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timselected dudley works


To me, architecture is a bridge that spans the gap between art and engineering. A truly successful design walks a fine line between the two, and in doing so one discovers a beauty and a harmony in the balance. I approach every design with this philosophy in mind, devoting attention not only to function and form, but to materiality, structure, context, inhabitability, and constructability. Over-reliance on simple structural integrity produces dull and uninviting buildings. Similarly, architecture as pure sculpture is often insensitive to its surroundings and in defiance of its own physical properties. Architecture is design, but it is also construction. In this portfolio are a series of projects - both academic and professional - that hope to find this balance. The cover photo was taken at the opening of ‘Between Spaces’, a 2007 installation and performance piece by artist Wendy Jacob, of which I assisted in the design, installation, and maintenance. The silhouette in the photo is Madeleine Prevost, a professional tightrope walker from Montreal who performed at the installation opening.

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ACADEMIC PROFESSIONAL

4

COVE

6

LEMNOS PDX

Fall 2007, Alan Joslin

Fall 2013, Howard Davis

HIGH 12 WASHINGTON Winter 2013, Amy Miller-Dowell

18 RESADIYE 2007-2008, Jan Wampler 20 STRATA 2016, SolTerra 24 NIWA/ESKER 2015, SolTerra ZAI 26 YAKITORI 2011, Michael Kim Associates

28 SHÕJÕ 2012, Michael Kim Associates RESIDENCE 30 SHARON 2011, Michael Kim Associates

PRE-FAB

SCHOOL 32 HAIGANG 2013, Xian Dai Arch. Design Group

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END MODULAR 34 SOUTH 2008, Dan Chen MODULAR 38 OPEN 2013, Will Macht NEW CITY 42 EXPO 2013-2014 Thesis, Hajo Neis


This design imagines the template of an intimate jazz club as an open-air pavilion in an abandoned quarry near Gloucester, MA. The subject of a one week charette, this waterfront site is naturally enclosed by rising granite cliffs and allows for a harbor to be carved with very little intervention. One of my main motivations was to preserve as much of the natural character of the site as possible. The interior of the club is simply terraced stone stepping down to the waterline. Musicians play on the lowest terrace, a minimal stage barely separated from the audience, with the calm lake serving as their backdrop.

A single curved concrete wall emerges from the water and rises along the existing slope in one gesture to envelop the ‘room’. As it tops the cliff, the form breaks from the ground and terminates skyward, defining an entrance and connecting visually with the floating roof.

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COVE An outdoor music pavilion at Rockport Quarry Fall 2007, Alan Joslin

A canopy free of interior support was the driving design factor. This ‘sail’ roof is achieved by draping a fabric over a bent truss, which is both suspended and anchored by cables from various points outside the pavilion.

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Lemnos Labs, a hardware incubator based in San Francisco, provides mentorship and resources to talented engineers with innovative ideas and a passion for making things. Lemnos helps startups by holding regular formal design reviews and bringing together experts to give feedback at every step along the way. At the end of the six month program, companies will have made enough progress to secure financing and begin selling production hardware.

Urban Design Goals AL SHOWRO USTRI OM IND

INDUSTR

L TRIA IAL INDUS SALMO

N ST RE

TAYLOR S

ET

T R EE T

YAMHIL L

ST R EE

T

Opening facades to industrial showrooms allows regular commuters and visitors to realize what the ESID has to offer. Moving truck traffic to Salmon and Yamhill makes Taylor more inviting for pedestrians.

SITE A continuous street wall enhances pedestrian experiences. Street trees are added where a continuous wall is not possible.

Final vision. Cohesive urban fabric and desirable neighborhood. Plan and implement new developments in available empty lots; development to match the existing fabric.

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Lemnos: PDX is a proposed venture into Portland’s East Side Industrial District (ESID), helping to bring the district into the digital age while preserving the area as an urban sanctuary for manufacturing and industry.

North Facade from Taylor St.

