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April-May 2015 vol 19

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Local Events | Art & Culture | Home & Garden | Vibrant Living

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Our BerkshireTimes™ PUBLISHERS Kathy I. Regan publisher@ourberkshiretimes.com Kevin J. Regan kevin@ourberkshiretimes.com _______________ EDITORIAL Kathy I. Regan editor@ourberkshiretimes.com Rodelinde Albrecht rodelinde@gmail.com Copyeditor/Proofreader Rodelinde Albrecht _______________ DESIGN Magazine Design/Layout Kathy I. Regan Ads–Independent Designers Katharine Adams, Rural Ethic Studio katmail@ruralethicstudio.com Christine Dupre cedupre@msn.com Elisa Jones, Berkshire Design Studio elisa@berkshiredesignstudio.com _______________ TO ADVERTISE CONTACT Our BerkshireGreen, Inc. P.O. Box 133, Housatonic, MA 01236 Phone: (413) 274-1122 advertise@OurBerkshiretimes.com www.OurBerkshireGreen.com www.OurBerkshireTimes.com www.OurBerkshireCalendar.com _______________ COVER ILLUSTRATION

Late Summer Bouquet by Koo Schadler, Artist Koo Schadler’s egg tempera paintings are in more than 400 private and public collections worldwide. She is a master painter of the Copley Society, a contributing editor to The Artists’ Magazine, and a popular painting instructor who has taught workshops around the US and abroad for 18 years. Koo grew up in Litchfield, CT, and has fond memories of visiting the Berkshires. For more information visit www.kooschadler.com.

April-May 2015

Contents 4

art, culture & entertainment

20

SUBMIT? NO WAY! EVENT SAMPLER

7

spring in the berkshires BUSINESS SPOTLIGHTS

10

24

education & workshops COLLABORATION & COMMUNICATION A REMARKABLE PLACE

27

health & wellness HEALING FOODS

food & drink GRASS FED MEAT MOTHER'S DAY STRATA

16

real estate & professionals OLD AND NEW POST-AND-BEAM

animal talk ON THE MOVE

12

CAMP SPOTLIGHTS

22

NEW BEGINNINGS

camp sampler

THE POWER OF RHYTHM

29

mind & spirit THE RELAXATION RESPONSE

home & garden

30

PROJECT BEE

STAFF PICKS

SPRING CLEANING GIFT GUIDE

have you heard?

31

featured advertisers

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Go to www.OurBerkshireTimes.com/coupons to find advertisers who are offering additional online coupons and deals with fantastic savings! Join our mailing list to receive our informative eNewsletter and coupons directly. Our BerkshireTimes magazine is a bimonthly publication (six issues yearly starting in February, since 2009), free to the public, and enjoyed by community members and visitors alike. Most of our editorial content is contributed by our readers. We welcome your ideas, articles, and feedback, and encourage you to submit original material for consideration through our website. To find out more about advertising, submitting editorial, and posting events on our free community calendar, see our websites at left, and join our mailing list to receive our free monthly eNewsletter. All content in Our BerkshireTimes™ is accepted in good faith. We do not necessarily advocate and cannot be held responsible for opinions expressed or facts supplied by our authors, illustrators, and advertisers. We reserve the right to refuse advertising for any reason. For printing errors of the publisher's responsibility, liability is limited to the cost of the ad space in which it first appeared. Unless otherwise noted, we use a Creative Commons License in place of a standard copyright.

English Rabbit and Keats. Egg tempera on true gesso panel, finished with oil. 8 ½ x 10

This publication is printed with soy ink on FSC-certified paper.

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art, culture & entertainment

submit? no way! FEISTY BERKSHIRE RESIDENT EMILIA ANN FIELD BREWER / By Jennifer Lilienthal

H

er grandmother’s first name was Submit, but she would not. Defying Stockbridge town leaders, local police, and the strongmen of the telephone company, as well as a faction of the neighborhood, Emilia Field Brewer held a one-woman protest – and won. Born in 1834 to the Rev. Josiah Brewer and his wife, Emilia Ann (Field) Brewer, in a mission in Turkey, Emilia seemed destined to lead a life of quiet obedience. Besides her missionary father, her maternal grandfather was also a minister – the Rev. David Dudley Field. She became an educator and a missionary in her own right. At some point, as an unmarried woman who wanted to get things done, action must have replaced submissiveness as a virtue – one that let her help the people she taught in Africa, or the poor of Alabama. In 1904 – when Massachusetts women lacked the right to vote – Miss Brewer’s protests against the wheels of progress probably appeared futile. The Stockbridge Selectmen had made their decision: a telephone pole was to be buried on the edge of the Brewer property, where Emilia’s sister operated a school for young ladies. Over Emilia’s protests, the New England Telephone Company’s men dug a large hole in preparation for putting the pole in place the next day. When they left for the day,

Antique Repair Good as Old

Emilia – a 70-year-old woman with failing eyesight – decided the only way she could defend her sister’s property was by blocking access to the hole with her own body. She put a cot over the hole and bundled up on the cot with an umbrella over her head, determined to be there when the men arrived the next day to finish the job. Some curious neighbors expressed sympathy when they noticed the old lady in the hole; some even erected a tent to protect her from the elements. When Stockbridge Selectmen had local police remove her bodily and escort her back into her house, she ran back to the worksite and got back into the hole, despite official threats of incarceration. The next day, the phone company dug a new hole across the street on Lawrence Yale’s property – though only after obtaining his consent. The New York Herald ran an article about the feisty Miss Brewer entitled, “Judge’s Sister Wins Pole War,” probably to imply that Emilia’s position was strengthened by the fact that her brother was U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Josiah Brewer. No mention of his intervention was discussed in the news coverage, however. It seems to me that, while Emilia’s family wealth and connections probably helped her cause, her biggest asset was her own belief she could make a difference – and the support of a few kindly neighbors. It’s easy to view protestors and muckrakers as irritating troublemakers and ignore the issues they seek to expose. Somehow, it’s a bit harder to ignore a 70-year-old neighbor camping in a hole, protesting the only way she can.

Do you have a valued possession that is damaged beyond repair? I can fix it! I will restore it to“Good as Old.” ~ Peter K. Lilienthal

Porcelain/Statues • Marble/Stone • Furniture Signs • Frames • Paintings • Leather Professional Mending by Peter K. Lilienthal, Stockbridge, MA (413) 298-1051 • (413) 854-7803 • pklilienthal@gmail.com Before

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April | May 2015

After

Before

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

After

Sources: “Judge’s Sister Wins Pole War,” New York Herald, 6 Aug. 1904, p. 1, col. 4; image on www.fultonhistory.com. Diana Gravlee, memorial creator, “Emilia Field Brewer,” Memorial #37929076 on www.findagrave.com; referencing Brewer family plot in Stockbridge Cemetery, Berkshire County, MA. Jennifer Lilienthal is a professional genealogist, artist, and writer who lives in Stockbridge, MA. She has a bachelor’s degree from Mt. Holyoke College and has also studied at Heidelberg University, with coursework in genealogical methodology and forensic genealogy at Boston University. Her business, JLL Family Stories, helps clients learn and retell their family stories, specializing in research in New York, western Massachusetts, and Germany.


art, culture & entertainment

april-may event sampler

THE

SEE MORE EVENTS OR POST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT www.OurBerkshireCalendar.com

Celebrating our 40th year as an independent bookstore. Thank you! We sell eBooks! for your iPad, iPhone, Android or Kobo device

Music Marathon Weekend Date: Saturday, April 11, 2015, 10am-5pm Place: Berkshire Music School, 30 Wendell Ave, Pittsfield, MA (413) 442-1411 Price: Free Annual music marathon weekend with students of all ages performing in five-minute increments, having earned pledges to support their performances. All funds raised go to BMS educational activities. www.berkshiremusicschool.org Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story Special Screening Presented by Project Native Date: Saturday, April 11, 2015, 7pm Place: Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, 14 Castle Street, Great Barrington, MA - (413) 274-3433 Price: Free. This event is part of Project Native’s 5th annual environmental film festival featuring 14 award-winning films on a variety of current environmental topics. We all love food. As a society, we devour countless cooking shows, culinary magazines, and foodie blogs. So how could we possibly be throwing nearly 50 percent of it in the trash? Filmmakers and food lovers Jen and Grant dive into the issue of food waste from the farm, through retail, all the way to the back of their own fridge. After catching a glimpse of the billions of dollars of good food that is tossed each year in North America, they pledge to quit grocery shopping cold turkey and survive only on food that has been discarded. Just Eat It brings farmers, retailers, inspiring organizations, and consumers to the table in a cinematic story that is equal parts education and delicious entertainment. Call the box office, (413) 528-0100, to reserve your free tickets. www.projectnative.org/film_festival.html

Great Barrington 413 528 1521 thebookloft.com

EGG TEMPERA PAINTING

Arts HotcHkiss at

All are welcome!

