles, including one for a loss, and three assists. Loftus had three tackles and four assists. He also blocked a punt and rushed the passer into an incompletion. Sweetman returned from missing last week’s game with a broken hand. He made four tackles, including one for a loss, assisted on another and recovered a fumble. Tyler Armillay had two tackles for losses.

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PAGE 25


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112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air, power windows/locks, CD/cassette, Keyless entry, sunroof, new battery. Car drives and has current PA inspection. Slight rust on corner of passenger door. Clutch slips on hard acceleration. This is why its thousands less than Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO. Make an offer! Call 570-592-1629

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE $47,000

GREAT DEALS! MERCEDES ‘29

Kit Car $5,500 OR TRADE JUST REDUCED (570) 655-4884

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. Priced to Sell! $23,000. Call 570-825-6272

MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR 6 cylinder automatic. 52k original miles. $1500. OBO 570-899-1896

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

439

Motorcycles

‘12 BRAND NEW SCOOTER

All ready to ride, electric start, automatic transmission, disk brakes, rear luggage trunk, under seat storage, around 100 mpg, fully street legal, all ready to go! only $1,595. Call 570-817-2952

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130

250 General Auction

250 General Auction

Palletized Bluestone/

Flagstone Auction

(550) Pallets of Cut Stone/ Landscape Stone (550) For: Johnson Quarries, Inc.

Le Raysville, PA 18829 (Lawton / Wyalusing Area) Saturday, October 20, 2012, 9:30 AM Auction To Be Held At Johnson Quarries, 15962 Route 467, Stevensville, PA. From Lawton: Take Route 706 To 467, Go 2 Miles to Auction Site. From Wyalusing: Take Route 706 To Route 467. (550) Pallets Of Quality Bluestone, Pattern Pavers, Landscape Stone, Etc., (550) Including: Thermal Full Colored Pattern, Including 1’ x 1’ x 1”, 1’ x 18” x 1” Plus Other Asst. Dimensions & Thicknesses; Full Color Colonial; Full Color Irregular; Full Color Irregular Tumbled; Lilac Irregular / Standup; Lilac Colonial; Lilac Pattern, 1” & ½”; Tumbled Pavers, 1’ x 1’ & 1’ x 18”; Creek Stone; Snapped Colonial; Other Asst. Types & Varieties; Palletized Stone To Be Sold By The Pallet Or By Square Ft. And Take The Pallet Full. Alike Pallets & Types Will Be Offered By The Pallet And Buyer Can Take Multiple Pallets. Selling Arrangements Will Depend On Types, Varieties And Way Stone Is Palletized. Types, Sizes, Selling Terms & Other Pertinent Info Will Be In Detailed Catalog On Our Website @ www.manasseauctions.com; Loading Of Stone: Stone Will Be Loaded For Buyer Free Of Charge For 2 Weeks Following Auction, From Monday – Friday 8:00AM – 3:00PM, By Appointment. Terms & Conditions: 13% Buyers Premium Will Be Charged. Payment In Full Day Of Auction In Cash, Good Check or Major Credit Card, 3% Discount For Payments Made By Cash Or Check. Nothing Removed Until Settled For. Auction Preview: Friday, October 19, 2012 From 12PM To 4PM & Day Of Auction From 8AM Until Auction Start Time. Auctioneers Note: The Johnson Family Have Decided To Reduce Their Stone Inventory, To Make Room; These Are All Top Quality Items, Not Seconds; All Selling Absolute To The Highest Bidder, Plan To Attend. Mel & Matt Manasse PA Auctioneers License # AU571L & AU3517L Sales Managers & Auctioneers Whitney Point, NY 607-692-4540 / 1-800-MANASSE www.manasseauctions.com


PAGE 28 439

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 Motorcycles

HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON SPORTSTER CUSTOM Loud pipes. Near Mint 174 miles - yes, One hundred and seventy four miles on the clock, original owner. $8000. 570-876-2816

SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800 GL INTRUDER Garage kept, no rust, lots of chrome, black with teal green flake. Includes storage jack & 2 helmets. $3600 570-410-1026

