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KeeptheHabitat IT’S ABOUT FORESTS, PEOPLE AND CARBON PO BOX 2707 DARWIN NT 0801 AUSTRALIA


Message from the Chairman I first visited the rainforests of Indonesia in the early 1990s. The virgin forest’s dark walls of buttressed tree trunks laced with rattans and vines rose more than fifty metres up to crowns in full sunlight where monkeys squabbled in the Meranti’s red-tipped canopies; it was the best Meranti in Indonesia, the World, and the Universe. It was 2007 when I again asked about that magnificent Meranti forest. The answer was shocking – habis – finished! I felt a profound sense of loss. The area had not been completely deforested – the forest cover had not been permanently lost – but roads and tracks had been cut through the forest to selectively harvest the Meranti. These roads now allow illegal loggers to cut and run with the very trees that were left to regenerate the forest. Pressures from an expanding population will push people to follow the roads, and to burn and clear the now degraded forest so they can grow food to feed their families. This is a problem not just for Indonesia but for all forest areas of the developing world. Illegal logging and deforestation are about humanity and existence; any solution must address these demands. The solution must stimulate sustainable forest management and sustainable communities and must touch individual lives. To do this successfully the solution has to be implemented by the very foresters who are trained to manage the forests and the landscapes, and finance for the solution has to address the opportunity cost of timber – the currency of the timber industry. Most important of all, the solution needs to result in increased levels of employment in local communities, needs to support businesses where people are paid to protect the forest from illegal logging, where they can rehabilitate logged-over areas and create a sustainable timber supply for a sustainable economy. The lives of the people who use the forest must be improved by the continued existence of the forest. This was the birth of KeeptheHabitat. The world needs forests – the forests of Indonesia have never been as important as they are now for helping mankind. But right now the forests need the world – they need help from us, the people of the planet. Locally, we can protect and rehabilitate habitats like the best Meranti in the Universe, but we can also have an impact globally because preventing all tropical deforestation will have the same effect on global carbon emissions as all the reductions of the Kyoto Protocol.

Nigel D Turvey Founder and Executive Chairman

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About this Document

Mamuju Habitat is a project designed and managed by KeeptheHabitat. Our aim is to create sustainable forests and enable the development of sustainable and prosperous communities. We plan to do this through the triple synergy of protecting rainforests from deforestation, developing timber plantations and generating electricity from plantation-grown woody biomass. This document provides essential highlights about our Mamuju Habitat on the island of Sulawesi, Indonesia. For more information about Mamuju Habitat or KeeptheHabitat please contact nigel.turvey@keepthehabitat.org

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Headlines

• Mamuju Habitat engages with the new carbon economy to create sustainable forests and sustainable communities through the triple synergy of protecting virgin rainforest habitats from deforestation, developing timber plantations on degraded lands and generating green electricity from plantation-grown woody biomass. • Mamuju Habitat lies on the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia; a biodiversity hotspot. It covers around 1.1 million ha of the Province of Sulawesi Barat and plans to touch the lives of 1 million people by providing employment, stimulating business, funding essential infrastructure and enabling community development in one of the poorest areas of Indonesia. • By stopping deforestation of up to 832,000 ha of virgin rainforest, Mamuju Habitat has the potential to deliver an estimated 24 million tonnes/yr of reduced CO2 emissions for sale in the accredited voluntary carbon market. In the future we expect these to be sold in a regulated REDD market. • Up to 174,000 ha of timber plantations developed degraded forest concessions will enhance the protection of neighbouring residual virgin rainforests from deforestation and provide sustainable wood supplies for new wood processing industries and generation of biomass electricity. • Up to 100 MW of biomass electricity is needed to meet the shortfall of more than 50% unmet electricity demand in the Sulawesi Barat. This can be generated by wood fired power stations using wood fibre from purpose-grown plantations, thinnings from longer rotations and wood waste from new wood processing industries. Biomass electricity has the potential to generate additional carbon credits by avoiding combustion of fossil fuels and using biochar, a by-product of combustion, to improve the productivity of agricultural soils. • Mamuju Habitat has a planned minimum life of 40 years, extendable by agreement up to 100 years. • Mamuju Habitat is a collaboration, structured by KeeptheHabitat, between the Provincial Government of Sulawesi Barat, the Indonesian State-owned Enterprise PT Inhutani I, the Indonesian Ministry of Forestry and the Indonesian Ministry of Stateowned Enterprises, and a consortium of private forest concession holders led by PT Sulwood. • KeeptheHabitat provides project design, governance, oversight of implementation and reporting to stakeholders. We ensure transparency by engaging independent auditors to check project funds, allocate funds based on delivered outcomes, and use independent experts and high resolution satellite imagery to verify progress of projects on the ground.