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LEMNOS: PDX

Hardware Incubator in Portland’s Inner East Side Fall 2013, Howard Davis


Program + Massing An existing warehouse on-site is repurposed as shop floor, with an added mezzanine for clean rooms and offices. The perimeter of the block is built out to house the remaining program, with a central courtyard for large scale product testing + fabrication.

Lab spaces are built for flexibility, allowing tenants to add or subtract square footage as their startup grows. A double height + mezzanine scheme allows for visibility betewen levels, with enclosed offices above open workspaces.

Floorplans Bike Room

Galler y

“Bullpen� Open Office

Courtyard

Open to Below

Ground Level

Mezzanine Level

Open to Below

Rentable Lab Space

Rentable Lab Space

CNC Labs

Shop Floor

Rentable Lab Space

Loading

ces

Clean Labs

Wo rk sp a

Storage

Work Yard

Admin. Offices

Lobby Cafe

Wo rk sp a

ces

Upper Levels

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North Elevation

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West Elevation

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The East Facade is where the new addition wraps into and over the school’s historic face. Using modern material elements to echo the interior structural grid, a gradient of overlap is created in which the new ‘dissolves’ into the old. In a practical capacity, the horizontal elements shield gallery entries from rain, while the vertical screens provide shade from the morning sun and add privacy in the unit bedrooms.

Washington High School is a historic 1920’s era building in SE Portland. Unoccupied since 1982, it was recently listed on the National Historic Register. This project envisions a scheme for adapting the school into a sustainable mixeduse residential complex.

MASSING

As the existing building lacks the leasable area necessary to be economically viable, this scheme seeks to densify the property by adding mass in a way that preserves the major facades and distinguishes new from old in order to preserve the historic character and beauty of the original structure. This alteration nearly doubles the residential square footage, with 75% more units, while opening the under-utilized core to bring natural light into the lower levels + basement.

Based on a ‘Hierarchy of Historic Significance’, specific areas of the building were designated for preservation + restoration. In this massing, the North facade along Stark St. and the West main entrance are kept in their original state. New additions wrap around the East and South, with a new modern facade in the East. The southern wing is carved out to create a lightwell and a new courtyard.

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WASHINGTON HIGH Environmental Economic + Community Sustainability Winter 2013, Amy Miller-Dowell

NorthEast Corner at 14th & Stark. Artist shops + galleries open to the street. The main residents entry is just off the corner on calmer 14th Street. The large glass enclosure echoes vertical circulation within.

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LIVE / WORK STUDIOS

RESTAURANT (below)

RES. LOBBY

LIVE / WORK STUDIOS

OPEN TO BELOW

PUBLIC LOBBY

CAFE

NEW MEDIA CENTER INTERPRETIVE EXHIBIT

742 sq ft

COURTYARD MGMT OFFICES

655 sq ft

1,001 sq ft 656 sq ft

Ground Level Plan + Site:

Level 1

A public plaza at the historic west entry connects with a planned adjacent community center. A ground level restaurant anchors the NW corner. Live/Work Galleries open to the north + east. The southern lot is for residents’ parking + gardening.

is mostly public, featuring the main entry, historic exhibits, and the school auditorium repurposed as a film, music + media library. An exterior courtyard carved within the original envelope allows natural light into the central areas.

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580 sq ft

748 sq ft

615 sq ft

700 sq ft

741 sq ft

764 sq ft

919 sq ft 735 sq ft

842 sq ft 734 sq ft

896 sq ft

SITTING AREA

739 sq ft

SITTING AREA

733 sq ft

743 sq ft

COURTYARD BELOW 753 sq ft

653 sq ft

665 sq ft

Level 4 is a typical residential level. Units occupy former clasrooms around the perimiter with large restored corridors on the east and west wings that overlook light-wells. The added mass is distinguished by red walls, with the original building in black.

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656 sq ft

663 sq ft

Live / Work Units As double-height spaces, the live / work studios are filled with ambient northern light from existing 12’ high windows. In the back half of the unit, the floorplate is lowered to create a mezzanine with translucent glazing that faces the southern lightwell.

Sustainability Strategies Light wells are carved into underused sections of the existing building - an open courtyard in the south and an enclosed well in the former back-stage. The original theater skylights have been restored to bring light into the core. This restored roof system also funnels rainwater into a basement cistern for toilet and irrigation use.


