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Five Folks As thousands of local students return to their classrooms, we asked a nostalgic question: “WHAT DID YOU LIKE BEST ABOUT GOING BACK TO SCHOOL IN THE FALL?” “Seeing all my friends again, at Pettebone Elementary School and Forty Fort High School.”

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“I liked my literature classes at Meyers High School. I had a fantastic teacher.” James Lutes, 73, Wilkes-Barre “I loved everything about (Georgetown High School), but I had to quit and go to work when I was about 16, because there were nine kids, and I was the second oldest.”

Mary Ann Shoplick, 90, Wilkes-Barre

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GETTING INTO THE GUIDE All submissions must be received two weeks in advance of the pertinent event. E-mailed announcements via guide@timesleader.com are preferred, but announcements also can be faxed to 570-829-5537 or mailed to 15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711. The Guide provides advance coverage and/or notice for events open to the public. Events open only to a specific group of people or after-the-fact announcements and photos are published in community news. All announcements must include a contact phone number

and make note of any admission or ticket prices or note that an event is free. We cannot guarantee publication otherwise. We welcome listings photographs. First preference is given to e-mailed high-res JPGs (300 dpi or above) submitted in compressed format to guide@timesleader.com. Color prints also can be submitted by U.S. mail, but we are unable to return them. Please identify all subjects in photographs.


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hen it was time for Esmeralda the gypsy girl and her pet goat to disappear, she picked him up and strode easily off the Wyoming Valley West stage – despite the fact he was a fellow student, as tall as she was. Then there were the college thespians who hid Falstaff from a jealous husband in “The Merry Wives of Windsor” at King’s College, and the group, a few years earlier, who stormed the theater, dressed as old-time Scottish warriors for “Macbeth.” Don’t forget the Coughlin High students who brought Alpine vigor, Argentinian glamour and some classy dips to a performance of dances representing the countries whose languages they study. But know that you, the public, are welcome to visit, to admire the displays in the college galleries, to cheer on young actors and musicians at just about every school, and, at least at Crestwood, to sign up for some classes yourself. Wine-making, anyone? You’re never too old to return to school, and the even better news is some of the best stuff available in and around the area’s ivory towers comes to us tuitionfree or is at least designed to provide entertainment or education on a budget. ••• For those who’d like nothing more than to sit in a classroom again, the Crestwood School District offers CACE, the Crestwood Area Community Education program, whose fall sessions start next week. The best part? No grades. For complete listings and pric-

es visit http://csdcomets.org/ and click on the “community education” link. In the meantime, here are some highlights of what’s on tap for fall: • Getting to know your iPhone and iPad: 5 to 6:30 p.m., four Mondays beginning Sept. 10. • Lemoncello class: 6 to 8 p.m. Sept. 10. (When life gives you lemons, make good drinks.) • Winemaking: 6 to 8 p.m. Sept. 11 and 18 and Oct. 2. • Creative-writing workshop: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., eight Tuesdays beginning Sept. 11. • Decorative painting, beginner: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., four Thursdays beginning Sept. 11, or 6 to 9 p.m., four Tuesdays beginning Oct. 16. • Photography workshop for the beginner: 6 to 8 p.m., six Wednesdays beginning Sept. 12. • Beginning bird watching: 6:30 to 8 p.m., four Thursdays beginning Sept. 13.

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The King’s College Theatre department put on the ‘Merry Wives of Windsor’ as one of last year’s productions.

• Intro to brewing: 6 to 8:30 p.m. Sept. 24. • Make your own jewelry: 6 to 9 p.m., three Thursdays beginning Oct. 11. ••• The arts are for everyone, and King’s College’s “Experience the Arts” program covers everything from writing to acting with

events taking place yearly and as individual sessions. The King’s College Players offer four main-stage theater productions throughout the school year including the 60-year tradition of one Shakespeare selection. Midday performances are offered as part of the Brown Bag See SCHOOL, Page 4

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If you love the arts, you don’t have to go to a play in New York or a gallery in Philadelphia. Local colleges and high schools are back in session and ready to welcome the public to their campuses – where you can no doubt witness something similar to the priceless moments described above. Some schools, mostly the colleges, have their arts calendars in place, listing everything from chivalry discussions to art exhibits to Broadway-style musicals. While Meyers High School knows it will produce “Little Shop of Horrors” in November and the Misfit Players will produce “Oliver” at Coughlin High School in January, in some cases the high schools are still deciding when this year’s play might be, or even whether the students of foreign language will perform their graceful salsas and foot-slapping schuhplatts this spring.


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Theatre Series. Upcoming full-length productions include: • Little Shop of Horrors: Oct. 4 to 7 and 17 to 19 • Arcadia: Nov. 14 to 17 • No Exit: Jan. 7 and 8 • The 39 Steps: Feb. 14 to 17 and 21 to 23 The Campion Society is the official literary club of King’s, a joint effort of students, faculty and the community that hosts workshops and open readings throughout the year. Two free public events will take place at the end of this month. A reading will take place at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 20 at the Regina Court on campus, and a writing workshop is set for 3:30 p.m. Sept. 26 in the Sheehy-Farmer Campus Center. ••• The arts also are alive, and open to the public, at Marywood University, on the Dunmore/ Scranton border. The Suraci Gallery will play host to regional and national artists, as well as faculty, student and alumni art. There’s also a permanent collection of fine and decorative art in the gallery, made up of Asian, 19th- and 20thcentury and religious works. Suraci’s current exhibit is “9x9x3: New Visions – Selected Works by the Textile Study Group of New York.” The exhibit consists of 52 works of fiber art created to fit inside 9-by-9-by 3inch boxes and runs until Oct. 14. Marywood ensembles also perform throughout the year. Sept. 16 will bring a night of Jazz Dancing with the Marywood Jazz Ensemble. This free dance night, which will take place in the Latour Room of Nazareth Hall, is for people who would like to ballroom dance with the back-

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Craft enthusiasts fill the Luzerne County Community College gymnasium during last year’s Alumni Association Craft Festival. This year’s festival is set for Oct. 20.

ing of a live big band. ••• For some, thought-provoking discussions are the best way to engage the brain and expand the mind. Wilkes University offers lecture series each school year. This year’s Max Rosenn Lecture Series in Law and Humanities, set for 7:30 p.m. Oct. 21 at the Dorothy Dickson Darte Center, will highlight the Hon. Cory A. Booker, mayor of Newark, N.J. The theme for the speech is “How to Change the World with Your Bare Hands.” A Nobel Prize winner will visit the Wilkes campus at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 18 in the Stark Learning Center. Roald Hoffman Hoffman, who won the 1981 Nobel Prize in chemistry, will deliver the Catherine H. Bone Lecture for the year.

I F YO U G O See something that strikes your fancy? Here are the contact phone numbers for the above-listed opportunities: ••• • Crestwood Area School District, 281 S. Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top. 474-6782. • Wilkes University, 84 W. South St., Wilkes-Barre. 1-800WILKES-U (945-5378), ext. 4330. • King’s College, 133 N. River St., Wilkes-Barre. John McAndrew, 208-5958. • Luzerne County Community College, 1333 S. Prospect St., Nanticoke. Lisa Nelson, 740-0732. • Marywood University, 2300 Adams Ave., Scanton. Kenny Luck, 348-6211 ext. 6207. • Misericordia University, 301 Lake St., Dallas. Center for Adult and Continuing Education, 674-6289 • University of Scranton, 800 Linden St., Scranton. Kym Fetsko, 941-7816, or Sondra Myers, director of the Schemel Forum, 941-4089.

studying and discussing subjects such as arts, history, philosophy, technology and theology. This fall’s forum will focus on significant periods in the English, Irish and American society. Artfully titled sessions include:

••• The University of Scranton also invites the public back to class. The Schemel Forum was founded in 2006 and is aimed at

• The “Chivalry: Knights and the Ladies Who Love Them.” 6 to 7:15 p.m. Wednesdays from Oct. 3 through Nov. 7 in the Weinberg Memorial Library. • “We Didn’t Need Dialog. We Had Faces! A Look at the American Silent Film.” 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Mondays from Sept. 10 to Oct. 29 in Brennan Hall. • “Bullets, Ballots and Bombs: Making War and Peace in Ireland, 1798 to 1998.” 6 to 7:15 p.m. Tuesdays from Sept. 11 through Oct. 23 in the Weinberg Memorial Library. Luncheon seminars also are a part of the Schemel Forum and will take place Oct. 11 and 22 and Nov. 2 and 8 from noon to 1:30. The University of Scranton also is known for a number of free entertainment events, from world-premiere concerts to a free Noel night each Christmas season. More information is contained in the online calendar listings for The Guide. ••• Fall is a hopping time for fairs and festivals, and Luzerne County Community College always gets in on that fun. Each year LCCC offers the annual Alumni Association Craft Festival, an event that so large it takes place in the gymnasium and spills out the gym doors. This year’s event will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 20. ••• Misericordia University, meanwhile, is giving artsy types an opportunity to get their hands dirty with Adult Clay Basics classes, set for Oct. 24 and 31, Nov. 7,14 and 28 and Dec. 5, all from 6 to 8 p.m. Other classes will take place from 10 a.m. to noon Oct. 23 and 30, Nov. 6, 13 and 27 and Dec. 4. Skip Sensbach, who opened Green Dog Pottery in Dallas in 1998, will instruct.

