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[Free] The Glimpse

The Glimpse Claire Merle DOC | *audiobook | ebooks | Download PDF | ePub

#1257687 in Books 2012-06-01Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 7.75 x 5.00 x 1.00l, .0 #File Name: 0571280536432 pages | File size: 57.Mb Claire Merle : The Glimpse before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Glimpse: 0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. A Dystopian "Glimpse" of the futureBy Tams (TTC Books and more)There is a lot going on in this novel; at times I was a little lost in details and dialogue but, I stuck with it and enjoyed it in the end. I was actually surprised Merle was able to keep the story intriguiging with the multiple plots and


characters; it really is a well written novel. Merle will leave you questioning the Mental Health field with this "Glimpse" into her Dystopian London that is completely plausible!I do LOVE the female lead, Ana (Ariana)( a Pure)! She is a no nonsense, smart as a whip, tough cookie. Several of the secondary characters in the book are memorable as well; there is even a teency weency zombie part thrown in there. We know I do love my zombies; Merle's version of these is plausible as well. My interest peeked with the introduction of Cole Winters (a Crazy) He's intelligent, sweet and Musical, like our Ana. There is an attempt at a Love triangle, don't be fooled, anyone that reads this book and thinks there is, is a Crazy!Slow to start but full speed ahead in the end, I give "The Glimpse" 3.5 out of 5 Quills... I'd recommend it to anyone that loves Dystopian Novels. But, that's just my 2 cents!!0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. The Glimpse by Claire MerleBy CustomerI decided to read this book because I was very interested in the concept. It seemed very unique and different than anything that I had ever come across before. The book was a little confusing to me. There was a lot going on in the story and I felt like it could have been explained a little better. Despite the book being a little confusing I still loved this book. It was a great story and I definitely want to read the book that comes after this one. I think that this author has the potential to have a very bright future in the young adult genre. :)1 of 2 people found the following review helpful. A Passable, Albeit Confusing, ReadBy Kat CollinsMy interest in the YA book, The Glimpse by Claire Merle, seesawed the entire time. From bored and wondering if I'll even finish the book, to fascinated, to disbelieving, to disgust, to whew, I finally made it to the end! All things considered, The Glimpse was a decent read.When you read other reviews about the book, there is a huge amount of controversy and disagreement about the subject of the book. As one reviewer on Goodreads put it, "This book is dangerous and disappointing." I disagree.In this dystopian world (2041), society is segregated between the Pures (ie. no genetic markers for mental illness) and the Crazies (ie. people with genetic markers for mental illness), determined by a DNA test that can tell whether people are genetically disposed to mental illness. Many reviewers take issue with the segregation and demeaning terms of Pures and Crazies, as well as using a DNA test to determine if you're a Pure or Crazy. Some reviewers went so far as to say they won't even read the book, but they're offering their uninformed, vilifying opinion anyways.Those who take issue with this book for that reason aren't looking beyond the face of the story. You need to delve deeper. This book isn't truly about mental health illness. The majority of the people who are being segregated are not sick. They only have the potential to be sick. Yes, there are others on the streets who are mentally ill and drugged into zombies, but the truly "crazy" ones and the potentially "crazy" ones are lumped together. It's as though the insane asylums are dumped onto the streets (don't get me started on the book's actual insane asylums! It's like a bad LSD/acid/horror trip).The "crazies" are people the government consider dangerous or problematic. Why? The answer is hard to discern in the book, but from what I can understand, emotion is ugly. To feel is to be crazy. Any sign of tears, anxiety, worry, fear, overt happiness, excitement...take your pick...is a sign of mental illness. Instead, you must wear a mask the whole time, burying your true feelings, lest you're hauled off to the loony bin and deemed "mentally ill." The whole `Pure' vs `Crazies' test is a lie, and the drugs they give to subdue the "crazies," is all about government control. One of the reasons, surprise, surprise, is the influence of big-money pharmaceutical companies.Sound familiar? It should because we're already living in it. We may not be segregated yet, but whose to say it can't happen in 30-40 years? Think of Nazi Germany. If Hitler had been unopposed and allowed to do as he pleased for another 20 years, the world would have been vastly different, and not in a good way. The Nazis used propaganda on an existing prejudice and look what happened (I know, I know...another controversial issue). Anyone who was different from the accepted majority (the "pures") was either ostracized or killed. That all happened in less than a decade. Thirty years isn't so farfetched, especially given the way society treats people with mental disorders.The basic synopsis of The Glimpse is that 17-year-old Ana has been living the privileged life of a Pure due to an error in her DNA test. When the authorities find out, she faces banishment from her safe Community, a fate only thwarted by the fact that she has already been promised to Pure-boy Jasper Taurell (think arranged marriages, binding ceremonies, joining ceremonies, but with a component of love).Jasper is from a rich and influential family, his father is a wellknown owner of a pharmaceutical company for treatment of mental health illness, and despite Ana's supposed potential mental health condition, wants to be with her. The authorities grant Ana a tentative reprieve. If she is joined to Jasper before her 18th birthday, she may stay in the Community until her illness manifests. But if Jasper changes his mind, she will be cast out among the Crazies. As Ana's joining ceremony and her birthday loom closer, she dares to hope she will be saved from the horror of the City and live a `normal' life. But then Jasper tells her he has a big secret, one big enough to kill and die for, and soon mysteriously disappears.Led to believe Jasper has been taken by a strange sect the authorities will not interfere with, Ana sneaks out of her well-guarded Community to find him herself. Her search takes her through the underbelly of society, and as she delves deeper into the mystery of Jasper's abduction she uncovers some devastating truths that destroy everything she has grown up to believe.The story is passable: at times confusing, and other times interesting. I struggled to engage with the characters. Cole was the only one who I found fascinating and rooted for the entire story. In all honesty, I didn't find the book even worth reading until Cole appeared. He brought the other characters to another level. Ana vacillates between being a radical rebel and "Daddy's little girl." Most times, I wanted to smack her upside the head for being annoying and pathetic. Ana's father is intriguing, but we aren't given enough of his character to fully grasp his humanity and why he made the choices that he