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Contents

Message from the Chairman

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About this Document

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Headlines

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1 Mamuju Habitat

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2 The Province and the People of Sulawesi Barat

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3 The Forests of Mamuju Habitat

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4 Accreditation

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5 Implementation

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6 Management

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7 About KeeptheHabitat

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1 Mamuju Habitat Mamuju Habitat is about the forests, people and carbon of the Province of Sulawesi Barat on the island of Sulawesi in eastern Indonesia. It is about engaging with the new carbon economy to create sustainable forests and enable the development of sustainable and prosperous communities through the triple synergy of: • protecting rainforests from deforestation • rehabilitating degraded logged-over forests, and • generating electricity from plantation-grown woody biomass.

Mamuju Habitat was launched in August 2008 with the signing of an agreement with the Indonesian State-owned forestry enterprise PT Inhutani I to use their 30,000 ha forest concession in Sulawesi Barat. Since then we have re-designed Mamuju Habitat to encompass the more than 1 million hectares of forests of the Province of Sulawesi Barat while touching the lives of more than 1 million people in one of the poorest regions of Indonesia. By covering all the forests of the Sulawesi Barat, Mamuju Habitat minimises ‘leakage’ of carbon, which happens when deforestation simply moves to a neighbouring area, because all the forests and people in Mamuju Habitat under one administrative structure.

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Stopping deforestation and carbon emissions When fully operational, Mamuju Habitat will protect more than 820,000 ha of virgin rainforest from deforestation resulting in reduced greenhouse gas emissions of up to 24 million tonnes of CO2/year. These reduced carbon emissions will be traded through the emerging voluntary carbon market; after 2012 they may be traded through a scheme of Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) which may be added to post-Kyoto Protocol climate change measures. The revenue from carbon trades will be used to employ people to protect and rehabilitate virgin rainforest areas, fund essential infrastructure and enable the development of sustainable forests and communities; it will provide a direct link between the protection of forests and the prosperity of individuals and communities.

Rehabilitating degraded forest areas Around 174,000 ha of degraded logged-over forest areas in Mamuju Habitat are planned for progressive rehabilitation through enrichment planting and establishment of timber plantations to supply a range of timber products. Timber grown in long and medium rotations will generate a predictable supply of high quality timber for the manufacture of furniture, flooring and house construction. Wood fibre will also be purpose-grown in short rotations as feedstock for wood-fired power stations; this will be supplemented by thinnings from longer rotations and wood waste from wood processing industries. Forest plantations will bring external capital into the Province to create employment in plantation establishment, maintenance, harvesting and transport. The establishment of a reliable and sustainable supply of plantation-grown wood fibre will also underpin investment and employment in new wood processing industries in the Province.

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Generating biomass electricity Green electricity generated from the combustion of purposegrown wood fibre biomass is an enabling investment; it will help meet the shortfall in generating capacity of more than 100 MW needed to supply the 58% of unmet demand in Sulawesi Barat. We also expect that demand for electricity will rise in step with new wood processing industries which will be developed as the forest plantation resource matures; these industries in turn will supply wood waste which can fuel generating capacity. Depending on the combustion method used to produce biomass electricity, the char remaining from the combustion can be ploughed into soils as a soil improver, enhancing nutrient and water retention; it may also qualify as a carbon credit. This biochar can be applied to the soil in the establishment phase of plantations, and can also be provided to local farmers to improve the productivity of their soils.

Synergies These three strategies work together – a triple synergy – creating sustainable forest resources which enable development of sustainable communities and businesses, provide healthy returns to investors and enhance the prosperity of more than 1 million lives. And there is also a synergy among the collaborators and stakeholders in Mamuju Habitat. KeeptheHabitat will implement the project along with our accredited Indonesian service providers PT Empat Delapan Saudara and our project partners; the Provincial Government of Sulawesi Barat, the State-owned forestry enterprise PT Inhutani I in collaboration with the Ministry of Forestry and the Ministry of State-owned Enterprises, and a consortium of private forest concession holders led by PT Sulwood. KeeptheHabitat’s is responsible for project design, implementation and coordination. We work closely with our project partners to resolve the challenges of implementing this innovative three pronged sustainable forest and community development strategy.

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2 The Province and People of Sulawesi Barat Location The Indonesian Province of Sulawesi Barat (West Sulawesi) is a new province created from the western part of the Province of Sulawesi Utara. It comprises 1.7 million hectares on the western coast of the island of Sulawesi, between 0o12’ - 3o38’ South and 118o43’ – 119o54’ East (http://sulbar.bps.go.id/).