Veterans Memorial Colesium (2013) This perspective-section hand drawing is taken from a studio project imagining Portland’s modernist stadium - the former home of the Trailblazers - repurposed as a community aquatic center and public bath.

Early Concept Sketches

The section highlights a large public concourse that connects the old entry plaza (right) to a new Memorial Park along the Willamette River (left). This concourse also divides the recreational pools (shown) from competition pools (not shown). A reconfigured roof directs rainwater through a series of kinetic features and pools into a massive cistern in the Coliseum’s sub-basement.

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I assisted Professor Jan Wampler on this large scale development in the rural village of Resadiye, Turkey. The new village center consists of stores, offices, workshops for local trades, cinema, cafe, library, health facilities, and roughly 80 housing units. My specific responsibilities included resolving the master plan (sketch at right) and the production of site models and CAD diagrams. During a site visit in October, we studied the site features, local design stlyes, materials, and construction methods. We also spent time learning about the local culture and demographics of Resadiye and the surrounding province. From this information we created a design that fit in with the fabric of the village.

The topographic base was fabricated from 2 inch rigid foam using 3D CAD models and a CNC router through a process of my own design. The finished site model was then covered with textured spraypaint. As a result, the site model was both light lightweight and durable, and able to survive a 4,000 mile plane trip.

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RESADIYE A new village for rural Turkey 2007-2008, Jan Wampler

Built into a southern slope, the site is terraced so that each unit has a clear view into the valley to the south. Services along the back of each terrace leave the front edge open to greenspace and pedestrian traffic. Rainwater filters through scattered small pools down into a catch basin where it can be stored as drinking water for the village. Wind mills on the hilltop generate clean power. Programmatically, the northeast corner is the commercial center of the site and a place for residents to gather. Density decreases outward from this node, from multi-family clusters near the plaza to separated private homes at the far western end.

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Located in Portland’s bustling Elliot Neighborhood, this innovative mixed-use building features a distinctive stratified building form inspired by the natural dynamism of eroding rock faces. Strata contains 110 apartments, with ground level commercial spaces and micro-retail kiosks, and a public courtyard with a natural water feature and geometric landscaping. The ‘box’ masses feature brick and vertically oriented windows that lend a humanist character to the building and pay homage to the historic character of Eliot. The ‘strata’ are clad in bamboo composite with a contemporary aesthetic emphasizing movement and change, a nod to the changes present in both the natural world and this rapidly-developing district.

VIEW FROM NE CORNER

MASSING

This LEED Platinum project contains many advanced sustainability features including an extensive greenroof, solar panels, rainwater harvesting, LED light fixtures, and an innovative mechanical systems.

FULL MASSING.

REDUCE. PUSH.

ERODE. STRATIFY.

PIVOT.

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STRATA Nature-inspired urban community 2016, SolTerra

VIEW FROM SE CORNER

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In keeping with our goal goal of bringing nature into the city, Strata integrates a number of unique landscaping features.

  

 

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At the ground level, a public plaza is centered around a landscaped berm that emerges from the ground, transitioning from a lawn at grade with the sidewalk to a raised planter. Seating is built into this landscaped feature that allows for sitting, leaning, and lounging. A rain-powered waterfall, shallow channel, and living wall are metaphorical natural features of a stratified rock formation. The passive water feature is part of the stormwater system, collecting water from the roof during a rain event and channeling it through the courtyard then into subgrade cisterns for future use throughout the building.

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Upper levels feature outdoor terraces for tenant use, and a roofdeck with a salt-water â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hot springâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. Extensive green roof plantings, green walls, and trellis-climbing vines are used throughout.