Egg Tempera Paintings & Silverpoint Drawings

Join Koo for Summer and Fall Workshops in Painting and Composition. For All Levels from Beginner to Advanced. See Website for More Information. A Comprehensive Guide to Painting Egg Tempera

hotchkiss.org/arts (860) 435 - 4423

KOO SCHADLER Buy the Book at www.kooschadler.com

Continued on page 6

The

BOOKLOFT

by Koo Schadler

Alstead, NH  (603) 835-2937

www.kooschadler.com

Sing for Joy Chor u s programs september through July The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT

A l l A r e We l c o m e Every Tuesday 10 to 11:30 at UCC  Lee MA for people with Parkinsons, their families, and friends. lead by

Vikki True

contact Megan at 413-770-1975 or beckethome@yahoo.com

guest concert series ~ tremaine gallery dance ~ hotchkiss dramatic association

~ film screenings ~ summer portals

Special Event Fundraiser songs and sing along UCC Church Lee  Friday April 24, 7 P.M.

sponsored in part by APDA

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

April | May 2015

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art, culture & entertainment

april-may event sampler SEE MORE EVENTS OR POST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT www.OurBerkshireCalendar.com Star Gazing Date: Saturday, April 11, 2015, at dusk Place: Notchview Reservation, Route 9, Windsor, MA Price: Free. Arunah Hill Natural and Science Center members will bring telescopes expertise on observing the night sky. Dress warmly. Cloud cover and rain will cancel. (413) 532-1631 ext 10. www.tinyurl.com/mvryr64 Our Amazing Spring Wildflowers: Guided Walk Date: Saturday, April 25, 2015, 10am-12pm Place: Bartholomew’s Cobble, 105 Weatogue Road, Sheffield, MA, (413) 229-8600. Price: Members $5; Family $15. Nonmembers: $8; Family $20. Sheffield is a global hotspot for rare species, and Bartholomew’s Cobble puts on one of the best shows of spring ephemerals from mid-April to mid-May. Come greet the rich variety of wildflowers, and leave with an understanding of how to help identify and protect these gems of our native flora, not just in conservation lands, but in your own yard and the open spaces of your community. A Trustees naturalist will reveal what makes this particular environment so well suited to rare and diverse plants and explain what the Cobble is doing to protect the natural resilience of this landscape. Please preregister. www.tinyurl.com/lfsc622

Wine Dinner at Cafe Adam to Benefit the Berkshire Music School Date: Thursday, May 7, 2015, 5:30pm Place: Cafe Adam, Great Barrington, MA Price: $125-$250 Elegant evening of wine paired with special menu, prepared by Chef Adam, to benefit Berkshire Music School. Lively auction, silent auction, and wine pull. Music by Talbot-Suters trio. www.berkshiremusicschool.org West Stockbridge Farmers Market Open for the Season Date: Thursday, May 21, 2015, 3-7pm Place: On the Green, Harris Street, West Stockbridge, MA Price: Free The 2015 Farmers Market in West Stockbridge will be held on Thursday afternoons from 3-7pm through October 8 selling local produce with entertainment and weekly raffle, rain or shine. Located On the Green at Harris Street Town Center (sometimes referred to as Merritt Green), near the Post Office. Save the Date: On Thursday, June 25, 2015, 3-7pm the strawberry crop will be our focus with sweet and savory items to buy. www.weststockbridgefarmersmarket.org

CELEBRATING 10 YEARS

MAY 28 - 31, 2015

GREAT BARRINGTON // PITTSFIELD

PASSES ON SALE NOW! BIFFMA.ORG rks

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new beginnings

spring in the berkshires

THE BREATHTAKING BEAUTY OF OUR COUNTRYSIDE By Kevin J. Regan

S

pring is a time of rebirth, rejuvenation, renewal, and inspiration. The length of daylight and temperature increase, causing new plant growth to spring forth, and streams swell with runoff from the melting snow. Spring is an old word, and appears in many Germanic languages with a meaning of to jump or to run. However, the word spring only began to be used to name the season following winter in the 1500s. Up until that point, the common Old English word naming that season was lencten, lengten, or lenten. Spring in the Berkshires has a meaning all of its own, though. The beauty of our countryside as it awakens with wildflowers and the buzz of nature is breathtaking. In late March to early April, salamanders migrate to vernal pools to lay their eggs. As you will see on page 11 of this issue of Our BerkshireTimes, turtles are on the move. In mid to late April, violets, dandelions, marsh marigold, and wild columbine poke their heads up, and buds begin to appear on many trees. The male goldfinch molts – ready to show off his vibrant yellow plumage – and raccoons and porcupines have their young. In May, we can look forward to buttercups, wild geranium, daisy fleabane, jack-in-the-pulpit, wild lupine, and red clover. The ruby-throated hummingbirds return and many songbirds lay their eggs. But it is not just nature that starts to buzz, so do we!

April 11 through May 3 be sure to visit Hancock Shaker Village for Baby Animals on the Shaker Farm. Meet all the new baby animals in the Round Stone Barn. Enjoy the historic village and its working farm, and have lunch at the Savory Harvest Cafe. May 6 from 10am-12pm join ecologist and plant geek Drew Monthie for a plant walk and talk at Bartholomew’s Cobble, Sheffield, MA: View Wildflowers and Ferns at their Spring Best. Visit www.berkshirebotanical.org for pricing and to register. May 8 from 11am-5pm (members only) and May 9 from 9am-5pm (open to the public), be sure to stop by the Berkshire Botanical Garden for their 38th annual plant sale. You will find thousands of plants to choose from (view a list of the plants for sale at www.tinyurl.com/pklejro)! www.berkshirebotanical.org. May 16 from 9am-12pm vist the Bridge of Flowers plant sale held at the Trinity Church Baptist corner lot on the corner of Main and Water Streets in Shelburne Falls. Plants from the Bridge, as well as from some of the best private gardens in the area, and an array of geraniums and other annuals will all be on sale. In addition, vendors will be selling books, art prints, note cards, and more.

LENNOX JEWELERS

Great Barrington’s Full Service Jeweler You can’t hide from LOVE.

FROM WATCH BATTERIES TO DIAMONDS & EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

413-717-4239

177 Main Street, Great Barrington, MA Mon-Fri 10-6, Sat 10-5  mail@lennoxjewelers.com www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

April | May 2015

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spring in the berkshires stress buster

Sheena Evans-Morris Sheena Evans-Morris

Mission ControlPresident info@missioncontrolbusiness.com Business Services, LLC (413) 717-0479 Let us help you solve Mission Control Business Services your business puzzle! comprehensive business support

P.O. Box 184, South Lee, MA www.missioncontrolbusiness.com

413.717.0479

P.O. Box 184, South Lee, MA 01260 missioncontrolbusiness.com

GIVE THE GIFT OF ORGANIZING!

T

he President of Mission Control Business Services, MCBS, Sheena Evans-Morris, offers what she always wanted from an executive assistant, someone who would understand her and tailor their services to her business needs. MCBS provides comprehensive business support, personal assistance, organization of everything(!), task analysis, and systems creation. “Focus on what you do best; let the admin stress buster do the rest!” ~ Sheena Evans-Morris

fascinating workshops TOURS, TALKS, AND GOURMET VEGAN COOKING

M

ay 1 to 3, America’s go-to guy for foraging, “Wildman” Steve Brill, with his 10-year-old foraging expert daughter, Violet Brill, will lead wild food tours, talks, and gourmet vegan cooking workshops, at Eastover Estate and Retreat, Lenox, MA. 600 acres of wild oasis for exploring and mid-spring foraging of varieties of common, widespread, renewable, native, and exotic plant/fungi species. For more information about these events and to book online go to www.eastover.com.

simply the best

Haflinger Haus Restaurant  Tavern  Inn

Austrian-American Cuisine

“Voted Best Restaurant in the Berkshires” Welcome to the Haflinger Haus! LOCATED AT 17 COMMERCIAL STREET, ADAMS, MA 01220 ~ The Haflinger Haus Restaurant and Inn was voted Best of the Berkshires two years in a row

Stop by for Mother’s Day. Available for special events.

~ From Wiener Schnitzel, Hungarian Goulash, and Lobster Spätzle, to fresh seafood, steaks and pasta, we bring the best of Austrian and American cuisines to the Berkshires

17 Commercial Street, Adams, MA 413-743-2221 www.haflingerhaus.com

~ Dine in the beautiful fireplaced dining room, the casual tavern or seasonal outdoor Biergarten where you can catch a glimpse of our vegetable and herb garden

F

DELICIOUS AUSTRIAN AND AMERICAN CUISINE

rom Wiener Schnitzel, “Gram’s” Hungarian Goulash, and Lobster Spätzle to fresh seafood, steaks and pasta, Haflinger Haus brings the best of Austrian and American cuisines to the Berkshires. Voted Best of the Berkshires two years in a row. Dine in the beautiful dining room with fireplace, the casual tavern, or seasonal outdoor Biergarten where you can catch a glimpse of their vegetable and herb garden. Make it a special treat and stay over in one of their guest rooms in this turn-of-the-century mansion.

~ Make it a special treat and stay over in one of our guest rooms located upstairs in this turn of the century mansion

cozy & rustic chic

~ We also host special events Like us on Facebook and see our weekly specials

Chef Christophe Jalbert brings to the Berkshires a handcrafted fine dining experience

PRESERVATION SOCIETY raw bar | charcuterie | multi-course tasting menu designed with elegance and expertly crafted

S

For a unique dining experience call (413) 429-6310

999 Main Street, Great Barrington, MA

Open daily except Tuesday from 5pm-10:30pm

www.preservationsocietyrestaurant.com

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INTIMATE DINING EXPERIENCE

F

or an intimate dining experience, visit the Preservation Society in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, featuring simply sophisticated dishes with an à la carte charcuterie and raw bar menu as well as 3- and 5-course prix fixe dinner options. The dining room is cozy and rustic chic with a view of the chef ’s work station. Seating is limited to 12 guests to ensure personal service. Parties of up to 30 guests are also offered. Preserving the harvest and Berkshire tradition.


spring in the berkshires a place for healing YOGA, GYROTONICS, WORKSHOPS, CLASSES & COUNSELING

C

ome to Embody, a place for healing. Their private yoga, gyrotonics, workshops, classes, and one-on-one counseling are focused on healing your whole self – body, mind, and soul. They also offer oracle and divination sessions, reiki, and Acutonics. Please visit their website at www.embodyhealingarts.com to view all their offerings and upcoming events. And be sure to check out the www. ourberkshiretimes.com/coupons for a 10% coupon for Mother’s Day! Visit Embody, because your body is a beautiful place to be!

At Embody Healing Arts™ we believe that every body is an expression of the unity of mind, emotion, and spirit.

 Yoga  Body Therapy  Products  Counseling  Gyrotonic®  Classes  Energy & Sound Healing  Events 33 Rossetter Street, Great Barrington, MA

413-644-8890 ` www.embodyhealingarts.com

spring is here!