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

Model 8526RLS Mountain Top,PA $18,500 570-760-6341

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘03 IMPALA auto, V6. very

clean car! $3,995. Call For Details! 570-696-4377

To place your ad call...829-7130

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

CHEVY ‘03 SILVERADO 4X4 REG CAB

AUTO, V8. LOOKS & RUNS GREAT $6995. Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

DODGE ‘03 CARAVAN Auto, V6. Nice clean car $4495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

5 speed, 2WD, Like New, 1 Owner Truck $4,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

Front wheel drive, auto, V6 Extra Clean! $4,995. Call For Details! 570-696-4377

CHEVY ‘04 COLORADO SPORT

To place your ad call...829-7130

HYUNDAI ‘01 SANTA FE

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

FORD ‘00 EXPLORER XLT

EXTRA CLEAN! 4X4. $3,495. 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘02 EXPLORER XLT 4X4 3rd row seat.

VERY NICE SUV! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘03 EXPLORER XLT

4X4, leather, sunroof, like new! $5,495 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

SATURN ‘04 VUE

Front wheel drive, 4 cyl, 5 speed, sunroof, clean, clean SUV! $4,495 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

457 Wanted to Buy Auto

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘03 F150 XL 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, 1

owner, great work truck $4495. Call For Details! 570-696-4377

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

FORD ‘99 F150

4X4. Super Cab. Extra Clean! 1 owner truck! $5,995 Call For Details! 570-696-4377

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

Save-a-Lot Food Store is now hiring Produce Clerks. Looking for dependable and customer oriented people. Previous produce experience required. Apply at 400 S. Main Street, Wilkes Barre. E.O.E

533

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

1518 8th Street Carverton, PA Near Francis Slocum St. Park

442 RVs & Campers

FOREST RIVER`08 5TH WHEEL

451

Commercial Flooring Estimator CAD experience a must, good salary, good benefits, please mail resume to: Hi-tech flooring,Inc. 166 West Union St. Kingston, Pa 18704

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

experience in residential & commercial. Must have knowledge of Gas, Water, Sanitary Sewer, Sprinkler System, ability to read blueprints, basic computer skills, including Microsoft Office. Driver’s license is a must. Compensation based on experience. Inquiries to: info@derman associates.com

Logistics/ Transportation

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS Experience a must.

Background check and drug screening required. Please visit ceankiewicz.com to complete application Fax 570-868-3654 Email ceatrucking@ frontier.com.

Logistics/ Transportation

DRIVERS

Due to our continued growth, Bolus Freight Systems is expanding its fleet of company drivers. Company drivers will enjoy dedicated runs or regional runs. You can be home every night or every weekend, the choice is yours. You can earn in excess of $1400 per week, and you will be driving a new or late model truck. Part time and weekend work also available. This is a career opportunity for dependable drivers to work for an industry leader and one of the highest paying companies in the business. We offer a performance bonus, paid vacations and holidays, medical and life insurance as well as 401K. For more information call: 1-800-444-1497 ext 721 or hit ‘0’ and ask for Bob or Carl.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got PLUMBERS WANTED the directions! Minimum 4 years

542 509

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

542

DRIVERS: with Flatbed experience. Excellent Wages, Top 25% of fleet earn over $65,000 Top 50 % over $57,000 Excellent Benefits. Newer Trucks, Rider program. Safety Bonus, Home Weekends CDL-A 2years experience. P&S Transportation 877-660-1663 x367

548 Medical/Health

ASSOCIATE CLINICAL DIRECTOR J R # 1714 OB

EQUISITION

Keystone Human Services is seeking a qualified Associate Clinical Director to provide clinical support and supervision. This position will be responsible for coverage across Luzerne and Wyoming Counties. Please review the full description and apply online. www.Keystone Employment.com EOE

551

Other

Accepting Snow Plowing Bids for Oakridge and Woodbryn driveways and parking lots. Contact Jim at 570-474-5738

554

Production/ Operations

AEP Industries, Inc., a leading supplier of flexible packaging has immediate openings for

