Page 1

(Online library) The Private Thoughts of Amelia E. Rye

The Private Thoughts of Amelia E. Rye Bonnie Shimko ePub | *DOC | audiobook | ebooks | Download PDF

#1817219 in Books 2010-04-13 2010-04-13Original language:EnglishPDF # 1 8.56 x .91 x 6.38l, .76 #File Name: 0374361312240 pages | File size: 60.Mb Bonnie Shimko : The Private Thoughts of Amelia E. Rye before purchasing it in order to gage whether or not it would be worth my time, and all praised The Private Thoughts of Amelia E. Rye: 0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. TouchingBy Bike RiderThe viewpoint from a child hard to write. Kept me entertained and waiting for the next mystery in Amelia's life to unfold. A great read.0 of 0 people found the following review helpful. Great readBy linda hunter-millarI want more from this author! Love the way she writes. Relatable and straight from the heart. I have gobbled up both of her books in record time for me!0 of 2 people found the following review helpful. The Private Thoughts of Amelia E. RyeBy Leland A. FittsThis a great book, well


structured to take you through the trials and tribulations of a young girl in somewhat less than ideal living circumstances. "All a person needs in life is one true friend."So says Grandpa Thomas, the only member of Amelia's family who cares about her one bit. That true friend finally arrives when Fancy Nelson, the first Negro kid Amelia has ever seen in person, walks into her fourth grade classroom. As Fancy's special sort of magic rubs off on Amelia, she slowly comes to understand her trainwreck family and her place in itand Fancy discovers a surprising secret about her own past. From School Library JournalGrade 46When Fancy Nelson arrives in a small upstate New York town in the mid-1960s, she is just the friend that lonely Amelia Earhart Rye needs. Unlike most residents, Amelia could care less that the newcomer is African-American. Local bullies insult Fancy by cutting off her braids; she then remarks that even kids in Alabama were not so cruel. Although the incident rattles her, she picks herself up and takes pride in a new, short haircut. Meanwhile, emotionally abused Amelia learns how to be strong from her bold new friend. She practices standing up for herself against teachers, cousins, and, finally, her mean mother who never wanted her. Amelia's most significant rebellion occurs when she defies her mother and walks away from the baptismal font at their strict Protestant church. Shimko cleverly uses this transformative moment in Christian religious life to illustrate how Amelia has been reborn, thanks to Fancy's kindness and friendship. She also gives the fourth grader a loving surrogate mother in the character of Margo LaRue, whom Amelia initially hated for running away with Mr. Rye before Amelia's birth. Like most of the characters, Margo has a depth and complexity that unfold at a leisurely pace. This novel is sure to engage readers in search of character-driven stories about friendship.Mary Landrum, Lexington Public Library, KY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.From Booklist*Starred * Anger and hurt drive the first-person narrative of Amelia Earhart Rye, who is also laugh-out-loud irreverent as she describes growing up in a train-wreck family in small-town, upstate New York in the early 1960s. Before Amelia was born, Daddy took off with Margo, the town hussy. Now Margo is back (without Daddy), and she is much kinder to Amelia than harsh Mama is. Loving Grandpa, who really raised Amelia, is incapacitated after a stroke, but Amelia finds wonderful support from her best friend, Fancy Nelson, who is tough, smart, and unmoved by the local prejudice directed against her because she is the colored granddaughter of the town's white judge. Shimko draws all of her memorable characters, including Amelia's unattractive big sister and jailbird brother, without stereotype or sentimentality, even in the conclusion, which brings a surprising turnaround from Mama. Throughout, the narration remains true to the voice of caring, innocent Amelia. When Margo apologizes for running off with Daddy, Amelia doesn't make it easier for her and say that it was OK, because it wasn't. Will Daddy come back and rescue her? The final reconciliation may be a bit too tidy, but the heartfelt, nonpreachy drama of family and friends in hard times makes a great story. Grades 5-8. --Hazel Rochman I loved this book, I couldn't put it down. It was heartwarming and filled with the clarity of innoncence. A real page-turner. Sara Gruen, author of Water for ElephantsThe intricate storylines come together and create a wonderful read. Library Media ConnectionShimko's story is original, and Amelia's distinctive voice and likable nature will have readers rooting for her in times of trouble and cheering her ultimate good fortune. The happy ending is immensely satisfying. Publishers Weekly

THE-PRIVATE-THOUGHTS-OF-AMELIA-E-RYE  

THE-PRIVATE-THOUGHTS-OF-AMELIA-E-RYE

THE-PRIVATE-THOUGHTS-OF-AMELIA-E-RYE  

THE-PRIVATE-THOUGHTS-OF-AMELIA-E-RYE

Advertisement