In Business Since 1881

SHOP FOR FLOWERS, VEGETABLES, ACCESSORIES & MORE

H

anging baskets filled with flowers, herbs, or strawberry plants make wonderful gifts for Mother’s Day. They are very practical for decks and balconies in particular, or where other plants won’t grow. Water thoroughly and often, use a slow release granular fertilizer, and rotate the basket on occasion so the plant gets sun on all sides. Stop by Jaeschke’s Orchard to shop for vegetable plants, gardening accessories, gifts for Mother’s Day, and for more helpful gardening and landscaping tips.

Open 7 Days

Hanging Baskets Planters Annuals Cemetery Boxes Geraniums • Perennials

In-season fruits & vegetables, Vegetable plants, garden accessories & more!

$

500 OFF PURCHASE OF $25 OR MORE

With Yankee Clipper Coupon Only. Expires 9/2

Ave., Pittsfield • 413-443-7180 736 Crane Ave., Pittsfield736 • 413-443-7180 Crane Ave, Pittsfield736  Crane (413) 443-7180 Locally owned West Road, Adams • 413-743-3896

West Road, Adams • 413-743-3896 business since 1881! West Road, Adams Under (413) 743-3896 the Gazebo on Frank Consolati Way, Lee Under the Gazebo on Frank Consolati Way, Lee Open Fridays Only from 10am - 3pm Open Fridays Only from 10am - 3pm

outstanding service THE CUSTOMER ALWAYS COME FIRST

H

appy Mother’s Day! Cheshire Liquor Center is a local, family owned and operated business that always puts the customer first. Stop by and you will find a great variety of unique wine, beer, and spirits for every taste and in every price range. They can help you find exactly what you need! If they don’t have it, they will get it. They also have groceries, hot coffee, and lottery tickets. Gift cards are available for that special occasion or for just a simple thank you. BudgetBlinds_514_Layout 1 4/8/14 1:37 PM Page 1

lavish selection

104 South Street US Route 8, Cheshire, MA

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Mon to Sat 6am-11pm Sun 6am-9pm

(413) 743-9603

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RENTAL APARTMENT

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Best Prices in Berkshire County

BEAUTIFUL WINDOW COVERINGS ARE JUST THE BEGINNING

B

udget Blinds offers high quality, stylish window coverings. Their goal is to provide you with the best products and services to enrich your home environment. Their lavish selection of window treatments includes shutters, blinds, draperies, shades, and even window film. Regardless of the window’s size or shape, you can rest assured they have a customized window covering solution ready for you. They take the measurements and even do the installation! Financing available. Call them today for your free in-home consultation!

Commercial & Residential Free In-Home Consutation www.budgetblinds.com 413-243-6633 | 800-434-1422 bpoulin@budgetblinds.com

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April | May 2015

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animal talk

CAMP WAGALOT Stockbridge, MA (413) 298-5300

Pet Partners of the Tri-State Berkshires

Provides … Food for needy dogs and cats Reduced rate spay/neuter Assistance with basic veterinary care costs Call Faith 518-781-0362 Call 413.229.8579 or 518.781.0362 or visit www.petpartnersberkshires.org

We are an entirely 501(c)(3) Nonprofit A division of Scientific Allianceall Forvolunteer Education (S.A.F.E.), a 501( c)(3) NonOrganization Profit Organization

CARING FOR PETS SINCE 1957 Your trusted source for quality foods and supplies. Your trusted resource for raw-feeding information and advice.

BENSDOTTER’S PET 413-528-4940 940 MAIN STREET, GREAT BARRINGTON, MA 01230

Convenient Location with Ample Parking on Route 7 less than a minute south of Guido’s

Mon-Fri 10a-6p

Sat-Sun 10a-4p

www.bensdotters.com 10

April | May 2015

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EXERCISE & PLAY Exercise and Play BOARDING in a safe and supervised environment. Boarding and Daycare DAYCARE

www.lovecampwagalot.com


on the move

animal talk

A BASIC COURTESY TOWARDS NATURE By Faith Connolly

T

urtles are fascinating, slow-moving reptiles that have existed for about 215 million years. According to Mass Audubon, there are 10 species of turtles in Massachusetts, ranging from the tiny bog turtle (3-4” long), to the snapping turtle (up to 19” long), in addition to five sea turtles that have been found offshore or stranded on beaches. Turtles generally live between 30 and 100 years depending on the species, but many of them are now in danger. Turtles are on the move this time of year. When the weather warms up, they become increasingly mobile. Keep a close eye out for them when you’re out driving or riding in someone else’s car – if you spot one in the road, please be sure to stop and help it get safely across. Last summer the town of West Stockbridge, Massachusetts, put up Turtle Crossing signs in the most critical turtle crossing locations. Hats off to the caring people of West Stockbridge! If you come across a turtle anywhere, the first thing to do is to determine whether or not it is injured. If it is, place it in a cardboard box, close the lid so it’s dark, and leave it in a quiet area so it does not get overly stressed until you can bring it to someone qualified to help. Please, don’t assume that a turtle that is hit by a car, or injured by some other means, is dead. Turtles have extremely slow metabolisms and can suffer for days – even weeks – before dying, even when they are severely injured. Many vets and rehabilitators will take in wildlife and treat them. You will not get the turtle back, but they will ask you for the location in which you found it so that they can have it released to the same place when it has recovered. You can find a list of vets and rehabbers online (a good link to start with is www.rescuenetwork.org). If you have determined that a turtle is not injured, then lend her or him a hand crossing the road. Always bring the turtle in the direction that they were heading in. Turtles know where they are going and they will just turn back around if you don’t send them where they want to go. Do not take it home. Do not relocate the turtle. Turtles have a homing instinct and they will try to get back to the area they came from. If you move the turtle far from its home you will likely cause it to get killed trying to get back home with encounters such as dangerous roads, predators, and humans. Leave the turtle in the area that you found it, do not bring it to a “nicer” place. Turtles have a profoundly strong connection to the location they are born in. They rarely travel far from where they were hatched and will stay there for the duration of their life if they are allowed. I always carry a plastic snow shovel with me just in case I come across a turtle in the road. The only safe way to pick up a snapping turtle with your hands is between his back legs and his tail, but if the snapper is a big one, forget that approach. That’s where my trusty plastic snow shovel comes in handy. I can either gently scoop the snapper part way onto the shovel and slide her or him out of the road, or if it’s a really big

snapper I can put the shovel handle in front of their face and they will lunge at the handle and cross the road without even knowing it. Whatever works! Some people dump their no longer wanted pet box turtle into the woods or their aquatic turtle into local ponds or lakes because they think they are giving them the good life. There are many reasons why you should not do this. If you find a turtle that is not native to your area, do not release it. If you are not sure, ask. Check with your local Fish & Wildlife to help determine if the species is native to your area. Non-native species should be turned in to a turtle rescue or rehabber or kept if you’re able to provide for it properly and the law allows you to do so, but they should not be released. In many states it is unlawful to take box turtles and many other native turtles from the wild. Some states even impose a hefty fine so be sure you know your state laws. Introduced species are causing havoc to our natural inhabitants. Red eared sliders for example, are very aggressive and their competitive nature has brought nothing but havoc to our native species. Lack of habitat is a big concern for all wildlife, but when that little bit of habitat that is left is invaded by an introduced species the more aggressive turtle is going to survive. The survival rate among turtle hatchlings is very low – very few live to be adults. Only approximately two to three hatchlings born to a female box turtle during her entire lifetime will survive to adulthood. During a lifetime a painted turtle may only have two offspring that survive to adulthood. Turtles mature very slowly; as a result turtle populations remain stable only when there are enough offspring to replace their parents. Eggs and hatchling turtles are extremely vulnerable to a wide variety of predators. Nest predators include raccoons, foxes, and skunks. Hatchling predators include gulls, crows, ravens, herons, people’s pets, and then there are humans. Road mortalities, loss of wetlands, pollution of wetlands and waterways, loss of habitat, mowing fields, burning brush piles, and worst of all, the pet trade. People who want to keep a turtle for a pet and know basically nothing about them is just sheer torture for that poor turtle. I have seen them housed in aquariums (aquariums are for fish, period!) on wet sand, kept in hamster and bird cages – yes, I have seen it all. Turtles thrive the best when they are just left alone, a basic courtesy towards nature. We are losing our turtles and tortoises on this planet at a very rapid rate. To learn more about this go to www. turtlesurvival.org. ~ Faith Connolly is

the President, Co-Founder, and Director of Pet Partners of the Tri-State Berkshires. www.petpartnersberkshires.org

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com April| |March May 2015 www.OurBerkshireTimes.com February 2015

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food & drink

grass fed meat HEALTHIER ● NATURAL ● SUSTAINABLE ● HIGH QUALITY ● DELICIOUS By Jeremy & Emily Stanton