MACHINE OPERATORS Starting at $ 9/hour – PLUS .50¢/hour night shift differential; Working Fulltime 12 hours shifts alternating 3 & 4 day work weeks. Every other weekend a must. As a Machine Operator you will remove, inspect, and pack finish product to specifications. You must be able to do some heavy lifting, know how to use a tape measure and scale, and be a TEAM PLAYER. Previous manufacturing experience preferred. Benefit Package includes: Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Insurance, Vacation, Holiday pay, Applications accepted daily @ AEP INDUSTRIES, INC. 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. 20 Elmwood Ave Crestwood Industrial Park Mountaintop, PA 18707 Email: grullony@ aepinc.com EOE * A drug free workplace

To place your ad call...829-7130 542

Logistics/ Transportation

566

Sales/Retail/ Business Development

600 FINANCIAL 630 Money To Loan

MRG America’s largest and premier independent specialty retailer in the casino and resort industry currently has openings for

“We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

Assistant Store Mgr., Supervisor & Customer Sales Associates

At Mohegan Sun, In Pa. The qualified candidates must have a background in retail including excellent verbal & written communication skills, Phenomenal Customer Service Skills & be detailed oriented. We are offering a competitive salary, medical & dental insurance, 401(K), PTO & a generous employee discount. Please apply online at

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

www.marshall RETAILGROUP.COM

or you may fax your resume to 609-317-1126.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

700 MERCHANDISE

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

708

542

542

Logistics/ Transportation

Antiques & Collectibles

DOLL HOUSE Vintage 1950’s style 3 rooms down, staircase, 2 rooms up plus furniture. Make offer. 570-6750460/574-1724

Logistics/ Transportation

Growth Creates Opportunity...Start A New Career! Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly, after completion of 90 day probation period. ***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT (12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week) ***75 cent night shift pay differential offered. ***Pay increase based on skill development. Take charge...LEARN AND EARN!

MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL TIME EXPERIENCE Skills Required: • High School Diploma/GED • Computer Skills • Valid Driver’s License • Criminal Background Check • Pass Pre-Employment Drug Screen & Physical *Mehoopany Location * Benefits Available *

JOB FAIR!

EVERY THURSDAY 12-4 AT THE TUNKHANNOCK LIBRARY

Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com. Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 708

Antiques & Collectibles

ANTIQUE OAK BED

(late 1800’s) with matching dresser and mirror. Additional nightstand included. All refinished. Excellent condition. $965. 466-6499.

ANTIQUE OAK HIGHBOY

744

FURNITURE SALE 3 piece reclining sectional, maroon, cup holder, magazine holder, paid $2700 asking $700 obo. Dark wood dining room suite 7 pieces with matching hutch set includes table, leaf, 4 chairs, 2 captain chairs & 2 piece hutch paid $2500 asking $750. obo. All furniture only 2 years old, have all original receipts moving from Pennsylvania to Arizona. Brown Lazy Boy rocker recliner excellent condition. $75. OBO. 570-6875335/570-780-0227

754 refinished with new vintage hardware Excellent condition $320. 570-466-6499

744

Furniture & Accessories

BEDROOM SUITE. 5 piece Bassett. Walnut wood. Double bookcase bed, triple dresser (9 drawers), chest of drawers (5 drawers) 2 night stands (2 drawers in each). $250 570-675-5046 CHAIRS, (2) Genuine leather, custom made recliners. Taupe color, like new. $550 each. 570-675-5046 DEN FURNITURE Wood/cloth. Regular size sofa, chair and ottoman. Coffee table, 2 end tables. Excellent condition. $325 for all. 570-675-5046

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607 HEADBOARD brass for double bed, custom made. Make offer 570-675-0460 or 574-1724

Machinery & Equipment

SNOW BLOWER. Craftsman. 12 HP, 32” dual stage. Electric start. Track Drive. $525. 570-675-5046

756

Medical Equipment

JAZZY POWER chair model #1121, New cost over $6000 sell for $500. 570-824-7015

772

Pools & Spas

HOT TUB. Jacuzzi, 6 person, green with cover, 19 jets, 1 hp motor, 230 VAC. Kept indoors, very good condition. $1,200. Avoca. 570-457-1979

