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CMYK Once upon a time........ Where can children become part of a fairy tale? See Page 6 for details.

THE ABINGTON

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JOURNAL

If not, find out the location at a recently opened borough museum. See Page 5 for details.

An edition of The Times Leader

Wilkes-Barre, Clarks Summit, Pa. Pa.

U of S deadline looming

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The Abington Journal

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ArtsEtc...............................10 Calendar.............................2 Classified ...........................15 Crosswords.........................4 Obituaries...........................9 Sports................................13

50¢

Ransom auditor: ‘I’m not allowed to audit’

BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER

SCRANTON - The University of Scranton faculty contract negotiations, which began in February and continued throughout the summer, are stretching toward the Aug. 31 deadline when the contract is due to expire, just five days after classes for the fall semester begin. The main obstacle on the bargaining table, according to Faculty Affairs Council (FAC) Chairman Michael Friedman, is “New Department Chair Concept,” which was introduced as a “non-negotiable stipulation.” He said the concept takes the current positions of academic department chairpersons as elected full-time faculty members and replaces them with administrative appointees. A statement released by the council in May stated, “This action constitutes an unfair labor practice because it takes work being done by union members and transfers it to non-union employees.” Stan Zygmunt, University of Scranton spokesperson, said following that statement’s release, “The new approach to academic chairs to which we aspire responds to the challenging and dynamic landscape of higher education nationally; supports our pursuit of strategic opportunities and will lead to more efficient and effective academic administration.” “Of course,” he continued,

AUGUST 15 TO AUGUST 21, 2012

Supervisor said certified CPA conducts compilation audits. BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com

Phoebe Mattes makes contact with the target…

… and Lackawanna Trail Jr./Sr. High School Principal John Rushefski meets the dunk tank water.

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ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/ALICE STUFFLE

Phoebe Mattes takes aim at the dunk tank target – school principal John Rushefskiduring Christy Mathewson Days.

MEET THE PRESIDENT

Waverly woman says yes BY KELLY MCDONOUGH Abington Journal Correspondent

WAVERLY - “I’m not very good at saying no,” said Hollie D’Agata, “so when they asked me to be president, I said yes. I thought I could help out in some way, and it’s a good organization.” ‘They’ is the Waverly Woman’s Club where D’Agata has reigned as president since May 2012. Prior to that, D’Agata was an active member for five years. When she retired, she searched for a way to get involved with something positive. The Waverly Woman’s Club, with its focus on giving back to the community, appealed to her sense of duty. D’Agata Hollie D’Agata spoke about the group’s mission which is mainly to promote The Attic Shop at the Waverly Community House. “We take on consignment clothes…nice used clothing that consignors can take back if their items don’t sell. Or, if it sells, receive a portion of the profit made. They can also elect to donate clothing,” D’Agata said. Items for sale include See Waverly, Page 11

dunk tank was just part of the fun when Christy Mathewson Days were hosted August 10 and 11 in Factoryville, hometown of Mathewson, one of the five original Baseball Hall of Fame inductees. For additional event photos, race scores and other information, see Page 13 and www.theabingtonjournal.com.

Marywood medical team serves in Haiti BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com

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enches in a church sanctuary. Wooden tables under a canopy outdoors. A large metal shipping container with cut-out doors and windows. These were the locations of some of the clinics where a team of 10 medical professionals and students from Marywood University treated patients during a recent trip to Haiti. Despite their limited tools and resources, and the lack of modern conveniences , the team members worked together for a week to provide quality healthcare. The medical mission trip, which ran July 8 to 15, was led by Karen E. Arscott, of Waverly, Program Director of the Physician Assistant Program at Marywood University. It included an interdisciplinary team of doctors, Physician Assistants, nurses and dieticians—five faculty members and five students. The team partnered with Heart to Heart International, an organization which, according to its website, “was one of the first humanitarian organizations to respond to the devastating earthquake in Haiti that killed more than 230,000 people and is one of the few organizations still there providing healing and hope.” Arscott said one thing that impressed the team about the people of Haiti, is that although they live in a poverty-stricken country, they are not lazy. As the team rode through the city (sometimes in Port Au Prince, sometimes Leogane) each morning at 6:15, they saw the population already up and working or looking for work. “The streets were so busy at that early hour, and everyone was working, everyone was doing something,” she said. The team traveled to five different clinics while in Haiti, and their main center base

was in Petionville in Port Au Prince. One clinic to which they traveled was located on a mountaintop near the village of Fondwa. Karen Arscott’s husband, James Arscott, who was also on the team, described the journey there as “very steep terrain.” “Farmers carve terraces into the mountainside in order to plant crops,” he said. “The terraces are so steep that the farmers tether themselves to the ground so that they don’t fall down the mountainside.”

‘Smile like a sunbeam’ It was in this place he said he met his “favorite patient.” “She claimed to be in her 60s, but was probably more in her 80s,” he said. “She wore a cloth that had ‘Jesus’ printed on it in different colors and fonts. She had a smile like a sunbeam and she insisted on hugging and kissing each of us, all the while saying ‘merci, merci’ over and over.” See Haiti, Page 12

Karen and Jim Arscott stand atop the Belair church clinic in downtown Port au Prince. In the background are the ruins of the national cathedral, the ‘pearl of the Caribbean.’ The Archbishop and Chancellory Choir there were killed during the 2010 earthquake.

RANSOM TWP. - At the Ransom Township Board of Supervisors meeting Aug. 6, after discussion regarding the ongoing forensic audit of township finances, Vikki Freeman, elected Ransom Township auditor, asked, “With all this going on, I’m wondering if there is any change with what us elected auditors are going to do.” She explained she recently received pamphlets in the mail from the governor’s center about upcoming classes for the township auditors in Lackawanna County. “Are we going to be allowed to audit?” she asked. This question prompted some confused looks from residents in attendance. Supervisor Dennis Macheska responded, “You will not audit the full books,” to which Freeman asked, “Why is that?” “Because we have a certified CPA that does it,” Macheska said. “It’s just too much money and too many things to look through for normal auditors to do.” Freeman asked, “And why are we not allowed to sit in?” Supervisors David Bird and Macheska then assured her she will be allowed to sit in and she will have access to those books. The forensic audit, which was requested by Pa. State Police, and began in May by Marx Accounting and Forensic Services in Scranton, follows the resignation of former township SecretaryTreasurer Kathy Zielinski. She resigned after irregularities were found during an initial audit of the township finances, according to Solic-

See Auditor, Page 7

S T R E T C H

S U M M E R

Be young at heart

BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI Abington Journal Correspondent

Who said you can’t be a kid again? Think like a kid and try one or all of this week’s five suggestions to stretch the last days of summer. We won’t guarantee it’ll make you look younger, but maybe you’ll feel lighter and more carefree. . 1. Go fly a kite. Allow your mind to wander for a moment. Imagine lying on a blanket at the beach as you glance up at the bright blue sky and see a kite flying overhead. Oops, did someone kick sand in your face? Now, come back to reality. If you can’t get to the beach in the coming weeks, Lackawanna State Park and McDade Park offer open areas See Summer, Page 11


CMYK PAGE 2A

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The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA

YOUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

REMINDERS LHV will run the Seventh Annual Heritage Explorer Train to the City of Carbondale for the Ethnic Heritage Festival on Saturday, August 18. Tickets are available at all Lackawanna County libraries now through August 17. Seating is limited. Bright Beginnings Preschool is now accepting 2012-2013 registrations for children ages three to five. The preschool is located in the Dalton United Methodist Church. Info: 563.1967. YOUTH EVENTS August 18: USA Luge Slider Search, in the main parking lot of the Toyota Pavilion, 1000 Montage Mountain Road, Scranton. Clinics will take place each day from 9 a.m.noon and 2-5 p.m. Participants will receive a USA-Luge Tshirt. Cost: free. Info/register: 1.800.USA.LUGE ext. 105 or www.usaluge.org. September 25 : Zombie Survivor Challenge, The ZSC is a “zombie- infested” 5k/3.1 mile obstacle course at an abandoned mine site in Taylor. Runners will traverse more than 10 obstacles as well as the challenges of the terrain as they evade the clutches of “hyper” and “shambler” zombies. Proceeds benefit local charities, including the Lackawanna Heritage Valley, the Ann Kutyna Kidney Fund, and the Taylor Fire Companies. Cost: prices vary. Info/tickets: www.infectscranton.com. No registration on the day of the event. DAILY EVENTS

Cancer survivors to celebrate

Cancer survivors, caregivers and oncology medical professionals are invited to connect and re-unite with each other at the 20th Annual Cancer Survivors Celebration hosted by the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute. This year, participants can choose between two locations and dates for the event: Sept. 22 at Kirby Park in Wilkes-Barre and Sept. 29 at McDade Park in Scranton. On both dates, the event will take place from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. The highlight of this year’s celebrations will be the “Circle of Survivors.” This activity will allow everyone in attendance the opportunity to share a thought or inspirational message about their cancer experience. The events will also feature a survivor’s banner, survivor and caregiver ribbons and pins, autograph books and programs, and light refreshments. To register for the event, or for more information, call the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute at 1.800.424.6724 or visit www.cancernepa.org. The registration deadline is September 14. Shown, from left, are members of the event planning committee: Judi Keller; Annie Densevich; Mary Densevich; Georgette Mecca, Event Co-Chair; Laura Toole, Director of Community and Patient Services at the Cancer Institute; Bob Jud; Fran Jud and Jill Kryston, Event CoChair.

their families. Guest speaker Dr. Kenneth Wilcox, Thoracic Surgeon from Lear Von Koch and Associates, will give a presentation on Nutrition and Heart Disease. Info: 587.5755 or 340.4842.

Band and music students. Info: 477.3264. Oyster Festival to Benefit Lupus Foundation, at Doc Magrogan’s Oyster House at August 19: Eagle Lake Com- the Shoppes at Montage from noon to 6 p.m. Includes allmunity Association “Pawsta you-can-eat oysters and other Dinner”, at the association’s August 17: Wise Crackers clubhouse from 1 to 4 p.m. Pet seafood, live music, children’s activities, raffles and parade begins at noon. August 15: Chicken-n-Biscuit Comedy Fundraiser, at The Clarion, 300 Meadow Avenue The 29th Annual Back Moun- more. Cost: $35 for adults or Ham Dinner, at Clifford in Scranton at 9 p.m. (doors tain Car, Truck and Motorcycle and $15 for children. Tickets: United Methodist Church, open at 8 p.m.). Proceeds bene- Show and Flea Market, at the 558.5008. Main Street, Clifford, from 4 – fit “The Walk to End Alzheim- Luzerne County Fairgrounds, All You Can Eat Breakfast 6 p.m. Take out or Dine in. er’s.” Cost: $15. Tickets/info: Buffet, at the Clarks Summit Route 118, Lehman, from 8 Includes dinner, dessert and 822.6919, ext. 404. Fire Company, 321 Bedford a.m. to 3 p.m. Coordinated by drink. Cost: $7.95. North Penn Cardiovascular St. from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the Lake-Lehman Band SponNature Ramble with Rebecca Specialists Open House, at 401 sors. Proceeds benefit all Lake- Cost: Adults $8; Children Lesko, at 6 p.m. at Endless North State Street, Clarks Sum- Lehman Jr./Sr. High School under 10 $4. Mountain Nature Center mit from 4 - 7 p.m. Samir B. (EMNC). EMNC’s Director and Pancholy, M.D. invites the pubNaturalist will wander the forlic to visit his new office locaest looking for animal signs and tion and meet the staff, inat the health of the plants, and cluding his new associate, search the trees along the river Claudia Dima, M.D. BP for bald eagles and other birds. Screening and light refreshRecommended for adults and ments will be provided. Info: children first grade and above 587.7828. accompanied by an adult. Participants are invited to bring August 18: Obon Lantern binoculars. Cost: $5 or free for Ceremony: Evening of ReEMNC Stewards. membrance, at Endless Mountain Zendo, Rinzai Zen Practice August 16: Fifth Annual Center, from 5:30 - 10 p.m. Cocktails for the Court, at State Open donation basket. Potluck Street Grill in Clarks Summit vegetarian offerings for supper from 5 - 7 p.m. Benefits the and/or late night refreshments tennis courts at the Waverly are welcome, but not required. Community House, which are Info/reservations: endopen to the public from April less@epix.net or 925.5077. through October. Cost: $25 Arts and Craft Festival, at the (includes food, State Street’s Chinchilla United Methodist signature martinis, wine and Perkins Restaurant and Bakery in Tunkhannock recently Church, 411 Layton Road at beer). Church Street in Chinchilla. raised more than $750 for the Wyoming County Cultural Monthly Meeting of Mended Includes a bluegrass band, a Center at the Dietrich Theater to support free children’s proHearts Inc., at Regional Hospi- book sale, a large slide for the gramming. Shown, from left: Jennifer Jenkins, Dietrich Thetal of Scranton, second Floor, kids, and many artisans and ater Executive Director; Nancy Aiello, Dietrich Theater Vice McGowan Conference Center, crafters with unique merchanPresident; Jim Roman, General Manager of Perkins Restaufrom 7 - 9 p.m. A support dise, a blueberry pancakes rant & Bakery in Tunkhannock. group for heart patients and breakfast, festival foods for lunch, and more. Cost: $1. Info: www.chinchillaumc.org. Vendor info: 587.5204 or gstanton@epix.net.