G

rass fed farming is the healthiest (for the animal and ourselves) and most humane way to raise the animals we utilize for food. This practice is also the most natural ............... and least impactful to the planet, a major concern in the face of global climate change. Using fossil fuels (fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides) to create feed that “nourishes” an animal to feed a person, is an unsustainable cycle. This practice has been proven to be devastating to the soil – stripping it of its vitality and contaminating it with chemicals. As purveyors of quality meats, we and our colleagues face the challenge of finding a consistent source of animals that meet our criteria of taste and quality. Genetics optimal for pasture-raised animals, as well as feed with a high protein and sugar content at the time of finishing, produces the tastiest and most tender meat. The farmer’s strict management of pasture (ideally utilizing methods termed Holistic Planned Grazing) facilitates healthy, well-mineralized soils interacting with a myriad of both annual and perennial plants. This diverse “salad” blend that changes with the seasons gives the beef, lamb, and other meats raised on such pastures the unique and bountiful flavor profiles that we love. When these factors are considered and controlled, the meat we offer is the best in the world. A consistent supply is challenged by the experience, season, and demand from larger markets on the few farms achieving this standard. It takes tremendous attention, time, and expertise to produce a fine grass finished animal, which justifies the high cost farmers demand for these animals. Innovation in grass finishing is flourishing as increased market demand for high quality grass fed animals is matched by the

conviction and dedication of farmers who want to produce an exceptional quality product. In turn, they increase the health of the planet while making a living. An exciting trend in pasture management, called Holistic Planned Grazing, or Mob Grazing, is growing in popularity as it both produces amazing quality meat and improves soil health. The practice is based on wild herd behavior, which clusters grazing animals close together as a defense against predators. When animals are clustered, the waste produced and hoof penetration into the soil are concentrated in a relatively small area. As a result, the plants under foot are evenly cropped down rather than cherry picked as would be the case when herds are more spread out. With Mob Grazing, the herd moves in its cluster, and allows the previous area to rest and regrow. This results in highly fertile and aerated soil. Farmers simulating this method achieve lush, gorgeous, healthy, and water-retaining land. This is a stark contrast to the sad picture of conventionally farmed land that is stripped barren of its nutrients, and looks dull, dusty, and dead. ~ Jeremy and Emily Stanton are the proprietors of The Meat Market, a sustainable butcher shop in Great Barrington, MA. Jeremy, Emily, and their team are committed to supporting grass fed farming because they believe it is the healthiest (for the animal and ourselves) and most humane way to raise the animals we utilize for food. They are excited to be working with farmers who use these modern sustainable practices as well as those that want to learn more about them. www.themeatmarketgb.com

CATERING

THOSE WHO FIND US SEEK AN INSPIRED EXPERIENCE Local food, cooked on-site in the open, over huge fires in our custom-built ironware and antique cauldrons.

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OUR EVENTS ARE ENLIVENED BY FIRE

RUGGED ELEGANCE | UNIQUE FOOD EXPERIENCE

fireroastedcatering.com ● 413-297-3473


food & drink

Taste, Quality, Service, and Respect for the Environment “Our mission is to offer a beautiful selection of local, grass fed, and sustainably raised fresh cuts of meat, charcuterie, and salumi made from traditional recipes. We believe that eating local foods is a definitive way to support physical health, our farming community, and the earth.”

389 Stockbridge Road, Great Barrington, MA

413-528-2022 • www.themeatmarketgb.com

Pittsfield & Great Barrington, MA guidosfreshmarketplace.com

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

April | May 2015

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food & drink

3 tbs Italian parsley, chopped 2 tbs dill, chopped 8 large eggs 2 cups whole milk 1 tsp coarse salt ¼ tsp freshly ground pepper

Instructions

Butter a 7"×11" baking dish. Lightly toast bread cubes. In a sauté pan, cook leeks in 1 tbs butter until soft, about 5 minutes. Toss in baby spinach and stir until wilted.

mother's day strata A SAVORY BREAD CASSEROLE WITH LEEKS, SPINACH, PARSLEY, AND DILL / From Guido's Kitchen

Yummy and easy! Make a day ahead. Serves 6

Ingredients

Add the remainder of the bread cubes and cover with the remaining leeks and spinach. Add the remaining grated cheese, parsley, and dill. Pittsfield & Great Barrington, MA

guidosfreshmarketplace.com

2 tbs butter for greasing dish and sautéing leeks ½ loaf challah or Italian bread, crust removed and cut into cubes 1 leek, washed and diced ½ lb baby spinach 1½ cup grated cheddar cheese

La Fogata Restaurant

Place half of the bread cubes in bottom of buttered baking dish. Sprinkle with half the leek and spinach mixture. Add half the grated cheese, chopped parsley, and dill.

In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, salt, and pepper. Pour mixture over the bread and cheese layers. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Preheat oven to 350 ◦F. Let strata come to room temperature (about 30 minutes). Bake strata uncovered until golden and fluffy, about 60 minutes.

Hawthorne Valley Farm Store

Colombian and Latin Cuisine Lunch & Dinner

770 Tyler Street Pittsfield, MA 01201 (413) 443-6969

From Our Hands to Your Table A full-line natural foods store featuring organic breads, pastries, cheeses, yogurt, raw milk, sauerkraut and other foods made fresh on our farm!

Fresh • Organic • Local • Delicious Open 7 Days FARM STORE | www.hawthornevalleyfarm.org 327 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY 12075 | 518-672-7500 14

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food & drink

NORTH EGREMONT COUNTRY STORE

“ A Nostalgic Dining Experience”

T A V E R N

Wholesome ● Homestyle ● Delicious Warm & Friendly Service

We offer a full line of groceries and spirits. Let us help you with your holiday needs! Photo by John Phelan

Monday-Thursday: 6a-6p Friday-Saturday: 6a-7p Sunday: 6a-5p

Route 71, North Egremont, MA (Near Prospect Lake)

Call (413) 528-4796

C O O P E R AT I V E LY O W N E D • C O M M U N I T Y F O C U S E D

Food Shopping with Value(s)

(413) 232-8565 5 Albany Road West Stockbridge, MA 01266

www.shakermilltavern.com

BTW save room

French chef, American baker, real food

5pm dinner only, seasonal hours

150 Main St., Lee, Mass. 413.243.6397 cheznousbistro.com

42 BRIDGE STREET • GREAT BARRINGTON, MA • WWW.BERKSHIRE.COOP

Come taste the “ancient flavors” of authentic Pompeian brick oven cooking & grilling, savored in an elegant, romantic ambiance in downtown Pittsfield. 413-499-1192 p trattoria-rustica.com 26 McKay Street, Pittsfield, MA Dinner daily from 5pm to closing. Closed Tuesdays. Reservations suggested.

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

April | May 2015

Two photos to far left by Caroline Alexander

“Antichi Sapori”

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home, garden & landscape

project bee

KEEPING THE BEES BUZZING IN THE BERKSHIRES / By Laura Endacott and Marius Louw

S

pring is the beekeeper’s favorite time of year in the Berkshires. After a long cold winter, spring offers the chance for beekeepers to finally open their hives and check on how they have fared over the winter. Yet in recent years, what beekeepers have been finding is devastating. Hives that were healthy in the fall and full of honey stores that the bees need to make it through the winter are found to have been mysteriously deserted, leaving only the queen, a meager number of worker bees, and stores of honey untouched. This phenomenon, called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), has claimed from a third to a half of all beehives around the world annually since 2006. One must assume that if CCD is happening with honeybees, other local pollinators must also be affected. The cause of CCD is still debated; however, a new class of systemic pesticide – neonicitinoids – has been strongly implicated as one possibility. Regardless, if honeybees are lost, we lose not only the culture of beekeeping passed on from colonial America, but most importantly the pollination that provides a majority of our fruits and vegetables. In an effort to find like-minded individuals concerned about the annual losses of pollinators, Laura Endacott and Marius Louw, with funding from the New Marlborough and Massachusetts Cultural Councils and support from local individuals and businesses, started Project Bee in 2009. Recognizing the need for a free bee club in the Southern Berkshires, Project Bee started monthly bee meetings at the New Marlborough Library in Mill River at 10:30am on the last Saturday of every month. Here beekeepers, experienced or new,

circa

Your Resource for Big City Style in The Berkshires Your Resource for Big City Style in The Berkshires

Danish and Mid-Century Modern Furnishings and Lighting Danish and Mid-Century Modern Furnishings and Lighting

circaberkshires.com 436 North Street circaberkshires.com 436 Street, North Street 436 North Pittsfield, MA circaberkshires.com 436 North Street, Pittsfield, MA circaberkshires.com 413-445-7200

413-445-7200 413-445-7200

413-445-7200 Now Open Sundays!

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www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

can discuss beekeeping best practices and get opinions on how to keep their hives healthy in the Berkshires. Local meeting times are announced at www.projectbeeline.org and their Facebook page, Project Bee, shares ideas, images, and videos. In an effort to encourage future generations of beekeepers, Project Bee visits local schools to get students excited about honeybees. Students are given the opportunity to see live bees in an observations hive, to learn about honeybees’ lifecycles, and to make and sell crafts such as candles and lip balm. Within the wider community, Project Bee presents at local day fairs, invites experts for presentations, makes hive visits to new beekeepers who are just starting out, and responds to swarm calls. Project Bee’s motto is to “Preserve the art and culture of beekeeping in New Marlborough, the Berkshires, and Beeyond.” The organization is fortunate to have the support of the people in the Berkshires and encourages other communities in Massachusetts and around the country to create their own local collaborative beekeeping programs as well. Regardless if one is a beekeeper or not, everyone can do something to help our local pollinators. Individuals can create homes and habitat for native bees, plant neonicitionoid-free flowers, buy organic food and local honey and avoid pesticide use, learn about bees, and watch the documentary Vanishing of the Bees. Together we can ensure that each spring our bees keep buzzing.

~ Laura Endacott and Marius Louw are co-founders of Project Bee. They can be contacted through the Project Bee’s website www.projectbeeline.org. Both reside in Mill River, Massachusetts.

Celebrate Our Forty-third Year!

Wonderful Things

Largest Selection of Yarns and Unique Handcrafted Gifts in the Berkshires Gift Certificates S Free Knitting Lessons Open Mon-Sat 9:30-5, Sun 12-4 Harry and Debbie Sano 232 Stockbridge Road, Great Barrington, MA 01230 (413) 528-2473 • www.wonderful-things.com


home, garden & landscape

made in the usa

give and receive

WE TAKE GREAT PRIDE IN OUR PRODUCTS AND SERVICE

IT'S LIKE GETTING HELP FROM A FRIEND ®

S

heds-N-Stuff offers an extensive line of finely crafted Amish-made products including sheds, gazebos, playhouses, gym sets, dog houses, barns, and garages. They also sell wood lawn furniture such as picnic tables, benches, glider tables, bridges, wishing wells, and arbors. Sheds-N-Stuff has been a local family owned and operated business for 25 years. They take great pride in their products and service, they have the ability to customize almost any project to your specific needs, and they deliver!