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TYP. UPPER LEVEL PLAN SOLAR PANELS, SEE ARCH

BAR-HEIGHT COUNTER, SEE C.58

MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT

SHOWER

PLANTER

RAMP, ADA ACCESSIBLE

LEVEL 5 COURTYARD BELOW

EXTENSIVE GREENROOF, TYP

BUILT-IN BENCH, TYP ELEV

SALT WATER SPA, SEE DETAIL GUARDRAIL, SEE C.58 SHALLOW COLD SPRINGS FEATURE, SEE C.58

STAIR

BRIDGE W/ GUARDRAIL, SEE ARCH

AMENITY KITCHEN

SEATING STEPS (6â&#x20AC;? HIGH), SEE C.58 CANOPY ABOVE MOVABLE FURNISHINGS GAS FIRE TABLE, SEE C.58

LEVEL 6 BELOW GROUND LEVEL COURTYARD BELOW

INTENSIVE GREEN ROOF W/EVERGREEN TREES, SEE C.58

ROOF LANDSCAPE PLAN

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MICRO RETAIL

LIVING WALL

PARKING RIGHT-OFWAY AND N WILLIAMS AVE

BERM CONCEPT

COURTYARD VIEW

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Each of these projects, concurrently undergoing development in Seattle, incorporates the ethos of reconnecting cities and nature that SolTerra champions. Esker, in the Capitol Hill neighborhood, mediates the boundary between a dense urban streetfront and greenspace with a series of planted terraces. Niwa, in Queene Anne, takes inspiration from Japanese gardens with a sequence of moss-landscaped internal courtyards. While at SolTerra I helped bring both of these projects through concept development and Early Design Guidance. Both are currently in design development. Images:

(d) (d) (d (c) (c (c)

(a) (b) (c) (d)

NIWA, view North along 1st Ave. NIWA, public walkway with shops and moss gardens Esker, West facing terraces Esker, looking west toward downtown Seattle.

(b) (b

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ECOROOF ECOROOF

ECOROOF

NIWA / ESKER Natural Tranquility in Busy Seattle 2015, SolTerra

ROCK GARDEN

NIWA COURTYARD SCHEME

(a)

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Existing Conditions

Floorplan

Yakitori, japanese-style charcoal grill, is traditionally found in street cafes and railroad depots. Our concept for a formal Yakitori restaurant in a nineteenth century Boston brownstone takes cues from this history. Set in a long narrow unit, our design exploits an inherent linearity to evoke a scene from a mid-century railroad dining car. Low soffits, pendant lighting, and a long bar against the open kitchen serve to elongate the dining room. Natural wood throughout - including a live-edge wood slab bar from relcaimed material - pays further homage to the visual style of pre-war Japan. The result is a modestly clean and warm interior that combines a modern Japanese design sense with a more traditional Japanese palette of materials. This rendering highlights the length and linearity of the new space. Wood elements along the sofďŹ t are adorned with japanese calligraphy.

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YAKITORI ZAI Japanese restaurant in Boston’s South End 2011, Michael Kim Associates

Construction Progress

The charcoal grill is in view of diners, and a copper tile backsplash reflects the vibrant flames.

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The yakitori bar is made of a single live-edge wood slab, while the bar wall is made of reclaimed floorboards from an 18th century Massachusetts house.

The finished restaurant decor, with wow soffits and long linear orientation evokes evokes the atmosphere of a 1930’s Japanese dining car.


Before Renovations

For this pan-Asian bar in the heart of Boston’s Chinatown, we created a minimalist, industrial atmosphere in the space of a former take-out cafe. Deep grey tones, a polished concrete floor, sandblasted brick, false-soffits with backlit frosted windows, and exposed lighting fixtures give this space a ‘well-worn’ feel while maintaining a clean polished look. Reclaimed wood was used to make the benches and tabletops, as well as accent walls. A local artist painted several murals onto the buildings concrete block walls.

After Renovations

My primary responsibilities in this project involved bringing the concept to detail, sourcing materials, and construction administration.

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SHÕJÕ Modern Asian in Boston’s Chinatown 2012, Michael Kim Associates

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Existing Conditions

“Sustainable, Beautiful, Affordable” A commonly spoken phrase in architecture is, “Sustainability, beauty, affordability... pick two.“ This house, a rebuilding of a 1940’s New England ranch on a wooded lot south of Boston, is a modest attempt to achieve all three. A new house built over the existing foundation footprint, our proposal is for a “right-sized” home of around 2200sf that is both energy and space efficient. Structural Insulated Panel walls and roof sit atop the existing concrete foundation.