Features writers Mary Therese Biebel and Sara Pokorny contributed to this report.

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I F YO U G O

T H I S W E E K : S E P T. 7 TO 13, 2012 Felittese Italian Festival, the 25th annual event with a variety of Italian dishes and desserts, games of chance, the inaugural 2K Race and Fun Walk for Our Lady of Constantinople (9 a.m. at Old Forge High School) and entertainment by Fuzzy Park (tonight), Gold Dust (Saturday) and the Poets (Sunday). On Sunday a 10 a.m. Mass is celebrated at St. Mary’s Church followed by a procession carrying the statue of Our Lady of Constantinople to the festival site. Felittese Association, 145 Third St., Old Forge. 5 to 10 tonight and Saturday; noon to 10 p.m. Sunday. 430-8257. First Friday Architectural Walking Tour, in downtown Scranton. Sponsored by the Lackawanna Historical Society. Meet at the Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel, 700 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. 5 tonight. 344-3841. Hazleton Funfest, the family festival and street fair in downtown Hazleton with a car show, Celebrity Adult Tricycle Race, Christmas Cookie Contest, craft show, children’s activities, three stages of entertainment, garage sale, Latin Music Celebration, Meatball Cookoff, farmers market, Pierogie-Eating Contest, Pierogie Slapshot Challenge and the Funfest Parade. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday; 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday. Free. 455-1509 or hazletonchamber.org. Pennsylvania Endless Mountains Fiber Festival, with fiber arts and crafts, sheep shearing, felting and more. Harford Fairgrounds, 14028 Fair Hill Road, Harford. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. $3. 465-3360 or pafiberfestival.com.

Hop aboard for a train ride from Duryea to Jim Thorpe and help out area causes on the Greater Pittston Charity Train Ride set for Sunday. Wilkes-Barre. Saturday with doors at 6 p.m., dinner at 6:30 p.m. and dancing 7:30 to 9:30. $15 advance only. 823-4988. Celebrity Chef Fabio Viviani, star of Bravo TV’s “Top Chef,” hosts a “Meet and Eat” with demonstrations of his cooking, autographs, photo sessions and tasting of his signature dishes. Mount Airy Casino Resort, 312 Woodland Road, Mount Pocono. Saturday with doors at 6 p.m. and event at 6:30 p.m. $25. 877-682-4791. Wesley Village Car Show, antique and classic cars plus craft and

Come on, you love kickball, admit it. You were just looking for an excuse to get out there and play. Now you have one. Kick It For A Cause is a kickball tournament – for ages 12 and over – that will benefit Boy Scout Troop 100 and the Osterhout Free Library. The fun will take place at the Birchwood Hills Field in Plains Township beginning at 8 a.m. Saturday and continuing throughout the day. Cost is $20 per person with 10 people to a team. Call 899-4090 to register.

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Pens thank you for loving them By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

A group of now-beloved athletes skated into the hearts of many in Northeastern Pennsylvania 13 years ago, part of an organization that would become an integral piece of the area’s culture and collective social life. No matter the number of wins or trips to the playoffs the WilkesBarre/Scranton Penguins have under their belts, or the various events and charities the organization has been part of throughout each year, vice president of operations Brian Coe said nothing would be possible without one key element. “Our fans. They are the No. 1 asset we have and the reason we’re even here,” Coe said. “We always strive to give back to them, to the people who have been so loyal to us the past 13 years.” For the third time, the Penguins will host Pensfest, the team’s biggest way to give back to its fan base. The festivities set for tonight will include plenty for visitors to do, as well as some behind-the-scenes looks at the organization itself. The Penguins have operated in the Coal Street facility in WilkesBarre for only three summers, since 2010. The set-up is a first for the group. “This is the first time in the history of the franchise where the front office is in the same building as the players and coaches, which is nice,” Coe said. “We don’t have to drive to the arena to see them

I F YO U G O What: Pensfest When: 5 to 8:30 tonight Where: Coal Street Park, WilkesBarre Events: Free skating session, autograph sessions with players, outdoor activities and music by the Chixie Dix. More info: 208-7367 Schedule: • 5:30 and 7:30 p.m.: Player autograph sessions, in groups of four • 6:45 to 8:15 p.m.: Free skating session • 5 to 7:30 p.m.: Outdoor events, such as bounce houses, games and live music

now if we need something.” Coe said the Pens would like to showcase this new facility as well as the team itself. Eight players will be available for two autograph sessions tonight. Beau Bennett, Brian Dumoulin, Tom Kühnhackl, Reid McNeil, Jason Megna, Joe Morrow, Adam Payerl and Dominic Üher will be on hand for sessions at 5:30 and 7:30. “We’re even giving people a chance to glimpse where the players are set up on a day-by-day basis, which is a side that most people don’t see,” Coe said of the locker tours that will be available throughout the event. Many of the outdoor festivities will take place until 7:30 and include various games, bounce houses and live music by local band the Chixie Dix. A free public skating session will begin at 6:45 p.m. and include free skate rentals.

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Fans line up outside the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins’ Coal Street complex for last year’s Pensfest.

Ibiyinka Alao, who will visit King’s College on Monday, titled this painting ‘Grace’ and said the patchwork-quilt effect is a tribute to his mother and her ideas that everyone is equal.

Pearls of wisdom

African artist ‘paints out’ path to peace, forgiveness By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com

I F YO U G O

The humble oyster has a lesson for us. It knows how to forgive. “Irritation gets into the shell. It doesn’t like the irritation. So what does it do? It makes a pearl,” said Ibiyinka Alao, who travels the world as the United Nations ambassador for art. “When we have irritations in our lives, there is only one prescription: Make a pearl.” “Ninety-nine percent of wars could be avoided if people would let bygones by bygones. Children understand that,” said the artist, who will show some of his artwork and share his message of peace during a presentation on Monday at King’s College. Alao, 35, grew up in Nigeria, where the equatorial sun was so big, so warm, so close “it seemed you could reach out and touch it.” The sun led him to appreciate brightness and color – two elements essential to his art. Perhaps as tribute, he said, “You’ll always see me paint the sun, somewhere in the corner” of a painting. He can’t remember when he started to paint – “You’d have to ask my mother,” he said – but he knows he was very young. “When I would have a bad dream and it would scare me, I

What: “Visions of True Colors: The Art of Ibiyinka Alao” Sponsored by: King’s College’s Office of Diversity and the College’s African Cultures course. When: 6 p.m. Monday Where: Fitzgerald Room of the Sheehy-Farmer Campus Center, located between North Franklin and North Main streets on King’s College Campus Info: 208-5823 Admission: Free

would tell my mom or dad and they would say to let it out in painting. That would make me feel better.” Has he experienced other irritations? “When I was learning English, it was the greatest irritation of my life,” he said with a laugh. “Being from Africa, it tangles the tongue.” A speaker of 14 African languages who is working on French, he practiced English as a youth by reading his father’s copy of Dante’s “Divine Comedy.” “I thought it would be a funny book,” he said, admitting he felt somewhat frightened by Dante’s “gruesome description of the journey from hell to heaven.” But if he felt frightened, he could always “paint it out.” For Alao, art has become a

There’s one prescription for life’s irritations, Ibiyinka Alao says: ‘Make a pearl.’

path to spirituality. “I pray when I paint. I paint when I pray,” he said. His message is always peaceful, he said, even though he’s been to some dangerous places on his home continent where “I had to run for my life.” “You just have to shake your head sometimes,” he said. “Muslims are trying to kill Christians, and Christians are trying to kill Muslims.” But he believes there is a way to experience the joyfulness and peace suggested by some of his paintings, including one called “True Miracles,” in which women are not dancing so much as floating around an oyster. “When we forgive people, we are making pearls,” he said. “Then you can feel the way the astronauts feel when they are weightless. Fully free.”


All-ages appeal at county fair I F YO U G O

By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

Were you born to hand-jive? Perhaps you’ve thrown on a pair of blue suede shoes and are rocking out to the sounds of Lisa Loeb or Smashmouth. Either way, you’ll fit right in at the Luzerne County Fair this weekend. The entertainment set for tonight through Sunday varies, allowing fair-goers to travel from the 1950s to the ’90s and everywhere in-between and beyond. The entertainment kicks off at 7:30 tonight with well-known central Pennsylvania rockers The Badlees. Pete Palladino (vocals), Bret Alexander (guitar), Paul Smith (bass) and Ron Simasek (drums) teamed up in 1990 and have offered fresh tunes throughout the years, even as the sounds of the industry have changed. The group is at it again this year. “There’s a lot of new music coming down the pipe,” Alexander said of the Badlees hitting the studio to work on a new album that will be released in 2013. “We just released our greatest hits in the spring, and now we’re working on something new.” How has the band succeeded during the past 22 years? “We just keep making new music,” Alexander said. “We try to keep it fresh. Like anything, if you do the same thing over and over again it’s boring, for us and the fans.”