S

eniors Helping Seniors® matches active, caring seniors with seniors in their community who need a little help to remain independent at home. The owner personally matches seniors of similar background and temperament to foster camaraderie. For SHS Providers, it’s a way to give and to receive.® Seniors Helping Seniors®: no contracts, no minimums, reasonable rates… and a little more enjoyment back in seniors’ lives. It’s like getting a little help from a friend.®

All the Fun Summer Stuff Your Yard Could Ask For! Gazebos ● Gazebos ● Benches ● Picnic Tables Swings ● Sheds ● Swings ● Children’s Gym Sets Sheds Benches

Picnic Tables Children’s Gym Sets

W

It’s like like getting aa little little help from from a friend. ®® It’s It’s like getting getting a little help help from aa friend. friend. ® It’s like getting a little help from a friend. ®

(413) 822-9988 (413) 822-9988 (413) 822-9988

Route 8 Cheshire, MA (413) 743-9964 Toll Free (866) 411-7433 www.berkshiresheds.com

SeniorsHelpingSeniors.com/Berkshires SeniorsHelpingSeniors.com/Berkshires SeniorsHelpingSeniors.com/Berkshires SeniorsHelpingSeniors.com/Berkshires SeniorsHelpingSeniors.com/WesternMass SeniorsHelpingSeniors.com/WesternMass SeniorsHelpingSeniors.com/WesternMass SeniorsHelpingSeniors.com/WesternMass

the personal touch

15th anniversary

8 Cheshire, ALWAYSRoute WITH YOUMAIN MIND

EXPERTISE AND A UNIQUE SELECTION

(413) 743-9964 Toll Free 1-866-411-7433 (shed) www.berkshiresheds.com

hen picking out your bridal flowers, it is always best to sit with a wedding floral specialist for a consultation. Floral specialists are able to discuss your budget, color, and flower preferences. An experienced floral designer can complement props and decorations. This personal touch is also important for other special occasions including Mother’s Day. When you stop into Flowers by Jona ask for Jeanne. She will discuss your event – “always with you in mind.”

W

ild Birds Country Store carries the highest quality and largest selection of bird feeding products in Berkshire County, but they also carry a unique selection of hostess gifts, wedding gifts, outdoor handcrafted furniture, chimes, books, poles, and so much more. They also carry a wonderful selection of birdfeeders and birdhouses, many handcrafted locally or by the Amish. Stop in and have them create a backyard sanctuary just for you. We also do repairs on your equipment!

FLOWERS BY JONA

Florist & Events Specialist weddings and all occasions

(413) 445-5662 VISIT OUR NEW LOCATION AT

337 Elm Street, Pittsfield, MA www.flowersbyjona.net “Always with you in mind”

Bird Feeders ` Bird Houses Birdseed ` and so much more! (413) 644-9007  www.wild-birdstore.com 783 South Main Street, Great Barrington, MA

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

April | May 2015

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home, garden & landscape

spring cleaning A HELPFUL REMINDERS AND IDEAS TO START THE SEASON OFF RIGHT / By Kathy I. Regan

W

hen we bid winter adieu by opening our windows to hear the birds sing and bring in the sweet spring air, many of us get the urge to declutter, clean, and give our homes a fresh new start. Spring cleaning gives us a wonderful opportunity every year to throw out the old and make room for new, and spruce up our surroundings. Following are some helpful tips and reminders to start the season off right.

 Sometimes we have difficulty deciding what items in our home to let go of, but a simple way to make more room when you are not in the mood to make difficult decisions is to eliminate expired items. Expired vitamins and medicines can be dangerous, so this is an excellent place to start. Do not flush drugs down the toilet, drain, or throw into the trash, though; call your local police station for instructions. Next, find and discard expired toiletries and makeup, followed by cleaning products (check with your local recycling center for safe disposal), and finally go through your pantry. For a convenient list of 77 surprising expiration dates for foods, beauty products, and household goods from Real Simple magazine, go to www.tinyurl.com/myn2wx6.  To help prevent making spring allergies worse, and for a healthier home in general, it is extremely important that you

regularly wash and/or change the filters of your fans, furnace, dehumidifiers, air and water purifiers, ducts, and air conditioners to improve the indoor air quality in your home. This will also help you realize additional savings as you increase the operating efficiency and prolong the lifespan of your equipment. Many manufacturers now make it possible for you to sign up for reminders. Or, if you love technology, for $4.99 you can purchase a helpful phone app with good reviews called HomeRoutines by Wunderbear that will help you manage all of your home chores. www.homeroutines.com.  Out with the old and in with the new. OK, so now that you have done some important basic home chores, it’s time to roll up your sleeves and do some serious clutter busting. Even though it can be a challenge to decide what to let go of, nothing can be more refreshing and satisfying (for your home environment as well as your emotions) than letting go of items that no longer serve you. Consider hiring a professional organizer if you need help. Donate items that may help others, and go to www. recyclingworksma.com to find out where you can recycle almost anything near you. Think you don’t have the time? Read Make It Happen in 10 Minutes a Day by local author Lorne Holden – a simple, revolutionary method for getting things done.

simple steps

Meadow Farm Equipment WE CARRY ALL OF YOUR OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT AND LANDSCAPING SUPPLIES

Visit Our New Location on Route 102

 Power Equipment, Tractors, Lawn Mowers  Mulch,Topsoil, Compost, Grass Seed  We Also Do Equipment Repair

1160 Pleasant Street, Lee, MA 01238 Mon-Fri 7am-5pm (413) 243-0777 Sat 8am-3pm

STONEMASON

Specializing in Dry Stone Walls, Walkways & Stairways ● Dry Stone Wall Construction & Restoration ● Recycling Old Wall Stone into New Walls ● Dry Layed Walkways & Patios ● Freestanding & Retaining Walls

EUROPE / USA, 35 Years Experience

Kenn “Hawk” Kaminski

(413) 572 6808

www.internationalstonemason.com 18

April | May 2015

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TO ASSURE A BEAUTIFUL LAWN AND GARDEN

M

eadow Farm Equipment (formerly Meadow Farm Market) advises that you prepare your ground now to assure a beautiful green lawn and highly productive garden. Often overlooked but very important is mulching. It makes your garden healthier, limits the amount of weeds, and cuts down on watering. It can also make your garden pest resistant and it looks tidy. Most important, it prevents soil erosion while maintaining the soil’s nutrients. Now sit back and enjoy your masterpiece!

beautiful stone ADD UNIQUE FEATURES TO YOUR HOME & GARDEN

K

enn “Hawk” Kaminski is a traveling dry stone waller (stonemason) of 35 years with projects in the USA and Europe. His specialty is the building and restoration of dry stone walls (retaining, free-standing), walkways, and patios. A unique feature, such as a built-in stone chair or display window, can be added to a stone wall (see website and ad at left). If the client so desires, Kenn welcomes participation in any aspect of the project. References available upon request.


gift guide

Our Berkshire Marketplace

Spring 2015!

DECORATE

Franco Pellegrino acrylic on canvas over panel painting is aptly titled "Moo." This vibrant, eyecatching piece measures 48" x 48" and can be found at Lauren Clark Fine Art in Great Barrington. Franco Pellegrino was born and raised in the Berkshires. He attended the Fine Arts Program at BCC and continued his studies at the Art Institute of Boston. He has won numerous awards for his work in the New England area. Price: $3,200. www.laurenclarkfineart.com

RELAX

This Armed and Stylish Outdoor Chair made from linen white canvas is from Dash & Albert, an Annie Selke Company. If you are looking for a sleek, comfortable piece to accent your outdoor decor, then look no further. Crafted by artisans committed to fairlabor practices. Dash & Albert is committed to quality and takes pride in each step of the process and offers free shipping on all orders. Price: $1,060. dashandalbert.annieselke.com

DESTRESS Made in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts, Sitlonger offers cushions exquisitely crafted from the finest quality upholstery weight fabrics. Tango Nouveau II, a black flocked velvet on natural linen-topped cushion with black cotton velvet band can be used as a meditation cushion, ottoman, or alternative seating. 18" in diameter, 8" crown height. 100% organic buckwheat hull fill. 18 lbs. Price: $240. www.sitlonger.com

DISPLAY

These Wire French Baskets with feet from Campo De' Fiori feature hand forged iron feet which raise the baskets elegantly off the surface of wherever placed. Both utilitarian and practical in the home or on the terrace. Each piece is shaped and soldered by hand. One can imagine myriad uses, from displaying fruit in the kitchen to soaps and cloths in the bathroom – the list goes on. 8"D x 6.5"H, 9"D x 7.5"H. Price: $33.75–$61.25. www.campodefiori.com www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

April | May 2015

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home, garden & landscape

camp sampler

Take Her Breath TakeAway! Her Breath Away!

NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE NOW SALE NOW SALES NOW NOWON ONSALE SALE  S NOW NOW ON ONSALE SALE  S NOW NOW ON SALE  NOW ONON SALE  SNOW ONON SALE NOW ON SALE

NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE ON ONON SALE S  NOW ONON SALE  NOW NOWON ON SALE SALE S NOW NOWON ONSALE SALESNOW NOW ONSALE SALES NOW NOW SALE NOW SALE  NOW ON SALE

 NOW ON SALE  NOW ON SALE  NOW ON SALE 

S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S

S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S

I Forever Do...