First Floor

The simplicity of SIP construction helped to inform the design as a minimal yet powerful geometry, with simple, strong masses and materials which recall the nature and equestrian past of the site. This project was designed in collaboration with Next Step Living, a green contractor in Boston.

Second Floor

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SHARON RESIDENCE Sustainable Living in suburban Massachusetts 2010, Michael Kim Associates

The house is well-insulated and will require minimal energy to remain comfortable yearround. An energy recovery system cycles warm air from the upstairs or naturally cool air from the basement as needed to maintain a moderate ambient temperature with very little input from a wood-pellet stove. Water-saving fixtures and recycled materials will be used throughout, including a full-wall hearth made from stone found on-site.

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The campus plan features seven wings, connected by open corridors. The main building (bottom-left) features the lobby, auditorium, and library. Along with the admin. building (top-left) it frames the main entrance. Three academic wings (center) surround interior courtyards. A cafeteria (top-right) and gym (bottom-right) form a buffer between the academic wings and athletic facilities.

As an intern at Xian Dai - one of Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest architecture firms - I joined a team in the Education department for this schematic design subission for a new middle school in Fengxian, a suburb south of Shanghai. The program and massing were largely dictated by the local government client, and rough floorplans had been sketched out by the team. I was charged with the design of the facades and the main entry sequence. An offset arc defines the main entry, with a pedestrian arcade that connects the southern academic and northern administrative buildings and acts as a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;gatewayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to the campus. Vertical wooden louvres shade the library from western sun and define the main entry. Wide corridors along the south edge of the academic wings provide shade and ventilation for the classrooms.

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HAIGANG SCHOOL Competition submission for a new middle school 2013, Xian Dai Architectural Design Group

The West and North elevations show the various screening solutions based on lighting conditions and glazing proportion requirements dictated by Chinese building code. Combining these code requirements with shading and heat gain studies as well as aesthetic considerations resulted in facades that are modern and visually exciting in addition to being functional.

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This mid-rise apartment complex, set at the end of a residential corridor in Boston’s South End, seeks to reinvigorate this underutilized block and act as a punctuation to the vibrant, rapidly-changing neighborhood to its southwest. On an urban scale, the complex steps down from the adjoining building heights to a more human scale via a series of terraces. This serves as a dénouement to the long corridor of development along Washington Street, ‘bowing’ to meet the open park spaces to the north and east. A dramatic cantilever extends over the northeast corner of the site, allowing for a large public plaza that anchors this corner as a monumental space. This project is the first in a number of modular design and prefabrication explorations I studied throughout my undergraduate and graduate education. A series of study models exploring site coverage, massing, and orientation.

(g)

(f)

(e)

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SOUTH END Modular mid-rise residences in Boston 2008, Dan Chen

(a) Clockwise from top: (a) Complex as seen from the north (b) South elevator tower and terraces (c) A dramatic cantilever enlarges the public streetscape (d) Publicly-accessible roof-garden on the east corner (e) A corner terrace overlooks the street (f) The central courtyard is sloped to cover underground parking. (g) Facade articulates the unit layout within

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(d)

(c)

(b)


EXTERIOR / COMMUNAL

7

7

4

7

7

5

7

MAIN LIVING SPACE

CIRCULATION / MECH

PARTI

CIRCULATION

5

6

5 3

5

2

1

Living 1

5

2

3

2

Living 2

2

Master 1

3

3

6

1

6

1

Living 2 (alt)

1

Living 3

2

6

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Hybrid

6

2

Master 2

6

2

Master 3 Bedrooms

A structural grid based on a 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 25â&#x20AC;&#x2122; rectangle forms a matrix into which any of nine modules can be inserted. Each module contains a subset of programmatic elements - living, kitchen, bedrooms, patios, etc. - and any number of modules can be combined in any number of ways to create a single apartment, as shown in the diagram at right. Every module follows the same schematic arrangement, allowing them to be connected without sacrificing space to circulation. This type of universal flexibility allows for potentially infinite customization and personalization without the need to design every individual unit. One, two, and three bedroom units, double-height spaces, and multiple level apartments are all featured in this complex. Unit aggregation examples

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Modular Concept

Modules are arranged within the structural grid of each bar. In this rendering, each module is colored according to use (corresponding to the schematics on the opposite page). The example shown here is one of a hypothetically inďŹ nite number of possible arrangements.