Perkins restaurant raises funds for Dietrich Theater

Fund open for crash victim Chris Cantner, a resident of the Newton and Ransom areas, was in a serious car accident Aug. 1, 2012. He survived, but the road to recovery is expected to be a long one, according to friends and family. An account has been opened at PNC bank in order to assist him, his wife and three young children with the mounting medical expenses. Anyone wishing to contribute may send a check to: The Chris Cantner Support Fund, C/O PNC Bank, 207 South State St, Clarks Summit, PA, 18411.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

THE ABINGTON

JOURNAL 211 S. State St., CLARKS SUMMIT, PA 18411 • 570-587-1148 NEWS@THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM EDITOR KRISTIE GRIER CERUTI 585-1604 / kgrier@theabingtonjournal.com STAFF WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER 585-1606 / lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com ROBERT TOMKAVAGE 585-1600 / rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com RETAIL ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JILL ANDES 578-9222 / jill.andes@timesleader.com CLASSIFIED ADVISOR LINDA BYRNES 970-7189 / lbyrnes@timesleader.com

Editor: Leadership Lackawanna, the leadership development affiliate of The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce, is pleased to announce to the community that our 2011-2012 annual report is now available for viewing at http:// news.scrantonchamber.com/. This year’s annual report features the many accomplishments of the 2011-2012 Leadership Lackawanna participants and the Board of Directors and includes coverage of Leadership Lackawanna’s: ·30th Anniversary celebration that featured the development of a collaborative mural and a video documenting and honoring our accomplishments throughout the past 30 years · Graduating classes from the Core, Executive and Tomorrow’s Leaders Today programs; · Impact on the local com-

munity through five community service projects benefiting area non-profits, including receiving the “Wish Maker” designation by the Make-A-Wish Foundation; · Awards presented to four leaders for outstanding achievements and their work with the community. For 30 years, Leadership Lackawanna has been the premiere leadership and professional development organization in northeastern Pennsylvania. Thanks to support from a number of local individuals, businesses, and organizations, we will continue to pursue our mission of enhancing the skills and knowledge of emerging citizens and advanced professionals and enabling them to better serve their communities. Lisa Hall, Leadership Lackawanna Board Chair Scranton

Editor: MetroAction, northeastern Pennsylvania’s leading micro lender, is pleased to announce to the community that our 2011-2012 annual report is now available for viewing at http://metroaction.org/blog/. This year’s annual report, Rebuilding Communities, Transforming Business, features several of our newest borrowers who have overcome challenges and found success through our financing and training programs.It also highlights many businesses devastated by the 2011 flooding that have turned to our Luzerne County Flood Recovery Loan Program, to rebuild their businesses. In addition, you will find information concerning our expanded loan programs, awards, trainings and achievements throughout the 20112012 year that have helped small businesses grow. For nearly 35 years, MetroAction has remained committed to supporting the growth of small businesses whether through providing loans or development assistance, training or other assistance to small businesses in northeastern Pennsylvania. MetroAction proudly serves nine counties, including Carbon, Lackawanna, Luzerne, Monroe, Pike, Schuylkill, Susquehanna, Wayne and Wyoming. Some examples of the work that MetroAction has accomplished in the Scranton/Wilkes -Barre Region include: • Launched $4 million Luzerne County Flood Recovery Program, spearheaded by Senator John Yudichak (D-14)

and provided $1.3 million in financing within the first nine months; • Hosted a number of training seminars to help entrepreneurs including Small Business Institute, Marketing Mastery, Search Engine Optimization, Working with the Media and Getting Started with Facebook; • Launched the Main Street Scranton Façade Grant and Loan Program and provided over $10,000 in financing within the first year; • Provided loans to Lackawanna and Luzerne businesses who could not receive traditional bank financing through loans, the Main Street Scranton Façade Grant and Loan Program and the Luzerne County Flood Recovery Loan Program; • Loaned over $3,560,970 to businesses in Lackawanna and Luzerne Counties since inception; • Graduated several Lackawanna and Luzerne County entrepreneurs from the Small Business Institute and Marketing Mastery programs. Since its inception in 1977, MetroAction has been committed to providing the tools and resources that businesses need through all stages of development to increase their chances of long-term success. MetroAction is looking forward to furthering our mission of transforming capital into local economic development and positive community impact to produce a stronger local economy for all of us to enjoy. Natalie O’Hara President, MetroAction, Inc., Scranton

COVERAGE AREA: The Abington Journal, a weekly community newspaper that is part of Impressions Media in Wilkes-Barre, PA, covers the “Abingtons” area of Lackawanna and Wyoming counties. This includes but is not limited to Clarks Summit, Clarks Green, South Abington, Newton, Ransom, Glenburn, Dalton, La Plume, Factoryville, Waverly, Tunkhannock and the Abington Heights, Lackawanna Trail and Lakeland school districts. Our circulation hovers between 2,000 and 3,000 readers. We try to get to as many events as possible, but staff and space limitations make it impossible to cover everything. If you have news about your family, town or organization, please send it to us and we’ll do our best to publish it. Photographs (with captions) are welcome. CORRECTIONS, clarifications: The Abington Journal will correct errors of fact or clarify any misunderstandings created by a story. Call 587-1148. Have a story idea? Please call. We’d like to hear about it. Letters: The Abington Journal prints all letters, which have local interest. Send letters to: Editor, The Abington Journal, 211 S. State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411. All letters must be signed and include a phone number where we can reach the author. Editor reserves the right to edit or reject any item submitted. Deadline is noon, Friday prior to publication. Want a photo that has appeared? We can provide color prints of photos taken by our staff. Prices: 8x10 - $25; 5x7 - $12. Call, mail in, or stop by to order. CIRCULATION Orders for subscription received by Friday at noon will begin the following week. See box at right for subscription prices. Local subscriptions should arrive Wednesdays. Please inform us of damage or delay. Call 587-1148. The Abington Journal (USPS 542-460), 211 S. State St., PO Box 277, Clarks Summit, PA 18411. Published weekly by Wilkes Barre Publishing Company, 211 S. State St., Clarks Summit, PA, 18411. $20 per year, in Lackawanna and Wyoming counties (PA); $24 elsewhere in PA and additional offices. Periodicals postage paid at Clarks Summit, PA, 18411, and at additional offices.

ISSN. NO. 1931-8871, VOL. 86, ISSUE NO. 33 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Abington Journal, 211 South State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411. ©COPYRIGHT 2012: Entire contents copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any means without the express written consent of the publisher. ADVERTISING CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Mondays at 10 a.m. DISPLAY ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Thursday at 5 p.m. CALL 587-1148 (Thursday at noon if proof required.) We have a variety of rates and programs to suit your advertising needs. The Abington Journal satisfies most co-op ad programs. Creative services at no charge. Combination rates with The Dallas Post, Dallas, available. We can produce your newsletter, flyer or newspaper. Call for quotes on typesetting, production and printing.

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CMYK WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA

WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 3A

Poet, postal carrier called to lead

South Abington Township Latter-Day Saint congregation gains new bishop.

ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE ELKO

Tom Louis and his son Ryder Louis with their dog Brody and his favorite nurse Nicole Blasko share Brody’s success story Aug. 8.

Business leader visits S. Abington

ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI

Pizzas from several local businesses are on display at the first annual contest during the Second Annual Clarks Summit Art & Wine Festival.

BY STEPHANIE ELKO Abington Journal Correspondent

SOUTH ABINGTON TWP.– U.S Small Business Administrator Karen Mills, who was appointed by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the Senate, toured the Veterinary Emergency and Referral Center Aug. 8 in South Abington Township. Mills has served in the president’s cabinet since January as a member of his economic leadership team. The team reflects the role small businesses and entrepreneurs play in the nation’s long-term economic growth. The U.S. Small Business Administration seeks to help small business grow and create a larger demand for jobs, according to Mills. Last year the organization hit a record of $550 million in loan support and is partnered with Fidelity Bank and the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce locally. “Small businesses are the backbone of this economy. SBA has helped manufacturing, agricultural and professional jobs but we need to do more. This is why the president is focusing on the SBA. We pledge to you that we will be there to partner with the banks. We try to hold small businesses as an example. To learn about our guarantees, counseling advice, addresses of partners and our district offices, visit SBA.gov,” Mills said. Dr. Nichole Danova owner of the Veterinary Emergency and Referral Center is one of the success stories under the organization. At the Aug. 8 event, Tom Louis, an Abington area resident, shared a personal experience with the Veterinary Emergency and Referral Center. His dog Brody, a golden retriever, was hit by a car in March and suffered from a shattered leg. The advanced technology and equipment at the hospital allowed Brody to walk and play again, he said. “They worked around my schedule and Brody is always excited to come here for his treatment. The care and compassion that they have shown to my family and Brody has been phenomenal,” Louis said. Danova explained that though the credit markets froze in 2008, she and a small group of staff members still ventured to start a Veterinary Surgical Center in 2009 located in the Wilkes –Barre/Scranton area. After that location was created they sought to expand. Then Danova contacted Fidelity Bank, who recommended that they speak to the Small Business Administration to create a business plan for the. Veterinary Emergency and Referral Center, a full -service hospital at 318 Northern Blvd., South Abington Twp. “So few of us really think of a small business like this. Through our employees they have bought nine houses, purchased 21 cars and we have relocated employees all over the country. The bank [Fidelity Bank] has been so supportive and we are ecstatic,” Danova said. The hospital has an estimated 60 employees and plans on expanding in the future which will bring more jobs to the area.

ABOVE: Pizza judge, Abington Journal Reporter Joan Mead-Matsui. There were plain and specialty pizzas to sample, ten of each, respectively, and notes to jot on the ballot sheet pertaining to each of 20 party cuts pizza prepared by local pizzerias. The occasion was a pizza contest held Aug. 10 in conjunction with The Second Annual Clarks Summit Art & Wine Festival 2012 held Aug. 11 and Second Friday Art Walk. According to organizer Charles Charlesworth, . judging the pizzas were Joe Statuto, Stephanie Longo, Abington Suburban editor; Christian Jugins, Ana Trinadad, Justin Bowen, Mary Bowen, Ed Czarkowski and Joan Mead-Matsui, Abington Journal Reporter. The winner in the “Plain Pizza” category was Colarusso’s, 100 E. Grove St., and Mamma Mia’s, 507 S. State St. won the title of best “Specialty Pizza.”.

Art, wine and pizza meet in Clarks Summit

AT LEFT: Kim Dominick, sells her handmade cheese and cracker trays.

ABINGTON JOURNAL/DANIELLE ANTONELLO-SMOLLEY

AT RIGHT: Floral Designer Raisa Statuto, shown with Joe Statuto, sells her handmade wreaths at Saturday’s Art & WineFestival. AT LEFT: Kevin and Jennifer Bartell of Clarks Summit attended with their children, Emily, 6, Lauren, 4, Lindsey, 4 and Erin, 2.

AT LEFT: Rosangela deFreitas, Angels Galeria is shown with artist, Leon Vieira.

ABOVE: Artist Joe Kluck, Simpson, showcased at Beta Bread.