Fine Jew s ’ n ele a i b rs a Est. 1985 Z Fine

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s Street,eLee wel n’Main 15 a i ers b a 413-243-0508 Est. 1985 Z 15www.zabians.com Main Street, Lee 413-243-0508

Open 7 days a week until Christmas.

www.zabians.com S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S NOW ON SALE S S NOW S NOW SALE  ONSALE SALE S  NOWON ON SALE S  NOW NOW ON ON SALE NOW ON 

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camp sampler  cam Berkshire Botanical Garden’s Farm In The Garden Camp - For children 5 to 14. Join one or more of six one-week sessions between June 29 and August 7. Children learn the connections that exist with themselves, nature, the food we eat, and the friendships that develop in between. There are baby animals to feed, vegetables to tend to, songs to sing, food to prepare, and a lifelong relationship with the outdoors to start building. (413) 298-3926, 5 West Stockbridge Road, Stockbridge, MA. www.berkshirebotanical.org Blue Rider Stables Summer Camp Weekly Summer Intensives. 12 weeks of summer programming beginning June 8. Be prepared for an amazing equine experience. Learn basic riding and horse care, or deepen your experience in selected areas of horsemanship. Each week offers either a half-day (call for age range) or a full-day (ages 9+) session with option for extended hours. (413) 528-5299, 15 Farm Lane, South Egremont, MA. www.bluerider.org Summer @ Steiner: A WaldorfInspired Summer Day Program For children from nursery to grade 8, sessions between July 29 to August 7. The Players program for children ages 3 to 4 follows the simple, gentle, and nurturing structure of a nursery day. The Discoverers program for children ages 5 to 6 follows an imaginative, playful, and explorative structure. In the Adventurers program, grades 2 to 5 thrive on the challenges and new adventures their week brings. Grades 6 to 8 can experience the Sports and Recreational program, the Wild Naturalist program, and/ or the Explorers program. (413) 528-4015, 35 West Plain Road, Great Barrington, MA. www.gbrss.org. The Hotchkiss School Summer Portals - Enjoy various camps for ages 12 to 15 from June 28 to July 26. Each day will be packed full. In addition to classes, your child will be eating in the dining hall, playing soccer on the turf, swimming in the lake, and sleeping in the dorms. They will meet motivated students from all over the world who share their curiosity and who are inspired to learn by doing. (860) 435-2591, 11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, CT.


camp sampler

mp sampler  camp sampler Eisner Camp - For more than 50 years, Eisner Camp has been a second home to thousands of youngsters looking for a place where they can make lifelong friends, savor new experiences, and explore what being Jewish means to them. Find out more about Eisner Camp and their commitment to providing fun, safe, and unforgettable summer experiences. Grades 2 to 12 beginning June 29. (413) 528-1652, 53 Brookside Road, Great Barrington, MA. www.eisner.urjcamps.org SMArt Summer Programs at Flying Cloud Institute For boys and girls age 5 to 14. Session one starts on June 29, from Monday to Friday, 9am to 3:30pm. At SMArt Summer Programs, learning is literally in the hands of the children. Ceramics, chemistry, painting, drawing, sculpture, horticulture, environmental studies, architecture, music, dance, theatre, filmmaking, and more.

(413) 229-3321, 731 New Marlboro Sandisfield Road, New Marlborough, MA. www.flyingcloudinstitute.com

Camp Lenox - This traditional sleep-away camp for boys and girls (age 7 to 16) is located on beautiful Shaw Pond. You will find unparalleled sports programs led by some of the finest coaches in the country, and a wide array of creative land and water activities. (413) 243-2223, 2042 N. Main Road, Lee, MA. www.camplenox.com

413-644-0077  www.kutsherssportsacademy.com

KSA Day Camp and Overnight Summer Camp!  coed, ages 5 -17 One to nine weeks completely elective sports program. Call today to speak with a director!

Celebrating 92 93 Amazing Summers in the Berkshires!

Summer at Montessori Inspiring joyful learning and exploration on 40 acres of Berkshire woodlands and fields.

Two-week session for children ages 3-6 One-week sessions for children ages 6-12

Visit BerkshireMontessori.org/summer for the full summer program descriptions and to register!

Enroll Today For Summer 2015

Day Camp and Sleepover Camp ~ Ages 3 to 16 Flexible Sessions ~ Beautiful Lake Buel Campus Only 5 miles from Gt. Barrington, MA

S40658

Session themes include:

Glorious Gardeners, Comic Book Camp, Games, Games, Games!, Mapping My World, Explore the Woods, and much more!

~Ÿ 888-528-0940 camphalfmoon.com 9 Camp Half-Moon Rd | P.O. Box 188 Great Barrington, MA 01230 (888) 528-0940 | (413) 528-0940 21 Patterson Rd. Lenox Dale, MA

www.camphalfmoon.com

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

April | May 2015

21


House Proud

Old and New Post-and-Beam / By Gladys Montgomery

Photo used with permission by Timberpeg Timber Frame Homes, www.timberpeg.com.

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n the Berkshires, the longest-running type of building construction is sturdy post-and-beam, which began here in the 1730s and continues into the present. Post-andbeam construction methods were brought to America when English colonists made landfall here. A throwback to the medieval period, post-and-beam framing comprises hefty horizontal wooden beams and vertical posts fastened together with mortiseand -tenon joinery and wooden pegs. Timber beams – very dense first growth wood so plentiful in that era’s virgin forests – could be as large as 12-14" square and were sometimes left rounded with the bark still on. The tenon part of the joint was created by carving down the end of one beam so it would nestle into the mortise (the carved-out, receiving portion) of another beam perpendicular to it. During America’s architectural First Period (1624-1710), post-and-beam framing was intentionally left exposed for aesthetic reasons, with beams beveled at their visible 90-degree angles with a chamfer terminating at both ends in an elongated spade-shaped flourish, called a lamb’s tongue. Exposed overhead beams, vertical corner posts, and the paneling around fireplaces might have been painted a rich vermilion red. Contrary to today’s popular imagination, well-to-do families at this time often had ceilings of plaster, and interior walls were generally lath-and-plaster or wood-paneled. For insulation in New England, there was often plank framing – wide, inch-thick wooden planks that ran from outside the post-and-beam structure, from the foundation’s sills to the roof eaves. Building exteriors were covered with wooden clapboards or shingles. The Georgian (1720-1785) and Federal (1790-1825) architectural periods brought greater refinement to interiors. The wealthy kept up with the latest architectural fashions, which 22

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set their homes stylistically apart from the vernacular homes of ordinary people, but even in modest homes, overhead beams and vertical posts were boxed inside finished casing, and overhead joists were universally hidden by plaster ceilings. However fancy the architectural style or embellishments, structural framing was still post-and-beam. In 1832, the lighter method of balloon framing was invented, making it possible to build taller structures, a change that altered the look of American houses entirely. However, timber framing was still used structurally and decoratively in the Gothic Revival style of the Victorian Period (1840-1910), when vaulted ceilings with elaborate wooden trusses were popular among the wellto-do, as architects and builders took inspiration from historic medieval construction. It was also selectively used in some Colonial Revival (1885-1930) and American Craftsman (19001930) buildings. In the last decades of the twentieth century, timber framers and builders of log homes revived post-and-beam construction. Today, house-wrights in the Timber Framers Guild, established in 1984, can reconstruct and replicate historic post-and-beam buildings, or create contemporary homes. These proudly display exposed framing, just as post-and-beam buildings originally did. Now, as in centuries past, we just like the look of it.

~ Gladys Montgomery is a Realtor with William Pitt Sotheby’s International Realty in Great Barrington, MA. Licensed in Massachusetts and New York State, she serves both buyers and sellers. Her background includes a 30-year career as a marketing specialist and as a writer/editor/author specializing in architecture, design, and lifestyle topics. www.gladysmontgomery.williampitt.com


Real Estate & Professionals

south county gem HISTORIC BUILDING FOR SALE IN NEW MARLBOROUGH, MA

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his historic building awaits your final transformation into a country store, cafe, antique shop, artist studio, or home. With plenty of parking, and zoned for commercial as well as residential use, the possibilities are limited only by your imagination. Interior renovations include new insulation, drywall, 400-amp electric service, and new heating system. The massive chestnut post-andbeam frame sits on its original stone foundation. Contact Kevin for more information. (413) 274-1122, kevin@hartsvilledesign.com

heart of the berkshires

Historic Building for Sale in Hartsville, Massachusetts

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arrington Brook, an open-space residential community, offers single-family condo living in the heart of Great Barrington MA, set on 156 acres of scenic beauty and privacy. Homes available include 3 to 5 bedrooms with 2 or 3 baths. All units feature a spacious great room with 11-foot ceilings, a garage, a deck, and a screened-in porch to enjoy the beauty of living in the Berkshires. At Barrington Brook you will enjoy maintenancefree living with lovely common grounds.

Barringtonbrook.com 413-637-0843

sunshine & savings 30 YEARS SERVING THE BERKSHIRES

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ince 1985, Berkshire Photovoltaic Services (BPVS) has installed hundreds of safe, efficient, and durable photovoltaic systems. They favor photovoltaic components manufactured in our region to support the local economy and because these modules, mounts, and power electronics are the best in the world. BPVS is fully licensed and insured for commercial, institutional, and residential PV systems. Ask them about income tax credits available for renewable energy systems for additional savings.

Berkshire Photovoltaic Services, BPVS

46 Howland Avenue, Adams, MA 01220 www.bpvs.com 413-743-0152 Berkshire Photovoltaic Services, BPVS Solar Energy Industries Association.

46 Howland Avenue, 01220 Association, Solar Energy Business Adams, AssociationMA New England, MA LIC #’s HIC131996, CSL of 73150 Member: American Solar Energy Society, Northeast Sustainable Energy Tel. 413-743-0152 • www.bpvs.com

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MA LIC #'s HIC131996, CSL 73150

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413-743-0152 • www.bpvs.com Member:Tel. American Solar Energy Society, Northeast Sustainable Energy Association, Solar Energy Avenue, Business Association New01220 England, 46 Howland Adams,ofMA Solar Energy Industries Association.

Berkshire Photovoltaic Services, BPVS

Berkshire Photovoltaic Services, BPVS

custom woodworking KITCHENS, BATHS, STAIRCASES, AND MILLWORK

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artsville Design builds and installs a full range of high-quality custom cabinetry and millwork for every room in your home and office. Whether it’s the kitchen you’ve always wanted, builtin bookcases, a unique fireplace mantel, fine furniture, inventive storage units to help you get organized, or an artistic display case for your high-tech audio-video equipment, Hartsville Design can work within your budget to match your individual space and lifestyle. Custom woodworking is meant to last for generations.

