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VOL.19 ISSUE 48 OCTOBER 10-16 2012 • THEWEEKENDER.COM

NEPA’S No. 1 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FREE WEEKLY MORE THAN 172,000 READERS WEEKLY*

MEET THE 2012 MODEL AND MAN OF THE YEAR, P. 38

RBY AT KIR N O IO S N E M IM D RD THE THIR S R E T N E D N A B

e i r e g n i L e g a r Mi

HAVE 3-D GLASSES? TRY THEM ON THIS COVER


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

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staff

What is the strangest band that you listen to?

John Popko

Chris Hughes

“Puscifer.”

“Dogs Die In Hot Cars or The Secret Machines.”

General manager • 570.831.7349 jpopko@theweekender.com

Kieran Inglis

Account executive • 570.831.7321 kinglis@theweekender.com

“Skrillex. I don’t know why, but random high pitched sounds and bass pump me up.”

Editor • 570.831.7322 chughes@theweekender.com

Amanda Dittmar

Rich Howells

Staff writer • 570.829.7132 rhowells@theweekender.com

“The Mars Volta or The Dresden Dolls. I make mix CDs all the time and none of the music ever belongs together.”

Mike Golubiewski

Graphic Designer • 570.970.7401 adittmar@theweekender.com

Production editor • 570.829.7209 mgolubiewski@theweekender.com

“Project Jenny Project Jan.”

“A tie between The Carpenters, The McGuire Sisters, and Captain & Tenille.”

Tell @wkdr the strangest band that you listen to. Contributors

Ralphie Aversa, Justin Brown, Marie Burrell, Kait Burrier, Caeriel Crestin, Pete Croatto, Stephanie DeBalko, Janelle Engle, Tim Hlivia, Michael Irwin, Amy Longsdorf, Matt Morgis, Kacy Muir, Jason Riedmiller, Lisa Schaeffer, Alan Sculley, Chuck Shepherd, Alan K. Stout, Mike Sullivan, Estella Sweet, Bill Thomas, Noelle Vetrosky Interns

Megan Lange • Bill Rigotti • Tom Taraszewski • Jolisa Tokar Address 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703

Letter from the editor Maybe some of the lessons that Andrew W.K. brought to Luzerne County Community College last month rubbed off on us. One thing is for certain, though. The Weekender staff sure knows how to throw a party. Just ask the nearly 200 people who turned out to The Woodlands on Oct. 5 for the 2012 Model of the Year Party. From the patriotic chants of the crowd to the exciting crowning of our top Man and Model from the last 52 weeks, the event was a blast from start to finish. I’ve been to several MOTY parties in the past, often working on the technical side of things, from streaming live video in the past to updating the Weekender’s social networks. This year, I got my first real chance to enjoy the evening while working a little bit, too. For me, no night is better than one where my wife and I can escape the doldrums of parenting for a few hours, which we were lucky enough to

do on Friday. It’s also pretty uplifting when a Playboy model and former co-worker sneaks by the voting table to tell you that “your wife is f--king smoking hot!” That may give me just a few less bragging points than Rob Nitkowski and Dominique Kozuch earned after they earned the support of readers and judges to take home this year’s title. There may be no more hysterical memory that I’ll have from past parties than watching the Man of 2012 passionately deliver the “If I can change” speech from the end of “Rocky IV,” dressed in his patriotic best. But enough from me. You can see what you missed and learn more about the cream of the crop from the Weekender on pages 36-38. If you missed this year’s party, be sure you don’t miss the next one. As always, thanks for reading.

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- Christopher J. Hughes, Weekender Editor

FOR THE RECORD In an Oct. 3 story, Tina Bray was incorrectly identified as the owner of Bratty Natty’s Boutique in the

social

Wyoming Valley Mall. Bray is co-owner with Natalie Bush. The Weekender staff apologizes for the error.

Online comment of the week.

Eugene Mirman @EugeneMirman “The saddest thing for Romney must be that most Americans would actually trust Obama to do a better job killing Big Bird.”

Fax 570.831.7375 E-mail Weekender@theweekender.com Online theweekender.com • myspace.com/weekender93 • facebook.com/theweekender • follow us on Twitter: @wkdr Circulation The Weekender is available at more than 1,000 locations throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania. For distribution problems call 570.829.5000 • To suggest a new location call 570.831.7398 • To place a classified ad call 570.829.7130

Editorial policy

The Weekender is published weekly from offices at 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703. The opinions of independent contributors of the weekender do not necessarily reflect those of the editor or staff.

Rating system

WWWWW = superb WWWW = excellent WWW = good WW = average W = listenable/watchable * Scarborough Research

The Weekender has 10,243 Facebook fans. Find us now at Facebook.com/theweekender


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WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

36-38 OCTOBER 10-16, 2012

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17

GOING GREEN Texas-based Blaggards in Scranton Oct. 10.

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33

ART OF THE PROCESS Misericordia show focuses on finished pieces, artistry that builds them.

MODEL CITIZENS Weekender crowns 2012 Model and Man of the Year.


this just in

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

index Oct. 10-16, 2012

LATEST LOCAL NEWS

Weekender Staff | weekender@theweekender.com

COVER STORY PRIMUS ... 14-15

LISTINGS

THIS JUST IN ... 7 SPEAK & SEE ... 13 CONCERTS ... 20-21 LIVE ENTERTAINMENT .... 22 THEATER .... 31 AGENDA ... 28, 34, 39, 48 FITNESS … 42 MIND AND BODY … 45

MUSIC

THE BLAGGARDS … 17 GLASS PRISM REVIEW … 18 ALBUM REVIEWS ... 24 CHARTS ... 24

STAGE & SCREEN MOVIE REVIEW ... 27 RALPHIE REPORT ... 30 STARSTRUCK ... 30 NOVEL APPROACH ... 31 LIT UNRAVELED … 32 MISERICORDIA EXHIBIT … 33

FOOD & FASHION LIFE IS A DRAG … 46 TIPS FROM A BARBIE CHICK … 53

MISC.

TECH TALK ... 16 PUZZLE ... 28 LOOK WHAT YOU MISSED … 36-37, 54 WHO ARE … 38 INFINITE IMPROBABILITY … 40 JUST FOR THE HEALTH OF IT … 42 SHOW US SOME SKIN ... 46 GET YOUR GAME ON … 52 SIGN LANGUAGE ... 57 SORRY MOM & DAD ... 58 MOTORHEAD ... 58 WEEKENDER MAN ... 69 WEEKENDER MODEL ... 70

ON THE COVER

COVER PHOTO AND DESIGN BY AMANDA DITTMAR VOLUME 19 • ISSUE 48

Dominique Kozuch, left, and Rob Nitkowski earned the support of readers and judges to become the Model and Man of 2012. (Photo by Jason Riedmiller) CROWNING ACHIEVEMENT The Weekender capped the 2012 Model of the Year party on Oct. 5 at The Woodlands by crowning Rob Nitkowski and Dominique Kozuch as the Man and Model of the Year. Kozuch and Nitkowski were among the top five recipients of votes cast at theweekender.com and through live ballots at the three-hour event in WilkesBarre this weekend. Each was a clear favorite among judges following a question-and-answer session with event hose Ralphie Aversa of 97.1 BHT. Weekender staff members joined models, special guests, and celebrity judges including Playboy model Sarah Clayton, Leverage Fitness Studio owner Tim Hlivia, Sapphire Salon owner Angie Morgan, Bratty Natty’s Boutique co-owner Tina Bray, and past Man of the Week Mike Henger for drinks, dancing, and live entertainment. Readers interested in becoming a Man or Model of the Week should email two recent photos, their full name, hometown, age, and phone number to either man@theweekender.com or model@theweekender.com.

Matisyahu will bring his annual Hanukkah celebration, “Festival of Light,” to the Sherman Theater (524 Main St., Stroudsburg) on Dec. 11. The 2012 expansion of the festival includes the first West Coast performance in its history. The Dec. 11 NEPA show is one of three acoustic sets scheduled in the six-date tour. Matisyahu will perform with his full band in Philadelphia; Washington, DC; and New York City, N.Y. Tickets go on sale Oct. 12 at noon for $25 and $30. For more information, visit slpcon-

certs.net. HOLBROOK SHOW CANCELLED Due to an unforeseen conflict in scheduling, Hal Holbrook has cancelled his upcoming performance of “Mark Twain Tonight!”at the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts (71 Public Square, WilkesBarre). The show was originally slated for Oct. 20 at 8 p.m. Full ticket refunds are being offered at point of purchase. For more information, call the Kirby Center Box Office at 570.826.1100.

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MATISYAHU DUE HERE IN DECEMBER SLP Concerts announced Monday that alt hip-hop artist

Hassidic raggae musician Matisyahu will deliver an acoustic set at the Sherman Theater during his 2012 “Festival of Lights” tour. (AP Photo/Thirty Tigers, Mark Squires)


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Weekender Wire Services

MAMA’S BOY A 14-year-old boy was hospitalized in critical condition in Churchill, Pa., in August after allegedly swiping a Jeep Grand Cherokee and leading the owner’s boyfriend on a brief highspeed chase before rolling the Cherokee over on Interstate 376. The boy’s mother, according to WTAE-TV, blamed the Cherokee’s owner: A vehicle with the keys in it, she said, “was an opportunity that, in a 14-year-old’s eyes, was ... the perfect moment.” Also, she said, the boyfriend “had no right to chase my son.” The boy “could have just (wanted) a joyride down the street. Maybe he (merely) wanted to go farther than he felt like walking.” TOO FAT TO DIE Ohio death-row inmate Ronald Post, 53, asked a federal court in September to cancel his January date with destiny on the grounds that, despite almost 30 years of prison food, he’s still too fat to execute. At 480 pounds, “vein access” and other issues would cause his lethal injection to be “torturous.” MIND YOUR MANNERS Iranian cleric Hojatoleslam Ali Beheshti was hospitalized in the town of Shahmirzad in September, allegedly after being roughed up by a woman. According to Iran’s Mehr news agency, the

IRRESISTABLE BOOTY

Aaron Morris was charged in August with battery in North Lauderdale, Fla., for groping the buttocks of a woman at a Walmart. According to the arresting officer, Morris explained, “Her booty looked so good, I just couldn’t resist touching it.” cleric was merely performing his “duty,” warning an allegedly immodestly dressed woman to cover herself better. She suggested, instead, that he should “cover (his) eyes,” and when he continued admonishing her, she, unladylike, pushed him away and kicked him. COCKY KAYAKER Arrested in September and charged with aggravated indecent exposure (making continued obscene gestures to female kayakers on Michigan’s Pinnebog River while nude): 60-year-old TV producer William H. Masters III -- the son of pioneer 1960s sex researcher William Masters (who, with Virginia Johnson, wrote the landmark books “Human Sexual Response” and “Human Sexual Inadequacy”). MACHETE HAZARD In August, the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Gerber Legendary Blades company of Portland, Ore., announced a recall of Gerber machetes. According to CPSC, the machetes might have a defect that could cause the handle to break, making the machete, said CPSC, a “laceration hazard.” SEX ED Richard Wagner Jones, running for a school board seat in Granite, Utah, told reporters in June that since the job is mainly

about taxes and budgets, he would not have to make site visits to schools. That is fortunate, for Jones is barred from schools as a registered sex offender based on a 1990 conviction.

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KILLER CAMPAIGN Mike Rios, a former school board member in Moreno Valley, Calif., said in August that he was still considering running for the town’s council despite his March arrest for attempted murder and April arrest for pimping (allegedly caught with several underage recruits). A FUNGUS AMONG US Yak herders in Tibet and farmers in the Indian Himalayas are becoming relatively prosperous, according to recent reports by National Geographic and London’s The Guardian, by harvesting rare caterpillar fungi. In Tibet, “yartsa gunbu” supposedly cures ailments ranging from back pain to HIV, from hair loss to asthma and more, and often sells in local markets for twice its weight in gold. In India, “kira jari” is believed to be an aphrodisiac and energy booster, but the government is trying to control the market because insufficient new larvae means the land might soon be picked clean. AND A NICE CHIANTI Arrests were made in July of two men who had openly chatted on the Internet about torturing, cooking and eating children, but investigators have searched in vain for evidence of any such crimes by the men. Jason Scarcello, 42, who wrote, “(A)ctually (seeing) a child cooking would be a dream come true,” is under arrest in Anderson, Calif., and Ronald Brown, 57, who suggested carving and cooking body parts for an “Easter meal,” in Largo, Fla., was detained for possessing child pornography, but, regarding the Internet chats, both claimed a First Amendment right to their un-acted-upon imaginations, however disgusting.

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MODERN WARFARE China, Japan and Taiwan each claim ownership of the uninhabited South China Sea islands of Senkaku or Diaoyu, and the controversy heightened in September when Japan announced that it had formally “purchased” the islands from a private company that reputedly owned them. China countered by “launching” its first-ever aircraft carrier (a vessel junked in 1998 by Ukraine), which it hopes will intimidate its neighbors even though it is useless to planes. Days later, patrol boats from Taiwan and Japan had a confrontation near the islands -- drenching each other in a military-grade squirtgun fight. (Japan won.)

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news of the weird


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

Infinite Improbability:

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A column focusing on geek culture, discussing, analyzing, and debating the impact of comics, movies, music, and anything that has a dedicated following.


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

PAGE 12

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POETIC Barnes & Noble Booksellers (Arena Hub Plaza, Wilkes-Barre, 570.829.4210) ❏ Book Signings: • 7th Annual Halloween Horror Book Signing: Oct. 13, 2-5 p.m. Authors are Ron Breznay, Lorne Dixon, Kevin Lucia, Darryl Mayeski, Anthony Rapino, Mark Thornton, Eileen Watkins. Barnes & Noble WilkesKing’s Booksellers (7 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.4700) ❏ Events/Book Clubs: • Open Mic Night: last Tues. of every month, 6:30 p.m. • Writer’s Workgroup: Wyoming Valley Wordsmiths: first/third Tues. monthly, 7 p.m. ❏ Children’s Events: • Weekly Sat. morning story time, 11 a.m.-noon.

Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock: 570.996.1500) • Writers Group: Thurs., 7-8:30 p.m. 18+. Celebrates all types of writing styles, formats. Join anytime. Free. Call to register. Lizza Studios (900 Rutter Ave., Suite 10, Forty Fort, 570.991.6611, betsy@lizzastudios.com) • On display: A private collection of work by Czech artist Colini.

The Osterhout Free Library (71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, www.osterhout.info, 570.821.1959) • Open Computer Lab: Mon./Wed., 5-8 p.m.; Sat., 1-4 p.m. • Socrates Café Discussion Group: Oct. 11, 6:30-8:00 p.m. • Knit & Crochet Group: Oct. 13, 27, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. • Dirty Bingo: Oct. 15, 6 p.m. Free. • Poetry Series: Group meets third Tues. monthly. Oct. 16, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. • Sleuths Mystery Book Discussion: Oct. 18, 6:30 p.m. “A Plain Death” by Amanda Flower. Free. • Protect Your Identity: Oct. 24, 3-4 p.m. Protect yourself from identity theft, pizza and soft drinks served. Free. • Costume Party for Adults: Oct. 31, 7-8 p.m. Free.

Pittston Memorial Library

Plymouth Public Library (107 W. Main St., Plymouth, 570.779.4775) • Looking for volunteers: Call to sign up. • Adult computer lessons: Daily, call to register. • Story Time: Mon., 11 a.m. or Wed., 10:30 a.m. Toddlers/preschool children. • Book Fair: through Oct. 13, Barnes Noble Arena Hub, benefits library. Book Fair ID#10849180 for purchases in store or online. Special story time Tues., 10 a.m. by Judy Rittenhouse. • Women’s Club of Plymouth: Meeting Oct. 15, 6:45 p.m. Looking for new members. • Book Club: Meeting Oct. 29, 6 p.m. Informal discussion of “The Language of Flowers.” Call to register. STACKS Writing Group Every other Tues., 6 p.m., The Banshee, (320 Penn Ave., Scranton). Info: stackswritinggroup@gmail.com The Vintage Theater (326 Spruce St., Scranton, info@scrantonsvintagetheater.com) • NEPA Writers Collective Annual Dead Poets Night: Oct. 18, features open-mic poetry. • “Lit Unraveled!” readings/discussion by Amye Archer, Jason Lucarelli, Dawn Lea, Rich Howells, and Brian Fanneli: Oct. 19. 7 p.m. $3. • Poetry open mic: Nov. 15. • Scranton Story Slam III: Nov. 16. West Pittston Library (200 Exeter Ave., www.wplibrary.org, 570.654.9847) • Book Club: First Tues., 6:45 p.m. Free. Informal discussion of memberselected books. • Weekly story time for children: Fri., 1 p.m. Free.

VISUAL AFA Gallery (514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton: 570.969.1040 or Artistsforart.org) Gallery hours Thurs.-Sat., 12-5 p.m. • Life Drawing sessions: every Tues., 7-9 p.m. Contact ted@tedmichalowski.com for info. • Drawing Socials: every Sun., 6-9 p.m. $5 GA, $2 student. ArtWorks Gallery (502 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. 570.207.1815, artworksnepa.com) Gallery hours: Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat., noon-3 p.m., or by appointment. • “Robert Stark Retrospective:” through Oct. 27. Blue Heron Art Gallery (121 Main St., Wyalusing, 570.746.4922, www.blueheronart.org) Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Sat. by appt. • “Seeking The Muse-A decade of Art at the Blue Heron Gallery:” through Jan. 24. 22 artists. Info: wchamber@epix.net Camerawork Gallery (Downstairs in the Marquis Gallery, Laundry Building, 515 Center St., Scranton, 570.510.5028. www.cameraworkgallery.org, rross233@aol.com) Gallery hours Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. • Accepting submissions for new shows during 2012-2013. Photography only; all photographic methods considered. Check out submissions procedure on website for details. Gallery at the Pocono Community Theater (88 S. Courtland St., East Stroudsburg, 570.421.3456. poconocommunitytheater.org) Gallery hours: Mon.-Thurs., 3:30-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat., 3:30-11 p.m.; Sun., 12:30-9 p.m. • “Mediterrania” Paintings of the Amalfi Coast & Mediterranean Region by Thomas Augusta: through Oct. 21. Front gallery. • Local photographers James Chesnick and John Kopp: through Oct. 21. Back gallery. Hazleton Art League (225 E. Broad St., Hazleton, hazletonartleague.org) • Group exhibition: through Oct. 21. Hope Horn Gallery (Hyland Hall, University of Scranton, 570.941.4214) Gallery Hours: Sun.-Fri., noon-4 p.m.; Wed., 6-8 p.m. • “The Lackawanna Iron Furnaces of

Luzerne County Historical Society Museum (69 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.823.6244, lchs@epix.net) • “The Wonderful Story of Planters Peanuts:” through Oct. 27. Mahady Gallery (Marywood University, 570.348.6211 x 2428, marywood.edu/galleries.) Gallery hours: Mon., Thurs.-Fri., 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Tues.-Wed., 9 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 1-4 p.m. • 4 x 8 Landscapes: Furniture by Paul Ludick: through Oct. 14. Marquis Art and Frame (515 Center St., Scranton, 570.344.3313) • “En Passant:” through Oct. 30. Works by Lisa Hinkle. Marquis Art & Frame (122 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.823.0518) Gallery hours Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. • “Something Just a Bit Different:” through Nov. 3. Show will feature Brad Earl and Karen Poels. Mountain Top Photo Club exhibit, Wilkes-Barre General Hospital (239 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top). Opening reception Oct. 26, 7-9 p.m. Long-term exhibition. Info: mountaintopphotoclub.com. New Visions Studio & Gallery (201 Vine St., Scranton, www.newvisionstudio.com, 570.878.3970) Gallery hours: Tues.-Sun., noon-6 p.m. and by appointment. • “Nightmare on Vine Street II” horror-themed exhibit: through Oct. 27. Featured artists Tom Gates, Ashley Gries, Jay Salerno, Adam Weitzenkorn. Schulman Gallery (2nd floor of LCCC Campus Center, 1333 S. Prospect St., Nanticoke, www.luzerne.edu/schulmangallery, 570.740.0727) Gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. • Photography Exhibit: through Oct. 11 • Old Masters: Oct. 19-Nov. 22 • Annual Faculty/Alumni Exhibit: Nov. 30-Jan. 3 Something Special (23 W. Walnut St., Kingston, 570.288.8386) Open Mon.-Fri., 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat., 7:30 a.m.-2 p.m. • “Impressions of a Perfect Day” exhibit: through Nov. 9. Sordoni Art Gallery at Wilkes University (150 S. River St.,

STAR Gallery at the Mall at Steamtown (570.969.2537/343.3048) • “Survivor’s Speak Out Masks,” artists from Women Resources Center: through Oct. 30. Sullivan County Council on the Arts • Accepting applications for annual juried Fall Art Expo. At least $1,200 in cash prizes this year. Categories: Painting, drawing, photography, threedimensional art. PDF applications at sullivanarts.org/upload/2012expoapplication.pdf. Info: sullivanarts.org, info@sullivanarts.org, 570.928.8927 • Fall Art Expo: Oct. 13-14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Forksville Fairgrounds (Rte. 154, Forksville). Suraci Gallery (Marywood University, 570.348.6211 x 2428, marywood.edu/galleries.) Gallery hours: Mon., Thurs.-Fri., 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Tues.-Wed., 9 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 1-4 p.m. • 9x9x3: New Visions-Textile Study Group of New York: through Oct. 14. The Vintage Theater (326 Spruce St., Scranton, info@scrantonsvintagetheater.com) • Steampunk Exhibit: through Oct. 31. Various media on shown dedicated to steampunk. • “Rock, Paper, Scissor:” Nov. 2-29. Opening reception Nov. 2, includes light fare, drink, and live music. T.W. Shoemaker Gallery (312 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming) • “One Year Later: A Retrospective Look at the Flood of the Susquehanna River in West Pittston, Penna.:” through Oct. 27. Info: facebook.com/twshoemakerart, jamie@jamiesmith.com. Widmann Gallery (Located in King’s College’s Sheehy-Farmer Campus Center between North Franklin and North Main Streets, Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.5900, ext. 5328) Gallery hours: Mon. through Fri. 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Sat. and Sun. as arranged. Free and open to the public. “Recent Works” by Peter Nardone: through Nov. 2. Photography,

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- compiled by Rich Howells, Weekender Staff Writer. Send your listings to weekender@theweekender.com, 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 18703, or fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline is Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded listings at theweekender.com.

PAGE 13

Pages & Places • Cafe Programs every Thurs. Happy hour 6 p.m., programs 7 p.m. (Platform Lounge at Trax in Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel, 700 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton)

(47 Broad St., 570.654.9565, pitmemlib@comcast.net) • Craftastic Kids Craft Club: 3rd Sat. every month, starting Oct. 20, 10 a.m. Grades 2-5. Call/email to register. • Crochet Club: Tues., 10 a.m., Thurs., 6 p.m. New members welcome. • Kids Science Club: 1st Sat. every month, starting Oct. 6, 10 a.m. Grades 2-5. Call/email to register. • Lego Club: Meets Mondays, 4 p.m. Wait list only, call. • Page Turners Kids Book Club: 1st Thurs. every month starting Oct. 4. Grades 3-5. • Story Time: Toddlers Tues., 10 a.m. or Wed., 1:30 p.m.; Preschool Tues., 1:30 p.m. or Wed., 10 a.m.

The Linder Gallery at Keystone College (570.945.8335, keystone.edu/lindergallery) • “Robert Stark: Inside the Studio:” Oct. 28-Nov. 30. Opening reception Oct. 28, 4-6 p.m.

Stark Learning Center, 570.408.4325) Gallery hours: Tues.-Sun., noon-4:30 p.m. • “Rosalyn Richards: Recent Works:” through Oct. 21. Large-format graphite, ink drawings, etchings.

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

speak and see

Scranton, Pennsylvania: History, Art, Heritage:” through Nov. 6.


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

PAGE 14

s is, from left, le Known for quirky songs like “My Name Is Mud” and the “South Park” theme song, Primus guitarist Larry “Ler” LaLonde, drummer Jay Lane, and bassist/vocalist Les Claypool.

Primus bringing first 3-D tour to Wilkes-Barre By Rich Howells Weekender Staff Writer

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hen Primus, the funky alternative rock trio from San Francisco, announced that they would

be embarking on a threedimensional tour, many fans asked, “How can a band do a tour in 3-D?” It’s such a peculiar concept that even guitarist Larry

LaLonde isn’t exactly sure how it’s going to work yet. “We’ve been trying to incorporate more and more video stuff into our show and trippy stuff that plays off the music, like weird visuals and textures and stuff. I think it was probably our manager, Brad (Sands) – he probably

just bought a new 3-D TV; I’m assuming that’s where it came from. I think he was probably like, ‘Hey, man! What about 3-D?’” LaLonde said of the tour’s origins in a recent phone interview. “We started investigating what the possibilities of this were and came across some

een working guys that have been gy and it’s on this technology pretty cool. I’m pretty blown away by it. We haven’t actually put the whole thing together as far ass like doing a show or playingg it with the band andd m everything, so I’m pretty excited about it. We’ll find out in the next couple of days how it all works, but so far everything I’ve seen is pretty amazing.” It wouldn’t be the first time LaLonde has trodden new musical sical territory. Inspired by a Rush concert and his neighbor’s “really cool” Fender nder


Zappa and all this stuff. It kind of made me just switch into that. “I thought that was like the next level of music to be into.” That next level came in the form of Primus, which released six groundbreaking studio albums since 1990, one of which went gold (“Tales from the Punchbowl”) while two others went multiplatinum (“Sailing the Seas of Cheese” and “Pork Soda”). The success of singles like “Jerry Was a Race Car Driver,” “My Name is Mud,” and “Wynona’s Big Brown Beaver” can largely be attributed to the

Experimental guitarist Larry LaLonde performs with Primus in Pordenone, Italy on March 23. (Photo by Elisa Moro) the metal guitar days.” Rejoined by one of Primus’ first drummers, Jay Lane, they hit a new creative stride in 2010 as they began working on their first studio album since 1999’s “Antipop.” The results became the wellreceived “Green Naugahyde,” released in Sept. 2011. “Getting back in was exciting, and everyone was ready to do it. On top of that, now there’s a lot more technology to make things easier, as far as I can pull up all my song ideas on my phone. I can record stuff and go home and work on stuff. All those things kind of made it a lot more fun,” LaLonde described. “As far as the songwriting, a lot of it was just jamming in the studio. Since we did have so much time off before this one, I had a ton of song ideas together. So I mean the basic idea behind the whole thing is that we just went in and just started doing it. Before we knew it, we just had an album.”