AT LEFT: Art of Brian Keeler, oil on board, Everything Natural during the Second Friday Art Walk

ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI

DePhillips to wed Frosini Mr. and Mrs. Peter Frosini of Glenburn, announce the engagement of their daughter, Elizabeth Anne Frosini, to Justin Michael DePhillips, son of Victor and Denise DePhillips of Clarks Summit. Frosini holds both master’s and bachelor’s degrees from The George Washington University School of Business in Washington D.C. and currently works as Associate Director of College Guidance at Wyoming Seminary College Preparatory School. DePhillips holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from Hofstra University, Hempstead, N.Y. and is Sales Account Executive for Signature Building Systems of PA LLC. The wedding is planned for June 22, 2013 at The Church of St. Gregory, Clarks Green and reception at The Scranton Cultural Center. Elizabeth Anne Frosini and Justin Michael DePhillips will wed June 22, 2013

To those in the 500 homes and businesses on his route, he is known as “Chuck,” the eversmiling Hawaiian postal carrier. To the 500 members of the Scranton Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints he is known as Bishop Failing. Charles Keawe Failing III was recently named the bishop of the Latter-day Saint (LDS) congregation which meets in South Abington Township and serves the greater Scranton area. He is one of thousands of LDS bishops around the world who, as lay ministers, are not paid for the approximately 30 hours they commit to their ecclesiastical responsibilities each week. Bishops and two counselors constitute a “bishopric” that oversees local Church programs, ministers to members of their congregations (known as wards) and seeks to serve the surrounding community. Serving as counselors to Bishop Failing in the Scranton Ward bishopric are Dr. Scott D. Rieder, a native of Lackawanna County and a podiatrist with a practice in Taylor and John H. Mills, maintenance manager at Keystone College and a resident of Clarks Summit. Bishop Failing succeeds Dr. Kenneth R. Lord, associate dean of the Kania School of Management at The University of Scranton, who served as bishop for the last five years. Bishop Failing left his native Hawaii in 1973 on a four-year tour of duty with the U.S. Air Force. He was stationed first in Turkey, where he met and married his wife, Mary Ann and then in New Mexico. His next stop was Slippery Rock University where, after having been admitted on probation, he graduated summa cum laude (highest honors) with a bachelor of arts in English. “They took me off probation after my second dean’s list,” Bishop Failing said. While mail delivery may not be the typical preparation for

Charles Keawe Failing III was recently named the bishop of the Latter-day Saint (LDS) congregation which meets in South Abington Township and serves the greater Scranton area. To those in the 500 homes and businesses on his Scranton route, Failing III is known as “Chuck,” the eversmiling Hawaiian postal carrier.

pastoral service in religious communities, Bishop Failing sees some synergy between the roles he fills. “Love is the greatest motivator,” he said. A resident of Scranton’s Hill Section, he delivers mail in the Bunker Hill portion of that community. “It’s the people; I like knowing my route is really my neighborhood. My route is family, our ward is family. Mary Ann and I have gone to the hospital visiting people on our route. Mary Ann has taken them her famous pizza. I have true love for my patrons. Even the dogs know that it’s my neighborhood. It’s ohana – the spirit of helping in Hawaii. The Scranton Ward is ohana. The people on my route are ohana to me as I talk to them and know their fears, their anguish, their hope.” Teaching self-reliance and charity, working with interfaith groups and helping the youth are priorities Bishop Failing identified for the years he expects to serve as bishop. “I want to work with interfaith groups so that we and they can be strengthened, knowing that there are others living the example of Christ,” he said. The Scranton Ward is one of eight Northeastern Pa. congregations that make up the Scranton, Pa. stake. It holds weekly services Sundays from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at 505 Griffin Pond Road in South Abington.

Blessing in bronze A special bronze commemorative medallion, shown here, was unveiled at the BorekPendrak Biennial Family Reunion July 29 and blessed by Rev. Jason Soltysiak, Polish National Catholic Church and distributed to family and friends who attended.


CMYK PAGE 4A

THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA

CROSSWORDS

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

ANSWERS ON PAGE 14

Auctions at Harford Fair

Shown, from left: Paul Montgomery, Carol Moore, Rob Waldeck, Mary Lesko, Mark Lesko, Anne Montgomery, Bill Montgomery, Ruth Reim and Barbara Montgomery.

SummerFest full of family fun Celebrating their relocation four years ago from Olyphant Avenue in Green Ridge to the city’s Bull’s Head section in North Scranton, the people of Providence United Presbyterian Church prepare to share their fourth annual festival of music, food, and fun to be held on the church grounds Aug. 24 and 25 from 4 to 10 p.m. each day. Originally dubbed “Summer Fest,” the event features music by Mike Strausberger Entertainment,

Tom Rogo, Keep Coming Back and the group Kingsong, along with surprise guests. Food will be served throughout, including clams and corn, hot dogs, hamburgers, sausage and peppers, Texas wieners, pizza, and all things fried, including funnel cakes, Oreos and Twinkies. The event also includes a basket raffle, flea market, Alex’s Lemonade and lots of family fun. For additional information call 570.346.0804.

Two years ago, the directors of the Harford Fair initiated a scholarship program for college students who have been affiliated with the fair either through 4-H, working or exhibiting . Funds for the scholarships are raised through the auction of the first and second place prize-winning baked goods exhibited. This year, the auction of the baked goods will be held under the Shade Pavilion Aug. 20 at 4 p.m. The 155th Harford Fair will take place Aug. 20-25. For details, visit www.harfordfair.com Jan Winemiller, owner of Tingley Glass, will share her knowledge of the history of glass and the art of stained glass-making during an all-day demonstration in the new Fine Arts area, previously the bingo stand. On Aug. 22, Winemiller will demonstrate the process. The final stained glass piece will be on display and auctioned Aug. 25 at 4 p.m. Each day of the fair, a fine arts crafter has volunteered to demonstrate. College students interested in applying for one of the scholarships can find information and application at www.harfordfair.com. Winners of the scholarships from previous years will be recognized at the Opening Ceremony of the fair Aug.19 at 7:30 p.m. Scholarship winners selected from this year’s applications will be recognized at the Harford Fair Banquet in October.

My name is ... Mindy

Name: Mindy Age: Young adult Sex: Female Breed: White shorthaired cat About me: I’m compatible with other cats and I’m litter trained. Remember to contact the Griffin Pond Animal Shelter at 586.3700 is your pet is lost or goes astray.

The Griffin Pond Animal Shelter, 967 Griffin Pond Rd., Clarks Summit, is open for the adoption of pets from noon to 4:30 p.m., daily. Wish list items are always appreciated, especially cat litter and paper towels. Adopt a cage at the Griffin Pond Animal Shelter for one month and your $20 donation will go toward care and feeding of the animal in that cage for the month you choose. A card will be placed on the cage identifying the sponsor for that month. Send the following Adopt-aCage information, including name, address, city, state and zip, phone number, sponsor month, choice of dog, cat or small animal cage and how you would like your sponsor card to appear, along with $20 for each cage to The Griffin Pond Animal Shelter, 967 Griffin Pond Rd., Clarks Summit, PA 1841 1.


CMYK WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA

‘Day for Doug’

HISTORY REVISITED

BY GERARD E. NOLAN Abington Journal Correspondent

GLENBURN- A Glenburn resident and his family face mounting medical bills, even with insurance, as he undergoes treatment for recently-discovered cancer found in four places after a liver transplant. Family and friends have united to organize a fundraiser to assist Doug Shook, 51, and his family to help pay for medical bills, which have grown exponentially. The fundraiser, called Day for Doug, will feature activities and food, including a chicken barbecue, clam bake, Chinese raffles and live music. Shook had recently received a liver transplant after being on the waiting list for years. After receiving a new liver, Shook was beset with medical problems. Doctors discovered cancerous tissue in his liver and other parts of his body. He is currently undergoing treatment for cancer. His friends and family came together to help him and his family in their time of need. “Family and friends are trying to help them through the difficulties. It’s emotionally demanding, it’s financially devastating. We want to help them any way we can,” said Barry Kaplan, Shook’s relative and co-owner of Everything Natural, a benefit sponsor. “We’re trying to give the family a ray of hope.” Organizers enlisted the help of local businesses to sponsor the event. Sponsors include Everything Natural, Servicemaster by Griffing and Cooper’s Seafood. Sandy Materna, Shook’s sister-in-law, has been credited with bringing the benefit from great idea to reality. “The response has been amazing,” said Materna, who has experience with fundraising for charitable causes but never for someone in her own family. “When the shoe’s on the other foot, and people are coming forward and doing things, you just appreciate it that much more.” Day for Doug will take place at the Dalton Carnival Grounds Aug. 25 from noon to10 p.m. Admission and parking are free. Donations will be accepted. A voucher for the chicken barbecue costs $8. Proceeds are intended to ease the strain placed on his family. Donations can be mailed or delivered to Penn Security,1100 Northern Blvd., Clarks Summit, PA,18411or Everything Natural, 426 S. State St., Clarks Summit, PA,18411. For details, refer to the event’s Facebook page, Facebook.com/ DayForDoug.

Vac–Way

WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 5A

ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/STEPHANIE ELKO

Members of the committee from the Abington Senior Center enjoy their Membership Appreciation Party Aug. 3. From left: Kathy Starck, Adelle Bianchi, Diane Bianchi, Wil Kreher, Charlie Giannetta, Rose Ann Aveline, Mary Leiber.

ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/DANIELLE ANTONELLO-SMOLLEY

A ribbon-cutting ceremony was attended by area dignitaries and members of the Clark’s Summit Centennial Planning Committee as they hosted a Meet and Greet with the public during the Grand Opening of the Clarks Summit Museum in Loughney Hall Aug. 11. Shown, front row, from left, are Sharleen Martin, Gerri Carey, Clarks Summit Borough Council President; Charles Kumpas, Dennis Martin. Back row: State Rep. Sid Michaels Kavulich with Clarks Summit Borough Council members Patti Lawler, Herman Johnson, Pat Williams.

A

ribbon-cutting ceremony was attended by area dignitaries and members of the Centennial Planning Committee at a Meet and Greet with the public during the Grand Opening of the Clark’s Summit Museum in Lough-

ney Hall Aug. 11. The museum, located on the second floor of the Clarks Summit Borough Building was funded by the Planning Committee’s efforts. “One of the last things the Clark’s Summit Centennial

State Rep. Sid Michaels Kavulich speaks before the ribbon cutting Aug. 11.

Coalition helps assist sailors Navy Cmdr. Michelle D. Morse, whose husband, John, is the son of Linda L. Phillips of Clarks Summit, and fellow Sailors aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) formed a Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) committee. CSADD is a peer-to-peer mentoring program geared toward assisting Sailors in making positive decisions in all areas of their lives. The program was originally created for those in ROTC, JROTC and similar programs. It quickly spread throughout the Navy and is a resource for all Sailors.

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Barb Pietluckiewicz, George Bryan and Bertha Zona wait in line for their food.

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he Abington Senior Center, 1151 Winola Road in Clarks Summit, hosted a Membership Appreciation Party Aug. 3. It included a buffet of meatballs, chicken wings, sandwiches and more; musical entertainment by Bill Kolata and dancing. Vicki Thiel and John Pisaturo dance to the musical entertainment of Bill Kolata.


CMYK PAGE 6A www.theabingtonjournal.com

The Abington Journal♌Clarks Summit, PA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

Parenthood, Abington Style with Adriane Heine

Ice cream for dinner

ABINGTON JOURNAL / EMILY TAYLOR

Comedian Elon Gold was the entertainment for the night at the Jewish Culture Festival Aug. 5.

ABINGTON JOURNAL/EMILY TAYLOR

Dr. Joseph McAulliffe of ProActive Family Chiropractic in Clarks Summit and his wife, Terra McAulliffe attend Festival Aug. 5.

ABINGTON JOURNAL/ALEXANDRA BATSON

Walter and Carol Sanko of Dalton attend the Jewish Culture Festival.