46 Howland Avenue, Adams, MA 01220

Tel. 413-743-0152 • www.bpvs.com

Hartsville Design Since 1985, recognized for careful designs, Woodworking proven components and high quality workmanship, MA LIC #'s HIC131996, CSL 73150

274-1122 BPVS solar electric systems(413) are user friendly, efficientKevin@HartsvilleDesign.com and reliable.

rKitchens r • Baths • Offices

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www.HartsvilleDesign.com www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

April | May 2015

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Summer at Montessori Inspiring joyful learning and exploration on 40 acres of Berkshire woodlands and fields.

Two-week session for children ages 3-6 One-week sessions for children ages 6-12

Session themes include: Glorious Gardeners, Comic Book Camp, Games, Games, Games!, Mapping My World, Explore the Woods, and much more!

Visit BerkshireMontessori.org/summer for the full summer program descriptions and to register!

21 Patterson Rd. Lenox Dale, MA


education & workshops

collaboration & communication THE IMPORTANCE OF EMOTIONAL CONNECTION

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By K. Meagan Ledendecker

hile shadowing snowboard instructors at Bousquet, I became acutely aware of how much time and attention goes towards interactions between instructor and student. Instructors take great care to ensure a student is at ease and comfortable. Research validates the importance of this kind of emotional connection. In The Emotional Life of Your Brain, Richard J. Davidson, PhD, writes, “Feelings and thoughts, which originate in the brain, literally get out of that grey matter and into the rest of the body.” In order for someone to learn a new skill or concept effectively, he must first feel stress free and emotionally open to learning. I recently joined guests who had come to observe at The Montessori School of the Berkshires. As the observers watched the classrooms, they commented on the similarity to creative office spaces: places where teams would meet, create, and inspire. The children were at ease and had a sense of joy and purpose as they worked together with adults and peers alike. The classroom observers were intrigued by how Montessori students have opportunities to share discoveries, collaborate to solve a problem, and learn from mistakes. Certainly, collaboration and communication are paramount to effective relationships – both professionally and personally. We need to be able to share our ideas, learn from others, and muddle through challenge together. To do so we need to feel secure and comfortable, so we can communicate and problem solve effectively. In Montessori learning environments, students learn skills to help them build community and understand themselves emotionally, socially, and intellectually. Toddlers learn how to respect each other’s space and offer help kindly, while also developing skills for tending to their basic needs and caring for their immediate environment. With gentle support from adults and peers, the 18-month-old learns how to wipe her own nose, pull on her own socks, and wash her own hands. When a table is dirty or a mirror is smudged, the same child can learn a sense of community belonging by having the skills and tools to beautify her surroundings. A 3- to 6-year-old develops the ability to act as gracious host by serving snacks or helping a classmate zip a coat. By the elementary years, students listen to others’ perspectives and ideas, and make consensus decisions with the consideration of what’s best for everyone. Montessori 7th and 8th graders regularly work in small teams to investigate, teach, and even offer service to the greater community. As we grow and evolve, we all benefit from a sense of belonging and togetherness. A gentle guide can connect on a personal level and ensure we feel safe enough to step outside our comfort zones and reach for our potential.

~ K. Meagan Ledendecker has Montessori training for ages 0-3, 3-6, and 6-12, and serves as the Director of Education at The Montessori School of the Berkshires. With three of her own children, she has somehow found time to learn how to snowboard and has greatly valued the process of stepping outside her comfort zone. www.berkshiremontessori.org

Buxton

–––

Live Your Education –––

Meet our students and faculty, tour the campus, and see us in action!

Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 11am

To RSVP and for more details: admissions@buxtonschool.org, 413-458-3919 GRADES 9-12 CO-ED • BOARDING & DAY • COLLEGE-PREPARATORY

Educating Progressively and Living Intentionally Since 1928 291 South Street, Williamstown, MA • www.BuxtonSchool.org

Great Barrington Rudolf Steiner School

Parent-Baby • Pre-K • Kindergarten 1st-8th Grade • Summer Program Waldor f Education in the Berkshires for over 40 years We educate our students to meet life with courage, impart meaning and purpose to their lives, and respond with creativity and integrity to the needs of the world. Our well-rounded, hands-on education prepares students for their choice of high school and college – and to reach their full potential.

(413) 528-4015

www.gbrss.org

Great Barrington, MA

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

April | May 2015

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education & workshops

a remarkable place

Southern Berkshire Regional School District

HAWTHORNE VALLEY WALDORF SCHOOL

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By Karen Preuss

magine going to a school set on a 400-acre farm that includes vegetable fields, gardens, forests, ponds, and streams. Where you pass dairy cows grazing on grassy pastures, feed chickens and collect their eggs, and meet piglets and calves just hours old. Where your class makes pizzas in a wood-fired stone and clay hot oven that was built by students, and where it is not unusual to see the kindergarten class walking the farm’s sheep – Stella, Luna, and Lila – out to pasture on leashes. Where the forge, practical arts building, and art studios ring with the voices of students learning the traditional skills of copper enameling, throwing clay, or weaving, and where music and the fine and performing arts are a part of every student’s school experience. Welcome to Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School. Founded in 1973, Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School offers students a Waldorf curriculum from early childhood through grade Mount Everett Robotics 12. The school’s campus is Hawthorne Valley Farm, an active takes third straight state title biodynamic farm in central Columbia County, NY. The beauty of tended nature and the seasons of farm life provide exceptional Advancing intellectual growth. Building character. educational resources built into the founding ideals of Hawthorne Capturing the heart. Engaging the creative mind. Valley. Our integrative curriculum is highly interdisciplinary, blending academics with lessons in the fine and practical arts, nature and farm-based activities, class trips, and more. Each year’s curriculum is designed to meet the unique needs of the developing child or young adult. The Early Childhood Program at Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School is a vibrant place – filled with Spring Parentthe joyful exuberance of children held in the Child classes begin secure embrace of their teachers and parents. April 16. The lower and middle school grades foster Call today for development of healthy social relationships a tour! and a love of learning. In the high school, young women and men grow academically, artistically, and socially into the creative individuals needed in today’s complex world. With its unique home-based high school boarding program and its active international exchange program, Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School welcomes students from all around the world. Whether you are a parent looking for a first experience for your young child or a Situated on a 400-acre Biodynamic farm in New York’s Hudson Valley, middle or high school student, we invite you Hawthorne Valley’s integrative curriculum is designed to meet the unique needs to explore Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School. of the developing child. We expect you will discover a remarkable Day and Boarding Programs • Accepting Applications place to study, live, learn, and grow. Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School is 518-672-7092 x 111 info@hawthornevalleyschool.org located at 330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY. To learn more about our school, please visit WALDORF SCHOOL | www.hawthornevalleyschool.org our website: www.hawthornevalleyschool.org, 330 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY 12075 | 518-672-7092 x 111 or come for a tour!

Nurturing living connections... early childhood through grade 12

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health & wellness

healing foods MEDICINAL

POTENT  FLAVORFUL

By Joyce Nelson

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ative to Indonesia and southern India, turmeric has been used as a healing food for more than 5,000 years. This knobby root, which bears a resemblance to ginger, has earned its medicinal reputation. Turmeric is a potent but safe anti-inflammatory and antioxidant. It helps reduce the effects of IBS, rheumatoid arthritis, cystic fibrosis, and other inflammatory conditions. Also, it improves liver function, offers cardiovascular protection, lowers cholesterol, and combats cancer and Alzheimer’s. Turmeric’s warm, peppery, and bitter flavor adds punch to curry powders, while its bright yellow color gives mustard its hue. Turmeric can also be used as a textile dye. Keep turmeric root in the refrigerator. Its deep orange color can stain; use caution when working with it in the kitchen and wear gloves. Add turmeric to egg salad or mix it with brown rice, raisins, cashews, cumin, and coriander for a very flavorful dish. Add more to any curried recipe for an extra kick and health boost. In general, turmeric pairs well with sauteed apples, cauliflower, green beans, onions, celery, sweet peppers, jicama, broccoli, and lentils; or use it in salad dressings.

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int is well known and respected for its medicinal and culinary uses. Native to the Mediterranean, mint is now grown almost worldwide, and figures prominently in many world cuisines, especially Greek, Middle Eastern, North African, Indian, and Thai. Mint’s cooling properties are especially valued in hot climates, or as a foil to spicy ingredients. While this restorative herb is most often used in savory preparations in the above countries, in Europe and America it’s most often used in sweets, or as a flavoring for toothpaste, candies, antacids, and breath fresheners. Medicinally, mint is a general pick-me-up, and is also used to treats colds, flu, fevers, poor digestion, rheumatism, hiccups, stings, earaches, flatulence, and throat and sinus ailments. It’s no wonder the Pilgrims brought such a flavorful and useful plant with them to the New World! Mint is also a symbol of hospitality and wisdom, very important qualities for beginning life in a new land. Mint combines well with many vegetables, including new potatoes, tomatoes, carrots, and peas. Dried mint retains many of its fresh oils, and is a good substitute for fresh. To keep dried mint in prime condition, keep it in a tightly sealed jar away from light. ~ Joyce Nelson, staff writer for Guido’s Fresh Marketplace, www.guidosfreshmarketplace.com.

gol dm an / tripp osteopathic healthcare As osteopathic physicians, we use our comprehensive knowledge of anatomy and physiology to promote health and healing. We work gently with our hands to help your body restore optimal function – based on optimal structure – to help solve musculoskeletal problems and health issues of all kinds. As fully licensed physicians, we have all of the full and current medical pharmacopeia, nutritional science and medical training at our disposal. Your individual treatment may include a wide range of approaches, but is always founded on our gentle hands-on work. Andrew M. Goldman, DO, Osteopathic Physician Kim E. Tripp, DO, PhD, Osteopathic Physician www.goldmantripp.net Great Barrington, ma 413-528-3334 | Sharon, ct 860-364-5990

sauna

therapy

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April | May 2015

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health & wellness

the power of rhythm A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO NEURODEVELOPMENT

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Flowing Form Bodywork Deborah Gerard Certified Feldenkrais Practitioner

ealing therapies can often be expensive, but cost and accessibility were some of the considerations that Judith Bluestone took to heart as she developed her paradigm: HANDLE® – a Holistic Approach to NeuroDevelopment and Learning Efficiency. Judith herself was exposed to toxic chemicals in utero and was born with neurological complications that impacted her ability to speak, hear, and act normally in a social world. She would have been labeled autistic as a child had that label been applied as prevalently then as it is now. Yet she was able to overcome her challenges largely through her own intuition, later supported by scientific research and applied educational theories, and went on to become an internationally acclaimed therapist and educator. One theory Judith applied is the brain’s capacity to change and adapt constantly; its neuroplasticity. This theory recognizes that the brain responds to all stimulation; when the stimulation is consistent and rhythmic (preferably daily) the brain will adapt and develop new capacities. Judith developed neurodevelopmental therapeutic activities using common household items such as a ball, straw, rolling pin, string, or human hands that could be easily done anywhere, by anyone. By providing individuals and caregivers with knowledge rather than with expensive equipment, HANDLE® practitioners have been able to save thousands of individuals and families around the world thousands of dollars.