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

BUYING SPORT CARDS Pay Cash for

baseball, football, basketball, hockey & non-sports. Sets, singles & wax. Also buying comics. 570-212-0398

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

BLUE LIGHT/AMBER/WHITE TAKE DOWN LIGHTS, good condition. $600. Call 570-704-9838

Toplaceyour adcall. .829-7130 HEATER. Emberglo VentFree Wall Mount Propane Heater. 2 double burners 11,000 BTU. $100. Call 570-417-9970

Musical Instruments

CLARINET Artley, solid wood, black with case & 4 new reeds. $175. Call 570-675-0460 or 574-1724

764 Musical Lessons/Services EXPERIENCED Singer looking for a guitarist or pianist to build a 2-3 person band. Jazz, blues, & dinner music. 740-827-1660

906 Homes for Sale

PITTSTON TWP. 900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

garage. $96,000. 570-823-8833

NANTICOKE 800 PETS & ANIMALS 815

PAWS TO CONSIDER.... ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130 Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

GOLDEN RETRIEVER LAB PUPS

1 black male. $200 570-836-1090

23 Ridge Street 4 Bedroom Colonial Home in Pocono Ridge Estates. Large 2 Car Garage, Paved Driveway, Electric Heat & Central Air, 1.5 Baths, Large Eat in Kitchen & Dining Room. Double Deck with Hot Tub. Low Taxes. $219,000 Call 570-212-1404

SALE PENDING

124 School Street 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths 1566 sq ft $134,900 (570) 313-5571

To place your ad call...829-7130

1472 S. Hanover St. Well maintained bilevel. This home 2 bedfeatures rooms, 1 3/4 baths, recreation room with propane stove. Walk out to a 3 season porch. Professionally landscaped yard. 1 car garage, storage shed, new appliances, ceiling Close to fans. LCCC. $163,900. Call 570-735-7594

HARVEYS LAKE

RARE OPPORTUNITY Lake frontage

available with or without building lots. From $200,000 Call 570-357-4539

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

ASHLEY

2 bedroom. Clean. Needs no work. Remodeled throughout. $16,000. Owner Financing. 570-471-7175 or 610-767-9456

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

1 bedroom efficiency apt. Heat, air, hot water, cooking gas, electric, sewage & garbage included. Rental also includes stove, refrigerator, washer & dryer. Owner occupied building. Credit/background check & references required. $540/month. Call (570) 332-2456

EDWARDSVILLE

Ground floor, 1 bedroom. W/w carpeting, washer/dryer hookup, fridge included. Porch. $350 month plus utilities and security. No Pets. Credit and background check. Not approved for Section 8. 570-779-5218

FORTY FORT

SHAVERTOWN

912 Lots & Acreage

Dogs

915 Manufactured Homes

PITTSTON TWP

906 Homes for Sale

Looking for the right deal To place your on an automobile? ad call...829-7130 Turn to classified. HANOVER TWP. For Sale It’s a showroom in print! by Owner 4 PARK STREET Classified’s got Ranch, 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Corner lot. the directions! Gas heat, 2 car

758 Miscellaneous

762 FURNISH FOR LESS

Furniture & Accessories

PAGE 29

938

Apartments/ Furnished

WYOMING 1 bedroom, 2nd

floor. No pets. Drug free. Non smoking. Proof of employment & background check. Heat & hot water provided. $585/month + 1 month security. Call (570) 693-2415 Leave message.

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

RENOVATED AFFORDABLE Managed

AMERICA REALTY 570-288-1422

“2 bedrooms Under Market at $750 + utilities (Affordable) for 2 years” complete renovation, 2 floors, private entrances. Maple kitchens, built-ins, gas fireplaces, carports, Florida rooms. NO PETS /NO SMOKING/ EMPLOYMENT VERIFICATION

HARVEYS LAKE

2 bedroom, 1 bath, eat-in kitchen, washer/dryer hookup, off street parking. $600 + gas heat.

570-606-7917 leave message

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

JENKINS TWP.