Units are created by grouping two or more modules. This image (colored randomly) shows a possible unit arrangement derived from the module combination above. Voids between units become communal space and egress stairs.

A facade is then applied. Outdoor spaces in each unit combine as random pixels of porosity along the face of the complex. Additionally, certain units are extruded and colored to break the monotony of the facade as well as to hint at the complex geometry within.

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This project, part of a larger class on pre-fabrication and modular development, provides a solution for pre-fabricated infill housing on a generic Portland lot (50’ x 100’). Design criteria requred four units of variable size (from 500sf to 2,000sf), parking, common and private outdoor space, and a $200/sf cap on development cost. The concept - “Open” - is based on a simple box and panel scheme. Floor, ceiling, and core walls are factory furnished with built-in structure and shipped complete. These box modules connect to each other on open sides, and 4’ or 8’ panels complete the enclosure.

MODULAR CONCEPT

This system allows for a wide array of unit arrangements and sizes with a relatively small kit-of-parts, balancing the economy of scale necessary for modular construction with the desire for individuality and identity in private dwelling.

The box dimension is based on a standard shipping container - although the modules are not made of containers - so that units can be shipped via existing infrastructure with no special accommodation.

Module Units are factory-furnished. Core walls (red) are built into the structure, while exterior walls (brown) are built as interchangeable panels.

Boxes connect along open sides to create larger units. 4’ or 8’ wide panels complete the enclosure.

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OPEN MODULAR A pre-fab inďŹ ll housing concept 2013, Will Macht

An array of Panel Styles allow for customization of the facade and a variety of privacy, light, and access depending on the use of each space. A modular fence + gate (top right) are used for exterior spaces.

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Aggregation. Shown are four units, varying from a 512sf studio to a 1600sf 2br townhouse. The modules can stack and overlap in myrad ways, creating courtyards and terraces.

Final Prototype Layout. Interlocking and overlapping units allow for residential density without sacrificing open space on the lot. A front setback allows for four parking spaces, and an asymetric placement on the lot creates a side-yard large enough for residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; use.


KITCHEN

MECH. BATH

F

CL.

CL.

BATH

DINING / LIVING

BATH

1/2 BATH MODULE

BEDROOM 2

BEDROOM

KITCHEN ADD-ON

BATH ADD-ON

MECH.

W/D

HW

F

KITCHEN

PANTRY

BATH CL. LIVING

COURTYARD

LIVING

DINING

ENTRY

LIVING

BEDROOM

W/D

MECH.

BATH

MECH.

HW

OFFICE

CL.

W/DR

LIVING

BATH

BEDROOM F

KITCHEN

BEDROOM

F

DINING

DINING

BATH

BEDROOM

LIVING

COVERED PORCH

CL.

BATH

This Prototype development features a 512sf studio (Orange), 768sf one bedroom (Green), 1152sf two bedroom (Yellow), and 1408sf two bedroom + office (Blue). Each unit features a private entry, private outdoor space, and one parking space.

Level 2

BEDROOM

Ground Level

PATIO

MECH. CL.

BATH

CL.

HW

LANDING

W/D

PANTRY

BATH

KITCHEN

KITCHEN ENTRY

W/D

MASTER BEDROOM

CL.

W/D

BATH

F

KITCHEN

PARKING

CL. ENTRY

CL. MECH.

MECH.

F

HW

PROTOTYPE DESIGN

EXAMPLE MODULES

BEDROOM

F

KITCHEN

STAIR MODULE

CL.

CL.