The new surround sound, 3-D tour, which stops at the F.M. Kirby Center on Tuesday, Oct. 16, will also leave little downtime for Primus this year, but that’s not what has the 44-year-old worried. “I better not wear the 3-D glasses because I might not be able to multi-task on the guitar playing and the video watching. ‘Hey, man! This is a cool movie!’ Oh, yeah, yeah, guitar!” he joked. “Maybe the next one we just put on ‘Free Bird’ by Skynyrd in the back speakers and that’s the show. Minimalist. Give ‘em what they want.” W

Primus 3-D Tour, Oct. 16, F.M. Kirby Center (71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre), doors 7 p.m., show 8 p.m., $35-50

PAGE 15

quirky but catchy bass lines and lyrics by frontman Les Claypool, but it is LaLonde’s guitar that fills the space in between and helps complete “I want to make sure the guitar part is kind of perfect, or at least perfect in my mind to make everything work… You try to find the holes, try to find the places where it fits in and makes sense…The Police was that way a lot; a lot of guitar parts were kind of fitted around the bass and bow wow wows. A lot of bands I was into were bass heavy,” he explained. “It’s funny. Sometimes stuff will just really be off the cuff songwriting and it won’t really be thought about too much, and then there’s other times where I’ll kind of o really think out a part because becaus there will be, like, a really interesting bass line that I want w to make sure that I don’t mess it up.” Tired of the record-tourre record cycle, the group went on hiatus in 2000 2000, playing shows sporadically sporadica over the years as LaLonde LaLond joined Tom Waits and Serj T Tankian of System of a Dow Down on the road and recorded two albums with his own band, No N Forcefield. “It was definitely definit a whole other experience to not be such a big part of o the band. I was was just just sort sor ortt of a side guy, so it was kind of cool to just slack off a bit and an just play guitar and not ha have to worry about much else. else They’ve all been really fun things,” he th acknowledged. “The No Forcefield stuff For was another tthing that was just cool because it was a bec crazy scene. scene It was a lot of hanging out in the turntable world around San Francisco. That Fra scene w was kind of like tthe next wave of how h guitar used use to be as far as people being really being re into in learning and a pushing the t boundaries and practicing. I hadn’t really seen anything like that since

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

Stratocaster, he bugged his parents at the age of 12 to buy him his first guitar, received lessons from virtuoso Joe Satriani, and delved into the burgeoning thrash metal scene by 15, playing in Possessed, which was widely credited as the founder of death metal. Metal was the perfect genre for the young axman to hone his technical chops. As the music became heavier and faster, he felt that he would rather be a part of something fresh and innovative, like the Dead Kennedys and Frank Zappa. “It finally got to a point where heavier and faster became me sort of the kind of becam sound of a garbage garrbage truck he road,” going down the th cracked. cked. “A LaLonde crac f bunch of my friends were into the Grateful ng Crimson Dead and King Kin nd of stuff, and all this kind kin dden I’m so all of a sudden sud w hanging out with them and started getting into Frank


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

PAGE 16

tech talk

By Nick Delorenzo

Special to the Weekender Unless you’ve been living in a cave for the past 10 years, you know about YouTube, the website that allows just about anyone to upload videos of just about anything, for free. The amount of video handled by YouTube is staggering – more than 2 billion views per day, which is nearly double the prime-time audience of the top three major broadcast networks. In the space of two months, more video is posted to YouTube than has been produced by those networks in the past 60 years. On top of that, there’s more than 7,000 hours worth of full TV shows and movies. Despite this, Google-owned YouTube generates “only” about $2 billion a year, a fraction of the amount taken in by a typical network. Since expenses are far lower than say, NBC, it’s still raking in plenty of cash, but always looking for ways to make more

money. Last year, YouTube decided to experiment with the production of original content, and it seems to have been a success – it’s adding a full 60 “channels” of original content for major markets in Europe and the United States. While these channels aren’t yet household names like the major network providers, they feature premium high-definition content produced by major names in media. If you step back and look at the big picture, the networks should be breaking a sweat. One of the greatest aspects of YouTube is that it can be accessed essentially anywhere.

From your computer, of course, from your phone, and yes, even your TV, provided that it’s new enough. Even if it’s not, a settop box called Google TV is available. YouTube is also beginning to offer live video. The most recent presidential debate was available from YouTube, live, for free. And there’s a crucial landmark approaching. You see, there’s really no reason why anyone needs a cable line, a phone line, and an Internet connection. All of these things can be piped into your house using the same wire (or even over the air via a 4G connection).

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Last year, YouTube decided to experiment with the production of original content, and it seems to have been a success – it’s adding a full 60 “channels” of original content for major markets in Europe and the United States… If you step back and look at the big picture, the networks should be breaking a sweat.

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Once all of these technologies converge, Google will suddenly find itself in a far better position than almost every broadcast network. All of that being said, I suppose we’re lucky that one of Google’s core tenants is “Don’t be evil.”

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- Nick DeLorenzo is director of interactive and new media for The Times Leader. E-mail him atndelorenzo@timesleader.com.


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The Second Annual Scranton Celtic Festival won’t be held until May 18-19, 2013, but Kildare’s Irish Pub (119 Jefferson Ave., Scranton) is offering a hoppy taste of next year’s festivities on Wednesday, Oct. 10 with a free concert featuring The Blaggards. The five-piece “Stout Irish Rock” band hails from Houston, Texas, but singer/guitarist Patrick Devlin still retains the accent of his father’s homeland despite living in the states for many years. “As every 18-year-old knows, there’s not much in the world that you don’t know and you can’t do, so I left home and moved to Boston. I love the United States. All my life, I knew I was going to move back over here…An island is just too small for me, so I had to get away,” Devlin explained during a phone interview while “neck deep in Philly traffic” after playing downtown the night before. Boston was too cold, Florida was too hot, but Texas – and its Mexican food – was just right for Devlin, who formed the Irishtinged On the Dole in 1996 before founding the “faster and louder” Blaggards in 2004, playing something other than the typical Top 40 hits he heard in pubs across the state. “I was just working in bars and finding out that there was absolutely nobody doing the traditional Irish music with a little bit of a rock feel. Flogging Molly and Dropkick Murphys and that kind of stuff came along at a later time,” Devlin said. Starting an Irish band in Texas may seem unlikely, but for him it was as easy as telling a little green lie. “You basically have to tell a lot of lies. You just have to tell them that it’s a lot like everything that

Texas-based Irish outfit The Blaggards are helping to bridge the gap between Celtic Festivals in Scranton with an Oct. 10 show at Kildare’s. they’ve ever played, and once they figure out it’s not, it’s too late they’ve already learned too many songs,” he said of his bandmates. Though they are providers of drinking music, Devlin has been sober for over 25 years – this doesn’t mean he can’t invoke the spirit, however. “I’m a bad influence on people. I get everybody else to drink and get them to do shots, and then I just sip coffee and sit back and watch the fray. Actually right now, we’re really a bad representation of an Irish band because there’s nobody drinking. The guitar and mandolin player will have a sip of whiskey or two. We’re going to Ireland next month and they’re going to be offended,” he joked. This will be the band’s third trip to the Emerald Isle, which he believes will be a much more comfortable flight than their first. “It was nerve-wracking…I remember the first flight we took going to Dublin. I remember how nervous I was getting over there, saying ‘What am I doing?’ I’m bringing these old Irish songs back and these Pogues covers and all this back to Dublin. I said, ‘I’m going to get killed!’” he recalled. Thankfully, they survived the experience and were received warmly, which may be due to the fact that they offer something for everyone. “It’s rock ‘n’ roll for ADD people. We have tons of different melodies and song ideas and little funny bits in the songs. We’ll do a lot more really heavy stuff and then just out of nowhere become

very, very folky and light and then back to traditional and over to metal. It’s really hard to map out where the show or the song is going to go. It’s very spastic,” Devlin noted. With two albums out and more material due to be recorded early next year, The Blaggards blend originals and covers into each set, including a unique medley of Johnny Cash’s “Folsom Prison Blues” with the popular Irish anthem “The Fields Of Athenry.” “I thought it would be kind of cool that the Irish guy would do the American song and American guy would do the Irish song. They fit so well together…That’s actually one of our more popular numbers,” Devlin pointed out. He said he’s looking forward to the free, family-friendly show at Kildare’s, which will also feature two pipers from the Wyoming Valley Pipe and Drum Band, dancers from the Gallagher School of Irish Dance, and fiddler Patrick Salmon to keep the Celtic theme going. “We’ll be back in May for the Celtic Festival, so it’ll be nice to show them what we do and hopefully get them excited about coming back to see us,” Devlin added.

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The Blaggards featuring Irish dancers, pipers, and fiddlers: Oct. 10, doors 5:30 p.m., music 7 p.m., Kildare’s Irish Pub (119 Jefferson Ave., Scranton). Free.

PAGE 17

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While the crowd gathered to see The Glass Prism reunite at the Scranton Cultural Center on Oct. 7 had primarily grown up in the band’s heyday of the ’60s and ‘70s, younger generations could have learned a lot from Sunday’s performance. This was only the fourth time the band had reunited since their breakup in 1971, but it was clear that they had been practicing consistently since “Resurrection,” their latest album of new material released earlier this year. Playing for a solid two and a half hours, the retrospective show, a benefit for the Northeastern Educational Intermediate Unit’s “Arts Alive” program, was titled “Resurrection: A Rock Opera,” though it was light on the opera and heavy on the rock. After a brief introduction by radio personality Shadoe Steele, it began with the young Wade Varano on acoustic guitar joined by local actor Casey Thomas playing Edgar Allan Poe, whose stories served as inspiration for many of the Prism’s songs as well as the backdrop on stage. As the program described, these two characters appeared to introduce the loose story, but soon disappeared after the band moved from the title track into several of their other original songs, including “The Conqueror

Worm,” “El Dorado,” and “Cognac and Roses.” From Elton John’s “Take Me to the Pilot” to Cream’s “White Room,” the third “scene” delved into cover territory and came out feeling fresh with new arrangements filtered through their groundbreaking progressive rock sound. The fourth scene moved back into their own territory with four songs, including “A Valentine” and “Annabel Lee,” before letting their female back-up singers, Lisa Marie GurleyAdalian and Nancy Graziano, take center stage with The Grass Root’s “Temptation Eyes” and Ike and Tina Turner’s “River Deep, Mountain High,” both showcasing beautifully trained vocals. From there, Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower” gave way to more new material from the five band members, while scene seven became a medley of classic rock, from “You Really Got Me” by The Kinks to “Smoke on the Water” by Deep Purple. A classic drum solo led into “Born to Be Wild” by Steppenwolf, followed by “Fire” by Jimi Hendrix and “Gimme Some Lovin’” by The Spencer Davis Group. Ending on a high note, the crowd was treated to the band’s hit single “The Raven” before finishing with the Stones’ “Gimme Shelter” as the finale. While I had previously assumed the operatic story of Poe described in the program would be the journey, the expedition was instead strictly a musical

one, which is not a criticism by any means. I could not return to a better time in music history like many in the audience could, but I could easily imagine what it was like based on the energetic performances, particularly from guitarist Tom Varano. In over two hours, the band stopped only once to fix a technical problem – “New technology gets you every time!” joked guitarist/keyboardist Lou Cossa – otherwise creating a seamless assortment of psychedelic rock during which most of the band switched instruments and vocal duties, giving each member a chance to shine. Being backed by females for the first time, the Prism’s sound was even richer, and their constant dancing and handclapping added to that classic ’60s feel. What impressed me most were the perfect vocal harmonies that soared over the experienced musicianship on display, a feature largely lost on today’s rock bands. On paper, the song choices may seem random, but arranged as they were, the flow was steady and consistent. In a millennium when rock music has become simpler and poppier, it was refreshing to hear something catchy yet complex. The Glass Prism has expressed interest in continuing to play shows like this one for charity. Let’s hope that next time they’ll be playing to an audience who has yet to experience this influential age in rock ‘n’ roll history.

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concerts

ALICE C. WILTSIE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

700 N. Wyoming St., Hazleton 570.861.0510 www.wiltsiecenter.org - “My Mother’s Italian, My Father’s Jewish, & I’m in Therapy”: Oct. 13, $15-$26 - The Righteous Brothers’ Bill Medley: Nov. 4, $27-$52 - Bret Michaels: Nov. 17, $45-$72 - An Evening with Michael Feinstein, “A Gershwin Holiday”: Nov. 24, $37-$72

COVE HAVEN ENTERTAINMENT RESORTS 1.877.800.5380 www.CPResorts.com - Chef Brian Duffy: Oct. 19-20 - Justin Willman: Nov. 18

F.M. KIRBY CENTER 71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre Phone: 570.826.1100 - Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic presents “Disney in Concert:” Oct. 13, 7 p.m. $29-60. - Primus 3-D: Oct. 16, 8 p.m., $42.10$52.85 - Jackson Browne / Sara Watkins: Oct. 18, 8 p.m., $39-$66 - Australian Pink Floyd Show, Oct. 23, 7:30 p.m., $27-$43 - Straight No Chaser: Oct. 27, 8 p.m., $36.45-$46.70 - Bruce Hornsby: Nov. 2, 8 p.m., $29.50-$75 - Liza Minnelli: Nov. 3, 8 p.m., $69-$150

MAUCH CHUNK OPERA HOUSE 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe 570.325.0249 mauchchunkoperahouse.com - Donna The Buffalo: Oct. 12, $25 - Ryan Shupe and the Rubberband: Oct. 13, 8 p.m., $24 - Jonathan Edwards / Michael Martin Murphey: Oct 19, 8 p.m., $34 - Simon and Garfunkel Retrospective: Oct. 20, 8 p.m., $24 - Swearingen & Kelli: Oct. 21, 6 p.m., $12 - The Badlees: Oct. 26, 8:30 p.m., $17 - Badge (Eric Clapton tribute): Oct. 27, 8 p.m., $23 - Montana Skies / Victor and Penny: Nov. 2, 8 p.m., $18 - Boolesque: Nov. 3, 8 p.m., $20-$35

MOHEGAN SUN ARENA 255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Twp. - Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey:

Barnum Bash: Nov. 1-4, TIMES VARY, $33.85-$93.75 - Trans-Siberian Orchestra: Nov. 25, 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., $38-$58

MOUNT AIRY CASINO RESORT 44 Woodland Rd., Mount Pocono Phone: 877.682.4791 www.mountairycasino.com - Total Soul: Oct. 12, 8 p.m.; Oct. 22, 2 p.m.; Nov. 16 and 30, 8 p.m., $20 - Stylistics: Oct. 20, 8 p.m., $30-$40 - Aaron Lewis: Nov. 3, 8 p.m., $40-$55

NEW VISIONS STUDIO & GALLERY 201 Vine St., Scranton 570.878.3970 - Terror On The Screen / To Hell With This / CPA / Days In Transit: Oct. 13, 8 p.m., $7. - Silhouette Lies / Midnight Mob / Sucker / screening of “Night of the Living Dead:” Oct. 27, 8 p.m., $7

PENN’S PEAK 325 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe 866.605.7325 or visit pennspeak.com. - Paul Revere and the Raiders: Oct. 26, 8 p.m., $27-$42 - Ambrosia / Firefall: Oct. 27, 8 p.m., $24 - Martina McBride: Oct. 28, 8 p.m., $62-$85 - Uriah Heep: Nov. 1, 8 p.m., $22 - Umphrey’s McGee / The Bright Light Social Hour: Nov. 2, 8 p.m., $27.50

RIVER STREET JAZZ CAFE 667 N. River St., Plains Phone: 570.822.2992 - George Wesley Small Ax Orchestra: Oct. 11, 8 p.m., $5 - Ol’ Cabbage / Mystery Fyre: Oct. 12, 8 p.m., $5. - Charles Havira: Oct. 13, 8 p.m., $5 - Slowdance / We Can’t Enjoy Ourselves / Brian TV: Oct. 17, 8 p.m., $6 - Flux Capacitor: Oct. 18, 9 p.m., $5 - John K Band: Oct. 20, 8 p.m., $12 - Donna Jean Godchaux Band w/ Jeff Mattson: Oct. 25, 7 p.m., $10 - Bernie Worrell Orchestra: Oct. 26, 9 p.m., $8 - George Wesley Band: Oct. 27, 8 p.m., $5 - Mullen, “A Salute to U2”: Nov. 2, 8 p.m., $5 - Alexis P. Suter Band: Nov. 3, 9 p.m., $10 advance, $15 day of show

SCRANTON COMMUNITY CONCERTS

Mellow Theater, 501 Vine St. Scranton Phone: 570.955.1455, lackawanna.edu, etix.com Prices vary, student and group rates available - Vince Giordano & The Nighthawks: Oct. 19, 8 p.m., $20-$30, $15 students - The Virgin Consort: Dec. 6, 7 p.m., $20, $15 students

SCRANTON CULTURAL CENTER 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton Phone: 888.669.8966 - Disney in Concert with NEPA Philharmonic: Oct. 14, 2 p.m., $34-$65 - Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic presents “Disney in Concert:” Oct. 14, 2 p.m. $29-60. - Lewis Black: Running on Empty: Oct. 25, 8 p.m., $42.85-$68.40 - Maino: Nov. 1, 8 p.m., $40 - Listen Local featuring Rogue Chimp: Nov. 2, 8 p.m., $10

SHERMAN THEATER 524 Main St., Stroudsburg Phone: 570.420.2808, www.shermantheater.com - Medeski, Martin & Wood: Oct. 11, 8 p.m., $25-$32 - Barstool Blackout F*ckin Foam: Oct. 12, 10 p.m., $30 - Trey Anastasio Band: Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m., $39.50 - The Maine / Mayday Parade: Oct. 23, 7 p.m., $17-$20 - Eoto: Oct. 25, 9 p.m., $15 - Blackmore’s Night: Oct. 26, 8 p.m., $36-$39.50 - Theory of a Dead Man: Nov. 4, 7:30 p.m., $20-$22

VINTAGE THEATER 326 Spruce St., Scranton info@scrantonsvintagetheater.com - Aayu / The Van Allen Belt: Oct. 12 - Masquerade Dance Party ft. The Great Party / Shayfer James: Oct. 26, all-ages - Eye On Attraction: Nov. 3

PHILADELPHIA ELECTRIC FACTORY 3421 Willow St., Philadelphia Phone: 215.LOVE.222 - Public Image Ltd.: Oct. 11, 8:30 p.m. - GWAR / Devildriver / Cancer Bats / Legacy of Disorder: Oct. 12, 7:45 p.m. - Richie Sambora: Oct. 18, 8:30 p.m. - Robbie Rivera / Hot Mouth / Pauly Van Doorn / Kryoman: Oct. 19, 8 p.m. - Alanis Morissette / Souleye: Oct. 20, 8:30 p.m. - Cat Power: Oct. 25, 8:30 p.m. - Citizen Cope: Oct. 26-27, 8:30 p.m.

THE FILLMORE AT THE TLA 334 South St., Philadelphia Phone: 215.922.1011 - Waka Flocka Flame / Wooh Da Kid /

PHOTO BY JASON RIEDMILLER

Genius at work GZA, shown in a Jan. 2011 performance at the Sherman Theater, is set to perform on Oct. 20 at the Trocadero with Sweet Valley, Killer Mike, and Bear Hands.

Reema Major: Oct. 10, 7 p.m. - The Mountain Goats: Oct. 11, 7 p.m. - Alesana / In Fear and Faith, more: Oct. 12, 6 p.m. - Borgore / The White Panda: Oct. 13, 8 p.m. - The Wombats / Get People: Oct. 16, 7 p.m. - Ben Sollee / Modern Inventors / Luke Reynolds: Oct. 17, 7 p.m. - Electric Guest / No / Work Drugs: Oct. 18, 7 p.m. - Miss May I / The Ghost Inside / Like Moths to Flames, more: Oct. 19, 5:30 p.m. - Zander Bleck: Oct. 20, 7 p.m. - Kimbra: Oct. 21, 7 p.m. - Com Truise / Bonde Do Role / Poolside: Oct. 22, 7 p.m. - Three Days Grace: Oct. 23, 7 p.m. - Machine Gun Kelly / Curren$y: Oct. 24, 7 p.m. - Yonder Mountain String Band / Brown Bird: Oct. 26, 7:30 p.m. - Squarepusher / Justin Paul / Mount Kimbie: Oct. 27, 8 p.m.

KESWICK THEATER Easton Road-Keswick Ave, Glenside, Pa. Phone: 215.572.7650 - Los Lonely Boys: Oct. 12: 8 p.m. - John Caparulo: Oct. 13, 8 p.m. - The Psychedelic Furs / The Lemonheads / The Chevin: Oct. 19, 8 p.m.

- Asia: Oct. 20, 8 p.m. - David Sedaris: Oct. 22, 8 p.m. - Bela Fleck / Tony Trischka: Oct. 25, 8 p.m. - Renaissance: Oct. 26, 8 p.m.

TOWER THEATER 69th and Ludlow Sts. Upper Darby Phone: 610.352.2887 - Heart / Alejandro Escovedo: Oct. 12, 8 p.m. - Celtic Thunder: Oct. 13, 8 p.m. - Silversun Pickups / Cloud Nothings / Atlas Genius: Oct. 16, 8 p.m. - Primus 3D: Oct. 17, 8 p.m. - Australian Pink Floyd Show: Oct. 19, 8 p.m. - SWV / Jagged Edge / Ginuwine / 112: Oct. 25, 8 p.m. - Martina McBride: Oct. 26, 8 p.m.

TROCADERO 10th & Arch St, Philadelphia Phone: 215.336.2000 - The Shock Trials / Kenny Curcio Band / The Color Mount, more: Oct. 12, 7:30 p.m. - The Legwarmers: Oct. 13, 9 p.m. - Lagwagon / DEAD TO ME / The Flatliners / Useless I.D.: Oct. 18, 7:30 p.m. - Misfits / The Attack: Oct. 19, 8 p.m. - GZA / Sweet Valley / Killer Mike / Bear Hands: Oct. 20, 8:30 p.m.


50 State Rt. 120, East Rutherford, N.J. Phone: 201.935.3900 - Justin Bieber: Nov. 9, 7 p.m. - Zac Brown Band: Nov. 18, 7 p.m.

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN

SUSQUEHANNA BANK CENTER

7th Ave., New York, NY Phone: 212.465.MSG1 - Madonna: Nov. 12-13, 8 p.m. - Zac Brown Band: Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m.

1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, NJ. Phone: 609.365.1300 - Rob Zombie / Marilyn Manson: Oct. 19, 8 p.m. - Smashing Pumpkins / Morning Parade: Nov. 2, 8 p.m.

RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

IZOD CENTER

- 10 Years / The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus / The Last Place You Look / Alright Junior: Oct. 21, 7 p.m. - Epica / Alestorm / Insomnium, more: Oct. 25, 7:30 p.m. - Dub FX / Snareophobe / Starfighterz: Oct. 26, 9 p.m.

1260 Ave. of the Americas, NY, NY Phone: 212.307.717 - Morrissey / Kristeen Young: Oct. 10, 8 p.m. - Jonas Brothers: Oct. 11, 8 p.m.

WELLS FARGO CENTER

Broad St., Philadelphia Phone: 215.336.3600 - Rush: Oct. 12, 7:30 p.m. - Trey Songz / Rick Ross / Brandy, more: Oct. 26, 6 p.m.

ROSELAND BALLROOM Nothing to fear Terror On The Screen will perform with To Hell With This, CPA, and Days In Transit on Oct. 13, at 8 p.m., at New Visions Studio and Gallery (201 Vine St., Scranton). Admission is $7.

ELSEWHERE IN PA

BRYCE JORDAN CENTER

Penn State University, State College, Pa. Phone: 814.865.5555 - Zac Brown Band: Oct. 10, 7 p.m. - Wiz Khalifa / Juicy J / Chevy Woods, more: Oct. 12, 7:30 p.m.

CROCODILE ROCK

520 Hamilton St, Allentown Phone: 610.434.460 - Cartel: Oct. 12, 6 p.m. - My Darkest Days / Surrender the Fall: Oct. 13, 7 p.m. - Stevie Stone: Oct. 17, 6 p.m.

GIANT CENTER

950 Hersheypark Dr., Hershey Phone: 717.534.3911 - Gaither Christmas Homecoming: Dec. 7, 7 p.m. - tobyMac: Dec. 9, 7 p.m.

p.m. - Jamey Johnson: Oct. 12, 8 p.m. - Heart: Oct. 13, 7 p.m. - Rick Springfield: Oct. 19, 8 p.m. - Boyz II Men: Oct. 20, 8 p.m. - John Legend: Oct. 23, 8 p.m.

STABLER ARENA

Bethel NY www.bethelwoodscenter.org - Rusted Root / Lauren Mann: Nov. 9, 8 p.m. - Judy Collins: Dec. 15, 7:30 p.m.

WHITAKER CENTER

BROOME COUNTY ARENA

222 Market St., Harrisburg Phone: 717.214.ARTS - Indigo Girls: Oct. 23, 7:30 p.m. - Ingrid Michaelson: Oct. 25, 7:30 p.m.

NEW YORK / NEW JERSEY 2124 Broadway, New York, NY. Phone: 212.496.7070

77 Sands Blvd., Bethlehem - Engelbert Humperdinck: Oct. 10, 7

BETHEL WOODS CENTER

Lehigh University, Bethlehem Phone: 610.758.6611 - Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Bash: Oct. 25-28, TIMES VARY

BEACON THEATER

SANDS BETHLEHEM

- Night of Too Many Stars with Jon Stewart: Oct. 13, 7:30 p.m. - Crosby, Stills and Nash: Oct. 16-20, 8 p.m. - Regina Spektor: Oct. 24, 8 p.m.

1 Stuart Street, Binghamton, NY Phone: 670.778.6626 - Celtic Thunder: Oct. 11, 7:30 p.m. - Alan Jackson: Oct. 18, 7:30 p.m.

HAMMERSTEIN BALLROOM 311 W. 34th St, New York, NY. Phone: 212.279.7740 - Public Image Limited: Oct. 13, 8 p.m.

- Rob Zombie / Marilyn Manson: Oct. 17, 7 p.m. - Primus 3D: Oct. 19, 7 p.m. - Justice: Oct. 21, 8 p.m. - Cat Power: Oct. 23, 8 p.m. - Melissa Etheridge: Oct. 24, 7 p.m.