AVAILABLE NOW! 3-4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, dining room, large living room, kitchen, stove, off street parking. Heat and water included. $875/month, security, credit check & references. 917-753-8192

KINGSTON

183 Zerby Ave 2 bedrooms, 1 tile bath with shower. No pets. $575/ month + utilities & security. 570-779-4609 570-407-3991

PITTSTON

Quiet neighborhood, 2 bedroom, new construction, heat, electric, & water included. All appliances, offstreet parking, no pets. $625/month +1 month security. (570)357-1383


PAGE 30 941

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 Apartments/ Unfurnished

SCRANTON

611 Philo St. 1 mile from Steamtown Mall. 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom. $600/mo plus utilities. Absentee landlord. Must have first and last months rent, as well as security deposit at signing. Will be available first week of Nov. 2012. Background check will be conducted. Call 718-300-3411

SWOYERSVILLE TOWNHOUSE

Newly constructed building. 2 bedroom, 1.5 baths, all appliances included. Garage. Hardwood floors throughout, cathedral ceilings in bedrooms. $1,200/ month, heat & sewer paid, 1 month security. 570-441-4101

WEST PITTSTON

Century home, 1 bedroom, freshly painted and new carpet. Appliances included. No pets. $450/per month + utilities. Security & references required. Call (570) 283-3086

WILKESBARRE

RENOVATED PERFECTION Managed

AMERICA REALTY 570-288-1422

GENERAL HOSPITAL DOORWAY... FIRST FLOOR. “1 Bedroom Under market at $625 + utilities (affordable”). 2 years. New interiors, maple kitchens, aesthetic fireplaces, luxurious wall to wall. NO PETS/ NO SMOKING/ EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION.

950

Half Doubles

KINGSTON

Sprague Ave. Charming, spacious 6 room, 2 bedroom duplex, includes 2nd & 3rd floor. Ample closets. Washer /dryer hook-up. $575/ month + utilities, security & lease. NO PETS. 570-793-6294

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1015

Appliance Service

ECO-FRIENDLY APPLIANCE TECH.

PLAINS

Spacious 3 bedroom, 1 bath with Victorian charm with hardwood floors, neutral decor, stained glass window, large kitchen. Washer /dryer hook-up, off-street parking. $700 month + utilities, security & lease. NO PETS. 570-793-6294

950

Half Doubles

25 Years Experience fixing major appliances: Washer, Dryer, Refrigerator, Dishwasher, Compactors. Most brands. Free phone advice & all work guaranteed. No service charge for visit. 570-706-6577

To placeyour adcall. .829-7130 1339

PLYMOUTH

Completely renovated 1 bedroom, washer/dryer hookup. Living & dining rooms, eat in kitchen, front & back porches & a yard. $500/month + utilities. 1st, last & security. No pets or smoking. (570)779-9647, evenings

Window Service

PJ’S WINDOW CLEANING & JANITORIAL SERVICES Windows, Gutters, Carpets, Power washing and more. INSURED/BONDED. 570-283-9840

Collect To place your Cash. ad call...829-7130 Not TRUCKSVILLE Dust. 3 bedrooms, refrigerator & stove, washer/ dryer hookup, laundry room, off-street parking, no pets or smoking. $700/ month + electric, gas & hot water, 1 month security, references & background check. 570-592-2902

Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH

WYOMING

Modern 1 bedroom, 1st floor, new carpeting, eat in kitchen, great storage & built-ins. Includes water, sewer & garbage. Gas heat. $475/ month. NO PETS. 570-696-2000

944

Commercial Properties

WYOMING

900 sq. ft. professional office space. High traffic area. Off street parking. Tenant pays electric. Will remodel to suit. 1 year lease. $600 month. 570-430-7077

3 bedroom, 1.5 baths, small yard, front porch, off street parking. $615/month security required. Tenant pays all utilities. 570-357-0712

GET IT TO GO. Search the app store and install The Times Leader mobile app now for when you need your news to go.

Over 47,000

people cite the The Times Leader as their primary source for shopping information. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today?

Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONLY ONL NL N L ONE LY N LEADER. LEA LE L E DER D . timesleader.com

Collect Cash. Not Dust. Sell it in The Times Leader Classified section.

953 Houses for Rent

ASHLEY

COOK STREET Very nice neighborhood. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, refrigerator & stove provided, washer/dryer, offstreet parking Big yard. $500/month + utilities, 1st & last. (570)822-3750

To place your ad call...829-7130

Call 829-7130 to place an ad. ONLY LEADER. ONL NLY ONE N LE LEA L E DER D . timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place an ad. ONLY LEADER. ONL NLY L ONE N LE LEA L E DER. timesleader.com


GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012

PAGE 31

VISIT US 24/7 www.valleychevrolet.com

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$

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10,999*

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14,999*

$

11,999*

#Z2755,5.3L V8 Auto., PW, PDL, Front/Rear Air, Remote Keyless Entry, Rear Heater, Deep Tinted Glass, Electric Mirrors, Rear Swing-out Window

$

16,995*

11,999*

#Z2735, 6.0L V8 6 Speed Auto., F/R A/C, Stabilitrak, Power Options, AM/FM/CD, Power Heated Mirrors, Deluxe Front Appearance

$

27,999*

12,999*

#Z2759, 4.3L V6 Auto. w/ Overdrive, Air, Full Floor Covering, PW, PDL, High Back Bucket Seats, Electric Mirrors, Full Body Glass, AM/FM Stereo

$

7,999*

*Prices plus tax and tags. Select pictures may be for illustration only. Select vehicles may not be GM Certified. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors. OnStar & XM Satellite fees applicable.

KEN WALLACE’S

821-2772 • 1-800-444-7172

VALLEY 601 KIDDER STREET, WILKES-BARRE, PA CHEVROLET MON.-THURS. 8:30-8:00pm; FRI. 8:30-7:00pm; SAT. 8:30-5:00pm

Scan From Mobile Device For More Specials

EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.


PAGE 32

GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012

K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N

TH TH A N K S L OW FIN A N CE

TO TO T O O U R CU S T O M E RS Fo rM a k ing U s

H IG H TRA DE

1 V OL UM E # E H T DE A L E R N A S S I N S TA TE O F P E N N S YL V

R A T E S

V A L U E S

E A IN TH A N D W ITH YO U R H E L P N IA **

T AA G A I N O IIT DO LL D L ’ L ’ E E ! W 2012 W BUY 2 AT T THH IS IS P R IC IC E! E!

N IS S A N A RM A DA

FO R

STK# N 22344 M O D EL# 26612 V IN # 618651 M SR P $57,045

P L A TIN UM 4X4

$

V8, Au to , Na vi, Pw rL iftga te, Hea ted S ea ts & S teerin g W heel, Blu eto o th, M o o n ro o f, Chro m e W heels , 2n d Ro w Ca p ta in Cha irs & M u ch, M u ch M o re!

2012 N IS S A N

2013 N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5 S E DA N 2 AT T S THH IIS STK# N 22468 M O D EL# 13013 V IN # 125432 M SR P $22,410

STK# N 21750 M O D EL# 22112 V IN # 282868 M SR P $23,050

4 7,74 5

$ W

B U Y FO R

17,9 9 5 / $ 15 0 0

N IS S A N

*

R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0

OR

L EA S E FO R

$

N M A C C A P TIV E C A S H

18 9

2012 N IS S A N M URA N O S A W D

$

$2000 O FF M

SR P !

2 0 ,4 10

$

*

W

S SAA V E O V ER E R $6000 $6000 O R M O R E OF FF F M SR S R P O N A L L 2012 2012 M U R A N O S IN IN STO S T O C K O N LY LY

B U Y FO R

2 6 ,8 5 0 / $20 0 0

N IS S A N

R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0

*

+ T/T

L EA S E OR FO R

$

N M A C C A P TIV E C A S H

269

+ T/T

VEHICLES 300 IN STOCK!

2012 N IS S A N S E N TRA 2.0S S E DA N

$

$3000 O FF M SR P ! B U Y FO R

16,420

*

OR

+ T/T

$

L EA S E FO R

18 9

*

P ER M O.