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PETE G. WILCOX FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER

The Sweet Inspirations have provided backing vocals for artists such as Aretha Franklin, Elvis Presley and Stevie Wonder.

Elvis, is that you? Pittston native Shawn Klush is a ringer for the king of rock-‘n’-roll. Here he’s performing Christmas songs last year at Grace Episcopal Church in Kingston.

Plenty of bands in the area pay homage to the ’80s, but a certain group is pushing it up a decade by focusing on all that was the 1990s. That ’90s Band plays at the fairgrounds tonight as well. “Nineties music is just a lot of fun, and it’s what we grew up listening to,” bassist Jeremy Carsman said. “It’s also still relevant today. We felt there was just a lack of a 1990s presence in the local scene, so we wanted to create a group dedicated solely to that music.” The 32-year-old Dallas resident is joined by Scott Wasik, 35, of Mountain top on lead vocals and guitar, Gerard Demarco, 29, of Taylor on keyboard, Shaun Walsh, 34, of Hanover Township on guitar, and Tim Rixner, 28, of Scranton on drums. Rewind about 40 years and you have the act for Saturday night.

Fifties-style rock-’n’-roll will roar into the fairgrounds with Bowzer’s Rock-’n’-Roll Party. Front man Jon Bauman is better known as Bowzer, the lead singer of Sha Na Na for 14 years. Since the early days of his career, Bauman has taken on various roles: producer, writer, musician, and actor among them. He’s VJed for VH-1, appeared on “Super Password,” hosted “Match Game-Hollywood Squares Hour,” and, in one of his most notable roles, appeared in the 1978 hit movie “Grease” along with Sha Na Na as Johnny Casino and the Gamblers, performing “Born to Hand Jive.” “It’s the most remarkable thing, how every generation has a fan base with that movie,” Bauman said. That appeal also goes for the

Hear the good chemistry I F YO U G O

By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER

From left: Sterling Koch, John Goba and Gene Babula play classic blues/rock as the Sterling Koch Band.

drix, and the people that influenced them, and ended up going all the way back to the era of Robert Johnson. It was an interesting journey, discovering a lot of the

What: Sterling Koch Band When: 1 p.m. Sunday Where: Hazleton Funfest, downtown Hazleton ••• What: Anti-Bullying Concert When: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday Where: Osterhout Free Library lawn, 71 S. Franklin St., WilkesBarre

people that were in blues.” Koch recently released a solo album, “Slide Ruler,” and is touring with the Sterling Koch Band in support of it. The trio, which See MUSIC, Page 9

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Rick K and the Allnighters certainly can play the night away, given their repertoire consists of music from the 1950s to present day.

’50s-style of music he and his act strive to preserve in present times. “I think it’s pretty clear that the music of the ’50s has never really gone away,” he said. “It’s something that sticks around and keeps coming back, as in things like ‘Grease.’ Younger people listen to it and say, ‘OK, that’s a little different than what I’m used to, but I can relate to it, and I like it.’ It’s very upbeat, fun, a wonderful sort of street corner music that’s very accessible for everybody.” Bauman’s alter-ego, Bowzer, is a stereotypical greaser, both a hero and aggravator to the crowd. Bauman created him in the Sha Na Na days. “He was really the first look at the greaser of the ’50s through the eyes of the late ’60s and early ’70s. He’s not always the noblest of characters; sometimes he

C O N C E RT S T H I S W E E K : S E P T. 7 TO 13, 2012 Coryell, Bailey and White, eclectic jazz, R&B and rock by bassist Victor Bailey, guitarist Larry Coryell and drummer Lenny White. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. 8 p.m. Saturday. $28. 325-0249. SafetySuit, the Nashville-based pop-rock group. Penn’s Peak, 325 Maury Road, Jim Thorpe. 7:30 p.m. Sunday. $15 advance, $20 day of show. 866-6057325.

FUTURE CONCERTS Paging Samuel, a Christian-music band. Presented by the Catholic Underground at St. Gabriel’s Church, 122 S. Wyoming St.,

What: Luzerne County Fair Where: Luzerne County Fairgrounds, 3605 Route 118, Dallas. 675-3247. Admission: $8, $4 senior citizens Weekend music schedule: Tonight • 7 to 8:30 p.m.: The Badlees, That ’90s Band Tomorrow • 7:30 p.m.: Bowzer’s Rock-n-Roll Party Sunday • 3 to 4:30 p.m.: Rick K and the Allnighters • 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.: Shawn Klush Elvis Tribute and the Sweet Inspirations

could be, but most times he wasn’t. Creating him was an amazingly fun thing to do with a lot of freedom.” “Some of my memories in the ’50s were being terrorized by the greasers when I was going to school to study classic piano,” Bauman said. “Greasers weren’t really so nice to me at the bus stop, but now I turned all those guys into my fans, which is kind of funny.” Sunday’s sounds go to Rick K and the Allnighters, a group that covers rock’s greatest hits from the 1950s and beyond. The Sweet Inspirations bring a soulful sound to the fair along with Pittston native Shawn Klush and his ever-present and popular Elvis Tribute. Hazleton. 7 p.m. Sept. 14. Donation. 403-3094. B.L.E.S.T., a concert of Christian music by duo Stephen L. Perillo and Barbara Roberts. The Truth Café, New Life Community Church, 570 S. Main Road, Mountain Top. 7 to 9 p.m. Sept. 14. Free. 301-7081. Eric Church, the Nashville recording artist on his “Blood, Sweat & Beers Tour” with country artists Justin Moore and Kip Moore. Mohegan Sun Arena, 255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Township. 7:30 p.m. Sept. 14. $47.50, $42.50, $37.50. 800-745-3000. Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic, the season opener with guest pianist Adam Neiman performing Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto See CONCERTS, Page 9

PAGE 7

All it took were some singles on vinyl. “I was 5, and my aunt would come over every week after getting her paycheck and play some of the newest and coolest songs out there,” Sterling Koch, of Cressona, said. “I knew right then that I was going to be hooked into music my whole life.” Koch, a lap steel guitarist, found his way into the classic blues/rock genre after hearing Jimi Hendrix. “Someone that’s 12, 13 years old, to hear music like that … it blew me away. I started to look at the people that influenced Hen-

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THE GUIDE of early settler Nathan Denison, 35 Denison St., Forty Fort. 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays through Sept. 30. $4, $2 children. 288-5531.

EVENTS Continued from page 5

along with food and entertainment. Johnson College, 3427 N. Main Ave., Scranton. 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. $5 per vehicle. 702-8963 or download an entry form at johnson.edu. Greater Pittston Charity Train Ride, from Duryea to Jim Thorpe with shopping and dining during the layover. Sunday with a 9 a.m. departure and 6:45 p.m. return. $65 benefits the Pittston Memorial Library, Greater Pittston YMCA and the Care and Concern Free Health Clinic. 693-0766 or 407-0579. Nicholson Bridge Day, with musical and stage performances, craft fair, chicken barbecue and more. Main Street, Nicholson. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. 942-6747. Ride for Eric, a fundraising motorcycle ride for the eighth-grade cancer patient. Four Seasons Golf Course, 750 Slocum Ave., Exeter. Sunday with registration at 10 a.m. and ride at 11 a.m. followed by a Family Picnic until 5 p.m. with children’s activities and entertainment by Headlock, Stealing Neil and DJ Joe Berman. $20 advance, $25 day of event. 655-4336. Bridal Showcase, a preview of current wedding styles along with hors d’oeuvres, refreshments and vendors. Irem Clubhouse, 64 Ridgway Drive, Dallas. Noon on Sunday. 675-1134. St. Faustina Bingo. St. Mary Church, 1030 S. Hanover St., Nanticoke. Sunday with doors at 12:30 p.m. and games at 12:45. Forty Fort Meeting House Talk and Tour, a guided walk through the historic 1807 church along with a talk on the history of the three early 19th-century meeting houses in Wyoming by Tony Brooks, executive director of the Luzerne County Historical Society. 20 River St., in the Forty Fort Cemetery. Sunday with tours 1 to 3 p.m. and lecture at 3:30 p.m. $2, $1 children. 287-5214. Denison House Tours, guided tours of the restored 1790 home

Wine and Cheese Tasting, with a basket raffle, light snacks and finger-food desserts. West Pittston Library, 200 Exeter Ave., West Pittston. 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday. $20, $35 couples. 883-7079. Open House, with music, storytelling, refreshments and interactive demonstrations on violin, cello, piano and Kindermusik at the new location of Suzuki School for Strings, 667 N. River St., Plains. 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday. Free. 208-9191. Memorial Ceremony, the 62nd annual service in recognition of the soldiers from the 1st Battalion. Front Lawn, 109th Field Artillery Armory, 280 Market St., Wilkes-Barre. 2:30 p.m. Sunday. 288-6641.