THE FILLMORE AT IRVING PLAZA 17 Irving Place, New York, N.Y. Phone: 212.777.6800 - Inked Magazine Music Tour ft. Alesana: Oct. 10, 6:30 p.m. - Revelation Records 25th Anniversary ft. Texas is the Reason / Underdog / Shades Apart, more: Oct. 11-14, 6 p.m. - Das Racist / Lakutis: Oct. 15, 7 p.m. - Off! / The Spits / Double Negative: Oct. 16, 7 p.m. - Miss May I / The Ghost Inside / Like Moths to Flames, more: Oct. 17: 6 p.m. - GZA / Sweet Valley / Killer Mike / Bear Hands: Oct. 18, 7 p.m. - Q-Tip: Oct. 19, 11 p.m. - Electric Guest / No / Jinja Safari: Oct. 20, 7 p.m.

239 52nd Street, New York, NY. Phone: 212.777.6800 - The Temper Trap / The Neighbourhood: Oct. 12, 8 p.m. - Santigold: Oct. 13, 8 p.m. - New Order: Oct. 18-19, 8 p.m. - Dirty South: Oct. 20, 9 p.m.

THE THEATRE AT MSG 7th Ave., New York, NY Phone: 212.465.MSG1 - Serrat and Sabina: Nov. 18, 7 p.m. - The Legend of Zelda: Symphony Of The Goddesses, Nov. 28, 8 p.m.

BORGATA HOTEL AND CASINO Atlantic City, NJ Phone:1.866.MYBORGATA.com - Frank Sinatra Jr.: Oct. 12-13, 8 p.m. - Jerry Seinfeld: Oct. 20, 8 p.m. - Rick Springfield: Oct. 20, 9 p.m.

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- compiled by Christopher J. Hughes, Weekender Editor. Send your listings to weekender@theweekender.com, 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 18703, or fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline is Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded listings at theweekender.com.

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WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

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We d n e s d a y : Arturo’s: Free Jukebox Bar on Oak: Line Dance Brews Brothers, Luzerne: The Coors Light Karaoke Challenge Metro: Karaoke w/ Joe Miraglia River Street Jazz Caféé: Open Mic Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge Stan’s Caféé: Open Mic Night w/ Kyle Lucarino To m m y b o y ’ s : B e e r P o n g Wo o d l a n d s : H a v a n a D e c k P a r t y & Z o m b i e N a t i o n i n E v o l u t i o n w / D J Mike playing EDM & top 40 V- S p o t : E r i c R u d y A c o u s t i c Thursday: Arturo’s: Mark Maros B a r o n O a k : T h e To n e s B a r t & U r b y ’ s : Tw i s t e d Te a m Tr i v i a Carey’s Pub: Dashboard Mary Chacko’s: Kartune H u n s C a f é é We s t : W h a t ’ s G o i n g O n D u o M e t r o : F r e e J u k e b o x & P o o l Ta b l e R i v e r G r i l l e : D J To n e z R i v e r S t r e e t J a z z C a f é é : G e o r g e We s l e y ‘ S m a l l A x O r c h e s t r a ’ Rob’s Pub & Grub: Beer Pong Rox 52: Beer Pong To m m y b o y s B a r & G r i l l : N F L t i c k e t , S t e e l e r s v s Ti t a n s Wo o d l a n d s : C l u b H D i n s i d e E v o l u t i o n w / D J ’ s R e d B u l l R o n & D J D a t a & DJ Kev Streamside V- S p o t : J a c k s o n Ve e A c o u s t i c Friday: Arturo’s: DJ Ransom Bar on Oak: Hip Hop DJ Bart & Urby’s: County Lines B r e a k e r s , M o h e g a n S u n : L u c k y Yo u Brews Brothers, Luzerne: 9 Platform 9 Chacko’s: Krystal Blu Grotto, Harveys Lake: Nick Coyle G r o t t o , Wy o m i n g Va l l e y M a l l : U n s h a c k l e d M u s i c Metro: Dex 6-9 on heated patio, Strawberry Jam 9-1 inside OverPour: 20lb Head R i v e r G r i l l e : D J O o h We e River Street Jazz Caféé: Ol’Cabbage & Mystery Fyre Rob’s Pub & Grub: Lee Strumski Rox 52: Free Jukebox Senunas’: Dodge City duo Stan’s Caféé: Drive To m m y b o y ’ s B a r & G r i l l : S t e r e o P a r a d e We l l i n g t o n ’ s P u b : M r. E c h o Wo o d l a n d s : E v o l u t i o n N e o n G l o w P a r t y w / H o s t 9 7 B H T & U U U i n t h e Exec Lounge w/ DJ Godfather during intermission V- S p o t : T h e Wa n a b e e s Saturday:

Arturo’s: Maros w/ The Lieback Brothers B a r o n O a k : R u s t i c I m a g e B a n d w / s p e c i a l g u e s t D i c k & To m - E v e r l y B r o t h e r s Tr i b u t e B a r t & U r b y ’ s : C o m m o n P e o p l e D J ’ s 5 t h Ye a r A n n i v e r s a r y P a r t y Breakers, Mohegan Sun: Nowhere Slow B r e w s B r o t h e r s , L u z e r n e : Tw o o f a K i n d Brews Brothers, Pittston: DJ Mike Riley Chacko’s: OZ G r a v i t y I n n : M r. E c h o Hollywood Diner and Sports Bar: Dustin Diamond, aka Screech from Saved By the Bell, and special guest M e t r o : H a t Tr y k Over Pour: MMA post fight party R i v e r G r i l l e : D J To n e z River Street Jazz Caféé: The Ends of The Earth w/ Charles Havira Rob’s Pub & Grub: Breakdown Jimmy Rox 52: Free Jukebox Ruth’s Chris: live music in the lounge Stan’s Caféé: DJ Mic karaoke contest To m m y b o y ’ s : J a x Wo o d l a n d s : E v o l u t i o n N i g h t c l u b - R e s i d e n t D J p l a y i n g To p 4 0 & C l u b Music w/ Host “Fishboy” of 98.5 KRZ w/ DJ Freezie & Generation Next w/ DJ Godfather during intermission in the Exec Lounge. V- S p o t : D e s t i n a t i o n We s t Sunday: B a n k o ’ s : M r. E c h o 6 - 9 Breakers, Mohegan Sun: UUU B r e w s B r o t h e r s L u z e r n e & P i t t s t o n : N F L Ti c k e t C a r e y ’ s P u b : N F L Ti c k e t K i n g ’ s , M o u n t a i n To p : N F L Ti c k e t Metro: Jazz Brunch w/ Angelo Miraglia 11 a.m. – 2 p.m., Adam McKinley 8-11 O v e r P o u r : N F L Ti c k e t R i v e r G r i l l e : N F L Ti c k e t S t a n ’ s C a f é é : N F L Ti c k e t To m m y b o y ’ s : N F L Ti c k e t Wo o d l a n d s : C r e s c e n z o ’ s N F L G a m e D a y, 3 0 s o m e t h i n g a g a i n i n Evolution w/ DJ Godfather & 40 Something w/ DJ Godfather Ve s u v i o s : N F L T i c k e t V- S p o t : G o n g S h o w K a r a o k e & N F L T i c k e t Monday: Arturo’s: Grand Opening, Mark Maros Rob’s Pub & Grub: Beer Pong To m m y b o y ’ s : F r e e J u k e b o x Wo o d l a n d s : C r e s c e n z o ’ s N F L M o n d a y Tu e s d a y : Bart & Urby’s: The East End Vipers Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Open Mic Night w/ Paul Martin Hops & Barleys: Aaron Bruch Jim McCarthy’s: Karaoke To m m y b o y s B a r & G r i l l : O p e n M i c N i g h t


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WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

PAGE 24

ALBUM REVIEWS Band of Horses still sweet, steady

From Seattle and indie giant Sub Pop to North Carolina and major label Columbia, Band of Horses has traversed indiedom, graduating to a more deliberate, brandable category of rock. Under the production of the legendary Glyn Johns (The Who, Ryan Adams, Eric Clapton) the quintet delivers a catchy, alt-country LP. “Mirage Rock”’s sound matches the filtered, warmly lit, mossy rock featured on the Dave Bett designed cover, which, like all BOH album art, could easily be a still from a Wes Anderson film. The album mellows into the molds set by folk rock icons Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.

“Mirage Rock” features less memorable songs than the standouts on previous BOH albums (“The Funeral,” “Is There a Ghost,” “Laredo,” etc.). Gritty, indie-rocking tracks include the hand-clapping, woo-hooing, single, “Knock Knock,” beatdriven “How to Live,” effervescent “A Little Biblical,” tidy dirt rock anthem “Electric Music, “ and “Feud,” which charges through Cease to Begin terrain with clanging cymbals, bright chord progressions, and Bridwell’s blithe tenor. The ballads feature the downhome lyrics and molasses sweetand-steady instrumentation BOH

HEART ’Fanatic’ Rating: W W W W

Heart continues reinventive rock Heart’s Wilson sisters know that hits are fleeting, and success is ultimately measured by continued musical integrity. Over the past decade, they’ve followed their own rules, careening from hard rock outings like 2004’s “Jupiter’s Darling” to the smoothed-out, midtempo mellow hush on 2010’s “Red Velvet Car.” Being bona fide rock stars seems irrelevant for the Wilsons these days as

fans have come to love. “Slow Cruel Hands of Time” and “ShutIn Tourist” offer an earnest, pretty twang while the playfully dark lyrics and steady tempo of “Long Vows” hearken to My Morning Jacket. The most indulgent lyrics are in “Heartbreak on the 101,” in which Bridwell whines, “I know it’s over and it sounds a bit cliché/ But I want you back so bad.” What the song lacks lyrically it makes up for with a lovely orchestral string arrangement. In “Everything’s Gonna Be Undone,” Bridwell passes the reins to guitarist Tyler Ramsey, who penned the song. Ramsey takes the melody while Bridwell harmonizes on this honest, stomp-rocking jam. One inarguably great surprise: “Mirage Rock”’s deluxe edition includes the Sonic Ranch Studio Sessions, an EP featuring the title track.

W

- Kait Burrier, Weekender Correspondent

they continue to push the boundaries of their decades-long partnership on “Fanatic.” Ann and Nancy take a bold creative dive headlong into studio exploration – hints of electronica, hard rock, and folk all intertwine through a barrage of drum loops, speaker-rattling overdriven guitars, and two angelic voices. Ann’s pipes still bellow with pure audacity - look no further than the war-ravaged soldier’s declaration “Dear Old America,” with Ann decrying “We don’t beg and we don’t run,” the emotional weight of hope versus doubt on her tongue. Long gone are the ‘80s power ballads, making way for the organic, acoustic-based grooves that define tracks like “Skin and Bones.” “Million Miles,” in its synth-programmed atmosphere, echoes U2 in the lush use of delay and percussive effect. Songwriting is at a premium, with all tracks written by the Wilsons with producer Ben Mink – the sisters offering “this is our story as it is now.” A spirit of musical restlessness drives this album, along with the Wilson’s refusal to succumb to classic rock caricature. They successfully reinvent themselves for a new era of rock ‘n roll expression.

W

- Mark Uricheck, Weekender Correspondent

charts

WWWW

Kiss ‘Monster’ Rating: W W W

Kiss' 'Monster' is scary good Nearly 40 years after first slapping on the makeup, donning the costumes, and changing forever the way a live concert is performed, Kiss can still bring it. “Monster” is the caped crusaders’ 20th studio album, and one that fans of old school ‘70s classic rock will be just as comfortable with as those who cut their teeth on later material.

Top 8 at 8 with Ralphie Aversa 8. Maroon 5: ‘One More Night’ 7. Flo Rida: ‘Whistle’ 6. Owl City/Carly Rae Jepsen: ‘Good Time’ 5. Alex-Clare: ‘Too Close’

RATING:

4. fun.: ‘Some Nights’ 3. Neon Trees: ‘Everybody Talks’ 2. P!nk: ‘Blow Me (One Last Kiss)’ 1. Ellie Goulding: ‘Lights’

Band of Horses ‘Mirage Rock’ It opens with a bang in “Hell or Hallelujah,” a fast-paced rocker that could be the band’s best concert opener since “I Stole Your Love,” way back in 1977 (though they put it in the middle of the set this summer). Imagine a mash-up of “Helter Skelter” and Kiss’ 1992 track “Spit,” and you’ve got “Wall of Sound,” a dramatic, groundpounder. “Freak” uses a grungier distorted sound to showcase the band’s longstanding philosophy of not caring what anyone else thinks of them. And “Back To The Stone Age” features Eric Singer’s pounding drums with a beat reminiscent of the Stones’ “Live With Me.” This is guitarist Tommy Thayer’s second studio album with Kiss since replacing Ace Frehley in 2003 (and completely stealing his musical identity to the point where the FBI should have been notified). His first outing, 2009’s “Sonic Boom” LP, was marred by rampant theft from Frehley’s classic solos. This time, Thayer restrains his most larcenous impulses. These solos won’t make anyone forget EddieVanHalenor Randy Rhoads, but at least most of them are his. Things bog down somewhat on tracks in the middle of the disc, but finish strong on “Last Chance,” propelled by an AC/ DC-like “Thunderstruck” chant. This album isn’t “Destroyer” or even “Love Gun,” but it’s still worth having.

W

- Wayne Parry, Associated Press

Top 10 Albums at Gallery of Sound 1. Three Days Grace: ‘Transit of Venus’ 2. Mumford & Sons: ‘Babel’ 3. Papa Roach: ‘The Connection’ 4. Green Day: ‘Uno!’ 5. Heart: ‘Fanatic’

6. Muse: ‘The 2nd Law’ 7. P!nk: ‘The Truth About Love’ 8. Van Morrison: ‘Born to Sing: No Plan B’ 9. No Doubt: ‘Push and Shove’ 10. Matchbox 20: ‘North’


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WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

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By Pete Croatto

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

movie review

Rating: W W

Weekender Correspondent

Bryan Mills (Neeson) puts his “special set of skills” to use once again in “Taken 2.”

Expect the expected from 'Taken 2' Liam Neeson’s strapping, stern confidence made “Taken,” a preposterous, almost patronizing action movie, intriguing. That is too much substance for “Taken 2,” which ups the snapping necks and shooting-people-at-uncomfortably-close-range quotas. And the masses, surprisingly, loved it. This past weekend “Taken 2” made $50 million, promising us at least two more breathtakingly stupid movies with a “father knows best” philosophy fit for a Greek tragedy and Neeson becoming the thinking man’s Steven Seagal. “Taken 2,” or as I prefer to call it, “Taken 2: Adultnapped!,” reintroduces us to security expert and dutiful family man Bryan Mills (Neeson). Longing for

quality time with daughter Kim (Maggie Grace) and not-so exwife Lenore (Famke Janssen), he invites them along to Istanbul, where he’s on assignment. A group of well-connected, heavily-armed toughs, still mourning the friends and family Bryan killed so creatively three years ago, interrupts the reconciliation/reunion/convenient plot device. When Bryan and Lenore tour the city, they’re abducted, but not before Bryan contacts Kim. The nice wrinkle to “Taken 2” is Kim’s development from victim to right-hand man. She assists Bryan in his inevitable escape and in tracking down a helpless Lenore. She speeds through Istanbul’s narrow streets

and throws grenades with Manning-like accuracy. The rest of the movie doesn’t extend the same creativity, replacing Bryan’s hardened determination with convenience as he saunters through a series of jumpy, indistinguishable fight scenes. That laziness means Bryan can direct Kim on his cell phone while he’s held at gunpoint. That means his captors have worse security skills than an elderly Wal-Mart greeter on Black Friday. That means the bad guys locate their hideout a short, zippy drive away from the family’s hotel. I’m not saying that Bryan shouldn’t vanquish his foes. But the movie’s creative team could have pretended something was at risk or provided Bryan with

obstacles to overcome. “Taken” drew you in because Bryan had 72 hours to apply his particular set of skills to rescue Kim before she was swallowed up by the sex slave industry. The clock is off in “Taken 2.” So is Bryan’s motivation. The quest to rescue Lenore carries no consequence because we’re not even sure if Bryan cares about her. Kim is still daddy’s little girl, the center of his world – a creepy device since Grace just turned 29. Bryan’s revived relationship with Lenore is primarily defined by sharing a glass of wine and the news that she’s newly separated, but he fumes that Kim has a boyfriend. He practically agonizes over her driving test.

What’s mystifying about “Taken 2,” aside from its unintentional incestuous overtones, is how the film earnestly equates violence and frantic search missions as ideal solutions for family togetherness. (The movie actually ends over ice cream sundaes.) I long for the next emotionally condescending installment where Bryan expresses love for his brother by rescuing him in Budapest or settles a friend’s golf debt by smashing an illegal caddy operation in Pebble Beach. It almost makes me wish my parents were kidnapped by a group of determined, vengeanceminded terrorists, forcing me to kill my way toward a tearful reunion. Our get-togethers have been a little draggy lately.

W

- For more of Pete’s cinematic musings, please visit whatpeteswatching.blogspot.com or follow him on Twitter, @PeteCroatto.

reel attractions OPENING THIS WEEK: ‘Argo’ ‘Here Comes the Boom’ ‘Seven Psychopaths’

There are seven to choose from, but Walken is our favorite psychopath.

Tyler Perry’s most challenging role yet wearing men’s clothing.

PAGE 27

COMING NEXT WEEK: ‘Alex Cross’ ‘The Sessions’ ‘That’s What She Said’


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

PAGE 28

agenda BAZAARS / FESTIVALS

• Fall Fiddle Festival, feat. Old Time Fiddlers Oct. 21, 2 p.m., Beach Lake Fire Hall (Rt. 652, Beach Lake). Fiddlers have 15-minute showcase to perform their favorite songs. Adults, $10; senior citizens, $7; age 12-adult, $5; 12 and under, free. Info: 570.224.6330, fiddlinaround@verizon.net • Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire Sat., Sun. through Oct. 28, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. $29.95 adults, $10.95 children ages 5-11, special ticket packages available. Free parking. Info: 717.665.7021, parenfaire.com • Sullivan County Fall Festival Oct. 13-14, fairgrounds near Forksville. Lumberjack/chainsaw carving competitions, quilt show and sale, block contest.

BENEFITS / CHARITY EVENTS

• Making Strides Against Breast Cancer of Wyoming Valley: Oct. 20, registration 8 p.m., program 9 p.m. Kirby Park, Wilkes-Barre.

American Red Cross • Simply Better Blood Drive: Oct. 11, noon-6 p.m., Throop Civic Center (500 Sanderson St., Throop) • Simply Better Blood Drive: Oct. 19, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., First National Community Bank Training Facility (Mundy Street, Wilkes-Barre) • Seeking crafters for Annual Holiday Craft Show (held Nov. 24-25, Kingston Armory). Proceeds benefit programs/services of local Red Cross. To be considered, complete application by contacting April Guse, 570.823.7161, ext. 348, april.guse@redcross.org. Items must be at least 75 percent handmade; no resale items. Rent booth for $85 plus $30 event license fee. booths, booths with electricity and corner booths. Backyard Ale House (523 Linden St., Scranton, 570.955.0192) • Fundraiser for Aubree Elyse: Oct.

11, 5-9 p.m. Baskets, 50/50, refreshments, entertainment by Lewis & Lake Duo. Benefits Aubree’s surgeries and daily care. $20 Info: 570.343.2258 or 570.470.7838. Blue Chip Farms Animal Refuge (974 Lockville Rd., Dallas, 570.333.5265, www.bcfanimalrefuge.org) • 4th Annual Benefit Dance: Oct. 20, 6 p.m.-11 p.m., Wilkes-Barre Township Fire Hall. Food, refreshments, Chinese auction, 50/50, raffles, music by The Sperazza Band. $25, BYOB. Candy’s Place (570.714.8800) • 2nd Annual It’s All About Me Pink Tea: Oct. 21, Woodlands Inn & Resort • 7th Annual Flower Sale: Oct. 23, $7 per bouquet Children’s Advocacy Center of NEPA (570.969.7313) • Masquerade Ball: Oct. 27, cocktails 6 p.m., buffet 7 p.m., dancing and entertainment 9 p.m. Costume contest, music, tarot card readings, raffles, more. Camelot Restaurant &

puzzles

American Cancer Society

Inn (17 Johnson Rd., Clarks Summit), $70 or $35 for students. Meadows Nursing & Rehabilitation Center (4 E. Center Hill Rd., Dallas, 570.675.8600) Fall Craft Fair: Oct. 17, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Raffles baskets, bake sale, lunch, flu shot clinic. Free admission, proceeds benefit residents of center. Asking for donations of small or gently used Christmas items, books, canned food. Safe Haven Dog Rescue (www.SafeHavenPa.org, SafeHaven@epix.net) • Camp Papillon Adoption Meet: Oct. 13, Northhampton Farm Bureau (300 Bushkill St., Tatamy). • Adoption Day: Oct. 21, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tractor Supply (Rt. 209, Brodheadsville). Pre-adoption application with references, home visit required prior to adoption. • Volunteer Meeting: Oct. 23, 6:30 p.m., Cherry’s Restaurant (Route 209, Kresgeville). Volunteers needed to help with Adoption Days, fundraising,

last week

transporting dogs, fostering. • Annual Pit Bull Awareness Day: Oct. 27, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Petco (3895 Dryland Way, Easton) Tracey’s Hope Hospice Care Program and Domestic Animal Rescue (570.466.7930, traceyshopenmcdonald@gmail.com, petservicesbydenise.com) • Bark-toberfest: Oct. 20, Thomas BBQ, Moosic. • Raising the Woof: Oct. 21, 12-6 p.m., Genetti Manor (1505N. Main Ave., Dickson City). $5, call 570.383.0206 for tickets.

CAR & BIKE EVENTS Gunners PA Law Enforcement MC (gunnerspalemc@gmail.com, $20/rider, $10/ passenger unless noted otherwise) • Phantom Rider Program: If unable to make it to ride, donate $10 passenger fee and new stuffed animal, which will go to children in need,

SEE AGENDA, PAGE 34

ACROSS 1 Navigator’s stack 5 Deck in the ring 9 Upper surface 12 Oil cartel 13 Leading man? 14 “Hail, Caesar!” 15 Pianist’s ticker 17 Barbie’s companion 18 Agreement 19 No stay-at-homes 21 Lindbergh book 22 Plot mathematically 24 Back talk 27 Greet the villain 28 Grant’s 31 Thickness 32 Once around the track 33 Long March leader 34 Yin counterpart 36 Salt Lake athlete 37 Titanic’s destroyer 38 Knighted women 40 “Monopoly” square 41 Increase in troop levels 43 Antenna 47 Yoko of music 48 Houston sports venue 51 Poorly lit 52 Squad 53 Rams’ fans? 54 Chowed down 55 Stitches 56 Carry on

DOWN 1 NYC cultural center 2 “Planet of the -” 3 Household critters 4 Threaded nails 5 Philosopher Immanuel 6 Big bother 7 Sweet potato 8 Last letter 9 After-taxes 10 Finished 11 Nerd-pack contents 16 Indivisible 20 Choose (for) 22 “The Men Who Stare at ” 23 Lasso 24 Agent 25 In the manner of 26 Stockholm 27 Sad 29 Scratch 30 Cranberry territory 35 Joke 37 Edge 39 Butcher’s wares 40 Earth (Pref.) 41 Pop 42 Troop group 43 Weaponry 44 Midwest state 45 “So be it” 46 For fear that 49 Witness 50 Playing marble


Wednesday $1.50 Dom Drafts $5 personal strombolis Thursday

Steelers vs Titans $1.50 Yuengling Drafts .50¢ Wings

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

Welcome College Students Bartenders Wanted

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ENTERTAINMENT REPORT

Ralphie Aversa | Special to the Weekender

starstruck

Is Wayne Brady gonna have to choke a ... presidential candidate? Wayne Brady didn’t get a chance to watch the first presidential debate between President Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney. When I told him about Romney’s plan to cut subsidies for programs like PBS, I wasn’t sure if Wayne Brady was gonna have to choke a… you get the idea. “As a child of PBS, I really say that a lot of what I learned in life as a kid, I learned from watching PBS,” explained Brady, who called in to “The Ralphie Radio Show” to promote his improv-comedy tour. “You would just think that someone ‘If you take who wants to run this music out of country schools, and would want to then you’re America have the going to try best and and snatch brightest.” While away PBS - Brady was clearly not he wants a pleased with nation full of the governor’s stance drones.’ on the issue, Wayne Brady the comediOn Gov. Mitt an alluded Romney’s plan to to an even cut subsidies for greater PBS problem he has with the Romney campaign. “If you take music out of schools, and then you’re going to try and snatch away PBS he wants a nation full of drones,” Brady concluded. “I guess coming from Romney, that might be apropos.” It didn’t surprise me that a

conversation with Wayne Brady would be wide-ranging given the variety of work he has accomplished in his career. While maybe best known for “Whose Line Is It Anyways?” and that infamous sketch on “Chappelle Show,” Brady is also an actor, singer, and current TV host of the game show, “Let’s Make A Deal.” “Even after all these years I’ll get stopped on the streets, ‘Hey man I love ‘Whose Line’ and c’mon, you really didn’t make all that stuff up? Tell me man, I’m your buddy,’” Brady explained. “First off, I just met you 6.8 seconds ago, so I probably won’t confide in you. And secondly, yes, it’s all improvised.” And yes, people still want Brady to say, “the line” – the rhetorical question he asks while playing himself as a pimp in a skit on “Chappelle Show” when he wonders aloud if he will have to choke a prostitute. “It was a funny sketch; it’s in the Museum of TV History as one of the best sketches of all time so you can’t ask for anything more than that,” he said, while also stating that he will not repeat the line to a stranger who approaches him. “Now I’m doing something else. And leave me alone, while I’m in the bathroom. I’m not going to say that while you’re standing next to me, and I’m peeing.”

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- Listen to “The Ralphie Radio Show” weeknights from 7 p.m.-midnight on 97 BHT.

Chuck May of Ashley, right, with original Alice Cooper drummer Neal Smith in Cherry Hill, N.J. in March 2008. Had an encounter with someone famous? If so, the Weekender wants your pictures for our Starstruck. It doesn’t matter if it happened five months ago or five years ago. Send us your photo, your name, hometown, the celebrity you met, and when and where you met them, and we’ll run one photo here each week. E-mail high resolution JPEGs to weekender@theweekender.com, or send your photos to Starstruck, c/o The Weekender, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, 18703.