Zest for culture

On Aug. 5, hundreds gathered at the Scranton Cultural Center for a unique celebration of Jewish cuisine organized by the Jewish Discovery Center, Clarks Summit. Guests sampled an array of dishes, from the winter-staple ingredients of Eastern Europe, to the spicy and colorful salads of the Middle East, all the way to tasty deli meats eaten with crusty rye bread and a crunchy pickle in New York’s Lower East Side. Actor and comedian Elon Gold from Hollywood offered a live performance. For details on upcoming events, visit jewishdiscoverycenterorg

My little sister taught me a valuable lesson last weekend. My family had road-tripped up to visit her family. It’s an annual summer tradition to visit them in Saratoga Springs during track season. The kids love the bustling downtown, the colorful tourists with big hats and wads of cash and the horses, horses, horses. As the weekend approached, my oldest daughter said she hoped we would visit that great ice cream shop, the one with the bench swing outside and the middle child hoped we would get to pet some horses. Somehow, neither my husband nor I remembered to factor in summer/ Friday traffic when we set our estimated time of departure. Saratoga is a three- hour ride, so he worked, I packed and we pulled away from our house with a loadedup minivan at 2 p.m., for a 5:30 date with a picnic basket and some polo ponies. Needless to say, we rolled into my sister’s driveway 5 hours and 15 minutes later. Early on in our journey, after we had made it through an hourlong backup on I -81 north, it became apparent we would not make it on time. The kids dealt with their extreme disappointment at missing the night’s planned outing through a series of moans and cries. Luckily, their iPods were chock full of Hunger Games trivia apps. Thanks to the fact that I am currently reading the trilogy to try to keep up with what’s trending in my preteens’ culture, the question and answer competition made for some fun-filled hours. Upon our arrival, the kids ran off and got to playing with their cousins as the parents headed for the patio and much-needed cocktails. Blowing off the steam created by sitting in traffic with a carload of kids can often lead to overindulgence. We finally had the wherewithal to get the kids to bed at midnight, and ourselves to bed an hour later. The much-later-thanusual bedtime, exacerbated by sharing a room with a baby who tends to wake often when not in her own crib, resulted in groggy people of all ages come Saturday morning. The men golfed and the la-

dies decided to take the children trail-riding at Lake George. The oldest three cousins loved it and my 7- year- old niece seemed to enjoy the ride until about the halfway mark. As soon as we were as far out on the wooded trail as possible, her horse stumbled momentarily and she got scared. The whining began and culminated in a sleep-deprived tirade against her mother when she was finally back at the barn and disembarked. “Why did you make me do that?!� She yelled at my sister. My little niece quietly cried and whimpered as we drove back toward Saratoga, the rest of us discussing the options for our next activity. It was lunch time, I pointed out. The preteens wanted to browse the downtown shops and my sister wanted to treat me to a pedicure. “Take me home!� Little Grace wailed from the back seat of the van. I offered to take the bullet. “Drop us off,� I said to my sister. “I’ll stay with her and at least the baby can get a nap.� But my sister had a brilliant alternative. “Who wants ice cream for lunch?� Sometimes, when the joy of many rests on the small shoulders of one cranky child, you just have to go there. “Me! Me! Me!� They all shouted. It was a valuable lesson and an intervention I hadn’t considered in the past. Sure, I’ve done breakfast for dinner when feeling lazy, uninspired and short on groceries, but this was a new concept for me. Plus my sister has a PhD and is a respected college professor, so I trust her opinion. There’s plenty of protein in all that dairy. The next day, as we lounged at the pool in the late afternoon following a day at the races, I mourned the end of a fun-filled weekend and the impending long drive home. I knew we had to drive through town, right by the bench swing that my daughter remembered from last year. “Who wants ice cream for dinner?� I asked. Adriane Heine and her husband, Doug, own Dublin’s Pub in West Scranton and are raising their three daughters in Waverly. Contact her at news@theabingtonjournal.com or with column questions or suggestions.�

ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/EMILY TAYLOR

Volunteer Emily Sarno reads ‘The Princess and the Pig’ aloud during Princess Story Hour Aug.7 at the Abington Community Library.

Royal treatment P

rincess for a day- or an hour, at least. The Abington Community Library was the host location for a story hour for children ages four to six led by teens Emily Sarno and Sammi Shea.

ABOVE: Beth Toursher assists her daughters, Sadie and Ella, while they make crowns. AT LEFT: Violet Holgate attends Princess Story Hour. AT RIGHT: Volunteer Sammi Shea leads the girls in a princess dancing activity.

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CMYK WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA

WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 7A

AUDITOR

pid I look?” she said. “…Hey, when I came the first day, I was surprised Continued from Page 1 after being elected that I itor Edmund Scacchitti. A State Police report dated wasn’t allowed to audit.” She added that she’s reJuly 18 stated an arrest is searched other municipalexpected in conjunction with ities that do have both the the continuing investigation public accountant and the which revealed “several elected auditors. thousand dollars were mis“I just wanted people to be appropriated by a former aware,” she said. township employee for perThe supervisors confirmed sonal use.” there are classes coming up The supervisors anfor the auditors, and they nounced at the Aug. 6 meetwill be more involved in the ing that the forensic audit future. reached its initial cost limit Supervisor William “Bud” of $7,500 and Scacchitti will Brown said, “The more eyes meet with the auditor to see looking at our books, the how much more it will cost. better it is.” Bird explained there are A resident asked the susome “issues” and the audipervisors how many years tor needs to “go deeper,” the CPA was auditing the expanding the investigation township books before findto cover the earned income ing the irregularities. tax records. Macheska said he isn’t Freeman explained the sure exactly, but he estimatreason for her question is ed two or three years. people have come to her Brown saidthe CPA does asking, “What’s going on? not conduct a complete auWhy wasn’t this caught?” dit, rather, a “spot audit” or She said her response to “compilation audit.” that is, “Uh...I’m not al“We didn’t know it at the lowed to audit.” time,” Macheska said. “We “Well, you know how stu-

found that out later.” “Well, I’m sure some of it could have been caught,” Freeman said. At the beginning of the meeting, Macheska introduced new township secretary-treasurer Sarah Griggs, of Newton Township, who was hired part-time to work 30 hours per week at $16 per hour. Griggs said she will generally work from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. The police report, given by Officer Thomas Kreidler was longer than usual, due to a list of seven reports and several complaints and questions from residents. Most of the discussion involved an ongoing neighborhood dispute in Sunset Mobile Home Park. Kreidler said police received a report July 20 about a resident in the park “who apparently travels at night picking up scrap metal and makes a lot of noise overnight. This particular night he was out there at 1:30 in the morning blowing an air horn because there was ei-

pervisors involved a break in at the 2200 Block of Ransom Road, the site of the proposed land development Vikki Freeman, elected Ransom for a riffle range by Ransom Township auditor Recreational Shooting Sports, LLC. Kreidler said this was the second time someone allegedly entered ther a cat or a raccoon in the the property overnight, cut the chain on the gate and trash.” He said the man had alleg- stole parts off vehicles on the property. edly been “harassing” and Brown asked what kind of “terrorizing” the neighbors. vehicles were on the properThen July 24 another call was received from the same ty, and Kreidler said they are old military vehicles. location saying an adult Brown said, “There’s not male and juvenile male were supposed to be any vehicles using “obscene language” on that property.” The superduring late night hours and visors explained it is an orverbally threatening the dinance violation and the neighbors. “At that time,” company was requested to Kreidler said, “police reremove them. sponded and responsible Kreidler said the items parties have been charged.” allegedly stolen included He added, “I believe that person will be moving out of radiators, radios and batteries. the trailer park if he hasn’t Township residents Roger already.” and Helen Doty of Creek At least two residents siRoad asked the supervisors multaneously responded, if any progress has been “He’s still there.” Another part of the police made regarding the problems with the township creeks report which caught attenwhich need cleaning out, tion from residents and su-

specifically across from their home, where they said the bank is sliding and taking a part of Ledge Drive with it. Bird said his goal is to take care of the sliding bank first, and he is working on getting the rocks to secure it. Next year, he said the township will have to budget for the rest of the needed work. Supervisors also discussed a new business resolution regarding the benefit plan for the non-police employees of the township. Brown made a motion to accept the resolution. Several residents then asked questions about the purpose, provider and rates. The supervisors explained the township pension plan for municipal workers. Brown then made motion to table it until the supervisors have a chance to review it. Supervisors agreed, and no further discussion was made on the resolution. The next supervisors meeting will be held Sept. 4, as the first Monday of the month falls on a holiday.

DEADLINE

ty is usually presented. Since Dr. Earl was a former Chair of FAC and a strong supporter of the union, the faculty members on the selection committee have declined to meet to choose a recipient of the award named after him until the faculty have a fair contract.” At the end of May, Friedman said he was hopeful university President Rev. Kevin Quinn would withdraw the “New Department Chair Concept,” after a then-recently requested meeting with the Faculty Senate’s Executive Committee for further consideration of the concept. He said, however, “Unfortunately, that action did not take place…Fr. Quinn adamantly announces his belief in shared governance, but in practice he does not seem to be willing to allow the clear voice of the fac-

ulty to affect his actions.” Friedman said although the FAC and University table teams have continued to meet over the summer, progress is slow, partially due to the absence of the University’s lead negotiator, Attorney Nick DiGiovanni, of Boston, who he said was “unavailable for long stretches over the summer, and the University will not meet without him.” Friedman added that two negotiation sessions were scheduled for Aug.14 and15, but if neither a contract extension nor tentative agreement are made by Aug. 31, the contract will expire. The University remains hopeful. Gerald C. Zaboski, Vice President for External Affairs, said in a statement, “Building on considerable progress made during bargaining sessions held thus far, the University hopes

and expects that the union team will work hard with our team during our upcoming sessions to reach a new contract.” Zaboski added, “Labor negotiation is not a spectator sport with weekly updates, and, as we have said before, we will not respond publicly to incomplete or misleading union claims, which are part of their prearranged publicity campaign. Having said that, if we do not reach final agreement after our remaining sessions, we will update our faculty in detail as to why and identify any remaining stumbling blocks.” Meanwhile, the FAC’s cause is receiving some attention on a national level. Friedman said a “resolution in support of the FAC efforts” was approved by the Executive Committee of the Collective Bargaining Congress (CBC), “the umbrella orga-

nization for all of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) collective bargaining chapters across the country.” He said he is encouraged by the resolution and hopes it will have an effect on the University administration, but can’t guarantee it will. The faculty’s current contract includes a no-strike clause; when it expires, so will that clause. Friedman said he is unable to speculate about what actions may occur at that time. “I can only say that University of Scranton faculty care a great deal about their students and would never do anything to interfere with their education unless they felt that they had absolutely no other choice,” he said. “FAC would strongly prefer to see the current contract extended until we can achieve an agreement.”

new contract. According to the May statement, the “New Department Continued from Page 1 “we have always fully recogChair Concept” also provoked nized our legal obligations to numerous letters of protest, a negotiate over the impact of boycott of the university’s Faculmoving in that direction, inty Appreciation Dinner March cluding any issues surrounding 30 and a pledge signed by 216 potential changes in bargaining faculty members, stating they unit work.” will not accept an appointment Friedman said the concept to the department chair position spurred the faculty to a160 to 27 if it is not included in the collecvote, which ended via electronic tive bargaining unit represented ballot April13, to adopt a strict by the Faculty Affairs Council. “work to rule,” or “minimal Now as the fall semester apcompliance” status in meeting proaches, Friedman said, “The contractual obligations. He said faculty are prepared to continue this means the union members their Minimal Compliance agree to temporarily uphold all efforts. Therefore, they will not mandatory duties outlined in the be taking part in the University’s Faculty Handbook, but refrain Fall Welcome Weekend or the from all duties not contractually Fall Convocation, where the mandatory, as a method of coveted John L. Earl III Award “pressuring administration” to for service to the university, the agree with faculty terms for the faculty and the wider communi-

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The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA

TH

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

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CMYK WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

OBITUARY

Edward Joseph Sheroda August 8, 2012 Edward Joseph Sheroda, 89, of Clarks Green, died Wednesday at the Gino J. Merli Veterans Center. His wife of 63 years is the former Irma Myernick. Born Oct. 30, 1922, in Throop, son of the late Joseph and Anna Humphrey Sheroda, he had been a resident of Clarks Green since 1952 and was formerly of Throop. He was a graduate of Throop High School and attended The University of Scranton. He was an Army veteran of World War II, having served from Feb. 4, 1943, to Feb. 11, 1946. He was the recipient of Presidential Unit Citation, Purple Heart and Oak Leaf Cluster, Bronze Star, Combat Infantry Badge, EAME Campaign Medal with four bronze stars, World War II Victory Medal, American Defense Medal and the Army Good Conduct Medal. Edward had presented and shared with students at Misericordia University his experiences in the epic war. As a private first class, he served in the 350th Regiment Infantry, 88th Infantry Division, which chased the German troops through Italy and liberated Volterra and Rome. The council of Volterra honored the men who liberated the historic city from the Nazis on April 25, 1997. He was honored for his role in