COMPACT CORE MODULE

BEDROOM 1

COMPACT BEDROOM MODULE

DINING / LIVING

2 BEDROOM MODULE

CORE MODULE

BEDROOM / LIVING MODULE

LIVING

Level 3

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This Thesis research and design proposal, located in Shanghai, China, confronts ‘catastrophic human failure’ on four scales: Global Failure, or “Failure of Environment” addresses the air, water, and soil pollution that has occurred as a result of China’s recent and rapid economic ascent. How can we continue to accommodate China’s economic growth and rapid urbanization while lowering the pollution that results from this growth? Regional Failure, or “Failure of Type”, adresses the hastily planned and poorly built housing developments in modern China. “Tower in the Park” style development ignores the long history of Chinese dwelling culture / neighborhood based community. How can we quickly build housing for an exploding urban population without sacrificing a sense of place, community, and ownership? Local Failure, or ‘Failure of Site’, looks at the former site of the Shanghai Expo2010, located near central Shanghai along the Huangpu River. After relocating over 18.000 families and major industry, and investing billions in the site’s infrastructure development, the area currently sits vacant and derelict. How can we redevelop the derelict Expo site in a way that re-engages the city context to re-grow, re-densify, and regenerate a vibrant urban neighborhood as a prototype + catalyst for future similar development? How can this new city embrace the Expo theme of “Better City, Better Life”? Personal Failure, or ‘Failure of the Worker’, questions the Chinese ‘Hukou' system of household registration, and the culture of internal migrants in the construction industry. How can we create a place for laborers to work-in-place? How can we reform the practice of construction to encourage permanence, community, individual agency, and a sense of ‘ownership’ / pride?

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EXPO NEW CITY ‘Sustainable Living through Modular Building’ 2013-2014, Hajo Neis

RE-GENERATIVE DESIGN STUDIO: Redesigning and Rebuilding Cities, Towns, Neighborhoods, Streets, Buildings and Gardens, Destroyed by Natural Disaster, or Catastrophic Human Failure.

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PROPOSAL A modular system that can come together piece-meal over time as demand calls is a better solution for urbanizing China than the current method of ‘all-at-once,’ top-down, ‘towers in the park’ style development. Rather than simply designing modular units, this proposal is for an assembly facility to be located on-site. As the level of operating energy in a building approaches zero, the embodied energy - from raw material extraction, transport, manufacture, and construction - becomes a larger and larger proportion of a building’s total energy impact. This design addresses primarily issues of embodied energy, material sourcing, and supply chains. Early industrial facilities were located far from population centers because of the pollution and disease that they created. In the 21st century, many of China’s largest industries are no longer “dirty.” Prefabricated construction is especially suited to a low-emissions factory. Such a factory can be easily located close to urban population centers, re-integrating the practice of industrial production with the increasingly ‘white collar’ modern city.

A ‘ Living Building, for prodducingg Livingg Buiildings’

By centralizing production and shipping finished products, this factory also seeks to subvert the practice of migrant labor and Hukou registration. Providing a permanent job will allow many poor rural workers and their families to relocate legally, regaining a sense of permanence, a sense of agency, and a personal reinvestment in their families and neighborhoods. Additionally, by using the manufactured units to rebuild the surrounding neighborhood, the workers will be able to see, and in some cases inhabit, the product of their labor. The laborer gains a sense of pride in their work, and the neighborhood gains a sense of pride in the factory.

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URBAN ANALYSIS SITE OF SHANGHAI EXPO2010 YANGTZE RIVER DELTA

LUJIAZUI BUSINESS DISTRICT OLD CITY THE BUND

CENTURY PARK PUDONG INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Metro Stations

Highways

Pedestrian Ways

Expo Pavilions

45


URBAN DESIGN LANGUAGE

PARTI

UNPROGRAMMED OPEN SPACE

EXPLOITABLE STREETSCAPE

This design is prescriptive, not formal. By establishing a set of rules and a simple parti, this design merely creates the framework in which an urban community can manifest organically (but not chaotically). These design examples are simply a single instance of a number of possible outcomes.

Areas for citizens to ďŹ ll with their own events, culture, and desires. Whether thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a concert, a market, or a protest, the intent is to provide a space that instills a sense of community ownership.