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Actors Circle at Providence Playhouse (1256 Providence Rd, Scranton, reservations: 570.342.9707, actorscircle.org) • “Any Wednesday”: Nov. 8-11, 16-18, Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m. $12, general; $10, senior citizens; $8 students. Nov. 8 preview, $8 general and senior citizens; $6, students.

Applause Theatre Co. (64 Church St., Pittston, applausetheatre.webs.com, 570.430.1149, applausetheatre@gmail.com) • “The Wizard of Oz:” Nov. 16-18, 23-25 • Raymond the Amish Comic: Dec. 1, 8 p.m. $15 • “Winter Wonderettes:” Dec. 14-16 F.M. Kirby Center (71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre, 570.826.1100) • Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian “Nutcracker:” Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m., $37.25-$79.75 • “A Chorus Line:” Jan. 11, 8 p.m., $39.80-$71.55 • “Rock of Ages:” Feb. 15, 8 p.m., $44.95-$74.10 • “Pirates of Penzance:” March 22, 8 p.m., $38.80-$69 The Gaslight Theatre Company (570.824.8266 or visit gaslight-theatre.org, gaslighttheatre@gmail.com) • “[Title of Show]:” Jan. 4-5, 7:30 p.m., Jan. 6, 2 p.m., Mellow Theater (501 Vine St. Scranton). Contains adult language/situations. Not suited for children. $10. Jason Miller Playwrights’ Project (570.344.3656, SubVerseAphrodesia.com, nepaplaywrights@live.com) • “The Resurrection of Campbell Colgate” by Sarah Regan: Nov. Multimedia staging of new play in process.

King’s College Theatre (Admin. Bldg., 133 N. River St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.5825) • “Little Shop of Horrors:” Oct. 17-19. 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 7, 2 p.m. $10; students/senior citizens, $5. A sensitive botanist discovers an exotic plant with a mysterious craving for fresh blood.

The Lakeside Players (Lakeville Community Hall, Route

The Miller Agency (Jacqueline Hyde Studio, 46 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe, 570.241.9072, casting@themilleragency.net) • Looking for choir singers, orchestra performers, comedians, burlesque performers: Oct. 13, 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Moose Exchange (203 West Main St., Bloomsburg, 570.317.2596) “Greased!”: Nov. 3, doors 6:30 p.m., show 7:30 p.m. Murder-mystery, dessert fundraising event. $25 Music Box Players (196 Hughes St., Swoyersville: 570.283.2195 or 800.698.PLAY or musicbox.org) • “The TV Guide Musical:” Oct. 19-21, 26-28. Special spaghetti dinner/show: $20; show only: $15; student show-only: $12. Fri.-Sat., bar opens 6 p.m., dinner served 6:30 p.m., curtain 8 p.m. Sun., bar open 1 p.m., dinner 1:30 p.m., curtain 3 p.m. • “It’s a Wonderful Life the Musical:” Nov. 24-Dec. 16, ThursdaysSundays. Pennsylvania Theatre of Performing Arts (JJ Ferrara Center, 212 W. Broad St., Hazleton, 570.454.5451, ptpashows.org) • “Cabaret:” Begins Oct. 19. • “Nuncrackers:” Begins Nov. 30. The Phoenix Performing Arts Centre (409-411 Main St., Duryea, 570.457.3589, phoenixpac.vpweb.com, phoenixpac08@aol.com) • “The Rocky Horror Show” Live: Oct. 12-27, Friday and Saturday shows 8 p.m., midnight shows Oct. 13 and 27, one matinee Oct. 21, 3 p.m. $12. • Auditions with Little Shiny Things Productions for “The Farndale Avenue Housing Estate Townswomen’s Guild Dramatic Society’s Production ofA Christmas Carol,” Oct. 29-30, 7 p.m. Production set for Dec. 7-15. from December 7 to December 15. Info: 570.430.6754,littleshinythings@yahoo.com. Scranton Cultural Center (420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton, 570.346.7369) ❏ Broadway Scranton (broad-

wayscranton.com) presents: • “West Side Story:” Nov. 2-4, Fri., 8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m. • “The Midtown Men:” Jan. 18-20, Fri., 8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m. • “The Addams Family:” Feb. 15-17, Fri., 8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m. • “Stomp:” March 5-6, Fri., 8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m. • Cathy Rigby is “Peter Pan:” April 5-7, Fri., 8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m. • “Hair:” April 15-16, 7:30 p.m. • “Dreamgirls:” May 10-12, Fri., 8 p.m., Sat., 2 & 8 p.m., Sun., 1 & 6 p.m.

Shawnee Playhouse (570.421.5093, theshawneeplayhouse.com) • “California Suite:” through Oct. 21. $28/adults, $25/seniors, $15/ children 12 and under. • “Laugh Lines” by Kaleidoscope Players: Oct. 21-Nov. 3, Thursdays and Saturdays, Oct. 25, 27, Nov. 1 and 3 at 2 p.m., Friday evenings Oct. 26 and Nov. 2 at 8 p.m. $18/adults, $15/seniors, AAA Members, Military; $10 students 12 and under. • “Much Ado About Nothing” by Pocono Shakes: Oct. 26-Nov. 3. ‘Tales of Dark Imagination III: Dark Chronicles of the Golden Raven Society,’ dinner theater by Endless Mountains Theatre Company: Oct. 26-27, cash bar at 6 p.m., buffet dinner at 6:30 p.m., Summit Tea Room (17959 U.S. 11,New Milford). Proceeds benefit Joseph’s Storehouse for families and individuals affected by autism. $30. Info: 570.465.7400. The Vintage Theater (326 Spruce St., Scranton, info@scrantonsvintagetheater.com) • Staged reading of Ted LoRusso’s “A Lie Is A Venial Sin:” Nov. 11 • Comedy Mini-Fest: Nov. 17-18, featuring stand-up comics, sketch actors and improv troupes from Scranton, Allentown, Philadelphia and New York.

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- compiled by Rich Howells, Weekender Staff Writer. Send your listings to weekender@theweekender.com, 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 18703, or fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline is Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded listings at theweekender.com.

‘The Cocktail Waitress’ By James M. Cain Rating: W W W

'Waitress' flips crime novel formula Crime tends to be a pretty cut-and-dry genre. There might be twists, turns, and many layers to a story, but in the end, the answer to “Who did it?” generally doesn’t leave a reader or a viewer hanging. In James M. Cain’s “The Cocktail Waitress,” that triedand-true formula gets turned on its head. And even though the author died before finishing the novel, leaving editor Charles Ardai to piece together notes and unfinished drafts, that’s not why the novel feels open-ended. It’s because Cain, who also penned “Mildred Pierce” and “The Postman Always Rings Twice,” gives the reader all the pieces of the puzzle along with a supposed outcome but still lets the reader decide. Any more information would give away the ending, so we’ll leave it at that. Told from the perspective of newly widowed Joan Medford, “The Cocktail Waitress” could almost be her twisted coming-ofage story. Forced to fend for herself and trying to gain back custody of her son from her

wretched sister-in-law, Joan takes a job waitressing, which leads her to two men who will change the course of her life. From there, an intricate web of deceit, greed and grit is spun. Though the writing is quick and makes it an easy read, it’s also dated. Howdy Doody is referenced at least once, and in the first chapter, Joan wears a veil to her husband’s funeral, a practice that all but disappeared with the custom of wearing only black to funerals. The way women are treated, referenced, and portrayed in the book makes for a literary playground for someone analyzing feminism or a lack thereof. It could be seen as insulting to womankind that Joan’s choice is between a man she doesn’t love but who is willing to essentially buy her and one who made a drunken, inappropriate pass at her. All that aside, however, “The Cocktail Waitress” is darkly compelling and, depending on how you look at it, makes up for those injustices eventually.

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Lackawanna College (Mellow Theater, 501 Vine St., Scranton) • “The Marvelous Wonderettes:” Feb. 8, 8 p.m. $25-$30, $15 student.

590, Lakeville, across from Caesars Cove Haven, 570.226.6207, lakesideplayers.net) • “Scandal Point:” Oct. 12-14. $12 or $10 for groups of 10 or more. Call for tickets.

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

theater listings novel approach


Poet Brian Fanelli, shown during a Drawing Social event at the AFA Gallery, will join four other creative minds from NEPA’s literary community at The Vintage on Oct. 19. (Photo by Rich Howells)

Layers of content at 'Lit Unraveled!' By Christopher J. Hughes 774748

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www.theweekender.com

Weekender Editor

Expanding on the familiar format seen at open mic nights and readings throughout the area, organizers of “Lit Unraveled!” will add a question-and-answer session to their Scranton event next week. Kingston resident Brian Fanelli, 28, said the event on Friday, Oct. 19 at 7 p.m. at The Vintage (326 Spruce St., Scranton) will work to break down the creative process behind some of the area’s most successful wordsmiths. “They (audience members) are going to walk away with rich content and rich feedback from the Q&A. They’re also going to be exposed to a variety of writing genres that night – fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. All of the creative writing genres, for the most part, are going to be well represented that night,” Fanelli, a poet, explained. Along with Fanelli, the evening will feature Amye Archer, playwright of “Surviving” and creator of the Scranton-based reading series “Prose in Pubs;” Rich Howells, Weekender staff writer and award-winning journalist; poet Dawn Leas, associate

director of the Wilkes University M.A. / M.F.A. Creative Writing programs and author of 2010’s “I Know When to Keep Quiet;” and Jason Lucarelli, co-founder/cohost of the New Visions Writers Showcase. Fanelli has seen how a simple discussion like the one set for next week greatly adds to the depth of a literary event. “Most of these authors are published, some in national journals and some are represented by literary agents,” he said. “We wanted to make it different than the other literary events here… I think it adds another layer and makes the authors a lot more available to the crowd. “Everybody on this reading is a skilled writer who has read in public a lot, so they’re going to give a good performance that night. I think they’re going to offer sound advice about the writing process and trying to get published,” he continued. The creative writing and English instructor at Keystone College is also the author of the 2010 poetry collection “Front Man.” He admits that he’s constantly wielding a pen as part of his process. “I write every morning, and even when I have a busy teaching

load, I make sure that I carve out at least a little bit of time to write. Before I send anything out to a journal, I ensure that it’s as polished as it can be… I also read every day,” he said. He often shares work with the various writing groups that he participates in and with other trusted voices in the writing community. Fanelli plans to share a number of poems set for publication in the tentatively titled “All That Remains,” which he hopes to release through Unbound Content in 2013. Aspiring authors, Fanelli said, should attempt to join writing groups in their community and attend events like “Lit Unraveled!” or open mic nights at venues like Library Express inside the Mall at Steamtown.

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‘Lit Unraveled!’ feat. Amye Archer, Brian Fanelli, Rich Howells, Dawn Leas, and Jason Lucarelli: Fri., Oct. 19, 7 p.m., The Vintage (326 Spruce St., Scranton). $3. Info: scrantonsvintagetheater.com, facebook.com/ events/535559606458300/


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Lancaster artist George Mummert, shown with a detail of his work ’Pangea,’ said those visiting the exhibit will have the chance to appreciate the process as much as the finished works. access to artists and a venue for displaying sculptures. Additionally, Mummert was interested in giving greater access to the community about the artistic process, including work in the on-site bronze foundry. KACC has functioned as a facility for Tymon and other artists. While both said their work takes time and inspiration, the method behind them is equally important. “When you work so much in this stuff, there is inspiration, but you’re working so much with your hands that it does become about the process,” Tymon said. Formal elements like line, form, and composition share the spotlight with the artist’s often meticulous work. “Built into these pieces, there’s a great deal of learning and appreciation for the process that’s already inside those pieces,” Mummert said. Both Tymon and Mummert hope that art enthusiasts who turn out to their first exhibit in this region walk away with some

Mike Tymon’s ’Daphne’ is one of several bronze pieces featured. inspiration. “I’m excited to see what the feedback is,” Tymon said. W ‘Form and Process: Sculpture in Bronze, Steel, and Stone,’ Misericordia University, Paul Friedman Gallery, opening reception, Oct. 13, 5-8 p.m. Exhibit continues through Dec. 9. Info: 570.674.6250

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3370 Scranton-Carbondale Highway Exit 191A off I-81 • 570-489-7448

Both of the artists featured in an exhibit opening at Misericordia University (301 Lake St., Dallas) on Oct. 13 agree that their work is as much about the process behind it as it is about the finished pieces themselves. George Mummert, 42, and Michael Tymon, 27, of Lancaster have combined their talents for “Form and Process: Sculpture in Bronze, Steel, and Stone,” a collection of about 12 pieces that highlight their individual works in the mentioned media. Tymon’s works will solely be in bronze, but Mummert will show pieces that involve all three. Working in bronze is a natural transition for Tymon. “I was formally trained in oil clay, and historically and even now, the typical medium to transfer that to is bronze,” he explained. He couples references to the Italian Renaissance, French Baroque, and French Realism periods with inspiration from modern life to create a variety of figures. “I first fell in love with stone when I was working on a commission at Yale,” Mummert said. “There was a quarry nearby, and we were using some of that stone in the work. Going to the quarry and watching people carving was when I became intrigued by the stone.” That commission, by the way, was a 21-foot-tall bronze Torosaurus that stands outside the Peabody Museum at Yale, one of two installations at the university he is known for. “I’m really in love with the process as much as I am the final product. To me, the journey of creating the piece is sometimes just as exciting as the final product,” Mummert continued. “Some of the pieces really say something about the process just by looking at the form. You can see places where metal has been cut or been formed, and in some cases that stands out immediately.” The shared exhibit at Misericordia isn’t the only connection the artists share. Mummert co-founded the nonprofit Keystone Art and Culture Center (420 Pearl St., Lancaster) in 2003 to address a need for a facility to provide

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

OPEN 24 HOURS


any left end of season go to Toys For Tots. Send to Gunners 11 Hemlock Dr., Tunkhannock, PA 18657. Hi Lites Motor Club (www.hilitesmotorclub.com, Jack 570.477.2477, John 574.7470). Events feature door prizes, food, music, 50/50 drawing, more. No alcohol permitted. Motor Heads of NEPA Cruises (held at Wegmans, Wilkes-Barre) • Oct. 27, 5-8 p.m. Uncle Buck’s BBQ Pit Bike Night Wed., 6-9 p.m., 361 W. Main St., Plymouth. Food, drink specials.

CHURCHES Christ Wesleyan Church (363 Stamm Rd., Milton, 570.742.8987) • Annie Moses Band: Oct. 19, 8 p.m. Conyngham United Methodist Church (411 Main Street, Conyngham, 570.788.3960, conynghamumc.com) • Sisters: Tues., 10 a.m., began Sept. 25. Andy Stanley six-week study, “Twisting the Truth.” All women welcome. Covenant Presbyterian

Church (500 Madison Ave., Scranton, 570.346.6400.) • ‘Junk and Jewels’ sale Oct. 12, 5-8 p.m., Oct. 13, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. First Presbyterian Church (300 School St., Clarks Summit, 570.586.6306, www.fpccs.org) • Great Valley Chamber Music Society: Oct.14, 7 p.m. Muhlenburg United Methodist Church (below Muhlenburg Corners on the Hunlock-Harveyville Rd., Hunlock Creek) • Fall festival Oct. 13, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. New Life Community Church (Fellowship Hall, 570 South Main Rd., Mountaintop, 570.301.7081) • Music by Steve and Jamie: Oct. 12, 7-9 p.m. St. Michael’s Ukrainian Orthodox Church (540 N. Main Ave., Scranton, 570.343.7165) • Pierogi Sale every Fri., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. St. Stephen’s Episcopal ProCathedral (35 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.346.4600) • Food Pantry open Mon.-Fri., noon-4 p.m. • Clothing Closet: free clothing for men, women, children. Open Tues., 4-6:30 p.m., Wed., noon-3:30 p.m.

St. Thomas More Society (St. Clare Church, 2301 N. Washington Ave., Scranton, 570.343.0634, stthomasmoresociety.org) • Guardian of the Redeemer Fellowship: First, third Mon. of month for men interested in adult discussion of Catholic faith. • YOUCAT Teen Group welcomes post-Confirmation youth from all parishes for discussion of Theology of the Body for Teens. Meets first, third Thurs. of month, 5:30 p.m. Trucksville United Methodist Church (40 Knob Hill Rd., Trucksville, 570.696.3897, office@trucksvilleumc.com) • All God’s Children special needs program: every Sun. 9:45-10:45 a.m. Wyoming Valley Presbyterian Church (S. Meade and E. Northampton St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.829.1479) • Annual Gymanga Ganu hymn sing Oct. 14, 3 p.m.

EVENTS ‘20 Minutes and a Beer’ with Kuhcoon, Backyard Ale House (523 Linden St., Scranton), Oct. 25, 6-8 p.m.. $8, American Advertising Federation members; $10, non-members. Info: aafnepa.org.

Bartolai Winery (2377 State Rt. 92 Highway, Coolidge Ave., Exeter Twp.) • Jeannine M. Luby “Keep Wine-ing He Might Start to Look Like Prince Charming” Comedy Show: Oct. 11, 7:30 p.m. Guest comedian Joe Bryan. $15, tickets must be purchased in advance by calling 570.650.7518 or visiting notprincecharming.com. Browndale Fire Co. (Route 247, 620 Marion St., Browndale, 43fire.com) • Homemade Pierogi For Sale: donation $6/dozen. Potato and cheese. To order, contact any member, call 570.499.4908, e-mail jdoyle@nep.net, go online. Brunch with Penn State University’s Nittany Lion and the Lion Ambassadors, Irem Clubhouse Restaurant (64 Ridgewayy Dr., Dallas), Oct. 21, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $11.95, adults; $6.95, children 12 and under. Info: 570.675.1134, ext. 102. The Caverna (602 Church St., Jessup, 570.489.1888) • Comedy Night: Oct. 13, 9 p.m. Johnny Watson, Chip Ambrogio, Mike Jones and host Father Paul. $12 advance, $15 at door, call for tickets.

Community Health Fair Oct. 14, noon-3 p.m., The Commonwealth Medical College (525 Pine St., Scranton). Free. Info: thecommonwealthmedical.com/SteamtownHealthFair. Conyngham United Methodist Church (411 Main Street, Conyngham, 570.788.3960, conynghamumc.com) • Sisters: Tues., 10 a.m., began Sept. 25. Andy Stanley six-week study, “Twisting the Truth.” All women welcome. Dietrich Theater (60 E. Tioga Street, Tunkhannock, 570.996.1500, www.dietrichtheater.com) • Airing of the Quilts: through Nov. 15. Free. • Golden Days of Radio Players: Tues. through Dec. 4, 7-9 p.m., ages 18 and up. Free. • Quilting for Everyone: "Carpenter’s Wheel": Wed. through Dec. 12, 6-7:30 p.m. $6 per class. • Quilting for Kids - "Birds in the Air": Wed. through Dec. 12, 3:30-5 p.m. $6 per class. • Jewelry Making: Brick Stitch Earrings: Oct. 10, 6-9 p.m., ages 16 an up. $45, all materials provided. • Design a Painted Scarf: Oct. 11, 7-9 p.m., ages 16 and up. $30. • Preschool Green Inventors with

SEE AGENDA, PAGE 39

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WEEKENDER 2012 MODEL OF THE YEAR PARTY @ THE WOODLAN


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NDS, 10.05.12 | Photos By Jason Riedmiller and Courtesy PA Photo Booths


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2012 Weekender Model and Man of the Year

Dominique Kozuch, Jessup

Rob Nitkowski,

Anytown, USA

DK: Art student & Dunkateer at Dunkin Donuts RN: Full-time patriot How did you choose your career? DK: I am pretty sick at illustrating. RN: America chose me. The best part of my job is… DK: Coloring like a 5-year-old. RN: Ending Communism. Something most people don’t know about me is… DK: I don’t like top 40s. RN: The Mexico story. My hobbies are… DK: Playing sports, hanging with my gurlz, traveling to Europe, and drawing. RN: Loving America, and dominoes. Three interesting facts about me: DK: 1) I have a big Polish nose. 2) I can lick it. 3) I’m pigeon-toed. RN: 1) I arm wrestle for pizza. 2) I form gangs. 3) I get real friendly with strangers. A talent I wished I possessed is: DK: I wish I could do somersaults. RN: Sexing for money. I unwind by: DK: Painting! RN: Sexing for money. One thing I’ve always wanted to do is: DK: Climb the Eiffel Tower. RN: Sex for money. PHOTO BY: JASON RIEDMILLER


Amy Colley: Thurs., Oct. 11, 18, 25, and Nov. 1, 10-10:45 a.m. Ages 4-5. Free. • Green Inventors with Amy and Steve Colley: Ages 5-8, Fri., Oct. 12, 19, 26, and Nov. 2, 2-5:30 p.m.; Ages 9-12, Thurs., Oct. 11, 18, 25, Nov. 1, 4-5:30 p.m. $40 for four classes. • ‘Camouflage & Mimicry: What You See Isn’t What You See’ with Rick Koval: Oct. 13, 11 a.m., Free. Learn about the fascinating techniques and adaptations animals use to avoid detection. • Contemporary American Classical Guitar Music with Jay Steveskey: Oct. 14, 11 a.m. $10. • Food & Culture Around the World with Bruce Arrowood and Laurel Radzieski: Oct. 15, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $15. • Nia: Mon., Oct. 15-Nov. 5, 10-11 a.m., ages 16 and up. $40 for four-class series. • Decorative Painting: Wed. Oct. 17-Nov. 28, ages 16 and up. $20 per class plus cost of painting surface. • Introduction to Creative Neckwear: Oct. 17, 7-9 p.m., ages 16 and up. $20, materials included. • Yoga for You: Wed., Oct. 17-Nov. 14 and Nov. 28, ages 16 and up. $60 for six-class series or $15 per class. • Jewelry Making: Kumihimo Beading: Thurs., Oct. 18, Nov. 1 and 15, 6-9 p.m., ages 16 and up. $75, all materials provided. Doug Smith Music (dougsmithbass@comcast.net, 570.343.7271) • Doug Smith Orchestra: Oct. 13, 20, 27, Skytop Lodge (1 Skytop Lodge Rd., Skytop) • Poetry and Jazz Drawing Social: Oct. 14, 6-9 p.m., AFA Gallery (514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton) • Erin Malloy, Ron Stabinsky, and Doug Smith: Oct. 18, Mall at Steamtown, noon-2 p.m. • Drawing Social: Oct. 21, 6-9 p.m., AFA Gallery (514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton) Frances Slocum State Park (Back Mountain, 570.696.3525) • Heritage Day: Oct. 14, noon-5 p.m. Jessup Hose Company No. 2 and Ambulance Association (333 Hill St., Jessup PA 18434, nonemergency: 570.489.1141, jessupno2.com) • Open House/Family Fall Festival & Craft Show: Oct. 13, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Demonstrations, eye and hearing exams, food, pumpkin painting, entertainment, raffles, more. Info: 570.983.5317

The Mall at Steamtown (300 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton, 570.343.3400) • Live music and/or magic and children’s entertainment: Every Tues., Thurs., noon-2 p.m.; every Sun. 12:30-2:30 p.m. • Open Mic with Sarah Yzkanin or Janice Gambo Chesna: Every Wed., 6-8 p.m. Masonic Village Octoberfest Oct. 19, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Irem Clubhouse (64 Ridgway Dr., Dallas). Info: 1.866.851.4243. Mill Market in the Hawley Silk Mill (Suite #111, 8 Silk Mill Dr., Hawley, 570.390.4440, info@MillMarketPA.com, www.millmarketpa.com) • Oktoberfest at Mill Market: Oct. 13, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. German sausages from Alpine Wurst & Meat Haus, samples of Stoudt Brewing Company’s Oktober Fest. Monroe County Garden Club • Monthly meeting: Oct. 10, 11:30 a.m., Hughes Public Library (1002 N. 9th Street, Stroudsburg). Call 570.420.0283 or email adeskus@ptd.net for more info. Pittston Memorial Library (47 Broad St., 570.654.9565, pitmemlib@comcast.net) • Crochet club, Tues., 10 a.m., Thurs., 6 p.m. • Kids Science Club, first Sat. of each month, open to students in grades 2-5. November meeting is Nov. 3 at 10 a.m. • ‘Page Turners’ kids’ book club, first Thurs. of each month, 4 p.m., grades 3-5. • Preschool Story Time for ages 3-5, Oct. 11, 2 p.m., six-week program. • Scavenger Haunt, Oct. 20, 7 p.m., open to students in grades 6-12. Free, bring a flashlight. • ‘Hangout Club’ book club for young adults, Oct. 22 at 6 p.m., open to students in grades 6-12. ‘The Pumpkin Twist,’ Meyers High School (341 Carey Ave., WilkesBarre), Oct. 20, noon and 4 p.m.; Oct. 21, 2 p.m. $10. Info: 570.287.7977, joanharrisdancers.com. Second annual Oktoberfest, Kingston American Legion Post 395 (386 Wyoming Ave., Kingston), Oct. 20, 3-8 p.m. $20. Info: 570.287.8343. Shavertown UMC 6th annual golf tournament: Oct. 20,

Mill Race Golf Club, Benton. Registration, 9 a.m.; shotgun start, 10 a.m. $80 per person. Info: 570.675.7295. ‘SnapshotPA Day: A Day in the Life of Pennsylvania Libraries,’ Osterhout Free Library (71 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre), Oct. 15. Event raises awareness of available programs and services. Info: 570.823.0156, ext. 230. Waverly Community House (1115 N. Abington Rd., Waverly, waverlycomm.org) • Family Halloween party: Oct. 27, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info: 570.586.8191, ext. 5. Westmoreland Club (59 South Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.822.6141) • Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic presents Chamber Music Series: Oct.11, 6:30 p.m. $29, tickets available at 570.270.4444 or nepaphil.org Wilkes-Barre City Events • Farmers’ Market: Thurs., through Nov. 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Public Square. Thurs. Info: wilkes-barre.pa.us/farmersm.php • Oct. 11: Music by Flashback Wyoming Farmers Market (Butlers Park, corner of 8th and Butler Streets) • Every Saturday 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Fresh produce, crafts, and food vendors. Vendor opportunities available at 570.693.0291, option 1. Wyoming Valley West Class of ’78 reunion meeting Oct. 26, 5 p.m., Kevin’s Restaurant (rear of Wyoming Ave., Kingston). Sign up for the July 12-14 reunion and other activities at WVW78.com. Info: 203.675.4095, info@wvw78.com. Your Dog’s Place, LLC (570.729.8977, yourdogsplace@yahoo.com) • K9 Nose Work: Intro to Nose Work, Sat., 11:30 a.m.; Wed., 10 a.m. Intro to Odor, Mon., 8:15 p.m. Intro to Vehicles and Exteriors, Mon., 7 p.m. Continuing Nose Work, Mon., 5 p.m. • Kinderpuppy: Wed., 6 p.m., Sat., 10 a.m. Puppy parenting 101. • Canine Life & Social Skills: Thurs., 5:30, 6:30, 7:30 p.m. • Reliable Recalls: Fri., 6-7:30 p.m.