Civil War Roundtable, a program on the North-South Skirmish

Association by costumed presenters. Daddow-Isaacs American Legion, 730 Memorial Highway, Dallas. 7 p.m. Thursday. $3. 675-8936. Railway Talk, on rebuilding rail-

road bridges in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Sponsored by the Lackawanna and Wyoming Valley Railway Historical Society. Iron Skillet Restaurant, 98 Grove St., Avoca. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Free. 822-0693.

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Open House at the Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical Society, 689 Main Road, Hanover Township. Mondays through Sept. 24 from 4 to 8 p.m. 610298-8417. Car Cruise, sponsored by the 109th Artillery Heritage Association with awards, raffles and food. All vehicles welcome. Applebee’s, 253 Wilkes-Barre Township Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Township. 6 to 9 p.m. Monday. 824-7015. Kirby Film Series, a showing of “Moonrise Kingdom” (PG-13) starring Bruce Willis and Bill Murray. F.M. Kirby Center, Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. Wednesday at 1 p.m. ($4) and 7:30 p.m. ($6). 826-1100. Scratching the Surface: 300 Years of Wyoming Valley History 1675-1975, the first of five sessions with Wyoming Seminary history teacher Clark Switzer, who uses video and discussion in a presentation on the years 1675 to 1800. West Pittston Library, 200 Exeter Ave., West Pittston. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Free. 654-9847. Homelessness in Our Own Backyard, a panel discussion on providing shelter for the homeless. St. Therese Church, 64

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No. 2. Also: Brahms’ “Academic Festival Overture” and Copland’s “Appalachian Spring.” Scranton Cultural Center, 420 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. 8 p.m. Sept. 14. 341-1568. Tracy Lawrence, country-music hitmaker. Penn’s Peak, Maury Road, Jim Thorpe. 8 p.m. Sept. 14. $33, $28. 866-605-7325. Spencer Bohren, the singer-songwriter, guitarist and storyteller

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guitar strap, so he switched. At this point in his career, Koch has settled into the Sterling Band Trio nicely, citing the ease with which the members work together as the reason. “Though they are such incredible musicians, I have to say it’s our chemistry that really makes us what we are,” he said. ••• Fourteen-year-old Jordan Tarter of Pittston has had enough of bullying and is looking to raise awareness about the unfortunate trend among young people. An Anti-Bullying Concert will take place at the Osterhout Free Library on Wednesday and will showcase the sounds of Tarter, who has written songs about bullying. Pat Rushton, outreach/ education manager of the Victims Resource Center in WilkesBarre, also will speak. There’s no charge, but a donation bucket will be present. This is the second such concert. Tarter organized an anti-bullying event in April at KISS Theatre in the Wyoming Valley Mall.

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PAGE 9

also consists of Pottsville residents Gene Babula on bass and John Goba on drums, will play at the Hazleton Funfest on Sunday. “Slide Ruler” brought many opportunities for Koch, the biggest of which was the ability to work with some well-known industry names. “I was very fortunate to work with Tommy Shannon, who played bass with Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble, as well as Chet McCracken, a drummer from the Doobie Brothers.” Koch’s instrument of choice is special as well. “My guitar has eight strings instead of the conventional six, and it’s actually played sitting in your lap, using a slide bar and thumb and finger picks,” he said. Koch played traditional guitar all along, until about eight years ago when he sustained a neck injury. Doctors recommended he stay away from the weight of a

KISS and Motley Crue. Two of the biggest, baddest bands in rock

history team up for a concert at the Toyota Pavilion, 1000 Montage Mountain Road, Scranton. 7 p.m. Sept. 18. $35 to $185. Tickets at livenation.com or ticketmaster.com.

Laughter with a Purpose, a bene-

The 35th annual Celebration of the Arts gets under way this weekend in the natural amphitheater setting in downtown Delaware Water Gap. The festival opens tonight with a Musical Motif Art Show from 6 to 8 at the Dutot Museum followed by a stage tour de force of classical music, edgy theater, modern dance and jazz ($10). The music moves outdoors at noon on Saturday with performances on the hour until 9 p.m. with such jazz great as the SheilaMark Band, Phil Woods and the COTA Festival Orchestra, Nellie McKay, Cohn Green Walsh, Sue Terry & Dangerous Sax and more. Sunday starts out with a Jazz Mass at 10 a.m. and Phil Woods continues with jazz sounds until 8 p.m. with performers Vinny Bianchi & La Cuchina, Lineage, Eric Doney & Zach Brock, Five Play, COTA Cats, Spencer Reed “Not All” Blues Band, Bob Dorough & Friends, Nancy Reed and David Liebman. Daily admission is $25; $40 for both days. Schedule is at cotajazz.org.

Continued from page 7

Brendan Regan. Artists for Art Gallery, 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Sept. 15 with shows at 8 and 10 p.m. $20. 604-1874.

Real Diamond, a re-creation of a live Neil Diamond show by the 10-piece tribute band led by Curt DiDomizio. Mauch Chunk Opera House, 14 W. Broadway, Jim Thorpe. 8 p.m. Sept. 15. $23. 325-0249.

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777137

C O N C E RT S

Continued from page 7

along with blues duo Ed Randazzo and Bret Alexander. Sponsored by Poco Notes at the Tripp House, 1011 N. Main Ave., Scranton. Sept. 15 with doors at 7 p.m. and show at 8 p.m. $20 advance; $25 at the door if available. 888-800-7626.

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T H I S W E E K : S E P T. 7 TO 13, 2012 Laurel Radzieski stars as Meaghan ‘The Fairy Wife of Llyn-y-Fan Fach.’

KIDS T H I S W E E K : S E P T. 7 TO 13, 2012 The Fairy Wife of Llyn-y-Fan Fach, a Welsh children’s play about a lonely farmer who marries a beautiful fairy on the condition that he must always be kind or he will lose his good fortune and his wife. But as his farm prospers from the fairy’s good luck, he grows greedier and grumpier. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. 10 a.m. today; 11 a.m. Saturday. Free. Reservations: 996-1500. Coming Back from the Flood, mural painting for children with artist Jan Lokuta. West Pittston Library, 200 Exeter Ave. 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays through Sept. 15. Free. Registration: 654-9847. Early Explorers, museum-based learning in literature, arts and natural sciences for ages 3 to 5. Everhart Museum, 1901 Mulberry St., Nay Aug Park, Scranton. Mondays through Nov. 12 at 1 p.m. Free. 346-7186.

FUTURE Fun on the Farm, with old-time games, crafts, music, scavenger hunts, hikes and more for ages 3 to 10. Quiet Valley Living Historical Farm, 1000 Turkey Hill Road, Stroudsburg. 9 a.m. to noon Sept. 15, Oct. 20, Nov. 17 and Dec. 15. $10, $5 children. Reservations: 992-6161. Ringling Clowns Story Time, with a visit by two clowns from the Ringling Bros./Barnum & Bailey Circus. West Pittston Library, 200 Exeter Ave., West Pittston. 1:30 p.m. Sept. 17. Free. Registration: 654-9847.

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Writers Showcase, with readings by local writers Scott Thomas, Lauren Stahl, Lisabeth Herr Gelatt, Jennifer Matarese, Richard Aston and Eugene Cross. New Visions Studio & Gallery, 201 Vine St., Scranton. 7 p.m. Saturday. Free. 8783970. Downloading e-Books, a tutorial with library director Anne Bramblett Barr. Bring your e-reading devices. West Pittston Library, 200 Exeter Ave.,

West Pittston. 6:30 p.m. Monday. Free. Registration: 6549847.

FUTURE Edgar Allan Poe Reading, including “The Tell Tale Heart,” “The Raven,” “Lenore” and more. Sharpe House, Eckley Miners’ Village, Highland Road, off Route 940, Eckley. 2 p.m. Sept. 16. $10. 636-2070. Campion Literary Society Open Readings. Share creative works including poems, short stories, drama and creative nonfiction. Regina Court, North Main Street, King’s College, WilkesBarre. 7 p.m. Sept. 20. 2085900.

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BUYS T H I S W E E K : S E P T. 7 TO 13, 2012 Craft Fair ’n’ Flea Market, with a lunch menu available. Saints Peter and Paul Church, 13 Hudson Road, Plains Township. 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Vendors welcome at $10 per space. 8224016. Flea Market with food vendors. Mountain Grange Hall, 1632 W. Eighth St., Carverton. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. 406-7749. Flea Market. Kingston Commons, 615 Wyoming Ave., Kingston. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. $10 per vendor space. 288-5496. Back Mountain Farmers Market. Back Mountain Memorial Library, 96 Huntsville Road, Dallas. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays through Oct. 6. 675-1182. Fall Rummage Sale, with a lunch menu. Zion United Church of

Outdoor Summer Marketplace, with fresh produce, concessions, baked goods, jewelry, collectibles, novelties and more. Mohegan Sun Arena, 255 Highland Park Blvd., Wilkes-Barre Township. 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Sept. 25. 970-7600. Wilkes-Barre Farmers Market, with fresh produce, breads and pastries, specialty items, festival foods and a lunchtime concert by Stanky & the Coal Miners. Public Square, Wilkes-Barre. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday. 2084292.