Sulawesi Barat

Population and Government The Province of Sulawesi Barat is governed by the Provincial Government and comprises five administrative Kabupaten; Majene, Mamasa, Mamuju, Mamuju Utara and Polewali Mandar. It has a population of more than 1 million people. The largest administrative district, Kabupaten Mamuju, covers almost half of the land area of the Povince and contains around 30% of the population. Implementation of Mamuju Habitat involves working with all levels of government in Sulawesi Barat through the Provincial Government, the Kabupaten or regency, the Kecamatan or sub-regency, the Kelurahan or village level, the Rukun Warga or sub-village level, right down to the Rukun Tetanga at the small community level because these people influence the very individuals who clear and burn the forest boundary to create more arable land.

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Economy Sulawesi Barat is the third poorest of the thirty three provinces in Indonesia. In 2007 the GDP of the region was Rp 6 trillion or around AUD 800 million of which agriculture contributed a little more than half; per capita GDP was Rp 6 million or around AUD 800. The annual budget of the Provincial Government is around Rp 630 billion, or around AUD 84 million.

Infrastructure The dominance of marine transportation reflects the cultural history of the Mandar people. There is one airport at Mamuju with commercial connecting flights to Makassar three times a week using propeller-driven aircraft. Electrical power comes from diesel generators; it is limited, unreliable, expensive and a constraint on regional development. The current supply meets less than half of electricity demand.

Agriculture and Forestry The Province is the highest producer of wetland rice, corn, cassava, sweet potatoes and peanuts in eastern Indonesia. The dominant estate crops are oil palm and coconut palm. The area was once a major timber producer but there are now only three forest concessions in which timber is being harvested and there are no active large commercial sawmills operating in Sulawesi Barat. Harvested logs are now shipped to Makassar for processing. There is very little manufacturing and a small amount of quarrying for limestone.

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3 The Forests of Mamuju Habitat Our Mamuju Habitat covers all the forests of Sulawesi Barat comprising more than 670,000 ha of Hutan Lindung (protected forest administered by the Province) and ten almost contiguous forest concessions totalling more than 430,000 ha (including one adjacent concession in neighbouring Sulawesi Tengah). The concession holders include both private companies and the State-owned enterprise PT Inhutani I. By collaborating with the Provincial Government and the concession holders Mamauju Habitat will protect residual virgin rainforest habitats, rehabilitate degraded forests by enriching planting, and establish sustainable plantations on logged-over areas and degraded landscapes.

Virgin rainforest habitats Conservation International recognises Sulawesi as the core of the Wallacea region, a biodiversity hotspot containing 1,500 endemic plant species, 49 threatened bird species, 44 threatened mammals, and 7 threatened amphibians. Only 15% of the region’s 339,000 km2 still carry virgin rainforest, but our Mamuju Habitat will help preserve and rehabilitate around 1.1 million ha or 20% of those rainforest habitats. Movement of the continents and rises and falls in sea levels over the past 200 million years created this Wallacea Region (Source: Conservation International) unique region of plants and animals called Wallacea. It includes the island of Sulawesi and Nusa Tenggara which lie to the east of Kalimantan, Java and Bali and to the west of the island of Papua/New Guinea. Nineteenth century British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace noted that while rhinoceros, elephants, tigers and new-world monkeys are endemic to the western islands, they are absent from islands to the east, and his name is now used to define the boundary of this important biogeographical region. The Wallacea Region was once connected to the Australian landmass and separated from it in the last stages of the breakup of Gondwana some 120 million years ago. As a result there are links between elements of the flora and fauna of Wallacea and Australia. Mamuju’s dramatic volcanic landscape is dissected into steep forested slopes and inaccessible valleys. The ridges and slopes carry nut-bearing damar trees (Canarium maluensi), nyatoh trees (Palaquium obovatum) which produce a latex known as Gutta-percha, bintangur trees (Callophyllum soulattri) which produce both light-weight durable timber and medicinal products, and the dense dark wood of ebony, kayu hitam (Diospyros rumphii).