LOCAL HISTORY Electric City Trolley Museum and Coal Mine Tour (Cliff Street, Scranton 570.963.6590) Museum open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Excursions: Wed.-Sun. 10:30 a.m., noon, 1:30 p.m., 3 p.m. Rides: $10 adults, $9 seniors, $7.75 ages 3-12. Mine open daily 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tours hourly, $8

adults, $7.50 seniors, $5.50 ages 3-12. The Houdini Museum (1433 N. Main Ave., Scranton) Every weekend by reservation. Open 1 p.m., closes 4 p.m. Also available weekdays for school groups, bus, hotel groups. $17.95/adults, $14.95/11 and under. • Ghost Tours: Scheduled daily, 7 p.m., reservations required. Secret time/meeting place divulged upon reservation, call 570.383.1821.$20/ adults, $15/11 and under. Rain or shine, year-round. Daytime walks also available on limited basis. Private tours can be arranged for groups. Info: scrantonghosttours.com, magicus@comcast.net. Lackawanna Historical Society (The Catlin House, 232 Monroe Avenue, Scranton, 570.344.3841) ❏ Downtown Walking Tours (free and open to the public): • Sat. through Oct., 11 a.m. Call for starting places. • Custom Tours: 7-8 blocks, about 2 hours. Routes selected based on interests of participants Most days, noon-6 p.m. $5/person, min. 4 people, max. 30. Call 955.0244. • Step-on bus tours, Costume Tours: Call for info. Luzerne County Historical Society (49 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre, 570.823.6244, lchs@epix.net) • Downtown Wilkes-Barre ghost tour: Oct. 13, 19, 20, 26, and 27, 6:30 p.m. Meet at Historical Society’s Museum (69 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre). $8, members; $10, non-members. RSVP required, 570.823.6244, x 3. • Swetland homestead tour: Oct. 13, 11 a.m. Meet at 885 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. $8, members; $10, nonmembers. RSVP required, 570.823.6244, x 3. Pennsylvania’s Anthracite Heritage Museum (McDade Park, Scranton: 570.963.4804, www.phmc.state.pa.ust) Open year round, Mon.-Sat. from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., noon-5 p.m. Scranton Iron Furnaces (159 Cedar Ave., Scranton, www.anthracitemuseum.org) For guided tours, call Anthracite Heritage Museum at 570.963.4804 for schedule/fees. St. Ann’s National Basilica Shrine and Monastery (Scranton: 570.347.5691) Group tours available by appointment. Open 9 a.m.-8 p.m. daily. Steamtown National Historic Site (I-81 to Exit 53, Scranton: 570.340.5200 or 888.693.9391, www.nps.gov/stea) • Ongoing: Interpretive programs, visitor center, theater, a history

museum. Open daily, 9-5 p.m. $7 adults, $6 senior citizens, $2 children ages 6-12. • The “Scranton Limited” train ride: Wed.-Sun. 30 minute rides depart from Roundhouse boarding area Wed., 10:30 & 11:30 a.m., 1:30 & 2:15 p.m. A historic steam locomotive operates Thurs.-Sun. 10:30 & 11:30 a.m., 1:30 & 2:15 p.m. $3 per person, all ages 6+. Visit www.nps.gov/stea for train schedule or call 570.340.5200. • Moscow steam excursion: Oct. 13, 14, 21, 27 and 28, departs Steamtown NHS boarding platform 12:30 p.m.. $24 adults 16-61, $22 seniors 62+, $17 children 6-15. Tripp House (1011 N. Main Ave., Scranton: 570.961.3317). The oldest structure in Lackawanna County. Tours are conducted by appointment.

LEARNING Art Classes at the Georgiana Cray Bart Studio (123 Brader Dr., Wilkes-Barre, 570.947.8387, gcraybart@aol.com, gcraybartartworks.com) ❏ Painting, drawing, creative arts/ pencil, charcoal, oil, acrylic, pastel, colored pencil, mixed media: • Adults (Ages 13+): Mon.-Tues., noon-4 p.m.; Tues.-Wed., 6-9 p.m. Student may choose length of time from 1-3 hrs. for evening class • Children (Ages 8-12): Weekdays, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Ballroom Dancing taught by certified members of Dance Educators of America. Available for private groups, clubs, organizations, senior centers, more. Call 570.785.9459. Bridge. Beginning or Intermediate Lessons, playing time for regular games and tournaments. Jewish Community Center (River Street, Wilkes-Barre). Call Rick Evans at 570.824.4646 or Rev. Ken McCrea at 570.823.5957. Downtown Arts at Arts YOUniverse (47 N. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.970.2787, www.artsyouniverse.com) • Kids Craft Hour with Liz Revit: Sat., 10:15 a.m.-11:15 a.m. Make jewelry, paper mache, more. $15, includes supplies. For info or to register, call 817.0176. Drawing and Painting Lessons: Realist painter teaches techniques of old masters. Private lessons Fri.-Sun. To schedule, call 570.820.0469, e-mail bekshev@yahoo.com or visit www.artistvs.com. Everhart Museum (1901 Mulber-

SEE AGENDA, PAGE 48

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John Adams Elementary (927 Capouse Ave., Scranton, 570.348.3655) • Annual Craft Fair: Oct. 20, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Vendors needed. Info: johnadamsbulldogspta@gmail.com

‘Leadership on Tap,’ Susquehanna Brewing Co. (635 S. Main St., Pittston), Nov. 9, 5-8 p.m. $15 in advance, $20 at door. Proceeds benefit Leadership Wilkes-Barre Scholarship and Development Fund. Info: 570.823.2101, ext. 135.

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

AGENDA, FROM PAGE 34


GEEK CULTURE & MORE

Rich Howells | Weekender Staff Writer

Great toys are the other half of the battle

Motorhead

To Enter email pictures to: weekender@theweekender.com

Melissa’s Mind

If you’re relying on “ribbed for her pleasure” to satisfy your woman, maybe just get her a ribbed sweater and you go back to college.

Lissa of KRZ has a lot on her mind, and she needs to speak it. Check out the Weekender every week to read her deep thoughts and philosophical approach to life.

For more of Melissa’s wisdom, follow her on Facebook and read her blog. facebook.com/melissakrahnkerocks • 985krz.com/Lissa/11276840

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WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

PAGE 40

Infinite Improbability

Get your head inside the motor

This may start a war more epic than even Cobra Commander could conjure, but G.I. Joe is cooler than Silly Putty, Hot Wheels, LEGOs, Mr. Potato Head, and – yes, ladies – even your Barbie. Don’t take my word for it – the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis recently held a poll online asking people to name the most iconic objects that have defined American childhood in the last century. After 24,000 votes, the top five were: 1. G.I. Joe 2. Transformers 3. LEGOs 4. Barbie 5. View-Master Seriously, the “Real American Hero” scored higher than bicycles and crayons. Blocks, balls, yo-yos, puzzles, and Frisbees didn’t even break the top 20! What is it about this property that is so beloved? Well, for starters, Hasbro (the Hassenfeld Brothers at the time) coined the term “action figure,” making it OK for boys to play with dolls because it was “America’s movable fighting man,” not some stuck-up princess who couldn’t even stand up on her own. Introduced in 1964, it’s easy to see why young kids wanted to be like their fathers going off to war and fighting the bad guys, but with the increasing unpopularity of Vietnam, Joe became an adventurer who eventually learned martial arts, gained eagle eyes and life-like hair, and even added bionic parts. Many poll voters, some being grandfathers remembering their first parachuting Joe and others being 20-somethings with massive collections, posted their memories along with their votes, so here’s mine. I was born in 1983, so while I missed out on the original versions of the government issued warrior, I will forever remember the relaunch, which began in 1982 with 3¾-inch scale figures, a Marvel Comics series, and soon a popular cartoon show that made G.I. Joe an international team of soldiers and ninjas battling Cobra, a terrorist organization with over-the-top vil-

Despite bad live-action movies and countless cartoon reboots, G.I. Joe clearly lives on in the memories of many as a great toy. lains that only science fiction could create. It was these would-be world conquers, like Cobra Commander, Destro, Storm Shadow, and Serpentor, that stuck with me more than the mostly generic heroes (with the exception of the silent ninja, Snake Eyes, of course). These detailed and posable figures (along with accompanying vehicles and playsets) soon joined the ranks of my He-Man, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and Marvel armies, some of which I still have. Others were not so lucky and were lost to the two-man war that was my little brothers. I salute you, you brave, limbless souls. Like any piece of your childhood, toys make you nostalgic for those simpler times, when all that mattered was where your next blister packaged character was coming from. That may be why I still collect them here and there, but as I get older, I find it increasingly harder to find these mass-produced plastic sculptures. I had video games and even an early computer growing up, but I spent many more hours setting up massive figure battles and building colossal LEGO castles than I ever did in front of a screen. My mother read a lot of

stories to me, and told me many more when I refused to fall asleep, so maybe my imagination was just too wild for the “Go here! Do this! Complete that!” finality of this new technology. All these characters had origins in comics, shows, and movies to start off with, but where they went next was my choice. I wonder if newer generations are missing that. As toy stores disappear and figure aisles shrink, all I see is America’s most cherished hobby (according to the poll) being swallowed up in a mass of wires and controllers. Even G.I. Joe has become a mess of failed cartoon relaunches and a live-action movie so bad that its sequel was pulled from release before it even hit theaters to be reworked for next year, the only notable exception being the current IDW Publishing comic series. I hate to say it, Hasbro, but it may be too late to grab the attention of ADD children fighting much bloodier wars online. G.I. Joe clearly still has a Kung-Fu grip on its adult fans, however, so remember us fondly the next time you slap the name on some new ploy. We obviously remember you.

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GENETTI’S, WILKES-BARRE Friday, October 26 • Saturday October 27

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

OKTOBERFEST

Friday, Oktober 26th

Dr. Dirty Oktoberfest Celebration w/ national entertainer

DR. DIRTY JOHN VALBY

Serving traditional beer & Oktoberfest seasonal beer $20 VIP in advance or $25 at the door $15 General admission in advance or $20 at the door. doors open @ 8:30 p.m. advanced tickets available at ticketsalesnow.com call Mark @ 570-825-0000 or 570-905-7334 for VIP

Saturday, Oktober 27th

Oktoberfest Celebration 3 p.m.-2 a.m. $20 unlimited beer and food package All day-night pass for unlimited beer and select food $20 in advance & $25 at door - tix available online @ ticketsalesnow.com, at Genetti’s and all Gallery of Sounds or call 570-825-0000 for more info 3-7 p.m. GEORGE TARASEK ORCHESTRA, GSO, GERMAN & POLKA MUSIC, OOM PAH MUSIC, TAP THE KEG, AUTHENTIC FOODS, DESSERTS - FEAT. SUSQUEHANNA BREWING CO.’S OKTOBERFEST & PEACH PUMPKIN ALE 7-midnight

ERIC RUDY OF TRIBES, SUBNOTICS, BAD HAIR DAY & M-80

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midnight - 2 am.. ELECTRONIC DANCE MUSIC(EDM) - LASER LIGHT SYSTEM, DJ MC FEATURING TRIBUTE to Deadmau5 presented by Rittenhouse Entertainment Inc.,


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

PAGE 42

Fitness

CHARITY WALKS/RUNS

American Lung Association • Fight For Air Walk: Oct. 13, 10 a.m., Nay Aug Park, Scranton. Steph’s Fall 5K Oct. 27, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Luzerne County Sports Complex (2009 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort), $20 for 5K run/3K walk. In memory of Stephanie Godri-Johnston, an avid cross-country runner who passed away at 32 this year from, to fund the Stephanie Godri-Johnston Memorial Scholarship and raising colon cancer awareness. Info: stephsfall5k.webconnex.com/registeronline.

CLASSES Adult Kung Fu (Kung Fu & Tai Chi Center, Wilkes-Barre: 570.829.2707) Ongoing classes. Tues./Thurs., 6:30 p.m. Study of Chinese Martial Art open hand, weapons sets. Mon., Wed., 6:30 p.m. Covers Chinese style theories, concepts, applications. “Sport” fighting concepts explained, practiced. Aikido of Scranton, Inc. (1627 N. Main Ave., Scranton, 570.963.0500) • Self-Defense Class taught by Aikido Master Ven Sensei, every Mon. & Wed., 7-9 p.m. $10. • Traditional Weapons Class, Thurs., 7-9 p.m. $10. Beauty Lies Within School of Pole Dance (32 Forrest St., WilkesBarre, 570.793.5757, sl.beautylieswithin@gmail.com). Hours by appointment, free sample appointment. Call or e-mail for details. Dance Contours (201 Bear Creek Blvd., Wilkes-Barre, 570.208.0152, www.dancecontours.com) • Adult classes: ballet, tap, lyrical, CardioSalsa, ballroom dance. • Children/teen classes: ballet, tap, CheerDance, HipTech Jazz, a form of dance blending basic Jazz Technique with styles of street dance, hip hop. • Zumba classes for adults: Tues., 6 p.m., Sat., 10 a.m. First class free. • Adult ballet: Sat. morn. Danko’s Core Wrestling Strength Training Camp (DankosAllAmericanFitness.com) • Four sessions/week, features two clinics, two core strength. 4 sessions/ week. Increase power, speed, agility. Group discounts, coaches, teams, clubs, free stuff. Visit website or call Larry Danko at 570.825.5989 for info.

Downtown Dojo Karate Academy (84 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.262.1778) Offering classes in traditional karate, weapons, self defense. Mon-Thurs., 5:30-8:45 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-noon. • Zumba Classes: Tues., Thurs., 7-8 p.m.; Sat., 12:30-1:30 p.m. $5/class. Call for info.

Extreme M.M.A. (2424 Old Berwick Rd., Bloomsburg. 570.854.2580) • MMA Class: Mon., Wed., 6-7 p.m. First visit free. Wrestling fundamentals, basic Brazilian Ju-Jitsu No Gi. Call for info. • Boxing/Kickboxing Fitness Class: Mon., Wed., 7-8 p.m. First visit free. Non-combative class. • Personal Training: Call 317.7250 for info. GregWorks Professional Fitness Training (107 B Haines Court, Blakely, 570.499.2349, gregsbootcamp@hotmail.com, www.vipfitnesscamp.com) • Beach Body Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8 p.m.; Sat., 1 p.m. • Bridal Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8 p.m.; Sat., 1 p.m. Bridal party group training, couples personal training available. • Fitness Bootcamp: 4-week sessions, Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8 p.m.; Sat., 1 p.m. • New Year’s Resolution Flab to Fab Bootcamp: Mon.-Fri., 6:30 & 8 p.m., Sat., 1 p.m. Guaranteed results. • Private/Semi-Private sessions available, e-mail for info. Kwonkodo Lessons – by reservation at The Hapkido Teakwondo Institute (210 Division St., Kingston). $40/month. Call 570.287.4290 for info. Traditional Hung-Gar Tiger/ Crane Kung-Fu The Tiger’s Ark, Kingston. Unlock the real power, learn true meaning behind all martial movements by focusing on development of conceptual body language skills through use of age-old training apparatuses. Training more difficult than mainstream martial arts, done at own pace. Info: 570.817.5070 Wyoming Valley Goju Ryu Karate Academy • Classes Tues., Thurs. (kids: 5:30-7 p.m.; teens/adults: 7-8:30 p.m.); Sat. (kids: 10:30 a.m.-noon; teens/adults: Noon-1:30 p.m.), Kingston Rec. Center (655 Third Ave., Kingston).Info: 888.328.3218, valleygojukarate.com

just for the

health of it

By Tim Hlivia

Special to the Weekender

OUTSIDE Endless Mountains Nature Center: (Camp Lackawanna, Tunkhannock, 570.836.3835, www.EMNConline.org) • Birds of Prey identification workshop: Oct. 17, 7-8:30 p.m. Free, stewards; $5, non-stewards. • ‘Mommy and Me: Feathered Friends’: Oct. 24, 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. $4 per child, stewards; $7 per child, non-stewards; free, kids 2 and under. • ‘Owl Day,’ Oct. 28, 1-4 p.m. $8, stewards; $10, non-stewards. Friends of Salt Springs State Park (Silver Creek Rd., Franklin Forks, 570.967-7275, dadleman@stny.rr.com) • Look at Those Leaves!: Oct. 13, 2-5 p.m. • Geology in Your Back Yard: Oct. 14, 1-4 p.m. $5 members, $10 non-members • Halloween Fest: Oct. 27, 4-9 p.m. $5 person; $20 family; members 50% discount. Greater Scranton YMCA (706 N. Blakely St., Dunmore) • Senior Citizen outing to Martins Creek: Three miles moderate along Delaware River. Meet in the YMCA parking lot.$5 YMCA members, $8 non-members. Info: 570.343.5144. • Godfreys Ridge, Stroudsburg Hike: Oct. 21, 9:15 a.m. Meet in the YMCA parking lot.$5 YMCA members, $8 non-members. Info: 570.343.5144. Hickory Run State Park (1137 Honey Hole Road, 570.403.2006) Hike with Naturalist Megan Taylor: Oct. 18, 9 a.m. 3 miles, Oak Trail at Nescopeck State Park, uphill and downhill slopes. Meet at park office. Info: 570.403.2006, hickoryrunenvedsp@pa.gov. Nescopeck State Park (1137 Honey Hole Rd., Drums, 570.403.2006) • Rediscover Nescopeck State Park: Oct. 20, 9 a.m.-7 p.m., bird mist netting, nature hikes, music, storytelling. Oct. 21, 11a.m.-5 p.m., paddling on Lake Frances, geocaching and wilderness survival intros, green building tour, nature crafts, kids’ story time, live bats. Free.

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- compiled by Rich Howells, Weekender Staff Writer. Send your listings to weekender@theweekender.com, 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 18703, or fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline is Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded listings at theweekender.com.

As Christie proves, the key to weight loss isn’t in magic pills or protein shakes but in setting a deadline and meeting it. (Photo courtesy Leverage Fitness Studio)

Stick to your goals My last column highlighted some major tips regarding fat loss. If you’ve been following me, then you know I cut through all the “red tape” pertaining to losing unwanted body fat. I don’t think the world needs another gimmicky fitness product or weight loss plan. I also don’t think it needs another fad diet or fad exercise class. Marketing often misleads us on the BEST approaches. My job is to dispel all of those myths and give it to you straight. After all, you deserve real information. If the information is out there, why then, are we Americans, still obese? Why do people who go to the gym for years still look the same from day one? The cop out responses I usually get are something along the lines of, “at least I’m not gaining weight” or “I don’t have the time to workout for an hour a day, or prepare my food.” If you finally want to lose the fat and are committed to look and feel great, perfect. Now, let’s get you there. So what is the biggest fat loss secret? Success comes with the realization that there is no magic pill or no magic class. The elliptical is not the answer, and neither is cycling class. And the blessed treadmill… get off of it. It’s not protein shakes, grapefruits, detoxes or cleansers either. Say goodbye to the abductor/ adductor machines and aerobics classes.

Here is what I truly believe is the biggest weight loss secret. It is setting a deadline and having something riding on it. Not buying it? Studies have shown that people who have a reason to succeed will reach their goal compared to those who don’t have a reason to train. Without a deadline, it’s easier to skip workouts or veer off your nutritional plan. Think about it. Athletes succeed because they have something riding on it, a potential million dollar contract. Models also succeed because they are trying to land the cover shot. If those things aren’t motivating, nothing is. Do what Christie did. Set a deadline. What worked for Christie was setting a date to enter her first figure competition which will be this Saturday in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Three months ago, Christie set the date. Three months of hard work gave her the body of her dreams. She did it, and so can you. Set a goal. Set a deadline. Reward yourself for achieving it, and penalize yourself for not. I have set up reward systems for many of my clients and I can set one up for you. For more information contact me at LeverageFitnessStudio.com or call 570.338.3286.

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- Tim Hlivia is the owner of Leverage Fitness Studio in Forty Fort.


in your face scares

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

m u l y s A s t r a h n e Brok se haunted hou

Open this weekend and every weekend in October

Only $10.00 per person all ages BeneďŹ tting the Harveys Lake Fire Department

$1.00 off One coupon per person. No cash value.

located at the luzerne county fair grounds | just seconds from route 118 & 415

FOR YOUR SAFETY OUR ATTRACTIONS ARE INSPECTED TO THE STANDARDS OF THE PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

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www.brokenhartsasylum.com

780216

Friday and Saturday 7pm-12pm Sunday 7pm-11pm


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WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012


Harris Conservatory for the Arts (545 Charles St. Luzerne, 718.0673) • Cardio Kickboxing: Wed., 7-8 p.m.; Sat., 9-10 a.m. $5/class. Call for info. • Hoop Fitness Techniques: Mon., 7:30-8:30 p.m. $5/class. Call for info. Hoop Fitness Classes (whirligighoopers.com) • Beginner/Intermediate: Mon., 7:30 p.m., Harris Conservatory (545 Charles St., Luzerne). $5. Call 718.0673 to reserve. • Beginner/Intermediate: Thurs., 5:30 p.m., Studio 32 (32 Forrest St., WilkesBarre) $5. Inner Harmony Wellness Center (Mercy Hospital General Services Bldg., 743 Jefferson Ave., Scranton, 570.346.4621, www.innerharmonywellness.com, peteramato@aol.com) • Meditation Technique Workshops: Wed., 6:30 p.m. $15/session. Goal setting/ stress reduction, more. Call for info/ reservation. Jeet Kune Do Fighting Concepts Teaches theories of movement in Martial Arts. $100/month. Call instructor Mike DiMeglio for info, 570.371.8898. Jim Thorpe Arts in Motion (434 Center St., Jim Thorpe, 570.483.8640, jtartsinmotion.com) • Friday Night Drop-in Class for Chair Yoga, Guided Meditation, Spirit Connections: $8/class, $15/all three. Elemental Alchemist AnneMarie Balog, Level II Lakshmi Voelker Chair Yoga instructor. Private/group meditation sessions, reiki treatments, classes, yoga, tarot readings/ parties, divination consultations. Contact 881.2399, shantispirit23@live.com. Info: jtartsinmotion.com/Classes/elementalalchemist Kwon Kodo Lessons: Learn self-defense system that combines Korean Martial Arts such as Hapkido, Taekwondo & Kuk Sool. Lessons held at Hapkido Taekwondo Institute (150 Welles St., Forty Fort). $40/month. For info, call 570.287.4290 or visit htkdi.com.