FUTURE Rummage Sale. Prince of Peace Episcopal Church, 420 Main St.,

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Dallas. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 14; 9 a.m. to noon Sept. 15 (Bag Day). 675-1723. Flea Market, with food available. Bloomingdale Grange, Grange Hall Road, Bloomingdale. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 15. $5 per vendor. 256-7610. Waverly Antiques Show and Sale, with quality dealers offering fine collectibles, jewelry, country and formal furniture and more. Also: a gourmet luncheon, English Tea and Dessert Garden. Waverly Community House, 1115 N. Abington Road, Waverly. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 15; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 16. 586-8191. Wilkes-Barre Farmers Market, the summer marketplace with fresh produce, breads and pastries, specialty items, festival foods and a lunchtime concert by Lipstyk. Public Square, WilkesBarre. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 20. 208-4292.

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12:40PM 3:05PM 5:20PM 7:40PM 10:00PM 2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA (DIGITAL) (PG) 12:10PM 2:30PM 4:45PM 7:00PM 9:15PM

APPARITION, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)

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BOURNE LEGACY, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)

12:20PM 3:20PM 6:25PM 9:30PM

CAMPAIGN, THE (DIGITAL) (R)

12:30PM 2:50PM 5:00PM 7:10PM 9:20PM

CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER (DIGITAL) (R) 12:45PM 3:15PM 7:20PM

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FRI. 7:10, 9:20 SAT. 1:10, 4:15, 7:10, 9:20 SUN. 1:10, 4:15, 7:10 MON., TUES., THURS. 7:10 WED. 12:15, 7:10

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THE GUIDE

By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“T

he Words” is, as its name suggests, a wordy melodrama about a young writer, Rory Jansen (Bradley Cooper), who finishes his first novel, three years in the making — which is promptly rejected. Maybe, he wonders, he’s not who he thought he was — a writer. Then he stumbles across a yellowed, unpublished manuscript from long ago and sees his salvation, his shortcut to fame. Maybe, he realizes, he’s not who he thought he was — an ethical, honest man.

ever write. His ador“Words” is a pleas- I F Y O U G O ing wife (the lumiant but too complex nous Zoe Saldana) variation on an idea What: “The Words” ★★ Starring: Bradley Cooper, Zoe Saldana, can tell him “You are Woody Allen toyed Jeremy Irons, Dennis Quaid, Olivia everything you alwith in his stumbling Wilde, Nora Arnezeder, Ben Barnes ways wanted to be,” “You Will Meet a Tall Directed by: Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal but Rory knows betDark Stranger,” this ter. notion of counterfeit Running time: 91 minutes “The Words,” in a literary fame. What Rated: PG-13 for brief strong language and smoking fit of ambition, goes co-writer/directors after its themes by Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal attempt to do with it is get telling three stories, each existing at the guilt that comes with ill-gotten within the others. There’s the dull framework of the glory. Rory is cursed with being good enough piece, a book reading by a novelist, to recognize the gem he’s stumbled Clay Hammond (Dennis Quaid), who across in an attache case bought in a delivers the beyond-banal lines from his Paris antique shop, cursed with knowing this novel is better than anything he’ll See WORDS, Page 17


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Full seasons of several TV shows hit DVD this week, including “2 Broke Girls.” “2 BROKE GIRLS: THE COMPLETE FIRST SEASON,” GRADE B-MINUS: Although the series fell into some comedy ruts in the final episodes of the first season, there are still enough laughs on the menu for this show about two waitresses from opposite sides of the track who work and live together. Beth Behrs continues to play the comedy way over the top. And the writers have gotten a little lazy with the street-tough char-

STILL SHOWING

ALSO OPENING What: “Cold Light of Day” (not screened for critics) Starring: Henry Cavill, Veronica Echegui, Bruce Willis and Sigourney Weaver Directed by: Mabrouk El Mechri Genre: Action/Thriller Plot summary: After his family is kidnapped during their sailing trip in Spain, a young Wall Street trader is confronted by the people responsible: intelligence agents looking to recover a mysterious briefcase. Running time: 93 minutes Rated: PG-13 for language and sexual content Source: IMDB

Movie Amy

This Ritter flick is no ‘B’ movie Justin Kirk (“Weeds”), Rachel Bilson (“The O.C.”), Kristen Johnston (“Third Rock From The Sun”) and Jason Biggs (“American Pie.”) Shot in 2010, “Life Happens” received a limited theatrical run in April. It deserved a much bigger launch, considering the film is funnier, richer and sweeter than most mainstream comedies. Part of what distinguishes “Life Happens” is

the way in which Ritter and cowriter/director Kat Coiro allow each member of the cast to shine. The never-better Bosworth shines brightest as an author who knows what she wants and isn’t afraid to go out and get it. And playing a single mom lets Ritter, a whiz at sarcasm, show off a softer side. It might take some digging to find it, but check this sleeper out. “Life Happens” is touching and vital.

Amy Longsdorf writes about DVD and Blu-Ray releases with local connections.

ity. 99 mins. ★★★. ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT – Scrat again causes a cataclysmic event. PG for rude humor, action. 87 mins. ★★ LAWLESS — If you can accept that Tom Hardy, Shia LaBeouf and Jason Clarke could be brothers in this century or any other, you might be able to immerse yourself in the artfully pulpy allure of this story, based on the true story of the bootlegging Bondurant brothers. R for bloody violence, language and sexuality/ nudity. 110 mins. ★★ 1/2 MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS – Joss Whedon’s effects-driven Marvel superheroes smash-up. PG-13 for violence, adult themes. 143 mins. ★★ 1/2 THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN — A childless couple is mystically granted a test run at parenthood. PG for mild thematic elements and brief language. 104 mins. ★★ THE OOGIELOVES IN THE BIG BALLOON ADVENTURE – Meet three brightly colored, oversize felty young friends, plus a talking pillow, fish, window and vacuum cleaner. Goobie, Zoozie and Toofie get Schluufy some magic balloons for his birthday. When the balloons get away, they set off on an adventure around Lovelyloveville to get them back, aided by Ruffy, Windy and J. Edgar (yes, he’s the vacuum). No more can be said. G. 83 mins. ★ PARANORMAN — The frequently wondrous and whimsical visuals far surpass the disappointingly slipshod story of an 11-year-old boy named Norman who can see and speak to the dead. PG for scary action and images, thematic elements, rude humor and language. 92 mins. ★★ POSSESSION – Swap the clerical collars for a yarmulke, change the sacred incantations from Latin to Hebrew, leave out the pea soup, and you have a passable PG-13 version of “The Exorcist,” the granddaddy of all exorcism movies. PG-13 for mature theme, violence and disturbing sequences. 91 mins. ★ 1/2

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Before she snagged the starring role in “Don’t Trust the B----In Apartment 23,” Shickshinny-reared actress Krysten Ritter co-wrote and starred in “Life Happens” (2012, Universal, R, $20 ), a tangy comedy about an L.A. dog walker named Kim who becomes pregnant after a one-night stand. The focus isn’t on Kim’s romantic life, though a cute guy (Geoff Stults) catches her eye, but on the ways in which new motherhood impacts her friendship with her best friend Deena (a cheeky Kate Bosworth). Rounding out the cast are

2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA – This promises to demystify the president but does more to illuminate its filmmaker and his ego. PG for adult themes. 89 mins. ★ THE APPARITION – A “Paranormal Activity” knockoff with effects as generic as the cookiecutter mission revival in which it’s set. PG-13 for terror/images and sensuality. 82 mins. ★ THE BOURNE LEGACY — This fourth film in the franchise is really about drug addiction and the lengths to which a junkie will go for his fix. PG-13 for violence and action. 135 mins. ★★ 1/2 BRAVE — A beautiful-to-look-at princess story that still feels old-fashioned and safe. PG for action, rude humor. 93 mins. ★★ THE CAMPAIGN – Will Ferrell and Zack Galifianakis in a political showdown. R for language, partial nudity, sexuality. 85 mins. ★★ CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER – Rashida Jones and Andy Samberg co-star in this offbeat comedy about events that either will drive a wedge between a separated couple or further reinforce their bond. 91 mins. R for drug use, profanity, sexual candor. ★★★ 1/2 THE DARK KNIGHT RISES – It’s neither as anguished, perverse nor dangerous as its weighty predecessor. PG-13 for action violence, sensuality, strong language. 164 mins. ★★ DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS – Summer misadventures beleaguer our boy. PG for rude humor. 94 mins. ★★ THE EXPENDABLES 2 – This is a a too-cute trip down ’80s Action Film Lane. R for bloody violence. 101 mins. ★ 1/2 HIT AND RUN – A fun little carchase comedy. R for pervasive language including sexual references, graphic nudity, violence and drugs. 99 mins. ★★ 1/2 HOPE SPRINGS — You’ll want to go home and have sex with your spouse. PG-13 for mature thematic content involving sexual-

acter played by Kat Dennings, who has gone from telling jokes about dealing with a hard life to those of a sexual nature. But these women are still the most energetic team in any TV comedy. “THE FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT,” GRADE D: An engaged couple have trouble getting to the altar. Jason Segel stars. Director Nicholas Stoller, who co-wrote the script with Segel, has created a jumbled mess of a film. At times it wants to be a wild comedy. Then it quickly shifts to deep conversations about love and commitment. Stoller’s inability to blend these comedy and drama aspects leaves both parts a mess.