James Henry Bunnell August 13, 2012 James Henry Bunnell, Peckville, died Monday morning, Aug.13, at home. He was preceded in death by his wife Lola Bunnell, who died in 1992. Born in Clarks Summit, he was the son of the late Loyal Willard and Marjorie Elizabeth Nichols Bunnell. Prior to his retirement he was a Contract Special Investigator for the

Catherine Mary Delevan August 10, 2012 Catherine Mary Delevan, of Elizabethtown, formerly of Clarks Summit, died Friday morning, Aug. 10, at the Masonic Village in Elizabethtown. Her husband of 40 years, Glenn W. Delevan Sr. passed away in July, 1982. Born December 9, 1920 in Scranton, she was the daughter of the late Gwilym and Jane “Jenny” Jones. She was a graduate of Scranton Technical High School. She was appreciated for being a stay -at -home mom before working as a maid at the Inn at Nichols Village in Clarks Summit. She was a member of the Waverly United Methodist Church and past President and member of the Clarks Summit VFW Abington Memorial Ladies Auxiliary. Catherine was known for her beautiful singing voice, which she mastered through stage and chorus productions at North Scranton Junior High School and Dr. Jones Memorial Church Choir. Lovingly remembered by all that crossed her path as “Nanny,” Catherine’s greatest pleasures were her family and friends. Surviving are three sons: Glenn Delevan and wife Marian, Robert Delevan and companion Richard Fellows and David Delevan and wife Nancy; a daughter Kathy Menichiello and companion Craig Nicholof; ten grandchildren David W. Delevan, Glenn W. Delevan III, Kelly DelevanWilliams, Rob Delevan, Jennifer Yerico, Julie Delevan, Dave Delevan, Nathan Delevan, Michael Menichiello and Maria Kamora; eight great -grandchildren Roy Delevan, Blake Delevan, Amanda Delevan, Maddie Delevan, Meegan Yerico, Ryder Yerico, Max Jake and Evan Kamora and several nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by a brother Glyndwr Jones and a sister Elizabeth Jones Thorpe. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Masonic Villages, 1 Freeman Drive, Elizabethtown Pa, 17022 or charity of donor’s choice.

the battle. Mr. Sheroda was wounded shortly after he helped liberate Rome. He lost his left leg when he stepped on a land mine and spent 11 months in McGuire General Hospital, where he recovered. He had a long career employed by the Internal Revenue Service, Scranton office, before retirement. He was a member of Church of St. Gregory, Clarks Green. His family would sincerely like to express its special appreciation to Ed’s doctor, Dr. Lori Williams, and the dedicated staff at Gino J. Merli Veterans Center for their kind compassionate care. Also surviving are a daughter, Anne Kubic, Virginia Beach, Va., and husband, R.Adm (retired) Charles Kubic; a son, Michael Sheroda and wife, Belinda, Middletown, Md.; four grandsons, Lt. Cmdr. Charles Kubic and wife, Heather, Oxnard, Calif.; Andrew Kubic and wife, Dr. Georgia, Salt Lake City; Vaughn Sheroda, Frederick, Md. and Brian Sheroda, Middletown; two granddaughters, Kathryn Comer and husband, Brad, Greensboro, N.C. and Sara Sheroda, Middletown; three great-grandchildren, Azalea and Alder Kubic and Liam Comer; nieces and cousins. He was also preceded in death by two sisters, Olga Mizerak and Marian Miklus. Arrangements by the Jennings-Calvey Funeral and Cremation Services Inc., 111 Colburn Ave., Clarks Summit. To send an online condolence, visit www.jenningscalvey.com

Federal Government and a Special Agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He held several top secret clearances and had worked on a special project for the Tennessee Valley Authority’s Inspector General’s Office. He was a proud veteran of the U. S. Air Force during World War II. Also surviving is his companion, Evelyn Ham, with whom he resided; three brothers, William and George, Clarks Summit, and John, Johnstown; and Melanie Mellow, Clifford and Sheila Koltis, Peckville, who he considered the daughters he

THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA

Charles J. Dooley III August 6, 2012 Charles “Chas” Dooley, 63, died Monday morning, Aug. 6, at Moses Taylor Hospital in Scranton after a courageous battle with cancer. He was the husband of 37 years of the former Kathleen Corcoran. Born in Wilkes-Barre, son of the late Charles J. and Elizabeth Walsh Dooley, he was a resident of Dalton since 1977. Chas attended St. Aloysius grade school and was a 1966 graduate of St. Mary’s High School. He graduated from King’s College, Wilkes-Barre, in 1970, where he was an active participant in the glee club, serving as president his senior year and where he made many lifelong friendships. Before retirement, he was a pharmaceutical sales representative and was employed by Novartis Pharmaceuticals from 1988 to 2006, where he was nationally recognized for his awardwinning sales. Previously, he had worked for Boroughs-Wellcome in Brooklyn, N.Y., and for Penn-walt Corp. He was a member of the Lackawanna Pharmaceutical Association. An avid outdoorsman, Chas could be found more often outside than inside. He was a keen hunter, a passion he shared with many of his close friends. One of his favorite activities was “sleeping rough” at bear camp up on Barclay Mountain, regardless of weather. He loved old cars and his lifelong dream came true when he became the proud owner of a 1959 Series II Land Rover. One of his favorite hobbies was running. His proudest achievement in that sport was completing the Boston Marathon in 1978. He was a talented artist, never had; nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his brother, Judson; a niece, Ellen Holman; a nephew, George “Chip” Bunnell. The funeral will be held Thursday, Aug. 16, at 11 a.m. at the Lawrence E. Young Funeral Home, 418 South State St., Clarks Summit. Interment will follow in the Clarks Green Cemetery, Clarks Green, PA. Friends may call from 10 am until the time of the service. For directions or to send an online condolence, visit www.lawrenceeyoungfuneralhome.com.

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always sketching the world around him. He was a prolific painter. His favorite subjects to paint were scenes from his experiences as a firefighter. This artwork can be seen in many local firehouses. A lifelong animal lover, Chas was the owner of many adoring pets, all of whom were strays or adopted from the local animal shelter. Chas was happiest at the beach; his favorite being South Beach on Martha’s Vineyard. He spent many summers exploring the beaches up and down the East Coast. For 35 years, Chas was an active member of the Dalton Fire Company, where he served as president, radio officer, safety officer and lieutenant. His favorite role was that of training officer and mentor to younger firefighters. He was a strong advocate for ongoing training and education for firefighters, completing his Firefighter 1 certification at the age of 61. Leading by example, he was always the first person to sign up for a new class, and he was instrumental in bringing new equipment and ideas to his station and others in the area. Even in his later years, Chas still entered burning buildings, climbed ladders in full bunker gear and participated in water rescues despite icy conditions. He regularly received the annual award for responding to the most calls. He was a member of Our Lady of the Abingtons Parish, Dalton. Also surviving are a son, attorney Charles J. Dooley IV, Philadelphia; two daughters, Katie Dooley and Mollie Dooley, both of Kingston; a brother, Patrick Dooley; a sister-in-law, Mary Ellen and a niece, Marietta, Nanticoke. Memorial contributions may be made to Dalton Volunteer Fire Company, P.O. Box 684, Dalton, PA 18414. To send an online condolence, visit www.jenningscalvey.com.

Agnes L. Aronsohn August 3, 2012 Agnes L. Aronsohn, 88, formerly of North Abington Twp., died August 3, 2012 at her Foulkeways residence in Gwynedd. She was born in the city of New York to the late Fannie Flateau Levites and Benjamin Levites on Feb-

Donald A. Zimmerman August 8, 2012 Donald A. Zimmerman of Tunkhannock died Wednesday afternoon, August 8 at the VNA Hospice Unit in the Community Medical Center. His wife is the former Mildred Bray. Born in Scranton he was the son of the late Willard and Mary Reese Zimmerman. Prior to his retirement he was employed at the Clarks Summit State Hospital. He was a member of the Tunkhannock Assembly of God Church. Don was an avid hunter, enjoyed fishing, dirt track racing,

Janet Murphy

and camping, especially his trips to Florida in his camper to visit relatives and friends. He was known for building log cabin birdhouses and tin men; but his most joy came from being surrounded by his family and friends. Also surviving are five sons, Donald Zimmerman, Mark Zimmerman, Scott Zimmerman, Russ Zimmerman, and Randy Zimmerman, four daughters, Toni Slivinski, Evelyn Chesik, Arlene Rodney, and Ellie Fino. Several grandchildren, great grandchildren, two nieces and a nephew. He was preceded in death by a sister, Evelyn Williams. To sign the online guest book, visit www.lawrenceyoungfuneralhome.com. Memorials may be made to the American Cancer Society, 712 S Keyser Ave Taylor, PA 18517.

Janet Murphy, mother of John, Kathy, and Leslie, and grandmother of Joe, Hillary, Maximilian, Hannah, Drew, and Matthew died just over one year ago August 13, 2011. She was born on November 12, 1941, in Clarks Summit, to William and Eleanor Jermyn. Her great grandfather, John Jermyn, came to Scranton from England and was a successful coal miner. This was carried on by her grandfather, Edmund B. Jermyn, former mayor of Scranton and father, William Jermyn, who also served in World War I. She was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, tracing her heritage to the founding of the United States. One of her great loves was horses, growing up with them in Pennsylvania, even bringing her horse to the Grier School, in

Tyrone, Pa., where she was president of the senior class. She maintained a special connection to horses and looked forward to the Palos Verdes Horse Show each year. She moved to Los Angeles with her husband, John Murphy, in 1965, who passed away in 1989. The Murphy family raised their children at the Portuguese Bend Club in Palos Verdes, Calif. where they enjoyed the beach life. Jan was very involved in the life of the community and shared many good times with her friends. Her interests included playing Mah Jongg, paddle tennis, being out in the sun, and anything that would bring friends together. She is survived by her other brother, Bill, who still lives in Pennsylvania; her son, John, his wife Michelle, and children Joseph, Hillary, Drew; daughter, Kathleen, her husband Gary, and children Maximilian, Hannah; and daughter Leslie and her son, Matthew. Her body was cremated and her ashes were spread below the sun on the water along the beaches that brought her peace throughout her life in California.

ruary 18, 1924. Agnes was a graduate of the Dalton School (New York City) and attended Chevy Chase Junior College before marrying Langdon Jack Aronsohn in June 1943. She was active in the League of Women Voters, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and Waverly Community House Attic Shop and was a member of Temple Hesed. She is survived by her daughter

Sandy Taylor; her son Jeff Aronsohn, D.D.S.; three grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. In addition to her parents, Agnes was predeceased by her brother, Harry; daughter, Terry and husband Jack who was a partner at S.J. Aronsohn, Inc., Petersburg Silk Mill, Scranton. In keeping with her wishes, the family will hold a private gathering in memoriam for her.

August 13, 2011

A Safety Message from PPL Electric Utilities

Please drive carefully and yield to construction crews For the next several weeks, PPL Electric Utilities contract tree crews will be working in Ransom Township on Beacon Drive and Sekol Avenue and in Newton Township on Newton Road and State Route 307. Crews will be traveling via Keyser Avenue, Jackson Street, West Mountain Road, Division Street and Community Drive. For your safety, and the safety of our workers, please take care while driving in those areas. Thank you!


CMYK PAGE 10A

www.theabingtonjournal.com

The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

ArtsEtc...

Visual Arts/ Performing Arts Judy Jaymes Show, Aug 16 at the Radisson Hotel, 700 Lackawanna Ave, Scranton. Tonylou Productions presents lunch at noon, followed by “The Fabulous Judy Jaymes Show,” staring Judy on vocals and Frank Santoro on keyboards. The duo will perform all-time favorites, from up-tempo tunes to sultry ballads. Cost: $31. Reservations (required): 226.6207.