Meditation/Yoga classes at Spectrum Health & Racquet Club (151 Terrace Dr., Eynon). Meditation: Fri., 7-8 p.m. Yoga: Sat., 9:45-10:45 a.m. $5 each class, bring mat. Call 570.383.3223 for info. Melt Hot Yoga (#16 Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville, 570.287.3400, melthotyogastudio.com) • Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m., 5:30 p.m. (90 minutes) • Tues., Thurs., 4 p.m. (one hour) • Sat., Sun., 9 a.m., 3 p.m. (90 minutes) New Visions Studio & Gallery (201 Vine Street, Scranton, 570.878.3970, newvisionsstudio@gmail.com, newvisionsstudio.com) • Vinyasa Yoga Classes with Sarah Yzkanin: Sundays, 2-3 p.m. All levels welcome. $6. Call 570.575.8789 or e-mail dealerinwares@hotmail.comfor info. NutriFitness Boot Camp (311 Market St., Kingston, 570.288.2409) • Free week of Boot Camp for new members: Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m., 5:30 p.m. • Wirred: Mon., Wed., 6:45 p.m., Sat., 10 a.m. $5. • Yoga: Thurs. 7 p.m. $10. • Tang Soo Do Karate Classes: Mon., Wed., 6:45 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m. Call to register. Odyssey Fitness (401 Coal St., Wilkes-Barre, 570.829.2661, odysseyfitnesscenter.com) • Yoga Classes: Sun., 12:30 p.m.; Mon., 7:15 a.m.; Tues., 7 a.m., 5 p.m.; Wed., 8 a.m., 6:30 p.m.; Thurs., 6:30 p.m.; Sat., 10:30 a.m. All levels welcome. • ZumbAtomic: Lil Starz, ages 4-7: 5:30 p.m.; Big Starz, ages 8-12: 6:15 p.m. Open Your Eyes To Dream (143 W. Main St., Bloomsburg, 570.239.7520, www.oyetd.com) ❏ Open-Eyed Yoga. Call 394.2251 or go online for current updates/cancellations. E-mail: yoga@oyetd.com • Beginner Vinyasa: Mon., 5:30-6:30 p.m. • Level II Vinyasa: Mon., 7-8:30 p.m. • Mixed Level Vinyasa: Tues., 9-10:30 a.m., Wed., 6:30-7:45 p.m. Mats & props available. Student/ package discounts available. Bring friend to first class, get two for price of one. Prana Yoga Studio (960 Prescott Ave., Dunmore, www.pranayogadunmore.com) Classes taught in vinyasa flow, geared for all levels • Mon.: Advanced, 6 p.m.; tai chi with Blake Wheeler 7:30-8:45 p.m., Thurs., 8:45-10 p.m., $45/month, on class/week,

$65/month, two classes/week. Contact Blake at 434.989.1045 or blakewhlr@yahoo.com for info. • Tues.: Beginner, 10 a.m.; Open Level, noon; Beg./Intermediate, 5:30 p.m.; Intermediate, 7:30 p.m. • Wed.: Beginner, 5:30 p.m.; Advanced 7:30 p.m. • Thurs.: Open Level, 10 a.m.; Beg./ Intermediate, 5:30 p.m.; Intermediate, 7:30 p.m. • Fri.: Open Level, 10 a.m.; Advanced, 6 p.m. • Sat.: Beg./Intermediate, 10 a.m.; Intermediate, noon. • Sun.: Intermediate, noon; Candle-lit Open Level, 6 p.m. • Sandstorm Fitness with Rachel “Kali” Dare: Wed. 4-5 p.m. Learn various techniques and shed pounds. Call 570.677.7067 or email standuphungry@yahoo.com for info. Reiki Classes (570.387.6157, reikictr@localnet.com) Sessions with Sue Yarnes: • Beginner to Advanced Reiki at our locations or your home. Hospital endorsed, training for professional Usui Reiki teacher certification available. Call or e-mail for info. The Self Discovery and Wellness Arts Center (200 Lake Ave., Montrose, 570.278.9256 or e-mail wellness@epix.net, wellnessarts.com) • Monthly World Peace Meditation and Reiki Circle: First Tuesday of every month, 5-7 p.m. $10. Sandy Seyler Studio (House of Nutrition, 2nd floor, 50 Main St., Luzerne, 570.288.1785, SandySeyler.com) Sheri Pilates Studio (703 Market St., Kingston, 570.331.0531) • Beginner mat class: Tues., 5 p.m. $50/10 classes. • Equipment classes on reformer and tower: $150/10 classes. • Private training available on reformer, cadillac, stability chair, ladder barrel, cardiolates on rebounder. Call studio for additional mat class/ equipment class schedule, all classes taught by certified instructors. Spine & SportCare (Old Forge, 570.451.1122) • Pilates Mat Classes: Mon. 9:30 a.m.; Wed. noon; Thurs. 5:30 p.m.; Yoga Flow: Tues. 5:30 p.m. $10/class, $45/5 classes. • Small Group Personal Training: Personalized program changes w/ every session, similar to P90X crossfit. All levels, call for details. Studio Brick (118 Walnut St., Danville, 570.275.3240) • All Levels Yoga: Wed. (ongoing), 10-11

Tarot Card Readings with Whitney Mulqueen Mon., noon-5 p.m., Duffy’s Coffee House (312 S. State St., Clarks Summit). Info: 570.575.8649 Tarot Readings every Sun., 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Shambala, Scranton, located at Mall At Steamtown, first floor outside Bonton. By Whitney Mulqueen. Walk-ins welcome. Info: 570.575.8649, 344.4385, find Shambala on Facebook. Thetravelingyogi@yahoo.com Individual attention for physical/spiritual advancement. All levels welcome. Call 570.709.2406 for info. Classes held at The Studio at 32 (32 Forrest St., WilkesBarre) Sat., 10:30 a.m.-noon. Unity: A Center for Spiritual Living (140 South Grant St., WilkesBarre, 570.824.7722) • A Course in Miracles / Holistic Fitness-Yoga Sessions: Tues., 6:30-8:30 p.m. • Meditation Chakra Clearing Deeksha: 2nd, 4th Mon., 7-8:30 p.m. $8. Oneness meditation, chakra clearing/ energization, transfer of Divine Energy. Welcome beginning, experienced meditators, all paths. Info: 587.0967, ernie@divinejoyministry.com. Waering Stained Glass Studio (336 N. Washington St., Wilkes-Barre). • Tarot Card Readings: $50/first half hour, $10 additional. Appointment only. Call 570.417.5020. Waverly Community House (1115 N. Abington Rd., Waverly, 570.586.8191, www.waverlycomm.org)

White Dragon Internal Strength Chi Kung (330 Sandra Dr., Jefferson Twp & Scranton, 570.906.9771) Tai chi, yoga, meditation, chi kung, white lotus, pai lum, flowing water, inner tiger. Beginners-advanced. Mon.-Fri., open 6 a.m.-10 p.m. Sat. 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Sun 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Private and group. Any ages. Wilkes-Barre YMCA events (570.823.2191) • Zumbatomic: Sat., 1 p.m. $16/8 week session for YMCA members, $20/nonmembers. Designed for ages 7-12, now offering parent class. Pre-registration required. The Yoga Studio (210 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming, 570.301.7544) • Yoga: Mon., 9:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m.; Wed., 10:30 a.m.; Thurs., 9:30 a.m., 6:30 p.m.; Sat., 10:30 a.m. • Zumba: Tues., 5:30 p.m.; Wed. 9 a.m., 7 p.m.; Fri., 5:30 p.m. YMCA of Greater Pittston (10 N Main St, Pittston, 570.655.2255 ext. 104, mlabagh@greaterpittstonymca.org) • Zumba Toning: Mon., 5 p.m. • Zumba Gold: Tues., 10:30 a.m. • Kids’ Creative Movement: Tues., 3:45-4:15 p.m. • Zumba: Wed., 5 p.m. • Zumba Gold: Thurs., 10:30 a.m. • Early Tikes Gymnastics: Wed., 9-9:30 a.m. $30. • Just 3’s: Wed., 9:45-10:15 a.m. $30. • Twinkie Fitness: Thurs., 5:15-6 p.m., $30. Age 4. • Beginner Gymnastics: Young beginner (ages 5-7), Sat., 9-9:45 a.m.; beginner (ages 7+), Sat., 10-10:45 a.m.; intermediate (ages 10+), Sat., 11 a.m.-noon. $40/member, $30/family member, $55/non-members. • Basketball: Beginner (kindergarten, grades1-2), Tues., 5:30- 6:15 p.m. • Basketball Basics: (grades 3-5) Tues., 6:30-7:30 p.m. $50/members, $40/family member, $65/non-members. • Basketball and Softball: Tee Ball (ages 5-6), Sat., 9-9:45 a.m.; pre-minors baseball (ages 7-10), Sat., 10-11 a.m.; preminors softball (ages 7-10), Sat., 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m., $50/members, $40/family members, $65/non-members. Zumba Fitness Classes • Mon./Wed., 5:15 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m., at TLC Fitness Center (bottom of Morgan Hwy., Scranton). $5/class. Call 570.558.7293 for info. • Adult classes held at Fitwize 4 Kids Tues./Thurs., 7:15, Sun., 11 a.m. on Keyser Ave. across from Keyser Oak Shopping Center Call 348.9383 for info.

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- compiled by Rich Howells, Weekender Staff Writer. Send your listings to weekender@theweekender.com, 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 18703, or fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline is Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded listings at theweekender.com.

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Leverage Fitness Studio (900 Rutter Ave., Forty Fort, 570.338.2386, leveragetrainingstudio.com) Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 6 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri. 6 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. • Fusion Flexibility: Sun. 9-10 a.m. • Wake-Up Workout: Mon., Wed., Fri. 7-7:45 a.m. • Executive Workout: Mon., Wed. 12:15-12:45 p.m. • Sexy to the Core: Wed. 5:30 p.m. • Primal Scream: Tues., Thurs. 7-8 p.m. • Inferno: Sat. 10 a.m. All classes free to members, $10

non-members.

Symmetry Studio (206 N. Main Avenue, 3rd Floor, Scranton, 570.290.7242, SymmetryStudioNEPA.com) • Mon.: Gentle Yoga 5:30 p.m.; Core Yoga 6:30 p.m. • Tues.: Beginners Yoga 5 p.m.; Yoga Strength and Flexibility 6 p.m.; Cardio Kickboxing 7:30 p.m. • Wed.: Slow Flow 5:30 p.m.; Core Yoga 6:30 p.m. • Thurs.: All Levels Vinyasa 5:30 p.m.; Cardio Kickboxing 7:30 p.m. • Fri.: Community Ballroom (call for registration details) • Sat.: Prenatal Yoga 9:30 a.m.; Essential Yoga All Levels 11 a.m. • Sun.: Slow Flow 11 a.m. • Intermediate Jazz/Contemporary Technique Class: Mon., 4:15-5:15 p.m. Ages 10-14. 10/class. • Jazz/Contemporary Technique Class: Mon., 7:45-8:45 p.m. Ages 15-adult. $10/class. • Modern/Lyrical Technique Class: Thurs., 7:45-8:45 p.m. Ages 15-adult. $10/class. • Cardio Kick and Interval Training: Mon., 5:30 p.m., Tues., 4 p.m. • Dancers Wanted: Female/male dancers, ages 10-adult for Symmetry Dance Company’s Junior, Senior Companies. Call or e-mail info@symmetrystudionepa.com. Info: symmetrystudionepa.com/dance-company

• Meditation Classes: through Nov. 1, Thurs. 7-8:30 p.m. $10/class.

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

Mind and body

a.m.


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

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Life is a Drag

show us some skin

POSITIVE ADVICE IN A NEGATIVE WORLD

Estella Sweet | Weekender Correspondent

Dear Stella,

Is the “beer before liquor, never sicker” thing true? I’d like to drink responsibly and also avoid feeling awful in the morning. I know you’re a bartender, so any advice? - Trying Not to Get Wasted in Wilkes-Barre Dear Trying Not to Get Wasted, Kudos to you, partying responsibly! We all love a good party but hate the walk of shame and/ or worshiping the porcelain god. So, yes, I will give you my very best bartender advice. From my experience, “beer before liquor” is a myth. Mixing of any kind is not advised. Excepting long explanations, mixing = bad. Either stick with one type of liquor all evening or one type of beer or wine. Remember that all alcoholic drinks are made differently and they all affect everyone differently. Something most people don’t realize is the effect carbonation has on the absorption of alcohol. The pressure from the carbonation in your stomach actually forces the alcohol into your system faster. Having beer after liquor to “slow down” is only adding fuel to the fire. This also explains the myth of becoming sick from “beer before liquor.” When you fill your system with carbonated beer and add alcohol on top, the liquor is absorbed faster and your body rejects it to avoid alcohol poisoning. As far as avoiding the morning after hangover, hydration is key. Alternating alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages while drinking not only paces you and keeps you from drinking too quickly, but most of the time, that morning headache is due to dehydration. Alcohol, although a fluid, actually dehydrates your body. So it’s good to remember slow and steady wins the race. Water, before, during, and especially before you go to bed will ensure you are well hydrated. As with all drugs, alcohol

Name: McKensie Curnow Town: Greenfield Township Last month’s winner: Steve Lappan of Berwick

Stella dishes on responsible drinking habits and tips for thrifty fashionistas. (Photo by Scott Reilly) consumption can be a slippery slope. This advice is just a scratch on the surface of “responsible alcohol consumption,” and if you really are looking to be as safe as possible, I do recommend researching the topic further. In my line of work I’ve seen the good, bad, and the ugly. Moderation is key. Party on! Dear Stella, Is wearing white after Labor Day really such a sin? I’m a bit of a “fashion victim” or so my friends seem to think. I seem to have trouble with such things as patterns and the use of color. I do want to look my best but I also want to be comfortable and I’m on a budget. Any thoughts? -Walmart Fashionista Dear Fashionista, I’d like to tell you to wear what you like and just go for comfort. Unfortunately in today’s society, you are what you wear. With that being said, here are my suggestions. White after Labor day is becoming more acceptable and is better than wearing clothing that doesn’t match or that doesn’t quite fit right. Beware of colors that clash or don’t match, like pink and red, or black and brown. If you’re going to wear pat-

terns, try and stick to just one. If you think it’s too busy, it probably is. If you’re looking to step up your wardrobe on a budget, second hand is the way to go! I’m a firm believer that paying top dollar for a label or brand name is a waste of money, and you don’t always get what you pay for. You can find some real quality at your local thrift store if you have the time to look. Just be sure you thoroughly inspect what you’re buying before you purchase and as with any new clothing, wash it before you wear it. Remember it is second hand and you don’t want to end up wearing someone’s stained and tattered hand-me-downs. Size matters! Just because it stretches, it doesn’t mean it fits! Finally, comfort is important. No matter how good you look in it, if you’re uncomfortable, it’ll show. Wear what makes you feel good about yourself. Happy shopping!

W

- Have a question? Write Stella at stella@theweekender.com. Find more of Stella all week long at Twist Night Club or at www.facebook.com missestellasweet.

HOW TO ENTER:

E-mail a photo of your tattoo (at least 200 dpi) with your full name, address and phone number to weekender@theweekender.com to enter our weekly contest. Each month, Weekender readers vote for their favorite, and the winner receives a $75 gift certificate to Marc’s Tattooing. Must be 18 to participate

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AGENDA, FROM PAGE 39 ry St., Scranton, 570.346.7186, www.everhart-museum.org) • “Everybody’s Art” New Series of Adult Art Classes: $25/workshop members, $30 non-members. Preregistration required. • Rosen Method easy movement program, Thurs., 2-3 p.m., Folk art gallery, $5/class, free to members. Must pre-register. • Early Explorers: Mon., 1-1:45 p.m. Free, suitable for ages 3-5. Preregistration required, groups welcome. For info, to register, call or e-mail education@everhart-museum.org. GreenBeing (334 Adams Ave., Scranton, info@shopgreenbeing.com) • Not Your Granny’s Sewing: oneon-one lessons: $40/lesson, $140/4 sessions, 2-3 hour sessions. Tailored to individual needs. Guitar & Bass Lessons available from Fox Studios (11 Rhine Creek Rd., Drums) Mon.-Thurs. 1-10 p.m. $16 per hour. All ages, all styles of music, all levels. Call 570.788.4797 for info. Harris Conservatory for the Arts (545 Charles St. Luzerne, 570.287.7977 or 718.0673) • Instrumental Music Instruction • Private Ballroom Lessons • Private Vocal Instruction: Tues. evenings. • Private Guitar Instruction: Classical, acoustic, electric for all ages. Horse Back Riding Lessons Elk Stables, Uniondale, by appointment only. All levels welcome. Call 570.575.8649 to schedule. Math Tutoring and Coaching Highly qualified and experienced teacher. All levels tutoring, coaching, homework help. Individuals/groups. Fun-filled Math Anxiety Buster Workshops. Open all week. Ongoing enrollment. Call 570.899.5576, e-mail sibut4710@aol.com. Moscow Clayworks (moscowclayworks.com) • Focus on hand-building techniques: Adults, Tues., 6-8 p.m.; kids, Thurs., 6-8 p.m. $125/5 sessions. Reservations required. • Potters Wheel for Beginners: Mon., Wed., 6-8 p.m. $125/5 sessions. Reservations required. NEPA Bonsai Society (Midway Garden Center, 1865 Hwy. 315, Pittston, 570.654.6194, www.myspace.com/nepabonsai). • Monthly meeting last Wed., 7 p.m. Features business sessions, demonstrations/programs/workshops. New Visions Studio & Gal-

lery (201 Vine Street, Scranton, 570.878.3970, newvisionsstudio@gmail.com, newvisionsstudio.com) • Kid’s Art Class: All About Art: Sat., ages 11-16. Sun., ages 5-10. $100-$125/ month, $30/class. Supplies included. Call to register. Northeast Photography Club (www.northeastphotographyclub.org) meets first Wed. of month 7 p.m. in boardroom of Prime Med (old Wes Freedman Building) off Morgan Hwy. Variety of topics, monthly contest, guest speakers. Membership open. Phoenix Performing Arts Centre (409-411 Main St., Duryea, 570.457.3589, phoenixpac.vpweb.com, phoenixpac08@aol.com) • Dimensions in Dance w/ Lee LaChette: Jazz, tap, ballet for adults & kids. $10/hour, $5/second class. E-mail or call 991.1817. • Vocal lessons w/ Joelle Colombo Witner: Wed., Sun. E-mail or call 991.1817. • Vocal Coaching w/ Nicole Rasmus: $15/half hour • Stage Combat Lessons w/ Paul J. Gallo: 12 weeks, date/time TBA. 1.5 hours, prepare for intense physical activity, dress appropriately. $20/ week or $200 up front. Piano and Flute Lessons (Anne, 570.881.2433) • Private studio in Kingston, enthusiastic approach, learn at own pace and in natural learning style. Professional teacher/performer (Bachelors in Music Performance, SUNY Purchase Conservatory of Music; Masters in Music Performance, University of Texas at Austin Butler School of Music). Accepting new students of all ages, time slots available early mornings into evenings weekdays for 30, 45, 60 minutes. Pocono Arts Council (18 N. Seventh St., Stroudsburg. 570.476.4460. www.poconoarts.org) ❏ Ongoing Adult Classes ❏ Adult Classes • Sculpting Demonstration at Backstreet Studio: One day, Oct. 13, 1 p.m., Backstreet Studio (6th St., Stroudsburg). $10 member, $15 non-member. Private Voice Lessons Mon.Thurs. by appointment. Learn proper singing technique in downtown Wilkes-Barre studio. Specializing in opera/classical/musical theater. Hour, half-hour lessons. Student discounts available. Please call 824.5428 or visit www.katrinalykes.com for info. Something Special: (23 West Walnut Street Kingston, 570.540.6376, angiethear-

tist@aol.com, www.angelademuroart.com) • MANGA Art Class: (Japanese Cartooning) Wed., 4-5 p.m. Learn the art of Japanese cartooning. 4-week session, supplies included: $60 per child. Call or e-mail to register. Southside Senior Center (425 Alder St., Scranton, 570.346.2487) • Language Partnership English & Spanish Classes: Fri., 10 a.m. Free, open to all. For info, call 346.0759. Waverly Community House (1115 N. Abington Rd., Waverly, 570.586.8191, www.waverlycomm.org) • Ballroom Dancing Lessons: Wed., 7:15 p.m., Comm auditorium. Basic & advanced ballroom, swing. $15/ person. For info, call Vince Brust at 489.3111. Wyoming Valley Art League • Painting with Irina Krawitz: $15/ hour, $120/4-weeks. Call 570.793.3992 for info.

SEASONAL EVENTS Brokenharts Asylum (Luzerne County Fairgrounds, Route 118, Dallas, 570.760.8027, screamindemonshaunts.com) • Fri. and Sat., 7 p.m.-midnight; Sun., 7-11 p.m. $10, immediate re-ride for $5 more. Dracula’s Forest (2828 Rock Dr., Clarks Summit, 570.586.5084, draculasforest.com) • Fri.-Sun., through Oct. Tickets available at 6:30 p.m. Haunted hay ride $15 for adults, $7 for kids 10 and under; Shockwalk $7; Little Screamers, Sundays, 1 to 5 p.m., $7. Gymboree’s Pumkin Parties, Gymboree (1159 Highway 315, WilkesBarre) • Oct. 26, 5:30-7 p.m.; Oct. 27, 2-3:30 p.m.; Oct. 28, 10:30 a.m.-noon, . $15 per child for enrolled members, $20 for non-members. Info:570.208.2908, gymboreeclasses.com/wbarrepa.site Gravestone Manor (1095 Highway 315, Plains, 570.821.6500, unitedwaywb.org/gravestonemanor/ terror.htm) • Fri. and Sat., 7-11 p.m.; Sun., 7-9:30 p.m., through Oct. 28. $10. Halloween party: Oct. 27, 6-11 p.m., Irem Clubhouse (64 Ridgway Dr., Dallas). $25. Info: 570.675.1134, ext. 100. RSVP due by Oct. 15. Haunted Lantern Tours (Eckley Miners’ Village, 2 Eckley Main St., Weatherly, 570.636.2070, eckleyminersvillagemuseum.com) • Oct. 12-13, rain date Oct. 14; Oct. 19-20, rain date Oct. 21, Oct. 26-27, rain date Oct. 28. Doors 6 p.m., first

tour at 6:30 p.m., last tour 9 p.m. $10 for adults 13+, $5 for children 6-12. Not recommended for children under 6. Horror Hall (11 E. Poplar St., Nanticoke, 570.735.7899, horrorhall.com) • Fri. and Sat., 6 p.m.-midnight; Sun., 6-10 p.m., through October. $12,50; fast pass $17.50. Reaper’s Revenge (456 Swika Ln., Scott Township, 570.253-GRIM, reapersrevenge.net) • Fri. and Sat., 6-11 p.m.; Sun. and Nov. 2-3, 6-10 p.m., through Nov. 3. $25. Trails of Terror Haunted Walk (West Wyoming Hose Co., 926 Shoemaker Ave., West Wyoming, 570.760.3489) • Fri.-Sat. dusk-11 p.m., Sun. dusk-10 p.m., through Oct. 28. $5. Volunteers still needed.

SOCIAL GROUPS AA Intergroup NEPA If you want to drink, that’s your business. If you want to quit, we have an answer. Info: aaintergroupnepa.org, 570.654.0488 Alcohol Anonymous: Mon./Fri 7 p.m. (373 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre), Tue. 7 p.m. (25 Church St., WilkesBarre), Wed. 10:15 a.m. (301 Shoemaker St., Swoyersville), 7 p.m. (1000 E. Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre), 8 p.m. (562 Wyoming Ave., Kingston), Thurs. 10 a.m. (75 S. Prospect St., Nanticoke), 7:30 p.m. (301 Lake St., Dallas), Fri. 7:30 p.m. (Triangle 24 Hour Club, Dallas), Sat. 7:30 p.m. (1003 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort), Sun. 7 p.m. (128 W. Washington St., Nanticoke). Call 570.288.9892 for info. Beehive Area Narcotics Anonymous (Wilkes-Barre-Kingston-Nanticoke-Mountaintop) 24 hour phone line: 570.654.7755 or 1.866.935.4762. Building Industry Association of NEPA (570.287.3331) • Sponsorship: Become host of a monthly General Membership Meeting. Call or e-mail danielle@bianepa.com for details. • Accepting entries for Outdoor Theme Project from builders, trade schools, Vo-Techs, Job Corps. For info, call 570.287.3331. Geisinger Wyoming Valley (Kistler Learning Center Specialty Clinic, 1000 E. Mountain Blvd., WilkesBarre) • Breast cancer screening: Oct. 26, 1-3 p.m. Info and RSVP: 570.808.6153. Living with Grief: free sixweek bereavement support group (2-3:30 p.m., 6-7:30 p.m., Spiritual Center, Geisinger Wyoming

Valley Medical Center, 1000 E. Mountain Blvd., Wilkes-Barre, 570.808.5539) Nar-Anon Family Group Meetings Sun. 7 p.m. Clear Brook Bldg. (rear), Forty Fort; Wed., 7 p.m. United Methodist Church, Mountaintop. 570.288.9892. Narcotic Anonymous Meetings every Tues. at 7 p.m., downstairs in the Methodist Education Building, located off Courthouse Square, on the corner of Marion and Warren Street in Tunkhannock. There are no fees or dues. Newcomers always welcome. Oakwood Terrace (400 Gleason Dr., Moosic, 570.451.3171 ext. 116 or 101) • Support Group Meetings: third Wed. of each month, 6:30 p.m. Overeaters Anon. meetings Mon., Tues., Thurs., 7 p.m.; Wed., 7:30 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m. No fee, newcomers welcome. Call 570.829.1341 for details/meeting locations of visit www.oa.org. Pride of NEPA meetings the second Tues. of each month. Visit prideofnepa.org for details. St Joseph’s Senior Social Club • Trip to Cape Cod, Mass.: Oct. 15-19. Info: 570.654.2967. • Meeting: Oct. 18. Info: 570.654.2967. Suicide Bereavement Support Group First/Third Thurs. every month, 7 p.m., at Catholic Social Services (33 E. Northampton St., Wilkes-Barre). Call 570.822.7118 ext. 307 for info.

Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Resolve Infertility Peer Support Group: Last Sun. of month, 6:30-8 p.m., Kistler Learning Center at Geisinger Wyoming Valley. Contact Jennifer for info, 610.393.8098. Wyoming Valley Home School Network A support group for home school or cyber school parents throughout NEPA providing monthly meetings, field trips, park days, more. Visit wvhsnetwork.webs.com or contact Julie Lemardy at jmlemardy@gmail.com for info.

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- compiled by Rich Howells, Weekender Staff Writer. Send your listings to weekender@theweekender.com, 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 18703, or fax to 570.831.7375. Deadline is Mondays at 2 p.m. Expanded listings at theweekender.com.


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VIDEO GAME REVIEWS

Robbie Vanderveken | Special to the Weekender

'Worms' not a revolution, but tons of fun Usually having worms is a bad thing, unless you are talking about “Worms Revolution.” Then it’s a hilarious good time. The “Worms” series has been around for 17 years with several different iterations, and after all this time the wacky and fun gameplay has not only held up to the test of time, it has gotten better. If you missed worms in the late ‘90s, you may be asking why I would want to play a game about worms. For the same reason people play a game about “angry birds” – it’s comical, accessible, quick, and just plain addictive. One of the big reasons I have always been a fan of this series is the silly premise. You get a team of these cute little worms that is placed on a randomly generated battlefield where they use their wild arsenal of weapons to destroy each other in hilarious ways. The gameplay is turn-based; each worm has a short amount of time to move, select a weapon, and attempt to take out a member of the other team. On paper it sounds boring, but these games are a laugh riot. The things that make the game for me are the bright and colorful visuals, the silly things the worms say, and without a doubt the crazy weapons you get to use. What other game can you play where you get to blow up your friends with exploding sheep, old ladies, worms with jetpacks that can drop sticks of dynamite, napalm strikes, nukes, banana bombs, worm ninjas, and my personal favorite, the holy hand grenade from “Monty Python and the Holy Grail”? I haven’t played a “Worms” game since “Worms Armageddon” in 1999, and there have been a ton of new features and upgrades since then. First and foremost for me is the addition of online multiplayer; now you can blast the

v The new character types in ’Worms Revolution’ add another layer to the hilarious gameplay. crap out of friends online, complete training missions, and even customize your weapon loadouts, outfits, and even voices. Multiplayer also offers several fun game modes like Deathmatch, Forts, and Classic. These modes can be played locally with friends, or you can play with up to four people online. If the addition to online multiplayer is not enough, “Revolution” has more dynamic battlefields with physical items that can be strategically manipulated. The backgrounds can even act more like a weapon than ever before; you can now blast water pockets and fill the map with water, drowning your enemies. There are even destructible objects that release poison and other dangerous things. In previous installments of “Worms,” each of the worms looked and behaved the same. “Revolution” differs with the addition of character classes. The basic worm is now called a Soldier, and there is also the Scout, Scientist, and Heavy. Soldiers are agile and can easily move around with things like jetpacks and ninja ropes. Heavies are the exact opposite; they move slowly but can deal a lot more damage. Scientists give the rest of the team support by giving health and using tools like turrets, magnets, and much more.

’Worms Revolution’ is out for PS3, Xbox 360, and Windows. I think the class that was the most fun to play was the Scout. They are the most agile and can get in good positions to really do some damage. Having the new classes gives “Revolution” additional variety and replayability. “Worms Revolution” is definitely not going to change the way we play games, but if you are looking for a silly game to pass the time with friends, you should check it out. You will get a lengthy game experience with 32 levels, more than 20 puzzle levels, and hours of great multiplayer for the low price of $9.99. It sure beats taking a super sheep to the face.

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- Robbie Vanderveken is the digital operations specialist at The Times Leader. E-mail him at rvanderveken @timesleader.com.