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CELEBRITY Q&A BY R.D. HELDENFELS

JUMBLE

UNIVERSAL SUDOKU

BY MICHAEL ARGIRION & JEFF KNUREK

ABC daytime show ‘Revolution’ gets cut Q. Is there any chance “The Revolution” might be back? I like the hosts, Josh Elliott and Lara Spencer, when they’re on “Good Morning America,” but “Good Afternoon America” is a bit too much of the entertainment portion of the news. A. This question refers not to the NBC series “Revolution,” which was promoted mercilessly during coverage of the Olympics, but the daytime show ABC tried out after jettisoning a couple of its daytime soaps. The lifestyle series did not appeal to viewers, and was dropped in July in favor of a short run for “Good Afternoon America.” Speaking of which ... Q. I was surprised to read in your mailbag that come Sept. 10 I will not be able to see “Good Afternoon America.” You said that the soap opera “General Hospital” will be at that time. Why? Where will “Good Afternoon America” be in the lineup?

PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION

CRYPTOQUOTE

A. “GAA” was announced as a nine-week series, basically filling the 2 p.m. weekday time slot after the demise of “The Revolution,” but only until “General Hospital” moves into it. (“GH” is being moved to make a place for Katie Couric’s new series, which will air at 3 p.m. weekdays on many ABC stations.) But while “GAA’s” departure in September was preordained, ABC has reportedly considered bringing it back down the road — assuming the network is happy with “GAA’s” performance and something else falls by the wayside. Do you have a question or comment for the mailbag? Write to me at rheldenfels@thebeaconjournal.com or by regular mail to the Akron Beacon Journal, 44 E. Exchange St., Akron, OH 44309.

HOROSCOPE BY HOLIDAY MATHIS ARIES (March 21-April 19). Don’t get

stressed out about the idea of following your intuition by wondering which internal voice is the right one. Intuition often comes in the form of curiosity or interest. Follow that, and you’ll be psychically connected. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Beware of unguarded sharing. You won’t trust those who give too much information, and others won’t trust you if you tell stories that aren’t yours to tell. Loose lips sink ships.

ON THE WEB For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com

GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You will sense

that there is absolutely nothing to be gained by trying to be liked and selfless. You’ll take care of your own needs and pursue what delights you. CANCER (June 22-July 22). You have been neglecting what you want, afraid of making others uncomfortable. What if you don’t ask for what’s reasonable? What if you ask for more than you think you deserve? You just might get it. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Do you have the sense that someone is messing with you? It might help you to pretend like this person is playing the kind of elaborate game that makes life worth living. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You will be strongly protective of your loved ones

and will, in your own calm, controlled way, leap to their defense given the least provocation. Do the same for yourself. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Even though the demands on you are not loud or harsh, they are still abundant. So be as generous and helpful as you want to be, but also know where to draw the line. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). For all of your resistance to the work, you still get it done. So why resist it at all? Submit to the inevitable, and you just might find that you’re actually enjoying it. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Some days, the hours run like a low-grade fever, irritating in their development; everything makes you mad. Moods like that are signals that it’s time to rest.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). When you

are very clear about why you want to do something, your choices become more obvious. Just rule out everything that goes against your “why.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Your inner drive will be stoked by external events that seem to rally you forward. The attention you get is a reward in itself. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). By reading about and experiencing the company of people who are different from you, you get more clarity about who you are. TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Sept. 7). You’ll get another chance at a dream that’s not been realized. You’ll be considerably more creative in October. Your lucky numbers are: 50, 2, 23, 15 and 19.


Woman is shocked by waiter’s use of makeup and a wig Dear Abby: Last night at a restaurant, my husband and I were surprised to see a male server wearing a blond wig and full makeup. I was, to say the least, shocked and very glad we hadn’t brought the children, ages 11 and 14, with us. How do you explain something like that to an 11-year-old? The 14-year-old would be able to “get it.” What kind of policies are in place for restaurants in

DEAR ABBY ADVICE cases like this? What if customers are offended? Could I request a different server or just leave? Your comments would be appreciated. — Taken Aback in California Dear Taken Aback: In California, people have the legal right to dress in a style not typical of their gender without fear of

discrimination or retaliation. That right is protected by state law. If customers find it offensive, they can either request a different server or take their business elsewhere. Presumably, the customer would pay for food that had already been prepared. Because children today grow up quickly and are less sheltered than in past decades, I recommend you explain to your 11-year-old that not all people are alike, and the importance of treating others with respect. It’s called REALITY.

GOREN BRIDGE

Dear Abby: I have a pet peeve — people who make a big production out of yawning. It’s not enough to just yawn quietly. Noooo, they have to open wide, not cover their mouth and moan loudly. It annoys the heck out of me and I’m not sure it’s appropriate to say anything. People who do this seem to have several yawns in succession and want to make sure everyone notices. Any suggestions other than to grin and bear it? — Seeking Quiet in Georgia

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Dear Seeking Quiet: Yes. If it’s happening socially say, “I can see you’re getting tired, so maybe it’s time to end this visit.” If it’s happening at work, suggest the person take a break and go outside for some fresh air.

To receive a collection of Abby’s most memorable — and most frequently requested — poems and essays, send a business-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)

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Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 Celebrity Questions: TV Week, The Dallas Morning News, Communications Center, PO Box 655237, Dallas, TX 75265


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latest novel about “a young struggling writer struggling to make his voice heard.” How did this dullard get to be a famous novelist, with Olivia Wilde as his new wide-eyed groupie, no less? He tells us, after a fashion. Hammond narrates the second story, Rory’s romance with the fair Dora (Saldana). We see Rory’s years of struggle and his discovery of the novel he would ride to fame. And Hammond, giving away the whole novel in this one reading — apparently — tells of the day Rory meets “The Old Man,” the one person on Earth who recognized this book as his own, written more than half a century earlier, the one man who knows Rory is a fraud. Quaid has a nice gravitas but is saddled with a “book” that makes Hammond come off as a lousy storyteller. Cooper, earnest as ever, nicely underplays Rory’s frustrations but does little to suggest a guy supposedly wracked with guilt over a stolen limo lifestyle. As the Old Man, Jeremy Irons is the best natural storyteller in the cast, lending warmth to very generic narration of post-World War II romance and tragedy. Irons has the disarming twinkle of old age, but he can still turn on the steely glint of accusation and menace. No wonder Cooper looks in awe and ill at ease in their scenes together — the best scenes in the movie. If you were setting out to write the perfect fall film, you’d include much that’s in “The Words” — romance, romantic settings (New York and Paris), mystery, literary intrigue and longing. But for that “perfect” film, you’d have to heighten the emotions, make more of the characters and the relationships and find other ways for “temptation” and “retribution” to show themselves. And you’d probably trim a lot of words out of it.

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Restaurant Review

Fresh fare in room with a view

Y

ou might know it by its sign. Or by its signature glazed green coffee mugs. Both contain two little bears, dining at table together, looking as if they’re about to make a happy toast. Nope? Then you’re missing a hidden treasure, tucked away in bucolic Bear Creek Village. Open only for breakfast and lunch, Bear Creek Café has to be one of the cutest, most peaceful places in all of NEPA, we dare say, to enjoy an early meal. The first-shift crowd surely will find much to love on a breakfast menu whose entrées include everything from The Papa Bear, Mama Bear and Jolly Bear plates – containing varying combinations of eggs, bacon, sausage, ham, potatoes, toast and pancakes – to creamed chipped beef (Chef Rob’s personal recipe), stuffed French toast, a Belgian waffle and assortment of omelets. A Bear Hug and The Yummy Bear round out the morning menu as sandwich options. The first is eggs, cheese and meat in a flour tortilla, and the second is eggs, cheese and meat on a bagel. Both come with country potatoes. We’ve had – and loved – almost everything on this menu before, but our purposes for this visit were to scope out the lunch menu, which we hadn’t yet had much opportunity to enjoy. It’s sandwich heavy (as expected), but the options are attractive enough. The signature sandwich is a grilled turkey apple cheddar melt with apple slices and apple butter for $9.95, and that sounded like a great welcome back to almost-autumn, but we were drawn to The Café Quiche and another

I F YO U G O What: Bear Creek Café Where: 98 White Haven Road, Bear Creek Call: (570) 472-2299 Credit cards? Yes Wheelchair accessible? Yes Hours: 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday

afternoon item with “bear” in its name. Our two plates were almost studies in contrast, suitable for a mama and baby bear or perhaps a papa and baby or papa and mama. One of us sure looked hungry is my point. By that we mean The Grizzly Bear – grilled chicken (or steak) with onions, sweet peppers and cheese (Provolone was chosen) on a hoagie roll for $9.95 – was absolutely huge, and half came home. But it also was absolutely delicious, with special points going out to the tasty roll, crunchy on the outside but all kinds of soft on the inside. Chicken was chopped and plentiful – well-seasoned, too – and the cheese was generous, with the peppers kicking in a sweet bite. Multigrain

FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER

Bear Creek Café is a scenic and tasty respite at the entrance to Bear Creek Village.

chips, a deli pickle and a daily side made the portion even larger (and tastier). The Café Quiche ($7.95), on the other hand, was more delicate-looking, a pretty slice from a homemade pie. But it was plenty tasty: creamy and rich but not too rich. “A nice, light lunch,” my guest said, noting the generous cubed ham and mild cheese. Presentation was flawless, too. This one came with a side salad and a dinner roll. Options we passed over but would like to try in the future include the salmon burger ($8.95),

Southwest Wrap ($9.95) and quesadillas ($6.95 or $8.95 with meat). Chef salad and a Mandarin chicken salad also are available for the garden-grazers. Both sounded intriguing and would make a nice lunch with soup. Yep, there’s soup. We each had a teeming and hot bowl of beef barley, with our only disappointment being the beef was of the ground variety rather than the meaty, tender chunks we prefer. Still, the broth had plenty of flavor, and sometimes soup is all about the broth. Desserts, if you have the room, change daily, and homemade

cakes and pies appear to steal the show. So maybe plan to come hungry. Like any self-respecting bear. If you’re lucky, you might even see one scampering through the scenic grounds complete with a flowing creek/stream, visible through the tall glass windows off the main dining room. Did we see any bears? Nope, and, sure, that’s probably a good thing. But truly we couldn’t ask for a better view. Or a more pleasant lunch. Times Leader food critics remain anonymous.

Cheers!

Czech out this complex brew By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com

Still in its infancy, the Susquehanna Brewing Company in Pittston is churning out yet another brew: the Pils-Noir. “It’s an innovative black pilsner,” Fred Maier, vice president and co-founder of Susquehanna Brewing Company, said. This is due to the brewing proc-

ess used, a husk-free milling process and old Czech technique called decoction mashing. Decoction mashing is a technique used to conduct multi-step mashes without adding water or applying heat to the mash tun, another name for a brewing container. A third of the mash is removed to another pot and heated to conver-

sion temperature, then boiled and returned to the mash tun. “This creates color and complexity while giving the beer a smoother, lighter body,” Maier said. “The beer is then finished with a generous amount of Czech Saaz hops for a distinctly European finish at 33 IBUs.” The beer is made from Pearl barley and malted by Munton’s,

CaraMalt and Crystal malts. Pils-Noir is available in select bars for now but will become a staple brew for the company. SBC recently opened up its facilities for tours. The tours, which include tastings, run at 3 and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and at 2 p.m. Saturdays. •••

PILS-NOIR Brewed by: Susquehanna Brewing Company, Pittston Type: Pilsner

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Susquehanna Brewing Company’s Pils-Noir is a smooth, dark brew concocted through a Czech technique called decoction mashing.


"It's a Hit!" -The New York Times

“The best musical I’ve seen On or Off-Broadway in years!” -Joe Franklin (WOR Radio)

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THE GUIDE

“One of the finest pieces of musical theater anywhere.” -BEST OF publishers

You don't have to be Jewish to love...

...but it couldn't hurt!

"The Fiddler's Anatevka arrives in America." -Jewish Press

Show Will Sell Out!

Saturday, October 6th at 8PM Tickets available at astooponorchardstreet.com or by calling 888-322-7626 Tickets may also be purchased at the JCC of Wyoming Valley A portion of the proceeds benefit the JCC of Wyoming Valley

"Smart story, well crafted songs... not a dry eye in the house." -Wall Street Journal

JCC of Wyoming Valley The Weiss Theater 60 S. River Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 570-824-4646 It's 1910 and the Lomanskys, the Bubbie and all their stoop friends and neighbors are trying to survive in the teeming tenements of the Lower East Side. If your ancestors didn't come over on the Mayflower, this may be their story. You'll laugh, you'll cry and you'll forever remember this original musical that critics often refer to as, "the day after Fiddler."

PAGE 19

18 original songs! Outstanding cast of 20!


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PAGE 20

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S TA G E

EXHIBITS T H I S W E E K : S E P T. 7 TO 13, 2012

T H I S W E E K : S E P T. 7 TO 13, 2012

The Hexagon Project, visual art by ages 10 to 18 from around the world. Opens tonight with reception from 6 to 9 plus live music by Jason Smeltzer & the Interdependence Theremin Experiment and hands-on hexagon-making. Through Sept. 30 at the Lackawanna County Library Express, Steamtown Mall, Scranton. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursdays. 342-1653.

Jack and Jill, a play about the “hard work of love” after finding your perfect mate. Performed by the Bloomsburg University Players in the Theatre Lab behind the University Store in Bloomsburg. 7:30 tonight and Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. $6, $4 seniors and students. 389-5134.

Riverworks III: Lackawanna River Corridor Association Celebrating 25 Years, a juried exhibit. Through Sept. 29 with a First Friday reception 6 to 9 tonight. ArtWorks Gallery, 503 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays; 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays. 207-1815. I Like Tic Tacs, collaborative works by German artists Stefanie Schairer and Jana Jacob. Opens tonight with a reception from 6 to 8:30. Marquis Art & Frame, 515 Center St., Scranton. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. 344-3313. The Lackawanna Iron Furnaces of Scranton, Pennsylvania: History, Art, Heritage. Celebrating the 21st anniversary of

OUTDOORS T H I S W E E K : S E P T. 7 TO 13, 2012 Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, the annual 5K coed run and walk and one-mile fun walk to raise money for breast cancer research. Saturday with race-day registration at 6 a.m. and event at 8:30 a.m. Courthouse Square in downtown Scranton. Register on line at komennepa.org. 969-6072. Birding at Frances Slocum, to seek out songbirds. Meet at the boat-rental lot. Frances Slocum State Park, 565 Mount Olivet Road, Kingston Township. 8:30 a.m. Saturday. Free. 675-9900. Bird Walk on the Back Mountain Trail, with Craig Yarrish of Wild Birds Unlimited. Meet at the steps of the Carverton Road Trailhead, Trucksville. 8:30 a.m. Sunday. 696-5082.

the furnaces as a historic landmark. Opens tonight with a lecture from 5 to 6 and reception from 6 to 8. Tours of The Estate at 2 p.m. Saturday. Through Nov. 16 at Hope Horn Gallery, University of Scranton. Noon to 4 p.m. Sundays through Fridays; 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays. 941-4214.

CLOSING SOON Two Travelers, pastel paintings and photography of France by Mary Lou Steinberg and Kate Senunas. Through Saturday at Marquis Art & Frame, 122 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays. 823-0518. Kiln to Film, Pottery and Animation, with works by Ellen Mulvenna and Gerry Stankiewicz. Through Saturday at A Thousand Words Fine Art Gallery, 253 Wyoming Ave., Kingston.

‘West Palm Beach’ is one of the cameraphone photos taken by Rolfe Ross.

BEST BET Gone are the days when professional photographers needed several expensive pieces of equipment to produce a great shot. Today it’s sometimes as easy to capture an exhibit-quality photograph with the everpresent cameraphone. Among the exhibits opening at tonight’s First Friday Art Walk in downtown Scranton is the Cameraphone Show, a collection of photographs taken at a moment’s notice with the handy device. Stop by Camerawork Gallery at 515 Center St. for a show of works and a reception from 6 to 8:20. Details at 510-5028. Noon to 7 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays. 899-5578.

BEST BET For those who’ve always wanted to master one of those daunting climbing walls, the Wilkes-Barre Family YMCA offers a great opportunity with its Climbing Tower Clinic on Saturday. Camp Kresge’s new 30-foot tower has three levels of difficulty for children and adults to try out their skills. Wear sneakers and meet at the camp’s pavilion at 10 a.m. It’s free and a Keystone Active Zone Passport Stop for those collecting points for the summer program. Contact the YMCA at 823-2191 for more info.

Wild Mushrooms of Pennsylvania and the Mid Atlantic.” Susquehanna Riverlands, 634 Salem Blvd., Berwick. 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday. 866-832-3312. Keystone College Hike, four moderate miles. Meet at the Jewish Community Center, 601 Jefferson Ave., Scranton. 9 a.m. Tuesday. $8. 343-5144. Senior Citizens Outing, a tour and two-mile hike at Grey Towers National Historic Site, a visit to Dingmans Falls and lunch at Mount Haven Resort. Meet at

the Greater Scranton YMCA, 706 N. Blakely St., Dunmore. 9 a.m. Thursday. $8. 343-5144. Keystone Active Zone Passport, a free program that encourages people to get outside and active at more than 30 local parks, trails and events in Luzerne County. Earn awards and prizes by exploring the county and logging your discoveries through Sept. 30. Join anytime by registering at KAZpassport.com or call 823-2191. See OUTDOORS, Page 22

My Way: A Musical Tribute to Frank Sinatra, the music of Ole Blue Eyes from the 1940s swing era to Las Vegas and the Rat Pack. Theatre at the Grove, 5177 Nuangola Road, Nuangola. Through Sept. 23: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 3 p.m. Sundays. $20. Pre-show dinner available on Sept. 16 at 1 p.m. ($15 with reservations by Sept. 9.) 8683582. Forces of Nature, a staged reading of Stephen Most’s play about three giants of the American Conservation Movement: Gifford Pinchot, John Muir and Theodore Roosevelt, who address the issues of preservation and conservation of natural resources. Grey Towers, 151 Grey Towers Drive, Milford. Saturday with wine and hors d’oeuvres at 5:30 p.m. followed by the performance. $75. 296-9625.