Licensed Physical & Massage Therapist Craniosacral Therapy _________________

Pain relief through gentle touch and movement. Individual sessions and classes are offered.

www.flowingform.com debhands1@gmail.com 413-429-5438 28

April | May 2015

By Elizabeth Frishkoff

www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

Another advantage to movementbased cognitive therapies, versus drugbased therapies, is that when they are done on a daily basis, frequently the need for prescription medication is reduced or eliminated. Often the reason to medicate comes from an imbalance of the brain’s ability to process stimulation from the environment. Therapies such as yoga, Reflex Integration, and HANDLE®, which use rhythmic, organized movement in gentle, individualized amounts, can help the brain become more organized. The more organized the brain becomes, the easier it is to process stimulation from the environment, thus reducing stress and the need for medications. There are many stages of development that involve very neurologically organizing and important activities including rolling, sucking, crawling, and walking, all of which provide the healthy physiological and neurological foundation for complex learning activities such as reading, writing, speaking, dancing, and so forth. If any developmental stage is missed it can impact further learning. Fortunately, the knowledge of neuroplasticity can provide hope for continued growth and maturation if therapeutic amounts of developmental activities are introduced as the person is ready, and they have the support of proper nutrition. Ideally, children are nurtured in environments that are free from toxins, in which they can run, swim, breathe fresh air, drink clean water, and eat healthy food. Proper nutrition is critical for nurturing a healthy body and is essential in supporting healthy brain development. Thus, HANDLE® recognizes that embracing a “green” lifestyle is not only healthy, it is critical for providing a proper foundation for growth and learning. ~ For more information and other HANDLE® trainings, please visit the website www.handle.org or contact Elizabeth Frishkoff (413) 5280477, efrish@sover.net.


mind & spirit

the relaxation response ENHANCE YOUR HEALING ABILITY / By Susan Spiegel Solovay

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f you knew how simple it was to enhance your healing ability, would you stop for a moment – maybe right now – and learn how to do it? Imagine this: a group of medical students at Ohio State University, in a double-blind test, were checked for immune function – as measured by their T-cell count. At exam time, with the stress of late-night studying and anxiety, their T-cell count fell by half! But the group that was given a 20-minute relaxation CD to listen to saw their T-cell count bounce back. What did they use? A relaxation audio, one of many ways to achieve the healing state called the Relaxation Response. Coined as a term by Dr. Herbert Benson at Harvard Medical School in 1974, the Relaxation Response is also the name of his book that teaches the technique. But if you are stressed and too busy – who isn’t? – and could use a boost in healing, you can learn it online at www.relaxationresponse.org/steps.

Relaxation Response. Many modalities can help you – yoga, meditation, massage, acupuncture, hypnotherapy, and self-hypnosis induce the Relaxation Response. Of course, counseling and therapy are highly recommended to relieve anxiety and calm the mind. So, because no one’s life is perfect, I recommend you learn ways to calm and quiet your body and mind. As Dr. Mark Hyman has written, “The greatest pharmacy in the world is right between your ears.” Take a few minutes to stock your pharmacy with the most healing ingredients – the ones your body will happily make for you – for free!

~ Susan Spiegel Solovay is a Life Coach and Medical Hypnotist, with a specialty in helping people relax. You can contact her at healingwithhypno@ fairpoint.net. Ask for her guided relaxation audio, called Calm Me Down; she will send it to you at no charge.

But what if you feel trapped in stress? If you are like most people, feeling like you have too much on your plate, the state of overwhelm puts you into the opposite chemistry: the Stress Response. So does tension, worry, frustration. In the Stress Response chemistry, healing is put on hold. The body thinks there are tigers to fight, trees to climb, or we are running to save our lives. For thousands of generations, that is what our bodies evolved to deal with! So we developed the chemistry to be powerful, fast, and full of cortisol and adrenaline, when we are stressed. Healing happened later, when we got back to the cave to rest. While few of us have tigers to fight or are running for our lives, we may have an excess of stress hormones and chemicals dangerously filling our bloodstream while dealing with a difficult boss, a stagnating desk job, traffic, money problems, or back-talking teens. We don’t get to fight or flee and use adrenaline or cortisol. Until our chemistry shifts back to normal, healing is on hold. How do you know if you are dealing with the Stress Response? Let’s take a quick moment to find out your stress level. Get comfortable and close your eyes. Take a deep breath. Bring your focus from the outer world to your inner world. Imagine you have your own inner stress meter. It measures how much stress or tension you are feeling. The highest number, 10, represents the highest stress. The lowest number, 1, represents deep relaxation. Check in – sense it, and get a number on that meter. How high or low is it? You can learn how to lower that number – and achieve the

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heilaa Hite Intuitive Counselor

Featured in Paulette Cooper’s directory, ‘THE 100 TOP PSYCHICS in AMERICA’

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www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

April | May 2015

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have you heard?

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How many vacuum cleaners have you had for the last 25 years? How about one? 383 North Street, Pittsfield, MA ● www.aerusonline.com (413) 442-1544 | (413) 743-0985 | (802) 442-9560

In Memoriam

Connect with Great Music!

For Samples, Single Songs & CDs www.folk-legacy.com ● 860-364-5661 Caroline Paton

Reflect on Ideas for MA/NY CT & US www.livfully.drupalgardens.com Catherine Palmer Paton

(Permaculture, Parent & Community Networking)

thinkingkapp@gmail.com ● 860-626-5199 Kaelan Paton (‘93-’09) A Heroic Soul

have you heard? OUR BERKSHIRETIMES MAGAZINE STAFF PICKS. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING INTERESTING TO SHARE?

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haring long website addresses can be difficult – they sometimes break in emails, and when placed in print are almost impossible for the recipient to retype. Try using www.tinyurl.com to instantly shorten long URLs for free, and it never expires!

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gunquit, the beautiful seaside tourist town in Maine, is the first community in Maine and the second in the United States to prohibit the use of synthetic insect killers, weed killers, and fertilizers on all land – private and public – throughout its jurisdiction (Takoma Park, Maryland, banned cosmetic lawn pesticides in 2013). These chemicals are connected to cancers, endocrine disruption, and other abnormalities, as well as damage to our environment, wildlife, and beneficial insects like bees. Wouldn’t it be amazing if Berkshire County could do the same and gain national notoriety by being the third location in the United States to stop the use of these harmful chemicals as well?

P

ersonal privacy should be – and needs to be – the right of a person living in a free country. It is up to us to maintain that right. The right to privacy is not specifically mentioned in our Constitution, but the Supreme Court has said that several of the amendments create this right, including the Fourth Amendment, which stops police and other government agents from searching us or our property without probable cause to believe that we have committed a crime. Yet, every time you use the Internet, your search data is recorded. Major search engines capture your IP address and use tracking cookies to make a record of your search terms, the time of your visit, and the links you choose, and they store this information in databases. Those searches reveal a shocking amount of personal information about you, such as your interests, family circumstances, political leanings, medical conditions, and more for marketers, government officials, blackhat hackers, and criminals. Learn more about your constitutional rights and how to protect them. Consider using www.StartPage. com, and its sister search engine Ixquick, that are third-party certified search engines that do not record your IP address or track your searches. www.startpage.com

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April | May 2015

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www.OurBerkshireTimes.com

April | May 2015

31


CARING FOR PETS SINCE 1957 Convenient Location with Ample Parking on Route 7 less than a minute south of Guido’s

Monday-Friday 10a-6p Saturday-Sunday 10a-4p

BENSDOTTER’S PET

940 MAIN STREET, GREAT BARRINGTON, MA 413-528-4940

Upcoming Pet Wellness Events for Pet Owners * May 9, 2015 *

HoundsTooth Non-Anesthetic Dental Cleaning Clinic

* June 21, 2015 *

Understanding the Nutritional Needs of Your Pet

* July 19, 2015 *

An Introduction to Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine

* August 9, 2015 *

A Layman’s Guide to Homeopathic Remedies for Pets All events are hosted at BensDotter’s Pet. With the exception of the Dental Clinic, all events are free of charge, require no advance reservation, and run from 10am to about noon. For more Dental Clinic information, turn the page to see our inside back-cover ad. All event details are available on our website.

www.bensdotters.com

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Our BerkshireTimes Magazine, April-May 2015  

Our BerkshireTimes Magazine is a leading resource for local events, community news, personal growth, and vibrant living in the Berkshire, Ma...

Our BerkshireTimes Magazine, April-May 2015  

Our BerkshireTimes Magazine is a leading resource for local events, community news, personal growth, and vibrant living in the Berkshire, Ma...

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