RUBIE Maine Coon

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Katie Sokolas Plains Enter your pet for Weekender’s PET OF THE WEEK by sending photo, pet’s name, breed if applicable, owner’s name and hometown to: weekender@theweekender.com subject line: Pet of the Week

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WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

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get your game on


It’s easy to try out a new style each day, be it mod, rocker, or whatever you’re comfortable with.

Mod, rocker looks easy dress-up options A Rocker is the easier of the two since everybody’s familiar with leather jackets, spiked collars, and Hell’s Angels. While black on black is an easy way to create this look, feel free to mix it up with some lighter shades. It’s more of girly meets grunge. Pairing a soft button up blouse and pearls with something particularly punk and edgy takes things to the next level. The shoes are important, too. A lot of girls backstage had to abandon their dainty high heels for some edgy wedges or combat boots instead. It’s the littlest details that count and complete the look. The Mod era of the 1960s most popularized by the model Twiggy. It was all about being bold, but never used dark colors to express itself. Think bright neon colors, obnoxious prints and patterns, and never wearing pants. Mod very much preferred bare legged looks or outfits with contrasting color tights underneath their short A-line dresses. In particular, oversized accessories seem to be the most important. Keep the dresses short, the boots high, and the earrings large. That’s simply Mod. In the end, it’s about the attitude you have. Play dress up for the day and be whoever you want to be. After all, if it doesn’t work out, you can always change it up tomorrow.

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One of my favorite things about fashion is it is a lot like playing dress up when you were a little kid. You can wake up one morning and decide to put on a completely different persona for the day, a personality completely opposite of your own without really changing anything but what you wear. Your personal style is the message you send to the rest of the world and it is you who decides what to say, so why repeat the same sentence over and over? Scissorcandy is a hair show featuring the unique styles of talented hair stylists all over the world. They held their show in Philadelphia this year and specialize in insane hairdos and going over the top with their themes. This year was no different. The theme was “ Mod versus Rocker,” and with visions of the possible crazy hairdos and dressup outfits I’d get to wear, how could I refuse to be a part of it? While I was backstage, I got to share a few secrets of what it takes to create a whole new look. Whether you’ll be inspired to put these pieces in your wardrobe because you want to play dress up for the day or maybe are already looking ahead to that ideal Halloween costume, listen up, because here’s what it takes to transform into either a Rocker or Mod.

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FASHION TIPS & MORE

Janelle Engle | Special to the Weekender

Every other week, Steph writes about her other favorite F word:

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

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The


By Caeriel Crestin

Weekender Correspondent LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) When a fly gets caught in a spider web, it’s mostly snared by its own stupidity. If it had the sense to just keep still a moment, check out its situation and carefully extricate itself, it would have a better chance of getting free. But instead it struggles, inevitably tangling itself further and attracting the attention of the spider itself. I’m not criticizing an insect’s intelligence; it is what it is. But when you find yourself caught on one or two delicate, sticky filaments of trouble this week, don’t freak out and start flailing around. Stay calm, be resourceful and use the sharpest edge I know of—your brain—to cut yourself loose. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) The house of candy had lured many children to their doom already, until those infernal brats, Hansel and Gretel, came to visit. Skinny little things, they begrudged a witch her supper. Her cataracts prevented her from uncovering their deception as they proffered discarded finger bones for measurement—somehow they defied her fat-filled cooking. But the witch’s fatal mistake occurred when she believed the children to be more stupid than they were. As a result, they roasted her alive. This week, don’t let all your hard work—the gingerbread house, the weeks of fattening the children—get thrown into the oven, along with yourself, by a minor oversight. Be sure you’ve got your windowsills sugar-frosted, loose licorice tied up, and all cages securely locked. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) Picture the moment when the ant finally submits to its not-so-spontaneous combustion under a magnifying glass. Be impressed with the voracious wall of flame that runs marathons across a forest, sprinting with long glowing legs. There’s a certain element of darkness to the searing power of fire. But as your personal energy concentrates and intensifies—like sunlight through a lens—it doesn’t need to destroy or consume to show its power. It can warm, cook, entertain, illuminate, or protect. Please practice this mostly benevolent side of yourself. This week, shine without burning anyone or anything.

Mario Lopez Oct. 10, 1973 Emily Deschanel Oct. 11, 1976 HUGH JACKMAN (PICTURED) Oct. 12, 1968 Marie Osmond Oct. 13, 1959 Usher Oct. 14, 1979 Sarah Ferguson Oct. 15, 1959 Flea Oct. 16, 1962

with a similar dilemma this week, where it seems the only immediately viable solution is to just climb right inside your problem, icky s--t and all, and pull what you need right out of the bloody mess. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) Last night I dreamt you were confined to a room until you’d spun whole bales of hay into gold. You learned quickly, and soon produced spools of shining thread. Unfortunately, you were disappointed to discover that it was weak and inflexible, if pretty. Refining your system, you developed a much stronger, more versatile thread—in an unspectacular shade of brown. When reviewing your fine handiwork, the evaluators found it wanting; it wasn’t gold, not even close. The moral: give them what they ask for. Your way may be better, cleaner, faster, more environmentally sound, healthier, more efficient, more politically correct, but if they’re not asking for it, they’re not buying it. So what? Give yourself a break and let them suffer. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) An old friend of mine got accosted by a wigmaker on the streets of New York and offered two grand for her long, wavy red hair. She was flustered and suddenly had to reevaluate something she’d taken for granted, in light of the huge wad of cash she’d done virtually nothing to earn. In her case, she refused, suddenly treasuring this part of herself she’d often ignored or resented. When you’re offered a bonus this week for some aspect of simply being yourself, I hope—whether you take advantage of the offer or not—that you’ll teach yourself a thing or two about how much you’re really worth.

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) Invite the monsters under your bed out for a drink. Get them tipsy and pick their brains. What’s the secret behind your greatest, most successful anxieties? Do they thrive on freaking you out? Or is it simply because you sanction their existence by refusing to conceive of a life without fears? This is a good week to give lurking terrors that haunt you the boot; cast them out and don’t look back. Give the underside of your bed a good sweeping out, then invite some friendlier monsters in to live, ones that’ll remind you of all the ways you’re nourished and safe, not frightened or troubled. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) On one shoulder lolls a horny red devil, counseling you to not resist temptation, to succumb to your most perverse desires. On the other perches a tediously trite but strangely compelling little angel, advising you to do the righteous thing. Brush them off like a bad dandruff problem. The world’s more complicated than the viewpoints of unimaginative purists out of a cartoon reality. Hard-and-fast rules are for suckers; I prefer exceptions. Let me tell you a secret: there are a few of us out there who’ve learned how to wear horns and wings, to be horny and holy. There’s a way to satisfy your longings while doing the right thing. Find it. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) Every teacher’s primary goal should be to make herself obsolete. Instead of merely imparting rote, one-sided information of limited use, each instructor should teach his students to find facts, read between the lines, question; ultimately, to

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) You’ve got flower stems clogging your gun barrels, sugar in your gas tank, and love letters instead of dollar bills fill your wallet. All of this may be terribly inconvenient, but I doubt you’ll mind. When you’re feeling this good, it’s hard to resent the fact that you seem unable to vent your aggressions, go anyplace, or spend any money. Enjoy it, Cancer. Consider it a cosmic birthday present. Your obstacles have rarely been more pleasant. If anyone gives you s--t for being a bit on the lazy side this week, tell them it’s not apathy; it’s bliss. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) One of your lesser-known magical powers is the ability to mature gracefully. Although you lack the ability to age backwards (like those tricky Capricorns) you wear the occasional silver hair or wrinkle with compelling dignity and charm. Some of you even get sexier as you get older. But undue focus on your outward appearance can only eclipse an even more powerful Leonine secret: Leos get wiser with age. (Not everyone does.) There’s more, though: Your wisdom is eminently practical, not abstract or academic. For instance, now that you’re suddenly sexy enough to catch the eye of that previously apathetic crush, you’re also wise enough to know whether to bother, and better able to make it work if you do. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) You’re going to offend, hurt, or otherwise annoy a certain percentage of people no matter what you do. Even if you go out of your way to be helpful, humble and nice, some people will despise you for it. There’s simply no pleasing everyone. You know this. Yet you sometimes persist in censoring yourself because you’re scared some people won’t like you. Since there’s always going to be someone who hates you no matter which side of the fence you land on, why not do what you really want? Try it this week. I think you’ll find that speaking your mind is a lot more fun than biting your tongue.

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- To contact Caeriel, send mail to sign.language.astrology@gmail.com.

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CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) I read of one woman’s peculiar predicament: separating her two dogs from their meal. They were alternately eating and sleeping inside an enormous elk carcass that had ended up on her lawn. How could she get her hounds out of their meal? Hosing them didn’t work; in fact they seemed grateful for the cooling off—it must get hot inside a flesh-covered rib cage on a sunny day. You might be faced

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

learn and think for themselves instead of habitually taking others’ words at face value. You rarely (if ever) allow anyone else to tell you what to think—in fact, you’ll often present your opinion as fact! This week, encourage others to formulate their own opinions based on the most complete information (from as many perspectives as possible) available. If you can’t do that, at least be up-front about being a tight-ass when it comes to original thought—at least when it differs from your own.

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

sign language


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

PAGE 58

motorhead RIDE OF THE WEEK

Michael Golubiewski | Special to the Weekender

1971

CHEVROLET CHEVELLE

Owner:

Dave Garinger Pittston “This car was built by Northeast Auto Body on Suscon Road in Pittston Township,” Garinger said. “They put countless hours into the body work on this car to get perfect body lines and a flawlessly straight body, and the show stopping Hugger Orange paint from PPG makes it very hard for this car not to draw people’s attention.” The Chevelle has a 350 cubic inch engine under the hood with a six-speed manual transmission along with ladder bar traction for the rear. “I could not be happier with the outcome from where this car started. It was very fun to drive.” W To submit your vehicle, email: mgolubiewski@theweekender.com

sorry mom & dad A 20-SOMETHING’S WILD ADVENTURES

Justin Brown | Weekender Correspondent

There's something about Gina At some point every man will experience the aftermath of hooking up with a girl who is bat s--t crazy. When it happens to you, it sucks big floppy donkey d--k. When it happens to a friend of yours, you sit back and enjoy the show. “That 27-year-old I got with earlier this summer is coming back as a guest this weekend because she wants to hook up again,” my friend Joel, who I’m working at a resort with, told me one morning. Later that night, Joel pointed her out to me. Even with dimmed lighting, I could tell there was no possibility she was 27. I then went on a mission to discover her real age, striking up a conversation with her hoping to get the truth. She explained that her friend backed out last minute, but she still came as a treat to herself for just turning 37. I knew it! After discovering her age, I tried exiting the conversation, but she kept talking my ear off about how she really needed an escape for the weekend because her teenage son is gay and in special ed and has a lot of needs. Who says that? “Your girl is a hot mess!” I told Joel the next morning. Later that night Gina ran up to me. Wasted. “I can’t believe you told Joel my real age!” she screamed. “I still f--ked him this afternoon, though. Don’t be mad at me for it. I told him to still let you suck his d--k!” “What? You’re bipolar!” I

Justin got a good laugh from a friend’s bat s--t crazy hookup this week. shouted back. “Please don’t tell Joel I said we had sex. He was supposed to be working when we did it,” she cried as I tried leaving. “We won’t say a word if you show us your t-ts!” blackmailed my friend Chris, who was about to drive me back to my room on a golf cart. “Maybe,” she giggled. “Forget you,” I said. “Move over before I run over your feet with this golf cart,” added Chris. She chased us as we drove away, screaming “Don’t tell Joel.” We told Joel. The next day at lunch, when the staff handed out silly awards to guests, we gave Gina the “Friendliest to the Staff ” Award for getting with Joel. It was a walk of shame with a round of applause.

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WANTED MALE SINGERS 570-285-4810

ATVs/Dune Buggies

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified!

200 AUCTIONS 230

Real Estate Auction

HOME CARE

Reliable, Pleasant, Experienced Woman seeks position as companion. Appts, errands, etc. 570-823-8636.

412 Autos for Sale

NYC/RADIO CITY

310

Attorney Services

DIVORCE No Fault $295 divorce295.com Atty. Kurlancheek 800-324-9748 W-B

Christmas Show Veteran’s Day, 11/12 $85 bus/ticket. $32 bus only. 574-6375

Let the Community Know! Place your Classified Ad TODAY! 570-829-7130

Free Bankruptcy Consultation Payment plans. Carol Baltimore 570-822-1959

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified! 360

Instruction & Training

EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV Certified. Call 888-2203984. www.CenturaOnline.com

412 Autos for Sale

406

ATVs/Dune Buggies

TOMAHAWK`11

ATV, 110 CC. Brand New Tomahawk Kids Quad. Only $695 takes it away! 570-817-2952 Wilkes-Barre

412 Autos for Sale

FA LL FE STIVA L O F SA VIN G S!!! W E SE RVICE A LL M A K E S A N D M O D E LS!

E XPE R T SE RVICE FO R O VE R 65 Y E A R S

W IN TE R IZE Y O U R VE H ICLE N O W !

$AVE $AVE $AVE

B R AK E SE R VIC E $AVE 10% O FF W ITH C O U P O N

TAK E $10.00 O FF YO U R M E C H AN IC AL R E PAIR S O F $100.00 O R M O R E W ITH TH IS C O U P O N O N E CO U PO N PE R R E PA IR O R D E R , CA N N O T B E CO M B IN E D W ITH O TH E R CO U PO N O FFE R S,N O CA SH VA LU E E XPIR E S 12-31-2012

-IN CLU D E S N E W SE M IM E TA LLIC PA D S O N FR O N T O R R E A R -IN CLU D E S IN SPE CTIO N O F CA LIPE R S, M A STE R CY LIN D E R A N D LIN E S O N E CO U PO N PE R R E PA IR O R D E R , CA N N O T B E CO M B IN E D W ITH O TH E R CO U PO N O FFE R S,N O CA SH VA LU E E XPIR E S 12-31-2012

1280 SANS SO UCI PK W Y H ANO VE R TW P,PA 18706

TIR E S! TIR E S! TIR E S G R E A T PR ICE S A N Y SIZE R E G U LA R O R SN O W S

FR E E C O L L ISIO N R E PAIR E STIM ATE S

H O UR S M O N-FR I 8AM -5PM

NEW!! Full size adult ATV. Strong 4 stroke motor. CVT fully automatic transmission with reverse. Electric start. Front & rear luggage racks. Long travel suspension. Disc brakes. Dual stage head lights. Perfect for hunters & trail riders alike. BRAND NEW & READY TO RIDE. $1,995 takes it away. 570-817-2952 Wilkes-Barre

409

Autos under $5000

FORD ’95 F150

4x4. 1 Owner. 91K. 4.8 engine, auto. Runs great. New paint, stake body with metal floor. 570-675-5046. Leave message, will return call. $4495.

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

FORD ’95 F150

4x4. 1 Owner. 91K. 4.8 engine, auto. Runs great. New paint, stake body with metal floor. 570-6755046. Leave message, will return call. $4495.

MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR 6 cylinder automatic. 52k original miles. $1500. OBO 570-899-1896

412 Autos for Sale AUDI ‘07 A4 2.0 TURBO, 98,000 miles, automatic, perfect condition, original owner, full window tint, black on black leather, built in bluetooth system, sunroof, MP3 player & more! $9,000 OBO. 949-439-3636

DODGE ‘02 VIPER GTS 10,000 MILES V10

6speed, collectors, this baby is 1 of only 750 GTS coupes built in 2002 and only 1 of 83 painted Race Yellow it still wears its original tires showing how it was babied. This car is spotless throughout and is ready for its new home. This vehicle is shown by appointment only. $39,999 or trade. 570-760-2365

Selling your Camper? Place an ad and find a new owner. 570-829-7130

DODGE ‘07 CALIBER White,

good condition. Asking $5,900 570-709-7065

FORD ‘02 MUSTANG

GTRedCONVERTIBLE with black top. 6,500 miles. One Owner. Excellent Condition. $17,500 570-760-5833

HYUNDAI ‘05 ELANTRA GT 84,000 miles, leather, excellent condition, includes power train warranty. $7,000 (570) 262-0919

PAGE 59

570-825-4581

406

HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

120

150 Special Notices

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

MARKETPLACE


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

PAGE 60

412 Autos for Sale

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

WANTED!

MERCEDES-BENZ `73 450SL with Convertible

ALL JUNK CARS! CA$H PAID

570-301-3602

SUBARU ‘04 FORESTER XT (Turbo) Symmetrical AWD, auto, 52,000 miles, 4 cylinder black metallic/ black grey interior, remote starter, heated seats, alloy wheels, towing package, AM/FM /6-CD, AC, original owner, excellent condition, $14,000, 570-8515549. Albrightsville, PA.

TOYOTA `03 HIGHLANDER White. Original Owner. Garage kept. Excellent condition. $9,750. Neg. 570-677-3892

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT

112K miles. Blue, 5 speed. Air, power windows/locks, CD/cassette, Keyless entry, sunroof, new battery. Car drives and has current PA inspection. Slight rust on corner of passenger door. Clutch slips on hard acceleration. This is why its thousands less than Blue Book value. $6,500 OBO. Make an offer! Call 570-592-1629

415 Autos-Antique & Classic

CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE $47,000

GREAT DEALS! MERCEDES ‘29

Kit Car $5,500 OR TRADE JUST REDUCED (570) 655-4884

MAZDA `88 RX-7 CONVERTIBLE

1 owner, garage kept, 65k original miles, black with grey leather interior, all original & never seen snow. $7,995. Call 570-237-5119

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649

removable hard top, power windows, AM /FM radio with cassette player, CD player, automatic, 4 new tires. Champagne exterior; Italian red leather interior inside. Garage kept, excellent condition. Priced to Sell! $23,000. Call 570-825-6272

MERCURY `55 MONTCLAIR

99.9% original. 4 door sedan, black & yellow. Motor rebuilt, 250 miles on it. You’ve got to see it to believe it! call for more information after 1:00pm 540-3220. $19,500 or best offer.

427

Commercial Trucks & Equipment

CHEVY ‘08 3500 HD DUMP TRUCK 2WD, automatic.

Only 12,000 miles. Vehicle in like new condition. $19,000. 570-288-4322

439

Motorcycles

‘12 BRAND NEW SCOOTER

All ready to ride, electric start, automatic transmission, disk brakes, rear luggage trunk, under seat storage, around 100 mpg, fully street legal, all ready to go! only $1,595. Call 570-817-2952

HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON SPORTSTER CUSTOM Loud pipes. Near Mint 174 miles - yes, One hundred and seventy four miles on the clock, original owner. $8000. 570-876-2816

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800 GL INTRUDER

Garage kept, no rust, lots of chrome, black with teal green flake. Includes storage jack & 2 helmets. $3600 570-410-1026

439

Motorcycles

YAMAHA ‘97 ROYALSTAR 1300

12,000 miles. With windshield. Runs excellent. Many extras including gunfighter seat, leather bags, extra pipes. New tires & battery. Asking $4,000 firm. (570) 814-1548

442 RVs & Campers

FOREST RIVER`08 5TH WHEEL

Model 8526RLS Mountain Top,PA $18,500 570-760-6341

451

Trucks/ SUVs/Vans

518 Customer Support/Client Care

460 AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE DIRECTORY 472

Auto Services

$ WANTED JUNK $ VEHICLES LISPI TOWING We pick up 822-0995 WANTED

Cars & Full Size Trucks. For prices... Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562

Sport utility, 4 door, four wheel drive, ABS, new inspection. $4200. 570-709-1467

FORD ‘02 EXPLORER

Red, XLT, Original non-smoking owner, garaged, synthetic oil since new, excellent in and out. New tires and battery. 90,000 miles. $7,500 (570) 403-3016

MITSUBISHI `11

OUTLANDER SPORT SE

AWD, Black interior/exterior, start/ stop engine with keyless entry, heated seats, 18” alloy wheels, many extra features. Only Low Miles. 10 year, 100,000 mile warranty. $22,500. Willing to negotiate. Serious inquires only - must sell, going to law school. (570) 793-6844

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 457 Wanted to Buy Auto

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE PICKUP

570-574-1275

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

Fine Dining And Catering Facility Looking To Expand Is Now Hiring

Cashier/Teller

Full & Part time positions available $9/hour to start, must apply in person, no phone calls. United Check Cashing 34 Gateway Shopping Center Edwardsville, PA

Find Your Ideal Employee! Place an ad and end the search! 570-829-7130 ask for an employment specialist

522

CHEVY ‘99 BLAZER

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

Education/ Training

We are excepting resumes for the following positions :

Head Chef, Line Cooks & Prep Cooks Full and part time positions available. Must be willing to work weekends and holidays. Full time positions offer health benefits, vacation, personal time and competitive salary/wages. Please send resume and position you are applying for to:

548 Medical/Health

ALLERGY NURSE Valley ENT Is seeking an Allergy Nurse with excellent people skills Monday thru Thursday (40hr/week) Experience preferred. Salary commensurate with experience. Fax resume to 283-0302

551

Other

Box 4160

508

Beauty/ Cosmetology

Experienced Stylist, Nail Techs & Receptionist New salon –

SHINE

at Vive Complex CLIENTELE A PLUS. GREAT WAGE/ BENEFITS. Email resumes to: shinesalon500 @gmail.com

STYLIST At BONTON SALON

In Wilkes-Barre. Includes weekends. Salary vs. commission, paid benefits. Clientele a Plus. Call Carolyn 1-800-789-5478 ext 180

509

Building/ Construction/ Skilled Trades

GasSearch Drilling Services Corporation is looking for the following positions:

HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATORS

- Medical, Dental, Vision Insurance - 401K - Quarterly Safety Bonus - Paid Holidays - Paid Vacation

Apply within or online: GasSearch Drilling Services Corporation 8283 Hwy 29 Montrose, PA 18801 570-278-7118 www. gassearchdrilling. com

MMI PREPARATORY SCHOOL, FREELAND, PA MMI Preparatory has an immediate opening for a School Counselor who will promote personal, social and/or behavioral growth in students from primarily 6th through 9th grades to enhance educational success. The counselor will work with students both in and out of the classroom and with their parents. The successful candidate must have a BS in guidance or a related field and Instructional Certification in School Counseling. At least two years full-time counselor experience is required. A complete job description for College Counselor position as well as information on MMI is available on our website at www.mmiprep.org /about-us/employment.html. Interested candidates should send their resume to: cspencer@ mmiprep.org E.O.E

527 Food Services/ Hospitality

c/o Times Leader 15 N. Main Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711

533

Commercial Flooring Estimator CAD experience a must, good salary, good benefits, please mail resume to: Hi-tech flooring,Inc. 166 West Union St. Kingston, Pa 18704

CRUSHING & SCREENING EQUIPMENT SERVICE TECHNICIAN

• Must have knowledge of hydraulics, electrical, & welding • Possible overnight stays • Must be flexible with hours Please fax resume to 570-270-5792 or email

staffing@common wealthequipment.com

Find Something? Lose Something? Get it back where it belongs with a Lost/Found ad! 570-829-7130

545 Save-a-Lot Food Store is now hiring Produce Clerks. Looking for dependable and customer oriented people. Previous produce experience required. Apply at 400 S. Main Street, Wilkes Barre. E.O.E

Installation/ Maintenance/ Repair

Marketing/ Product

SALES/MARKETING

Full Time, Part Time experienced Sales/ Marketing professional. Identify and connect with senior executives, open doors and arrange meetings. Must have excellent phone skills. Fax Resume to: (866)969-0690 Email to: CMCNortheast@ verizon.net

Accepting Snow Plowing Bids for Oakridge and Woodbryn driveways and parking lots. Contact Jim at 570-474-5738

To place your ad Call Toll Free 1-800-427-8649 * Dealers Wanted *

Experienced and friendly casino dealers to use their skills at Las Vegas styled casino parties. Part Time in NEPA and surrounding areas. $17-20/per hour + travel reimbursement, .25 a mile after 25 miles. Send resume to: resume@ casinodealerllc.com

554

Production/ Operations

OPERATOR TRAINEES

A major thermoforming Plastics company in the Hazleton area is seeking full time positions for MACHINE OPERATOR TRAINEES. Qualified candidates must possess strong mechanical aptitude with good written and oral communication skills. Starting wage, $17.62/hr with 3/4 day weeks12 hour shifts. Drug screenings and background checks are conditions of employment. Applications are accepted on-site or you may forward resume to: FabriKal Corporation ATTN: Human Resources, Valmont Industrial Park 150 Lions Drive Hazleton, PA. 18202 Phone 570-861-3303

procure@Fabri-Kal.com

554

Production/ Operations

AEP Industries, Inc., a leading supplier of flexible packaging has immediate openings for

MACHINE OPERATORS

Starting at $ 9/hour – PLUS .50¢/hour night shift differential; Working Fulltime 12 hours shifts alternating 3 & 4 day work weeks. Every other weekend a must.

As a Machine Operator you will remove, inspect, and pack finish product to specifications. You must be able to do some heavy lifting, know how to use a tape measure and scale, and be a TEAM PLAYER. Previous manufacturing experience preferred. Benefit Package includes: Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Insurance, Vacation, Holiday pay, Applications accepted daily @ AEP INDUSTRIES, INC. 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. 20 Elmwood Ave Crestwood Industrial Park Mountaintop, PA 18707 Email: grullony@ aepinc.com EOE * A drug free workplace

91

%

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section. *2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today? Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONL NL ONE NLY N LE LLEA E DER D . ONLY LEADER. timesleader.com


We offer motivated individuals an opportunity to earn the type of income they deserve and set their own work calendar. Instead of cutting back, we encourage our winning team to work as much as they want and earn more money while enjoying a change of scenery each week working a variety of prescheduled in-store promotions and special events.

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

SALES REPS: $700-$1,200 weekly

We offer: • Consistent Full-Time Income • Advancement Opportunities • Unlimited Income Potential Qualifications: • Strong communication skills & work ethic. • Driver’s license & insured vehicle required. • Weekend Availability

CALL NOW: (888) 502-5521

PAGE 61

RMS Promotions, Inc. Apply Online: www.rmspromos.com/jobs


PAGE 62

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201


Logistics/ Transportation

542

Logistics/ Transportation

542

91

CDL DRIVERS WANTED Local, Regional & Shuttle Routes

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section. *2008 Pulse Research

For more than 50 years, CDS has offered drivers opportunity, stability, and a balance between time at home and driving duties. JOIN OUR TEAM Benefit package including family health, vision, dental, holiday and vacation pay. Candidates must have a Class A CDL, be 23 years of age with 1 to 2 years minimum tractor trailer experience. CALL, STOP IN OR EMAIL! Ronald Woznock 570-654-6738 rwoznock@cdstransportation.com One Passan Drive Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702

What Do You Have To Sell Today? Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONL NL ONE NLY N LE LEA L E DER D . ONLY LEADER. timesleader.com

551

Other

551

Other

551

Other

744

%

Logistics/ Transportation

551

Other

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Would you like to deliver newspapers as an Independent Contractor under an agreement with

THE TIMES LEADER?