FUTURE Legally Blonde, the Broadway musical about a quintessential Valley Girl who follows her exboyfriend to Harvard Law School, where she realizes she has a lot more to offer than a pretty face. Little Theatre, 537 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. 8 p.m. Sept. 15, 21-22; 3 p.m. Sept. 16 and 23. $18. 823-1875. Lattimer Massacre Radio Drama, a historical retelling of the 1897 event in Hazleton which pitted coal-company owners, the sheriff of Luzerne County and striking miners against each other with deadly consequences. Presented by Bill Bachman, senior instructor of communications at Penn State WilkesBarre. Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. 3 p.m. Sept. 16. Free but reservations required. 675-9269.

ANNOUNCEMENTS Auditions for local dancers to perform the roles of children, snowflakes, mice and other supporting characters in the Moscow Ballet’s “Great Russian Nutcracker” to be performed at the F.M. Kirby Center in WilkesBarre on Dec. 3. Open to ages 7 to young teens. Harris Conservatory of the Arts, 545 Charles St., Luzerne. 1 p.m. Sunday. 718-0673. Auditions for “The TV Guide Musical,” a new musical comedy revue with favorite theme songs from TV history. Music Box

The Scranton Iron Furnaces are the setting for the play ‘A Walk Through the Past.’

BEST BET The Scranton Iron Furnaces will serve as the unlikely stage for a family-friendly play on Saturday when A Walk Through the Past debuts at 1 p.m. In the play, a father and daughter are about to tour the famous furnaces when historical personages from the past appear to tell their story. Meet George W. Scranton, Elliot S.M. Hill (the first mayor of Scranton), Mary C. Nivison (the first female physician in Lackawanna County) and many more. In conjunction with Family Fun Day, the Furnaces also will host a farmers market at 10 a.m., hands-on workshops for children at 11 a.m. and tours of the historic Scranton Estate at 2 p.m. Stop by at 159 Cedar Ave. in Scranton for the free show. More info: 963-4804.

Dinner Playhouse, 196 Hughes St., Swoyersville. 3 p.m. Sunday. 283-2195. Auditions for Applause Theatre’s production of “The Wizard of Oz.” Needed: males and females age 8 to adult. Seton Catholic High School, 37 William St., Pittston. 6 to 9 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday. 313-2548. Broadway Bus Trip, to see “The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess” starring Audra McDonald, Norm Lewis and David Alan Grier. Leaves from the Dietrich Theater, 60 E. Tioga St., Tunkhannock. 8 a.m. Wednesday returning at approximately 11 p.m. $220 includes transportation, play and dinner at Carmine’s. Reservations: 996-1500. Auditions for a November production of the musical “Anything Goes!” Little Theatre, 537 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. 7 p.m. Sept. 16 and 17. 823-1875. Auditions for the Bloomsburg Theatre Ensemble’s productions of “A Christmas Carol” and “Live from Bloomsburg: A Very Special Christmas Special.” Seeking ages 7 to 18 with dance and gymnastics experience. Alvina Krause Theatre, 226 Center St., Bloomsburg. 6 p.m. Sept. 20. 441-7173.

PAGE 21

Marvelous Wild Mushrooms of Pennsylvania, indoor and outdoor sessions with Bill Russell, author of “Field Guide to

‘Pyramid in Paris,’ a photograph by Kate Senunas, is one of the works in the ‘Two Travelers’ exhibit in place through tomorrow at Marquis Art and Frame in Wilkes-Barre.

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OUTDOORS Continued from page 21

CLAMS $2.95 / DOZEN CHEF SPECIAL WEEKLY SPECIAL STEAK & SHRIMP BAKED HADDOCK 10 oz. NY Strip w/ Fried Shrimp baked potato & cole slaw w/ baked potato & cole slaw $8.95 $11.95

FUTURE Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Field Trip, sponsored by the Greater Wyoming Valley Audubon Society. Sept. 15. Meet at the Park and Ride, Route 309, Wilkes-Barre, at 8 a.m. or at 8:30 a.m. at Perkins Restaurant, Route 93, West Hazleton. $8, $4 children. Registration: 362-8727. Tree Walk, a 90-minute stroll at Grey Towers National Historic Site, Milford. 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Sept. 15. $6, $5 seniors, $3 youths. Registration: 296-9630. Mount Tammany Hike, 11 difficult miles. Meet at Sears Automotive Center, Wyoming Valley Mall, Wilkes-Barre Township. 8:45 a.m. Sept. 16. Sponsored by the Susquehanna Trailers. 825-7200.

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PAGE 22

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ENTERTAINMENT Friday: Karl Metzger 9 pm - 1 am Saturday: Sitingray w/ Special Guest Tom Townesly - Harp Player Extraordinaire - 9PM-1AM IN THE BAR AT THE CORNER OF E. NORTHAMPTON AND HILLSIDE ST., WILKES-BARRE • 829-9779 NEVER A COVER! • KITCHEN HOURS: SUN 1-8, WED-SAT 5-9. NOW ACCEPTING ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS

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“HOME OF THE COLOSSAL PIZZA”

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6 oz. South African Lobster Tail

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OR

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One Pound 1/2 Pound Brazilian Lobster Tail Brazilian Lobster Tail served with potato, vegetable and fresh baked bread

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40¢ UPEEL SHRIMP $1 OYSTERS ON THE HALF SHELL 40¢ BUFFALO WINGS MILLER LITE & LAGER DRAFTS $2.00 00

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27 Wilson Street, Larksville O pen Fri . 11:30-9:00 S at. & S un. 4:00-9:00

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Saturday, September 8, 2012, Meditation & Self Healing Workshop 1pm - 4pm $25.00 Wednesday, September 12, 2012, Join Henry Bieryla for: The Paradigm Shift @ 6:00 pm The first in a series of 3 classes $129.99, Book Included

BALLROOM DANCE PARTY

PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED CALL 570-208-1511

Friday September 7 & 14 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

CHECKERBOARD INN SPECIALS Mussels tossed with Fresh Spinach in Garlic Oil over Linguine Served with a side salad

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Chicken Chimichangas

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Pizza Special: Taco Pizza (Large Only) Back Room Available For Parties • Catering Off Premises Available See all our specials at www.checkerboardinn.com

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Restaurant & Catering *THIS WEEKEND* STEAMED CLAMS STRIP STEAK IMPERIAL SEAFOOD & PASTA SAUTEE CHICKEN PARM.ALFREDO CRAB STUFFED SALMON PORK MARSALA *BREAKFAST TILL 1:00 SAT. & SUN.*

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Mon. - Thurs. 4pm to 10pm Fri 11am to 11pm • Sat. 12:30pm to 11pm Sun. 2pm to 10pm

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651 Wyoming Ave. • Kingston 283-4322 • 283-4323

2 Large 16” Plain Pizzas

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95

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Cannot be combined with any other offer. One coupon per visit. Expires 9-13-12

...casual dining with a difference!

Costello’s is now offering an Early Bird Menu Tuesday-Sunday until 5:30 P.M.

Weekend Features

Spinach and Garlic Baked Haddock $15.95

Costello’s baked haddock topped with sauteed spinach and Garlic and finished with an Herb butter.

Prime Rib $19.95

A mouth watering 12-14 oz. cut of Prime Rib served with a side of Au jus, and a choice of two sides.

NY Strip Gorgonzola $26.95

HALLOWEEN PARTY

Need a Costume? Costumes by BARBARA

Sunday Special

Chicken & Biscuits $10.95

Our famous home-style Chicken & Biscuits served with mashed potatoes and gravy. Mmmm...what a way to go!

Please inquire about our private dining room for any and all occasions. Costello’s has a NEW Bar/Drink menu offering many new Specialty Drinks and also Bar Food!

HAPPY HOUR: Sunday-Friday 4pm - 6pm.

Gateway Shopping Center, Edwardsville (570) 714-7777 WWW.COSTELLOS.INFO

PAGE 23

186 Main St Luzerne 287-6226

Hand-Cut USDA choice New York Strip Steak encrusted with Bleu Cheese crumbles and finished with Gorgonzola Cream Sauce.


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IREM COUNTRY CLUB Friday, Sept 21 $25 Per Person CALL

675-4465 EXT. 241 FOR TICKETS

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PAGE 24

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The Guide 09-07-2012