MORE THAN MOVIES Dietrich Theater Erica Rogler

Book Signing for Historical Book “Green Ridge” by Margo L. Azzarelli, Aug.17 at the Fidelity Bank, corner of 1610 Nay Aug Ave. and Green Ridge Street from 1 to 3 p.m. Info: 346.6179. “Star Alumni” of Music in the Mountains Performance, Aug. 19 at the David DeWire Center in Eagles Mere at 4 p.m. Featuring young musicians whose performing careers have lead them to ensembles such as the Colorado Symphony and Louisiana Philharmonic. Cost: $15 (tickets available at the door). Info: 525.3232 or 525.3248. “Mind’s Eye View,” a photography exhibit by Sally Wiener Grotta, on display at The Abington Community Library throughout August. An exhibit of visual storytelling, sponsored by a grant from the Lackawanna County Department of Arts and Culture. The artist will be on hand Aug. 21 and 22.

Literary Arts

Author John J. Zelenski Book Signing, Aug. 16 at Barnes and Noble, Wilkes University Bookstore, 7 S Main St # 1, Wilkes-Barre, from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Zelenski, a resident of Scranton, will be available to sign copies of his book, Walker’s Vale.

ARTWORK COURTESY OF A. GREG RAYMOND

A special waterproof case made for the iPhone allowed A. Greg Raymond to snap this underwater photo of an airplane water toy.

Is that your camera ringing ? Since he got his first iPhone, which was essentially his first pointand-shoot camera, about two years ago, Raymond said he has fallen in ost are aware that phones love with it and its capabilities. these days aren’t what they “It has let me become so much used to be. more creatively adventuresome,” he They are more. So much more, that one may argue said via e-mail. Whether that means slipping the a phone’s primary function is no phone into a waterproof case and longer to place calls. jumping into the pool to photograph Perhaps that is why, when listing his phone number, Photographer A. his family underwater, taking snapshots out the window of a moving Greg Raymond, 37, of Scranton, joked, “My cell phone number or the vehicle, or having it on hand to capture something simple that caught his camera you can reach me at is...” By Elizabeth Baumeister lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com

M

Kathleen Barrett’s Summer Children’s Art Camp “Fashion Illustration,” Aug.20 – 24. Info: 687.2133. Abington Art Studio’s Ladies Night Out, Aug. 20 from 5 - 9 p.m. Hand-dyed silk scarves. Cost: $40 (includes refreshments).

See Camera, Page 11

POP of color

Arts, Crafts and More

Arts and Craft Festival, Aug. 18 at the Chinchilla United Methodist Church, 411 Layton Road at Church Street in Chinchilla. Includes a bluegrass band, a book sale, a large slide for the kids, and many artisans and crafters with unique merchandise, a blueberry pancakes breakfast, festival foods for lunch, and more. Cost: $1. Info: www.chinchillaumc.org. Vendor info: 587.5204 or gstanton@epix.net.

eye on the street, Raymond continues to press on toward more creativity and photographic adventure. Not only does he use his iPhone to take pictures, he processes and edits the images with it as well. He said sometimes he also uses his iPad (a similar but larger electronic device) to edit the images, but never a laptop or desktop computer. “The convenience of having not only a camera to capture images,” he said, “but also a computer to process

AT LEFT: Siobhan McKeon displays her bumblebee cake pop. BELOW: Colm McKeon decorates his bumblebee cake pop.

Blue Angry Birds and bright yellow bumblebees were spotted at a cooking event for teens at the Abington Community Library. Judy Detter presented the making of cake pops Aug. 1 as part of a series. For details on events at the library, visit www.lclshome.org/abington ABOVE: Michael Pfister puts the finishing touches on his Angry Bird cake pop.

AT RIGHT: Judy Detter explains the steps in making cake pops to the class. ABINGTON JOURNAL/EMILY TAYLOR

What star from "The Office" also stars in the new movie "Hope Springs"?

Last Monday, our Food and Culture Around the World class wrapped up at the Dietrich. It was great to see young chefs learn all about food prep and kitchen safety while creating delicious, healthy dishes from around the world. We would like to thank Seasons Restaurant Executive Chef Bruce Arrowood for donating his time and talent to teaching this class. If your child was unable to attend the summer session, don’t worry; the class will back in the fall for a one-day session Monday, Oct.15 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Stay tuned for more details. Another event for children that is just around the corner is the Tales From Wales story hour at the Tunkhannock Public Library. Join us Thursday, Aug. 23 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Children, families and friends will be able to experience Welsh tales from master storyteller Fiona Powell who specializes in tales from her native country, Wales. Admission to the evening is free and all ages are welcome. This story hour will be held in conjunction with the Dietrich Children’s Theatre production of “The Fairy Wife of Llyn Y Fan Fach” which will be performed at the Dietrich on Friday, Sept. 7 at 10 a.m. and Saturday, Sept. 8 at 11 a.m. This staged tale is about a lonely farmer, in the beautiful Welsh countryside, who sees an enchanting fairy emerge from a small lake. Struck by love, he convinces her to marry him. She has only one condition, that he must always be kind. This is an easy promise, though as his farm prospers from her good luck, he grows greedier and grumpier. But if he loses his temper, all of his good fortune – and his lovely fairy wife – will disappear forever. To find out what happens, join us for a performance. Admission is free. Tickets are available by calling the Dietrich Theater at 570.996.1500 or at the Dietrich Theater ticket booth. In addition to children’s theatre, the Dietrich will present radio theatre in September with “The Lattimer Massacre Radio Drama…A Journey Back In Time”. On Sunday, Sept. 16 at 3 p.m., audience members will experience the historical retelling of the Lattimer Massacre of See Movies, Page 11

Last week’s answer:

Three

Last week’s winner:

E.J. Kugler

of Clarks Summit

Contestants can only win once in a 60-day period.


CMYK WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA

LIBRARY NEWS

WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM

WAVERLY

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BY MARY ANN MCGRATH

For family fun, it’s “The Cat’s Pajamas,” coming to the Scranton Cultural Center on Thursday morning, Aug. 23. Sponsored by the Cultural Center and the Lackawanna County Library System, the event will be free with the presentation of a library card or a summer “passport,” issued to children who registered to take part in the 2012 Summer Reading Club at county libraries, including the Abington Community Library. “The Cat’s Pajamas” is an ensemble which has been awarded the Parents’ Choice Award for entertaining and energetic children’s recordings. Now here in person, the group will have children (and adults) enjoying their rock ’n’ roll tunes and dancing along in the ballroom at the Cultural Center. The show begins at 11 a.m., preceded by a craft time at 10:30 a.m. Pick a paperback novel for relaxing August reading. Here are a few suggestions from the New Books collection for adults: “The Thread,” by Victoria Hislop. In Thessaloniki, Greece, in 2007, a young Anglo-Greek hears the remarkable story of his grandparents, Katerina and Dimitri, for the first time. It is a story that spans eighty years, through Nazi occupation, civil war, persecution, and the economic collapse of Thessaloniki, their beloved city. “Bloody Winter,” by Andrew Pepper. What are the links between a kidnapping and rebellion in Wales and a murder in County Tipperary, where a young Irish policeman has been told to deal swiftly and quietly with the case? “Whiplash River,” by Lou Berney. When Charles “Shake” Bouchon thwarts an attempted hit on an elderly customer patronizing his new Belize restaurant, things go from bad to worse: his restaurant goes up in flames, and he’s on the run from a drug lord, two freelance assassins, and a beautiful FBI agent. “Conquered by a Highlander,” by Paula Quinn. Sent to infiltrate a traitor’s home, Colin MacGregor is determined to expose a treasonous plot on the battlefield, a final mission for his king. When Lady Gillian Dearly meets this mysterious Highlander, his raw strength gives her hope for a future beyond her home’s castle walls. “Pyg: the Memoirs of Toby, the Learned Pig,” edited by Russell Potter. Toby attains his celebrity in late-18th century England after escaping the butcher’s knife with the help of young Sam, his first friend. Toby tours the country with a circus, astounding audiences with his abilities to count, spell and read minds, but eager to step out of the spotlight, he begins studies at Oxford before finally settling down to tell his exceptional story. The Abington Community Library is located at 1200 W. Grove St., Clarks Summit. Visit our website, www.lclshome.org/abington to register online for events or call the library at (570) 587-3440. Don’t have a library card? Register for one at http:// www.lclshome.org/libraryinfo/library_card_reg.asp.

MOVIES

Staff at the Carmel Ardito School of Dance, Peckville, announces the fall season of dance. The studio is celebrating the 50th anniversary.

50 years of dance

The Carmel Ardito School of Dance, located at 59 Erie St. Peckville, announces the beginning of a fall season of dance. The studio is celebrating the 50th anniversary. The studio offers a staff, under the direction of Carmel Ardito, conducting classes in pre-ballet for the younger student, classical ballet, tap, jazz and lyrical ballet. At the close of each season, the dancers present both a Junior Company production and a Senior Company production. The performances are held at the historic Scranton Cultural Center. Ardito, is a certified member of the Royal Academy of Dancing, London, England. For many years she served on the staff of Ballet Theater of Scranton, under the direction of Constance Reynolds. For details, visit carmelarditodance.com or call 570.689.4565.

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images and an avenue to publish them bundled into a phone, is astounding and liberating.” He added that he doesn’t see any drawbacks to using his phone as a camera because, “the best camera is the camera you have with you, and like any tool, you work creatively within its limitations.” He explained a cell phone has as much creative photo editing power as a computer. He said the only difference, is the cell phone user combines effects from several applications (apps) to achieve the end result, while the computer user generally only needs one software program, such as Adobe Photoshop. He said the advantage to using multiple apps is each picture will turn out different, instead of all of them having the same one effect or fitting into one mold or formula. Raymond said he uses many different iPhone apps to edit his photos, but the ones he uses most frequently are: • Filterstorm, which he uses to “color correct, crop and remove any unwanted blemishes.” It also allows him to “combine two images, layering one on top of the other, and erase any elements that I wish to eliminate or reveal from the image underneath.” • StripeCam, he described as “a silly little gem that will reproduce an image as vertical or horizontal stripes or as plaid, using the colors of the original photograph.” • Pic Grunger “reaches...back in time to distress a picture and imply a weathered sense of gritty antiquity.” • Decim8 accomplishes the opposite of Pic Grunger, and “deteriorates an image in a flawed futuristic Max Headroom kind of way.” • AutoStich pieces together multiple images to create a panorama. With all these options and more at his fingertips (literally), Raymond said the first question he asks himself when processing an image is, “Do I really need to run this through an app?” He explained sometimes the original unfiltered image is the best. He said he tends to stay away from apps such as Hipstamatic, which processes the images without saving an unfiltered version. “While it’s cool looking now,” he said, “there may be a time when it seems dated, and since a large part of my photo library is of family, I prefer to capture unfiltered originals.” “If I do process an image,” he said, “it is because the image begins to tell a story, a story of some universal appeal. It may start with a long shadow cast by a cup of coffee in the autumn months, a nephew, belly down on the carpet with his train set, or a niece as her face is being painted for the Fourth of July. Manipulation with an app is used to bring just enough atten-

consequences. Before and after the radio drama, Van Wagner, a Pennsylvania Continued from Page 10 musician and historian, 1897, which occurred near will perform his original song “Lattimer Massacre.” Hazleton, through a oneAfter the presentation, hour radio drama, lecture Bachman will lead a disand music. The radio dracussion on the Lattimer ma is the result of nearly four years of research Bill Massacre as it relates to Bachman has completed on the U.S. today. Admission will be free thanks to a the event, which pitted grant from the Pennsylvacoal company owners, the sheriff of Luzerne County nia Humanities Council. and striking miners against Call the Dietrich at 570.996.1500 to reserve each other with deadly

A. Greg Raymond snapped this photo with his iPhone as his niece got her face painted for the fourth of July, then ran the image through a number of apps to achieve this heavily edited and unique piece of art.