Large sidewalks and plazas provide breathing room for vibrant street activity and allow space for food carts, repair shops, and other street retail seen throughout old Shanghai.

46


UNIQUE SUBNODES

LAYERED PRIVACY

CHAOTIC SPACE

Scattered throughout the larger urban plan, These nodes will vary in scale, location, aesthetic, and specific use, but will all serve the same basic function of providing a local center around which a sense of neighborhood differentiation can emerge.

The most important aspect of a Chinese dwelling is that of layered privacy. These differentiations begin at the scale of an individual unit, but carry through to the scale of building, complex, neighbrhood, and city.

Restored wetlands are treated as â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;urban wilds.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Once the boundary is established, these areas will be left to grow and evolve in the way they might if humans had never existed.

47


BUILDING PLANS

in g + L o a d in g iv Rece

w Ra

Ma

Sto ial ter

G

IN M

A

CEILIN

ELECTRIC / ME CH.

G

p Ramp U

xhib lic E

Public

it

Exhib

Ram

Kitche

BL

Y

live

ry

Rai

LIN

l Li n

e

E

it

Restaurant n

pD o

wn

SH

Pa t i o

y

EA

TH

IN

Sout h Bund --> To Wat erfro nt Park +

G

G

O

O

FL

za

IL

Pla

A

c

ET

P

li ub

D

RI

N

Pub

-IN

A

Entr

FR

U

TI

Y LIT

AIN

EM

B LY L I N E SSEM

M a in

RE

ASS

e rag

M CO

De

SUB

F in is

G

a Pa c k h+

g in g

H + S

t

n IN IPP

lp

de

AD

S h ip p

ock in g D

ING

u Sc

e ur

r Ga

LO

n Me tro Sta tio Mu se um + <-- To Ex po

GROUND LEVEL + CONTEXT

48


Incoming Material

MC

STorage

sub lines

assembly

assembly

FR

framing

courtyard

ORIENTATION

Entr y

PROGRAM MASSING

Core

OPE N TO BELO W

t

ces Of×

Ex hi bi

Adm

in.

f×ce ign O

Pu bl ic

OPE N TO BELO W

ces Of×

O Sales

f×ces

South Cour tyard OPEN TO BELOW

MEZZANINE LEVEL

49

finish

courtyard + waterfront

N OPE TO W BELO

EN OP O T W LO BE

enclosure

main line

Des

rt No

Break

STorage

break

Sort

assembly

assembly

STorage

MATERIAL FLOW

ard r ty ou hC

ITY

PROGRAM + LAYOUT

FRO

greenway + city STorage

ROOF PLAN

OM

t wa

er

fr

on

t


50


MATERIALITY + SUSTAINABILITY SOLAR POTENTIAL 40,000sf of angled PV panels provide up to 360KW of electricity while shading the assembly line and courtyards from summer sun.

PASSIVE SOLAR ORIENTATION Aside from facing south, the offset sawtooth roof is angled to allow direct sun on to the mass walls only in the coldest months. The factory floor is shaded from direct sun, but allowed ample natural daylight from the north. Skylights are punched into the panelized roof as dictated by the lighting requirements of the activities taking place within.

NATURAL VENTILATION Operable windows create stack ventilation to pull hot air out of the factory and draw in cool air from the underground cooling system.

RAMMED EARTH Massive rammed earth walls - made of excavated aggregate from other construction sites around Shanghai - form the major arc, providing enormous thermal mass for both heating and cooling.

DELIVERY BY SUBWAY A spur off the adjacent subway line carries specially constructed cargo trains directly to the factory, removing nearly all truck traffic from the residential streets.

SWAMP COOLER Chilled air from the cooling tubes is pulled through a subfloor lined with boulders and flowing water, which further cool and humidify the air for passive cooling throughout.

COOLING TUBES Buried tubes pull air from the adjacent wetland, through the thermally stable ground, and into the factory subfloor

51


STRUCTURE + TECTONICS

52


53


view more at:

timdudley.net tdudley@alum.mit.edu 978 . 618 . 1349

2016 Portfolio  
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