did. I would have loved to learn more about him. Jasper is mostly a non-contender. He remains on the peripheral, even when Ana is interacting with him directly. Once Cole is on the scene, it's easy to dismiss Jasper completely.A major pet peeve? There is a moment when the names `Jasper' and' Dr Cullen' are next to each other (Jasper Cullen). I have no idea why there is a reference to Twilight in this book (I know Jasper is not `Cullen,' but still it was a little too close for comfort.) Borrowing names like that is disconcerting, disappointing, and dangerous. You risk the association of that novel with this one (and they're nowhere near similar). Don't borrow (however insignificant) from someone else's fame. It's disrespectful and irritating.The ending of the book was anti-climatic. There is no resolution in any capacity, other than with Ana and Cole (at least I was happy about that). Instead of leaving me excited to read the next book (yes, this part of a two-book series...next one due in June 2013), it frustrated me. I wanted to pitch the book across the room in disgust.The book offered nothing new in the genre, just an easy, albeit confusing, read. However, I think the idea of the mental health illness segregation and control are illuminating and worth pursuing. I just wish Merle had executed it better.Note: The paperback book is not available in the United States (Claire Merle is from the UK), unless purchased from a vendor through . The Kindle version can be downloaded by anyone.I rated the book a "C." For more on my rating scale and other book reviews, visit [...] London, in the not too distant future, and people are now divided into Pures and Crazies, according to the results of a DNA test, with the Crazies sectioned off to live within 'the City.' Until the age of fifteen, Ana has lived amongst the Pures, but her whole world crumbles when she finds out that her DNA test was faked, which makes her one of the Crazies. She has just three years before she will be cast out of the Community . . . But Ana meets Pure-born Jasper and is offered a ticket to freedom when he asks her to Join with him. She looks forward to a 'normal' life, and fulfilling her dreams of becoming a musician. Then, just a week before the Joining ceremony, Jasper goes missing; it appears he is somewhere in the City, and no one knows why. Ana sets off on his trail, which takes her into the pits of the human soul. And as she delves deeper into the mystery of Jasper's disappearance, Ana uncovers some devastating truths that destroy everything she has grown up to believe, but she also learns to love as she has never loved before. About the AuthorClaire wrote her first paranormal screenplay at the age of thirteen and named it after a road sign. Danger Alive never made it to the big screen, but she continued to write and daydream her way through school and university. Claire graduated with a first BA (Hons) in Film Studies, and spent the next few years working in the BFI. She worked as a runner and camera assistant, and fantasised about creating her own films. In 2000, she wrote and directed the short film, Colours, which sold to Canal Plus. Today, Claire is concentrating on writing YA fiction. She spends her time between Paris and London, along with her French husband and two young sons.

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