tion to the narrative without taking away from the image by becoming all about the effects.” And then there’s Instagram, a digital outlet for “sharing,” or publishing the finished images. This he described as “a visual Twitter-like utopia.” He added, “It opened me up to the possibilities of cell phone art and exposed me to some amazing cell phone photographers.” One thing most cell phone photographers have in common is an enjoyment in sharing their art with their peers and viewing the art made by others. This is evidenced by the more than 30 million registered users boasted by Instagram who have uploaded more than a billion photos since the company’s launch in October 2010. Local camera phone photographers have an opportunity coming up to share their own art at a monthlong Cameraphone Show, beginning Sept. 7 at CameraWork Gallery in Scranton. Rolfe Ross, a manager at Camerawork Gallery, said camera phone photographers are invited to submit up to three photos each for one entry fee of $3, which must be paid in cash. Entries should be printed at a maximum size of 8.5 by11inches. Ross and his partners will determine the final entries, which will be pinned up unframed and unmatted on the gallery walls. He said camera phone photographers of all skill levels (not only the pros like A. Greg Raymond) are invited to participate, as the show was conceived as “more of a fun thing.” “We hope people will take a look at their pictures, pick two or three, print them up and bring them in,” he said. Raymond said he will be entering photos in the show, and the hardest part will be choosing three out of his favorites. The Camerawork Gallery is located below the Marquis Gallery, at 515 Center Street, Scranton. The opening show will be held 6 to 8:20 p.m. Regular hours are10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays.

your tickets today. And don’t forget, the Dietrich will be sponsoring a bus trip to Broadway to see “The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess” on Wednesday, Sept. 12. This show starring Audra McDonald, Norm Lewis and David Alan Grier received a Tony Award for the Best Musical Revival this year. Before the show, you will have free time to explore the city, and after the show, all participants will

enjoy a family-style dinner at Carmine’s on Broadway, between 90th and 91st streets. Sounds like a great trip! Right? Tickets are $220 each and the price includes “Porgy and Bess” ticket, bus and dinner, including tips and tax plus a contribution to the Dietrich Theater. Space is limited. Call 570.996.1500 to sign up. As you can see the Dietrich is so much more than the movies.

men’s, women’s and children’s clothing though they are actively seeking to increase their baby and children’s collection. The money earned by The Attic Shop is spread throughout the community. Sometimes money goes to the fire stations, ambulances, animal shelter or Red Cross. It depends on the Waverly Woman’s Club being alerted to those in the community in most in need of funding. Also, clothes at the end of the season are donated to the United Neighborhood Center, Salvation Army and organizations that promote dressing for business success. D’Agata said her vision as president is to make the group more efficient. On her wish list: More members and consignors. She pointed out that in today’s economy, they’re finding themselves in a market with many consignment shops. Despite the $1 sales and “quality clothes at really good prices,” they’re “feeling the pinch.” D’Agata said that because they are a volunteer group, they can not stay open every day and night. Change is inevitable. D’Agata said she is up for the challenge of making a few changes to help The Attic Shop increase its earnings. With that comes the focus on recruiting new members, hopefully some who are technologically gifted. “It’s good to work with a nice group of people. We have a good time consigning to our customers. We love dealing with the people,” said D’Agata. “We’re also a social club. We have lunches, and we’re also an educational group because we have a speaker every month to enrich our minds.” D’Agata is a graduate of Tunkhannock High School and Elmira College. She received her master’s degree from Marywood University. She taught grades kindergarten through 4 in the Tunkhannock school

SUMMER

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with plenty of room to set your line free. Scranton Hobby, 517 Lackawanna Ave. has a selection of kites ranging from $15 to $50. 2. Forget your big golf swing. You won’t need it if you’re playing a relaxing game of miniature golf at a local course, such as Lahey Family Fun Park, 500 Morgan Highway, Scranton or Red Barn Village Mini Golf, 1826 Red Barn Village Road, Newton Township, Clarks Summit. 3. Swing from the Monkey Bars. Climb the monkey bars and swing ’til your heart’s content at a playground such as South Abington Community Park, Dalton Streamside Park, Abington Area Community Park or Lackawanna State Park. Don’t forget Fido. The Dog Park at the Abington

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Meet the President Interests and Hobbies: I am a member of the Clarks Green United Methodist Church and a member of the Waverly Woman’s Club. I belong to a book group that has been meeting each month and discussing books for 17 years. As a member of a local garden club I love providing flower arrangements for Lake Carey Chapel Sunday mornings. Inspired by: My faith, authors who write with great talent and students who love to learn. Favorite place: Probably Lake Carey, especially when surrounded by my family. Favorite Book: As an avid reader, I have many favorites but most recently Ann Pachett’s “State of Wonder.” Greatest Achievement: Raising two wonderful daughters who have blessed me with delightful grandchildren. Perfect Saturday afternoon: Swimming at Lake Carey with my family and basking in beautiful sunshine. Can’t leave home without: My journal and my iphone

district for 25 years. Though D’Agata is retired, she still teaches part-time at Marywood University. She has been married 47 years to Ernest D’Agata, who formerly owned the Sun Auto Group, but is now retired. They have two daughters, Carie and Manda. She also has four grandchildren: Sara, 13, Anna, 7, Leah, 4 and Matilda, five months. D’Agata resides in North Abington. The Attic Shop hours of operation: every Wednesday 9:30 a.m.- noon, the first and third Wednesday evening 5:30 – 8 p.m. and every Friday from 9:30 a.m. - noon. Consignment hours : Wednesday 9:30 – 11:15 a.m. and the first and third Wednesday evenings from 6 to 8 p.m. Special consignment days prior to opening are Sept. 24 from 9:30 a.m. – noon and 6 – 8 p.m. Also, Sept. 25, 9:30 a.m. - noon. Opening day is Sept. 26. For details, call 570.586.5991. Area Community Park offers plenty of space for Frisbee. 4. Craft a Sand Castle. Sand and water – that’s all you’ll need. If you don’t have a sandbox in your yard, Promised Lake State Park, Pike County, 10 miles north of Canadensis along PA 390; Tobyhanna State Park, 2.1 miles north of the community of Tobyhanna on PA 423 and Lake Jean at Ricketts Glen State Park, 30 miles north of Bloomsburg on PA 487, offer plenty of sand. The parks are open until mid-September, 8 a.m. to sunset. 5. Don’t just dream of catching a prize -winning fish… …drag your rod and reel out of the basement and head to a local fishing hole to hook that fish you’ve dreamt of catching since childhood. Even if you missed every free fishing derby known to man or you’re too old to get in free you still have time..

Shown, from left: Jim Rosengrant, P&G retiree and Dietrich Theater volunteer; Jennifer Jenkins, Dietrich Theater Executive Director; Daniel Huff, P&G employee and Dietrich Theater volunteer; Alex Fried, P&G Mehoopany Public Relations Manager

P&G donates to Dietrich Procter & Gamble donated $20,000 to the Wyoming County Cultural Center at the Dietrich Theater toward the purchase of a new heating, cooling and ventilation (HVAC) system. Their original system sustained severe damage during a 2011 flood.


CMYK PAGE 12A

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The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA

HAITI

“Farmers carve terraces into the mountainside in order to plant crops. The terraces are so steep that the farmers tether themselves to the ground so that they don’t fall down the mountainside.”

Continued from Page 1

He said he and the Physician Assistant student working with him sorted through her list of medical complaints, but couldn’t find anything wrong with her, so they congratulated her on her good health and sent her on her way with some free vitamins. “The last we saw her, she was hugging and kissing her way toward the pharmacy area,” he said. The whole team spoke highly of the Haitian people, who they described as “grateful.” Dana Thomson, one of the Physician Assistant students on the team, wrote in a journal reflection of the trip, “The patience and gratitude of each and every person we came in contact with was truly incredible to me. The people would get to the clinic before we even arrived each day and many of them walked. Each person waited in line for triage, then again to be seen by the physician and yet again to pick up any prescriptions. Not one person complained about the wait. Not one person crossed their arms and got angry with us. I hope to remember their patience and gratitude every day of my life and that it reflects in my actions for years to come.” Karen Arscott said of the team, “We learned from each other. We lived together, we cared for patients together, we loved our patients together and we prayed together.” The medical care provided by the team varied, along with the individual skills of each of its members. Karen and James Arscott both went as physicians. “This was something,” Karen said, “because I haven’t practiced primary care in almost 20 years. I teach clinical medicine, but that is different. In Haiti I saw patients from five weeks up to 88 years old. It was something how my training as a physician came back very quickly and I felt more comfortable.” She added that she also had the opportunity to practice what she teaches her students by asking for help when faced with uncertainty. “I believe that was a major learning point for the students,” she said. “They saw the faculty openly asking each other for help.” The team included two physician assistant students: Dana Thomson, of Archbald, who worked with Karen Arscott; and Jacqueline Freebery, of New Castle, Del., who assisted James Arscott. They performed a variety of tasks, such as taking patient histories, conducting physical examinations, making diagnoses and more. Both Thomson and Freebery said their favorite part of the trip was working with the children, who Freebery described as “happy, innocent and thankful.” “Seeing the bright faces of the children each day was so inspiring,” Thomson said. “I loved having the opportunity to interact with the children— from a little girl running up and grabbing my hand, to handing out lollipops in a somewhat chaotic fashion, to teaching some young kids how to use a stethoscope, to holding a little baby while a mother talked to Dr. Arscott.” While the physicians and Physician Assistants conducted examinations, those in the field of nutrition and dietetics focused on the education and nutritional needs of the Haitians. Joanne Christaldi, of Scranton, assistant professor of nutrition and dietetics at the university, provided nutrition education and oversaw student involvement in nutrition related practices. “As a faculty member, this trip allowed me to provide service in a place of great need,” Christaldi said. “I have been very fortunate with receiving education, so having an oppor-

James Arscott, physician on the mission trip Describing journey to one located on a mountaintop near the village of Fondwa.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Dana Thomson, Physician Assistant student, visits with two orphans at Place L’or.

the role of food and nutrition in a foreign country. ” Two Nutrition and Dietetics students were on the team: tunity to pay back was a huge factor. I also hope to take back David Korb, of Scranton, and Maryrose Ammirati, of Long into the classroom the knowlIsland, N.Y. They worked to edge I gained about this culprovide education and assessture.” ment of the Haitian patients, She said from a nutritional standpoint, the team was able to taking their heights and weights and calculating BMIs (Body educate the Haitian patients Mass Index). about high blood pressure, gastric reflux, pregnancy and Hardest part: Leaving breastfeeding. Korb and Ammirati both said Jessica Rae Bodzio, Clinical Instructor/DPD Director in the their favorite part of the trip was Nutrition and Dietetics Depart- getting to know the people they worked with, as well as the ment at the university, also Haitians. They both said the represented the field of nutrihardest part was leaving. tion. “The main thing that I “This trip was transformative for me,” she said. “Additionally, learned while in Haiti,” Korb wrote in a reflection paper, “is my experience allowed me to have a greater understanding of that the Haitian people are

The mission team gathers at their headquarters at La Maison.

NOW OPEN SUNDAYS 10AM - 3PM

merely victims of colonial oppression and modern circumstance. Oppressed by the French, tortured by their government, destroyed by natural disasters, devastated by disease and the only thing the modern Haitian is guilty of is being born in Haiti...Their situation both shakes and fortifies your faith as you are angered and frustrated for these people but also take solace that despite their disparity they remain kind, hopeful and faithful Christians.” “I had no idea what to expect,” Ammirati said, “I will never forget it and want to continue to do service trips again.” The team also included Dr. Diane Haleem, Associate Professor of Nursing and Marissa DeLeo, a nursing student. James Arscott said he believes this trip and ones like it are important in the education of the students, because it allows them to gain an appreciation for the difficulty of life by experiencing hardship and poverty. He said it’s also important for them to see some of the diseases common in other parts of the world. Similarly, Bodzio said international experiences, especially in underdeveloped countries such as Haiti, bring to light the importance of one’s part in the world in which they live. James Arscott added, “If we are able to overcome culture and language barriers in Haiti, then we can do the same here at home. The United States is culturally diverse and the barriers that we had to overcome in Haiti are becoming commonplace here. There is also a value in learning to provide quality care in an austere environment. Lavish healthcare does not necessarily translate into quality healthcare. I think that our students saw that difference and can make that distinction.”

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

Juried exhibit celebrates river ArtWorks Gallery & Studio will celebrate the Lackawanna River and the work that the Lackawanna River Corridor Association and its executive director, Bernie McGurl has been doing. The theme for this juried exhibition is the river and its watershed. Create artwork to share views and interpretations of one of our area’s greatest

natural treasures. Drop off dates are Aug. 24 and 25 from 11a.m. – 3 p.m. at ArtWorks Gallery & Studio, 503 Lackawanna Avenue, Scranton. An opening reception will be held First Friday, Sept. 7 from 6-9 p.m. For information on entering, visit http://www.artworksnepa.com and click on the painting of the river.