Operate your own business with potential profits of up to $900.00 _________ per month. Call Rosemary to make an appointment at 570-829-7107

Routes Currently Available: Drums - Motor Route - Potential Profit - $980

Bear Run Dr. • Debbie Dr. • Edge Rock Dr. Four Seasons Dr. • Long Sun Dr. • Sand Springs Dr. 130 Daily Papers • 165 Sunday Papers

Plymouth - Potential Profit - $920

Cole St. • Flat St. • W. Main St. • North St. Davenport St. • Lee St. • Orchard St. 166 Daily Papers • 221 Sunday Papers

Wyoming - Potential Profit - $800

700 MERCHANDISE

610

708

Business Opportunities

Antiques & Collectibles

ANTIQUE OAK BED

JAN-PRO COMMERCIAL CLEANING OF NORTHEASTERN PA Concerned about your future?

BE YOUR OWN BOSS

(late 1800’s) with matching dresser and mirror. Additional nightstand included. All refinished. Excellent condition. $965. 466-6499.

ANTIQUE OAK HIGHBOY

Work Full or Part time Accounts available

570-824-5774 Jan-Pro.com

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

CHAIRS, (2) Genuine leather, custom made recliners. Taupe color, like new. $550 each. 570-675-5046

Furniture & Accessories

DEN FURNITURE Wood/cloth. Regular size sofa, chair and ottoman. Coffee table, 2 end tables. Excellent condition. $325 for all. 570-675-5046

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

FURNISH FOR LESS

HEADBOARD brass for double bed, custom made. Make offer 570-675-0460 or 574-1724

* NELSON * * FURNITURE * * WAREHOUSE * Recliners from $299 Lift Chairs from $699 New and Used Living Room Dinettes, Bedroom 210 Division St Kingston Call 570-288-3607

566 Sales/Business Development

566 Sales/Business Development

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

AUTOMOTIVE SALES CONSULTANT

NOW

throughout Luzerne & Lackawanna, Counties We guarantee $5,000. to $200,000 in annual billing. Investment Required We’re ready – Are you? contact JANPRO for more info and about VetConnection (Discount for Vets)

BEDROOM SUITE. 5 piece Bassett. Walnut wood. Double bookcase bed, triple dresser (9 drawers), chest of drawers (5 drawers) 2 night stands (2 drawers in each). $250 570-675-5046

744

refinished with new vintage hardware Excellent condition $320. 570-466-6499

Selling Your Furniture? Do it here in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130 DOLL HOUSE Vintage 1950’s style 3 rooms down, staircase, 2 rooms up plus furniture. Make offer. 570-6750460/574-1724

566 Sales/Business Development

Valley Chevrolet is seeking individuals who are self starters, team oriented and driven. (No Experience Necessary)

• Salary & Commission • Benefits • 401K Plan • 5 Day Work Week • Huge New & Used Inventory

BE PART OF THE BEST SALES TEAM IN THE VALLEY! Apply in person to:

Blake Gagliardi, Sales Manager Rick Merrick, Sales Manager

VALLEY CHEVROLET

601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

SALES REPS: $700-$1,200 weekly

630 Money To Loan

We offer motivated individuals an opportunity to earn the type of income they deserve and set their own work calendar. Instead of cutting back, we encourage our winning team to work as much as they want and earn more money while enjoying a change of scenery each week working a variety of prescheduled in-store promotions and special events.

“We can erase your bad credit 100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys for the Federal Trade Commission say they’ve never seen a legitimate credit repair operation. No one can legally remove accurate and timely information from your credit report. It’s a process that starts with you and involves time and a conscious effort to pay your debts. Learn about managing credit and debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

Say it HERE in the Classifieds! 570-829-7130

We offer: • Consistent Full-Time Income • Advancement Opportunities • Unlimited Income Potential Qualifications: • Strong communication skills & work ethic. • Driver’s license & insured vehicle required. • Weekend Availability

CALL NOW: (888) 502-5521

RMS Promotions, Inc. Apply Online: www.rmspromos.com/jobs

PAGE 63

W. 8th St. • Ensign St. • Hill Top Dr. • Holden St. Butler St. • W. Brady St. • Shoemaker Ave. 177 Daily Papers • 187 Sunday Papers 89 Sunday Dispatch

600 FINANCIAL

Furniture & Accessories

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

542


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

PAGE 64

744

Furniture & Accessories

SOFA

Lazy-Boy with Queen size sleeper, love seat & chair. Excellent condition. $600. 570-655-4256

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

754

Machinery & Equipment

SNOW BLOWER. Craftsman. 12 HP, 32” dual stage. Electric start. Track Drive. $525. 570-675-5046

756

Medical Equipment

JAZZY POWER chair model #1121, New cost over $6000 sell for $500. 570-824-7015

758 Miscellaneous CHURCH PEWS Beautiful used 8-ft church pews for sale @ $45/ft or 8 pews @ $2,400 OBO Unity of NEPA: A Spiritual Center 140 S Grant Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 For more info, call Marilynn 570824-7722 or 570269-2914.

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

758 Miscellaneous

All Junk Cars & Trucks Wanted Highest Prices Paid In CA$H FREE PICKUP

772

Pools & Spas

HOT TUB. Jacuzzi, 6 person, green with cover, 19 jets, 1 hp motor, 230 VAC. Kept indoors, very good condition. $1,200. Avoca. 570-457-1979

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

BUYING SPORT CARDS Pay Cash for baseball, football, basketball, hockey & non-sports. Sets, singles & wax. Also buying comics. 570-212-0398

570-574-1275

570-301-3602

CALL US! TO JUNK YOUR CAR

800 PETS & ANIMALS

BEST PRICES IN THE AREA

815

CA$H

ON THE

Dogs

$POT,

Free Anytime Pickup 570-301-3602

Shopping for a new apartment? Classified lets you compare costs without hassle or worry! Get moving with classified! 762

Musical Instruments

CLARINET Artley, solid wood, black with case & 4 new reeds. $175. Call 570-675-0460 or 574-1724

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

HDI Metals Cash Paid for Gold Silver Jewelry Coins any type or condition

Licensed & Insured (11AM - 6PM | M-Sat) Confidential & Secure

39 S. Prospect St. Nanticoke

570-735-1487 We will beat any competitors advertised price by up to 20% Guaranteed

PAWS TO CONSIDER....

906 Homes for Sale

906 Homes for Sale

HANOVER TWP. For Sale

by Owner 4 PARK STREET Ranch, 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Corner lot. Gas heat, 2 car garage. $96,000. 570-823-8833

Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

NANTICOKE

ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE Call 829-7130 Place your pet ad and provide us your email address This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed” You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

GOLDEN RETRIEVER LAB PUPS 1 black female & 1 black male. $200, each. 570-836-1090

Job Seekers are looking here! Where's your ad? 570-829-7130 and ask for an employment specialist PUPPIES FOR SALE Golden Doodles, $475. Jugs, $250. All shots and wormed. 570-274-5099

1472 S. Hanover St. Well maintained bilevel. This home features 2 bedrooms, 1 3/4 baths, recreation room with propane stove. Walk out to a 3 season porch. Professionally landscaped yard. 1 car garage, storage shed, new appliances, ceiling fans. Close to LCCC. $163,900. Call 570-735-7594

PITTSTON TWP.

23 Ridge Street 4 Bedroom Colonial Home in Pocono Ridge Estates. Large 2 Car Garage, Paved Driveway, Electric Heat & Central Air, 1.5 Baths, Large Eat in Kitchen & Dining Room. Double Deck with Hot Tub. Low Taxes. $219,000 Call 570-212-1404

SHAVERTOWN

124 School Street 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths 1566 sq ft $134,900 (570) 313-5571

1 bedroom efficiency apt. Heat, air, hot water, cooking gas, electric, sewage & garbage included. Rental also includes stove, refrigerator, washer & dryer. Owner occupied building. Credit/background check & references required. $540/month. Call (570) 332-2456

COURTDALE

TUNKHANNOCK AREA 3 bedroom home,

2 baths, concrete porch 3/4 around the house, garage. On six acres. Stonework, stone fireplace, heat with wood or oil. Commercial cook stove. Beautiful view. Well above flood or high water. Some farm equipment, track loader. With gas & oil rights. $350,000 570-665-9054

912 Lots & Acreage

HARVEYS LAKE

RARE OPPORTUNITY Lake frontage

available with or without building lots. From $200,000 Call 570-357-4539

3 bedrooms, 1st floor. Refrigerator and stove included $625+Utilities. 1 year lease, no pets. Call (570)696-2936

Looking to buy a home? Place an ad here and let the sellers know! 570-829-7130

DURYEA

2 bedrooms, stove & washer, off-street parking, no pets, electric by tenant, security deposit required. Call (570)954-1231

FORTY FORT

RENOVATED AFFORDABLE

“2 bedrooms Under Market at $750 + utilities (Affordable) for 2 years” complete renovation, 2 floors, private entrances. Maple kitchens, built-ins, gas fireplaces, carports, Florida rooms. NO PETS /NO SMOKING/ EMPLOYMENT VERIFICATION

Managed America Realty 570-288-1422

938

Apartments/ Furnished

PLYMOUTH APARTMENT FOR RENT ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED! PLEASE CALL 570-881-0636

SALE PENDING

Sell your own home! Place an ad HERE 570-829-7130

Apartments/ Unfurnished

ASHLEY

900 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Having trouble paying your mortgage? Falling behind on your payments? You may get mail from people who promise to forestall your foreclosure for a fee in advance. Report them to the Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency. Call 1-877FTC-HELP or click on ftc.gov. A message from The Times Leader and the FTC.

941

WYOMING 1 bedroom, 2nd

floor. No pets. Drug free. Non smoking. Proof of employment & background check. Heat & hot water provided. $585/month + 1 month security. Call (570) 693-2415 Leave message.

JENKINS TWP.

AVAILABLE NOW! 3-4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, dining room, large living room, kitchen, stove, off street parking. Heat and water included. $875/month, security, credit check & references. 917-753-8192

KINGSTON

183 Zerby Ave 2 bedrooms, 1 tile bath with shower. No pets. $575/ month + utilities & security. 570-779-4609 570-407-3991

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

AVAILABLE RENTALS KINGSTON: 1 BEDROOM, 2nd floor $460. 2 BEDROOM 1st floor $500. 2ND FLOOR UNIT 2+ bedrooms $510 3 BEDROOM 1/2 double $825. WILKES-BARRE 4 BEDROOM 1/2 double $750. PLAINS 1 BEDROOM $420. Appliances, sewer included. Utilities by tenant. Credit check, references, lease required. No Pets. Call Property Mgr 570-899-3407 for appointment

KINGSTON

1st Ave. 1 bedroom, single occupancy, off-street parking, no pets, references, $450 + utilities. Call 570-655-9229

KINGSTON

2 bedrooms, second floor, nice area, eat in kitchen, screened porch, heat/water/sewer included. No pets/smoking $775/per month, Call (570) 760-8684 after 5:00 p.m.

KINGSTON

2nd & 3rd floor, 2 bedroom, appliances included, central air, off street parking. washer & dryer. Back yard. $550 plus utilities. No pets. Call 570-287-9631 or 570-696-3936

KINGSTON AREA

Large 3 bedroom. One floor, stove, washer/dryer hook up, off street parking. Gas heat. Wall to wall carpet. $595/month, References, lease & security deposit. Call 570-301-3401

LUZERNE

Energy Efficient 2nd floor, 1 bedroom. Gas heat. $465. Some utilities included. Lease, security. No pets. 570-220-6533 after 6pm

PARSONS 2 bedroom, 1st floor New flooring throughout. Stove, fridge, washer & dryer included. $535 + utilities & security. Call 570-650-2494

NANTICOKE

EAST UNION ST. Modern 1 bedroom apartment, second floor, private entrance, all appliances, off street parking, no smoking, no pets. LEASE. 570-477-5959.

NANTICOKE

On the square. 1st floor, 3 rooms, 1 bedroom. Freshly painted, new carpeting, newly remodeled kitchen, stove and fridge provided, w/d hookup in basement. Heat and hot water included. No Pets. Non Smoking. $585/month 570-287-4700

Looking for that special place called home? Classified will address Your needs. Open the door with classified!

PITTSTON

Quiet neighborhood, 2 bedroom, new construction, heat, electric, & water included. All appliances, offstreet parking, no pets. $625/month +1 month security. (570)357-1383

PLYMOUTH

TWO SPACIOUS APARTMENTS: 2 BEDROOM 1 bath + office space / nursery. $650. 2 BEDROOM 2 bath + office space/nursery $700. Very clean living space. Tenant pays utilities. Very affordable sewer/off street parking included. New carpet throughout. Contact 570-8519656 for more details to set up a walk through. NO SECTION 8. NO CEO. No smoking indoors. We are looking for reliable trustworthy people to rent clean living space. CLOSE TO WYOMING VALLEY WEST HIGH SCHOOL AND MAIN STREET ELEMENTARY SCHOOL.

SCRANTON

611 Philo St. 1 mile from Steamtown Mall. 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom. $600/mo plus utilities. Absentee landlord. Must have first and last months rent, as well as security deposit at signing. Will be available first week of Nov. 2012. Background check will be conducted. Call 718-300-3411


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

CALL TO ADVERTISE 831.7349

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iINTRODUCING: THE LADIES OF HOLISTIC SPA & TANNING. CHRISTIANA, SAMANTHA & THEY ARE DOUBLE TROUBLE! WITH A HEAVENLY TOUCH! MYSTERY MALIA, SWEETIE SAHARA, ALLURING AMBER, MISTI ALL OUR LADIES ARE CERTIFIED IN REIKI MASSAGE GIVE US A CALL! WALKINS ALWAYS WELCOME!

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PAGE 65

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460 460 S. S. Empire Empire St. St. Wilkes-Barre Wilkes-Barre •970.4700 •970.4700


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

PAGE 66

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

941

Apartments/ Unfurnished

944

Commercial Properties

DOLPHIN PLAZA

SWOYERSVILLE TOWNHOUSE

Newly constructed building. 2 bedroom, 1.5 baths, all appliances included. Garage. Hardwood floors throughout, cathedral ceilings in bedrooms. $1,200/ month, heat & sewer paid, 1 month security. 570-441-4101

WEST PITTSTON

Century home, 1 bedroom, freshly painted and new carpet. Appliances included. No pets. $450/per month + utilities. Security & references required. Call (570) 283-3086

WHITE HAVEN Route 940. Large 2

bedroom near I-80 & PA Tpke. Fresh paint, w/w carpet, stove & refrigerator. Water, sewer & garbage included. No pets. $630 + electricity & security deposit. 570-443-9639

It's that time again! Rent out your apartment with the Classifieds 570-829-7130

WILKESBARRE

RENOVATED PERFECTION

GENERAL HOSPITAL DOORWAY... FIRST FLOOR. “1 Bedroom Under market at $625 + utilities (affordable”). 2 years. New interiors, maple kitchens, aesthetic fireplaces, luxurious wall to wall. NO PETS/ NO SMOKING/ EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION.

Managed America Realty 570-288-1422

WILKES-BARRE 111 Carey Avenue

1st floor 1 bedroom. Living room, kitchen & bath. Fridge & stove included. Washer dryer hookup. Off street parking for 1 car. Tenant pays utilities. Ready Nov. 1. $375 + security. 570-270-3139 WILKES-BARRE HISTORIC WHEELMAN 439 S. Franklin St. 1 bedroom, hardwood floors. A/C, marble bath. Security system. Laundry. $650 570-821-5599

WILKES-BARRE 17 Beaumont St.

1st floor, large 2 bedroom with new w/w carpeting and paint. Front porch, shared back yard, kitchen with appliances and dining room. Heat, hot water and water incl. Tenant pays electric. $575 plus security, no pets. Call 570-814-1356

WILKES-BARRE NORTH

7 E. Chestnut St. 1st floor, 1 bedroom, w/w carpet, eat in kitchen with appliances, front porch and shared yard. Washer hookup only. Small basement. Heat and hot water incl., tenant pays electric and cooking gas. $520 plus security. No pets. Call 570-814-1356

WILKES-BARRE NORTH N G H . EAR

ENERAL

OSP

518 N. Main St. 3 bedrooms, 2nd floor, Stove, fridge included. Washer / dryer hookup. Eat in kitchen. Off street parking, 1 car. Tenant pays gas & electric. Water included. NO PETS. $525+ security, Call 570-814-1356

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your basement, garage or attic and call the Classified department today at 570829-7130!

WYOMING

Modern 1 bedroom, 1st floor, new carpeting, eat in kitchen, great storage & built-ins. Includes water, sewer & garbage. Gas heat. $475/ month. NO PETS. 570-696-2000

944

Commercial Properties

ASHLEY/HANOVER TWP

779 Hazle St. 1st floor approximately 1300 sq. ft. with central air & all utilities included. Less than $1.00 per sq. ft. Can divide. Great for business offices, recently updated, painted & new bathrooms. 570-814-1356

Rte. 315 2,400 Sq. Ft. professional office space with beautiful view of Valley & Casino. will divide office / retail Call 570-829-1206

950

Half Doubles

953 Houses for Rent

PLAINS

Spacious 3 bedroom, 1 bath with Victorian charm with hardwood floors, neutral decor, stained glass window, large kitchen. Washer /dryer hook-up, off-street parking. $700 month + utilities, security & lease. NO PETS. 570-793-6294

PITTSTON

3 bedrooms, wall to wall carpet. Beautiful modern kitchen, washer/ dryer hook up Available Nov. 1st. $635/month + utilities. 570-5109518 or 570-8221544

315 PLAZA 1,750 SQ. FT. & 2,400 SQ.FT OFFICE/RETAIL 570-829-1206

WYOMING 900 sq. ft. profes-

sional office space. High traffic area. Off street parking. Tenant pays electric. Will remodel to suit. 1 year lease. $600 month. 570-430-7077

950

Half Doubles

HANOVER TOWNSHIP

Newly remodeled, 2 bedroom, 2 baths, no yard. Non-smoking, no pets. $550 + utilities & security. 570-825-1474

PLYMOUTH

Completely renovated 1 bedroom, washer/dryer hookup. Living & dining rooms, eat in kitchen, front & back porches & a yard. $500/month + utilities. 1st, last & security. No pets or smoking. (570)779-9647, evenings

TRUCKSVILLE 3 bedrooms,

refrigerator & stove, washer/ dryer hookup, laundry room, off-street parking, no pets or smoking. $700/ month + electric, gas & hot water, 1 month security, references & background check. 570-592-2902

KINGSTON WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH 3 bedroom, 1 bath, 3 bedroom, 1.5

hardwood, washer / dryer & stove, close to schools. No pets. $700 + utilities, security, references, lease required. 570-283-3086

GET THE WORD OUT with a Classified Ad. 570-829-7130

KINGSTON Spacious 3-4 bed-

rooms, convenient location. Off street parking, gas heat. Appliances included. $675 plus utilities, security & lease. Available 11/01 570-760-4830

KINGSTON

Sprague Ave. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, 1st floor duplex, New w/w carpeting & hardwood floors. Convenient to Wyoming Ave. Washer/dryer hookup, basement storage. Reduced! $520/month + utilities, security, lease. NO PETS. 570-793-6294

KINGSTON

Sprague Ave. Charming, spacious 6 room, 2 bedroom duplex, includes 2nd & 3rd floor. Ample closets. Washer /dryer hook-up. $575/ month + utilities, security & lease. NO PETS. 570-793-6294

1000 SERVICE DIRECTORY 1015

Appliance Service

ECO-FRIENDLY APPLIANCE TECH. 25 Years Experi-

ence fixing major appliances: Washer, Dryer, Refrigerator, Dishwasher, Compactors. Most brands. Free phone advice & all work guaranteed. No service charge for visit. 570-706-6577

1024

Building & Remodeling

1st. Quality Construction Co.

baths, small yard, front porch, off street parking. $615/month security required. Tenant pays all utilities. 570-357-0712

Roofing, siding, gutters, insulation, decks, additions, windows, doors, masonry & concrete. Insured & Bonded.

953 Houses for Rent

State Lic. # PA057320

ASHLEY

COOK STREET Very nice neighborhood. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, refrigerator & stove provided, washer/dryer, offstreet parking Big yard. $500/month + utilities, 1st & last. (570)822-3750

DALLAS

3 bedroom, 2 bath, brick Ranch house with attached 2 car garage. Full basement on Memorial Highway. $1300 per month. Security & references. 570-690-2570 HARVEY’S LAKE

HOUSE ON LAKE

includes partial use of boat house. Spectacular view, 4 bedrooms, all appliances, ample parking. $1475/ month plus utilities. 570-822-2992

WILKES-BARRE Safe

Neighborhood 2 bedroom, $550 Plus all utilities, security & background check. No pets. 570-766-1881

Senior Citizens Discount!

570-606-8438 1039

Chimney Service

A-1 1 ABLE CHIMNEY Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All types of Masonry. Liners Installed, Brick & Block, Roofs & Gutters. Licensed & Insured 570-735-2257

LINEUP ASUCCESSFULSALE INCLASSIFIED! Doyouneedmorespace? A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way tocleanoutyourclosets! You’re in bussiness with classified!

1054

Concrete & Masonry

D. PUGH CONCRETE

All phases of masonry & concrete. Small jobs welcome. Senior discount. Free estimates. Licensed & Insured 288-1701/655-3505

1135

Hauling & Trucking

A.S.A.P Hauling Estate Cleanouts, Attics, Cellars, Garages, we’re cheaper than dumpsters!. Free Estimates, Same Day! 570-822-4582 ALWAYS READY HAULING Property & Estate Cleanups, Attics, Cellars, Yards, Garages, Construction Sites, Flood Damage & More. CHEAPER THAN A DUMPSTER!! SAME DAY SERVICE Free Estimates 570-301-3754

1204

Painting & Wallpaper

GET IT TO GO. Search the app store and install The Times Leader mobile app now for when you need your news to go.

MARTY’S PAINTING

Interior & Exterior Top Quality Work 570-468-9079

LINE UP A GREAT DEAL... IN CLASSIFIED!

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

1252

Roofing & Siding

J & F CONSTRUCTION All types of roofing. Repairs & Installation 25 Years Experience Licensed/Insured Free Estimates Reliable Service 570-855-4259

1339

Window Service

PJ’S WINDOW CLEANING & JANITORIAL SERVICES Windows, Gutters, Carpets, Power washing and more. INSURED/BONDED. 570-283-9840

91

%

of Times Leader readers read the Classified section.

Selling your ride?

We’ll run your ad in the classified section until your vehicle is sold.

*2008 Pulse Research

What Do You Have To Sell Today? Call 829-7130 to place your ad. ONL NL ONE NLY N LE LEA L E DER D . ONLY LEADER. timesleader.com

Call 829-7130 to place your ad.

ON NLY ON NE L EADER. ONLY ONE LEADER. timesleader.com


WELCOME BODACIOUS SUNNY!

CALL TO HEAR OUR DAILY SPECIALS!

AVAILABLE FRI-SAT-SUN 4-12

WELCOME BACK NICKY!

AVAILABLE MON-THURS 4-12

HANNA IS BACK FROM HER LEAVE 731788

NOW HIRING IMMEDIATE POSITIONS AVAILABLE PART TIME & FULL TIME

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570-991-1395 5 70-991-1395

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(entrance in back, 2nd floor)

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539 R e a r Scott Str e e t, W ilk e s-B a r r e 570.82 9.3914 • H our s: 10 a m – 1 a m • Op e n 7 D a ys A W e e k

$10 OFF HOUR SESSIONS

570-337-3966 Unit 19A Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville

O pen 7 days 9:30 am -11 pm

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AVAILABLE MON-TUES-WED 4-12 AS ALWAYS, WE ACCEPT COMPETITORS MONEY OFF COUPONS

SS PP EE CC IA IIAA LL SS !!

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PAGE 67

736987

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242 N. Memorial Hwy., Shavertown, PA

B E A U T IF U L Y O U N G A S IA N G IR L S

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WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

Check out bigredw.com


PAGE 68

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201


FOR MORE PHOTOS OF RYAN, VISIT THEWEEKENDER.COM. PHOTOS BY AMANDA DITTMAR

HOMETOWN: WILKES-BARRE FAVORITE WEEKENDER FEATURE: SHOW US SOME SKIN WHAT’S SOMETHING MOST PEOPLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT YOU? I ACTUALLY HATE GETTING TATTOOED. The Sapphire Salon PITTSTON 570.602.7700 MONTAGE 570.414.7700

PAGE 69

weekender

781871

WANT TO BE FEATURED? SEND TWO RECENT PHOTOS, YOUR FULL NAME, HOMETOWN, AGE, & PHONE NUMBER TO MODEL@THEWEEKENDER.COM.

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

RYAN LEAR AGE: 23


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201

AGE: 19 HOMETOWN: SCRANTON FAVORITE WEEKENDER FEATURE: CONCERT LISTINGS MY BEST CONCERT WAS... FLEETWOOD MAC

FOR MORE PHOTOS OF KARLI, VISIT THEWEEKENDER.COM. PHOTOS BY AMANDA DITTMAR

weekender

The Sapphire Salon PITTSTON 570.602.7700 MONTAGE 570.414.7700

WARDROBE PROVIDED BY BRATTY NATTY’S BOUTIQUE HAIR AND MAKEUP PROVIDED BY SAPPHIRE SALON AND DAY SPA

781866

PAGE 70

WANT TO BE FEATURED? SEND TWO RECENT PHOTOS, YOUR FULL NAME, HOMETOWN, AGE, & PHONE NUMBER TO MODEL@THEWEEKENDER.COM.

KARLI URBAN


WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012

Mountaingrown

Music WEDNESDAY

10/17/12 at the Woodlands

no cover Performance by:

Sunset Villains Live radio broadcast from 10-11 p.m. on 102.3-FM, The Mountain

Hosted by Alan K. Stout

Weekender/Mountaingrown

Original Music Series

PAGE 71

weekender

781410

SUPPORTING LOCAL MUSIC ... LIKE NEVER BEFORE


753879

PAGE 72

WEEKENDER, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 201


The Weekender 10-10-2012