W / $ 2 0 0 0 N IS S A N R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0 N M A C C A P TIV E C A S H

*$189 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $10,292.60; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.

SA VE

$

$5000 O FF M B U Y FO R

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L EAS E $ FO R

299

* P ER M O.

W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H

VEHICLES 300 IN STOCK!

2012 N IS S A N M A XIM A 3.5S L IM ITE D E DITIO N

HURRY!

STK# N 22368 M O D EL# 16112 V IN # 861635 M SR P $34,435

V-6, CVT , A/C, S u n ro o f, Bla ck W heels , F lo o r M a ts , AM /F M /CD, M u ch, M u ch M o re!

5 A T TTHH IS IS P R IC IC E! E!

SA VE

$

$7000 O FF M SR P ! B U Y FO R

2 7,4 3 5 W

/ $350 0

N IS S A N

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+ T/T

$

R EB ATE & $ 5 0 0

L EA S E FO R

28 9

N

N

* P ER M O.

N M A C C A P TIV E C A S H

*$289 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $19,627.95; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .

*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils . **B a s ed o n N is s a n M o nth End Sa les R epo rtfo rSept. 2 0 12 . All o ffers ex pire 10 /3 1/12 .

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SR P !

*$299 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $16,710.90; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.

S TIL L TH E

2 A T TTHH IS IS P R IICC EE!!

4 Cyl, CVT , A/C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s ! SA VE

* P ER M O.

DO N ’ T BU Y A N YW H E RE E L S E !

* P ER M O.

*$259 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $11,837.80; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru N M AC @ T ier1; $2000 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+ ) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.

STK# N 22431 M O D EL# 12112 V IN # 757810 M SR P $19,420

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, L ea ther, Prem iu m Pa cka ge, F o g L ights , M o o n ro o f, Bo s e S o u n d , Cn v. Pkg, & M u ch M o re!

O N LLYY 8 M U R A NO S L EFT EFT A T T THH IS IS P R IICC E E!! !! HURRY

*$269 p er m o n t h p lu s t a x. 39 m o n t h lea s e; 12,000 m iles p er yea r; Res id u a l= $17,739; m u s tb e a p p ro ved t hru N M AC @ T ier 1; $1995 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u it y ( + ) p lu s regis t ra t io n f ees ; T o t a l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1500 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t e in clu d ed .

OR

259

P ER M O.

V6, CVT , Blu eto o th, AM / F M / CD, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

B U Y FO R

L EAS E $ FO R

*

2 A T TH T H IS IS P R IC IC E! E!

STK# N 22155 M O D EL# 15112 V IN # 260196 M SR P $31,530

*$189 p er m o n t h p lu s t a x. 39 m o n t h lea s e; 12,000 m iles p er yea r; Res id u a l= $12,908; m u s tb e a p p ro ved t hru N M AC @ T ier 1; $1995 Ca s h d o w n o rT ra d e E q u it y ( + ) p lu s regis t ra t io n f ees ; T o t a l @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1000 N is s a n L ea s e Reb a t e in clu d ed .

STK# N 21727 M O D EL# 23212 V IN # 218668 M SR P $32,850

O FF M SR P !

2012 N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5S COUP E

O N LY LY 5 L EFT! EFT!

2 A T TH T H IS IS P R IC IC E! E!

+ T/T

$9000

+ T/T

*S a le Price p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .

ROGUE S FW D

S SAA V E O V ER E R $5000 $ 5 0 0 0 O FF FF M S SRR P O N “S” “ S ” M O D EL E L FW FW D R O G U ES E S IN IN STO S T O C K O N LY LY !

SA VE

*

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s

IC E! E! P R IC

4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , T ilt, Zero Gra vity S ea ts , F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!

SA VE

012 H U R R Y O N LLYY 1100 22012 A R M A D A S R EEMM A IINN !

.E. PA

1- 8 6 6 - 70 4 - 0 6 72

229 M U N DY S TRE E T W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .

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Go Lackawanna 10-14-2012