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Clarks Summit, Pa.

SPORTS

AUGUST 15 TO AUGUST 21, 2012

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Abington Wildcats hosting tryouts The NEPA/Abington Wildcats 16 & Under Fastpitch Travel softball organization will host tryouts for their fall 2012/summer 2013 teams Aug. 18 from 1 to 3 p.m. and Aug. 19 from 1 to 3 p.m. at Abington Heights High School. For more information or to schedule a private tryout, contact Vic Thomas at 570.351.5187, Mike Thomas at 570.241.7030, John Kelly at 570.504.4808, or by email atAbingtonWildcats@yahoo.com. The team will be attending several college showcases.

Gavin O’Donnell won four medals at the Keystone State Games.

Lakeland track star competes in Keystone State Games

Panthers forming softball team The Impact Panthers are establishing a 16U fast-pitch softball team for the 20122013 season. Tryouts will be Aug. 25 and 26 at the Abington Recreational Fields on Winola Road, Clarks Summit (near C.S. State Hospital). Registration is at 12:30 p.m., and tryouts begin at 1 p.m. Preregister at impactpanthers16u@yahoo.com.

Rollin Thunder tryouts set The Rollin Thunder 18Under softball team will hold tryouts Aug. 18 and Aug.19 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Jessup Youth Sports Complex. Check-in will start at 9 a.m. For more information or to pre-register call Mark at 687.4735 or email ave3024@aol.com

ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/ALICE STUFFLE

Izzy Drehemsis was the winner of the one-mile race during Christy Mathewson Days in Factoryville Aug. 11. He took 1st place in the overall male category with a time of 6:10.

Fastest in Factoryville

Keystone College President Dr. Edward G. Boehm announces the start of the 1-mile race Aug. 11.

Tee it up for charity The 35th annual Ben Mar/ St. Jude’s Golf Tournament will be held Sept. 10 at Elkview Country Club. The captain and crew format will include brunch, golf and dinner at the Ben Mar Restaurant, Carbondale. The cost is $150 per player.

Isaac Ryon competes in the one-mile race during Christy Mathewson Days festivities Aug. 11 in Factoryville.

Christy Mathewson Days took place Aug. 10 and 11. Winners of the 1- mile race included: Braedyn Genello (6:37); Izzy Drehemsis (1st place overall male 6:10); Molly McGlynn, (7:25); Megan Johns (7:20); Bryce Genello (6:32) and Elizabeth Gumula (1st place overall female, 7:02.) Winners of the Big Six Race were: Dan Davis, 1st overall (19:58) and Samantha Snead, top female, tenth overall (22:02).

On Aug. 4, Gavin O’Donnell, 16, of Greenfield Township participated in the Keystone State Games Championship in Harrisburg. O’Donnell is a member of the Lakeland Jr./Sr. High School Track and Field team, as well as a starter for the school’s football team who recently participated in the United States Track and Field Junior Olympics in Baltimore, Md. ranking 18th nationally in the 400m hurdles and 26th in the 110m hurdles. The rising junior was one of 6,000 participants to compete in the Keystone State Games around the state capital the weekend of August 3-5 and was the sole Track and Field participant to medal in all four of his events (the maximum allowed for his age group of 15-16). The young athlete took gold medals in the 110m and 400m hurdles with times of 16.09 & 1:00.15 respectively, as well as a gold medal in the triple jump with a jump of 39-09.00. Gavin also took a bronze medal in the long jump with a jump of 18-00.25. This was a great end to the athlete’s 2012 Track & Field season which included placing at the PIAA District 2 championship and a trip to Shippensburg for the PIAA State Championship, as well as several gold & silver medals at the USATF Mid-Atlantic Association (West Chester) and USATF Regional championships (Newark, Delaware) winning him a National bid for the USATF Junior Olympics in Baltimore. O’Donnell gave credit for his drive, determination and effort to his Lakeland track coaches, See track, Page 14

Abington Heights tackles concussions head-on Dr. Jack Henzes, who has served as the team doctor for football at Abington he safety of student-athletes, specif- Heights for the last three years and has been the team doctor at Dunmore for the ically information regarding head past 17 years, has noticed a big change in injuries, took center stage at the the amount of attention given to concusAbington Heights High School Auditorium Aug. 9 during a Concussion Work- sions in recent years. “(There has been a significant change) shop with athletes, parents, coaches and in terms of awareness education, undersports medicine professionals. standing the pathophysiology that goes on A panel, that included High School Principal Pam Murray, head football coach with the injured brain, and the signs and symptoms to know the length of time it Joe Repshis and Dr. Jack Henzes, informed parents and student-athletes about takes to fully recover, and know that the athlete is fully recovered,” he said. the proper protocol to follow if signs or Henzes stressed the importance of an symptoms of a concussion are noticed. A athlete coming forward as soon as they concussion awareness video from Sports feel any symptoms of a concussion. Safety International was also shown to “I think the risk is that they will go back inform the audience about the danger and severity of concussions. T.J. Murray, a senior, who plays basketball and football, thought the workshop was informative and important for all parties involved. “I think it’s great that we have the information now,” he said. “The coaches know the possible things that can happen from something like this so it’s safer for ABINGTON JOURNAL/ROBERT TOMKAVAGE us. “We’ll still be competitive, but we have Abington Heights head football coach Joe a better understanding of what can hapRepshis pen.”

BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE

rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com

T

and play, and will run the risk of second impact syndrome where the brain has already been injured…not healed yet, and then take a second trauma to the brain,” he said. “That’s when you really set the brain up for significant damage and potentially long-term issues.” Henzes credited the increased concern over concussions for more student-athletes coming forward recently with their issues. “I think because there is more education about it,” he said. “Probably the most important factor has been athletic trainers at the schools. They do a great job of assessing the players on the field or court, and they are very pro player in terms of their safety. They are always going to err on the side of caution, and because of that we have fewer players who stay on the field. You will probably see fewer problems now because the athletic trainers are more aware of the athletes being injured.” According to Repshis, coaches are taking every precaution to limit head injuries to their players. “Any coach, first and foremost, is responsible for the safety and well being of their athletes,” he said. “I think concussions have always been at the forefront, See concussion, Page 14

ABINGTON JOURNAL/GERARD E. NOLAN

Shown, from left: Eric Onofrey and Cierra Beck

Students run tournament BY GERARD E. NOLAN Abington Journal Correspondent

The fourth annual Comm Classic Tennis Tournament was held Aug. 6 and 7 on the Waverly Community House’s tennis courts. Organized by Abington Heights High School rising juniors and tennis team members Cierra Beck and Eric Onofrey, the tournament drew nearly 30 participants. Players’ ages ranged from junior high students to recent high school graduates. The tournament is held

annually to “help with the upkeep and maintenance of the Comm’s tennis courts,” Onofrey said. While their matches are not held there, many members of the high school tennis team play there recreationally, according to Beck. Peter Kazmierczak of Scranton Prep won the boys draw over Mihir Mulloth of Abington Heights (8-4) and Emily Jonsson of Scranton Prep won the girls draw over Annie Tressler, also of Scranton Prep (8-4).


CMYK PAGE 14A

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The Abington Journal♦Clarks Summit, PA

A.H. junior to run fitness event

CONCUSSION

Continued from Page 13 especially with all the newspaper and TV reports about the NFL. With legislation being passed and new requirements of the coaches going through an awareness certification program, it brings more light to the severity and seriousness of the issue.” Repshis added that communication is an important factor in limiting the effects of concussions. “The parents, athletes, coaches and administration all have to be involved,” he said. “Everybody can help in the determination if someone may be suffering some of the signs and symptoms that may be the result of a concussion.” Abington Heights head wrestling coach Chris Calder talked about how concussion awareness has changed throughout his athletic and coaching career. “I think you’ve see the awareness go up a lot more in the last several years,” he said. “The last couple years it’s gone up increasingly and I think that’s a good thing. Back when I was a competitor, if you were dinged you walked it off, put a little dirt on it and moved on. Now, there is more prevention and (focus on) making sure things are being done properly to care for the athlete, and making sure long-term effects are dealt with.” Calder believes one of the advantages of having more information and awareness on the topic is that more athletes are reporting symptoms rather than brushing them off and returning to action. “In my first six years coaching, I think I saw one concussion,” he said. “In the last couple years, I think I’ve seen that number quadruple.” Pam Murray mentioned the effect to which sports have evolved over the years and the administration’s focus on the quality of life of their studentathletes. “Sports in general have changed, society has changed, and the information that we have about concussions has really come to the forefront,” she said. “It’s important that we as a community understand the signs and symptoms of concussions. “The short and long term cognitive function of the students is our primary concern.”

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

Peter Hubbard raised $2,625 for the Wounded Warriors Project through a powerlifting meet he ran at Brown’s Gym.

Women’s champs crowned The Country Club of Scranton’s Women’s Golf Association held its Member Guest Tournament on July 19. Shown, from left are the winner’s Sally McFarlane and Roz Stahl.

AH student raises money Abington Heights senior football player Peter Hubbard directed a fundraising powerlifting meet at Browns Gym in Clarks Summit July 14 titled “Push-Pull for the Vets.” Hubbard is a member of the Brown’s Gym Powerlifting team.

Lifters from four different states competed at the event; three Pennsylvania state records were set. Hubbard raised $2,625 for the Wounded Warrior Project and $875 for the Griffin Pond Animal Shelter.

Penn Security hosts Golf Tournament

Penn Security Bank committee members recently met to make plans for the bank’s 5th Foundation Golf Tournament to be held Aug. 27 at the Glen Oak Country Club. Proceeds of the tournament will be used to fund charitable grant requests. Shown, from left: Michelle Scaturro, Bill Calpin, Beth Wolff, Rich Grimm, Karli Musheno, Brian Chuff, Karen Thomas and Pat Dietz. Absent from photo: Lynn Thiel, Joan Rotondaro, Jim Tobin and Pat Scanlon.

CROSSWORD ANSWERS FROM PAGE 4

Peter Hubbard raised $875 for the Griffin Pond Animal Shelter through a powerlifting meet he ran at Brown’s Gym.

Ali Epstein, a junior at Abington Heights High School, will run a weeklong fitness event at the TLC Medical Center in Scranton from Aug. 20-25. All proceeds will go to the Prostate Cancer Foundation. Donation forms and T-shirt order forms are available for those who are unable to attend. Epstein will also be selling prostate cancer bracelets. She will also continue selling T-Shirts and bracelets through September, Prostate Awareness month. The fitness challenge may be performed anytime during business hours the week of Aug. 20-25. There will be a group walk Aug. 25 at 10 a.m. Pre- registration forms are available at Abington Heights High School and TLC Medical Fitness Center. Registration takes place at the TLC Center the day of participation as well.

U of S to hold lacrosse clinic The University of Scranton women’s lacrosse team will conduct a clinic Oct. 28, from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Fitzpatrick Field. Registration will be held from 8 to 8:30 a.m., followed by warm-up, skill instruction and games until 1 p.m. Lunch will be provided at 1 p.m., followed by an information session with The University of Scranton admissions office from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. The cost is $65 if you register before Oct. 1, $75 if you register after that date. For more information, contact head coach Cindy Wilson at cynthia.wilson@scranton.edu or assistant coach Katie Slade at katherine.slade@scranton.edu.

ABINGTON JOURNAL/ROBERT TOMKAVAGE

Dr. Jack Henzes, Abington Heights football doctor

TRACK

Continued from Page 13

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Tony Prudente and Art Davis who on their own time continued to assist in the preparation for these events, and Terry Reese Jr. a former NC State Hurdle coach and Nationally ranked athlete where Gavin attended a camp in North Carolina, stating “if it weren’t for the efforts and dedication to the sport and athletes like myself, I could have never achieved the goals I’ve set.” In addition to athletics, O’Donnell is also a member of the National Honor Society maintaining a 93 percent GPA and looks forward to hopefully taking his track and field abilities to the collegiate level.


CMYK WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15, 2012

THE ABINGTON JOURNAL♦CLARKS SUMMIT, PA

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The Abington Journal 08-15-2012  

The Abington Journal 08-15

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