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Forests of Sulawesi Barat (concession holders numbered) Legend 1

PT Parakawan (not included)

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PT Inhutani I KSO PT Sulwood (not included)

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PT Sulwood

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PT Zedsko Permai

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PT Rante Mario

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IUPHHKPT Aneka Varia Sejahtera

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PT Hayam Wuruk

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PT Intan Hutani Lestari

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PT Sampaga Utama Sakti

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PT Inhutani I

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PT Palapi Timber

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These forests are home to anoa the Sulawesi buffalo (Bubalus depressicornis), rusa timor the shy deer (Cervus timorensis) and the cat-like Sulawesi giant civet or musang (Macrogalidia musschenbroekii). The marsupial kuskus (Phalanger ursinus) – a close relative of Australia’s kangaroos and wallabies – lives in the forest canopy together with the old-world black macaque (Macaca maura) and the tiny, nocturnal, wide-eyed singapuar (Tarsius tarsier). Solitary Celebes hawk-eagles (Spizaetus lanceolata) soar over the forests searching for prey while pairs of hornbilled burung rangkong birds (Aceros cassidix) nest in fig trees which emerge from the forest canopy. The ayam hutan (Gallus gallus) or native chicken scavenges the forest floor and on sandy river banks of the valley floors the maleo bird (Macrocephalon maleo) digs into the sand to lay and incubate its giant eggs – it is a close relative of Australia’s brush turkey, mallee fowl and scrub fowl.

Rehabilitation of degraded forest areas The objectives of the rehabilitation programme in the forest concessions of Mamuju Habitat are to provide: • sustainable plantation timber products which provide an attractive return for investors • employment in communities to demonstrate the link between sustainable forests and prosperity • new timber processing industries and the green electricity to power them, and • protection of the neighbouring virgin forests from deforestation. The plantations will provide high value timbers for furniture and joinery such as Meranti, Teak and Ebony grown in long rotations, furniture and construction timbers grown in medium length rotations such as Acacia and Gmelina, and fibre for biomass electricity generation from short rotations of Albizia, thinnings from longer rotations and wood waste from timber processing industries. The production of consistently good quality plantation sawlogs and green electricity generated from biomass fuels will stimulate local economies and new businesses in a range of new wood processing industries like the manufacture of furniture, flooring, decorative panels and timber cladding. Biochar, a waste product from firing wood in the production of electricity, will be used to improve the productivity of agricultural soils in the Province. Employment generated by protecting virgin rainforest habitats, establishing, maintaining and harvesting plantations, new wood processing industries and biomass electricity generation, will improve the human condition and bring sustainable prosperity to the people of Sulawesi Barat – sustainable forests and communities.

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4 Accreditation CCBA We plan to gain gold accreditation in the Climate Community and Biodiversity Standard for Mamuju Habitat from the Climate Community and Biodiversity Alliance (www.climate-standards.org).

Voluntary Carbon Standard By adhering to the IPCC 2006 Guidelines and supported by the baseline carbon survey and subsequent monitoring, we plan for VCU (Voluntary Carbon Unit) offsets to be accredited by the Voluntary Carbon Standard (www.v-c-s.org). We plan that these VCUs will be registered in the Voluntary Carbon Standard Association’s VCS Registry and viewed in the VCS Project Database. After 2012 we expect these credits to be sold in a regulated post Kyoto Protocol REDD market (Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation).

Forest Certification It is important for the international success and marketing of products from new wood processing industries which arise from Mamuju Habitat that the plantation forests which supply the timber are accredited. This will be achieved early in the developmental stage of the forest plantation programme through either the Forest Stewardship Council (www.fsc.org) or another suitable forest management accreditation group.

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5 Implementation Project Plans KeeptheHabitat implements Mamuju Habitat through three plans; the Habitat Protection Plan, the Habitat Rehabilitation Plan and the Community Plan. The plans are implemented under a legally binding detailed Service Agreement between KeeptheHabitat and its Indonesian partner PT Empat Delapan Saudara, as well as the forest concession holders and the Provincial Government.

Habitat Protection Plan The Habitat Protection Plan defines the geographical area, resources, expertise and methods to protect the virgin rainforest from illegal logging and fire. The Habitat Protection Plan is implemented by: • immediate cessation of illegal logging and clearing of vegetation • assignement of personnel and resources to prevent illegal logging and poaching now and for the future • satellite monitoring for illegal activities • delivery of education programmes for wide support of forest protection • employment for communities in forest protection • application of forest management methods to minimise other forms of disturbance, especially fire, and invasive species • satellite mapping of forest boundaries and forest cover, and on-ground assessment of standing biomass and carbon • scientific assessment of forest habitats and biodiversity, especially endangered and threatened species, and • regular monitoring and progress reports on implementation of the Habitat Protection Plan.

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Habitat Rehabilitation Plan The Habitat Rehabilitation Plan defines the area, time frame and methodology for rehabilitating both logged-over and degraded forests in the project area. The Habitat Rehabilitation Plan is implemented by: • delimiting areas of logged-over and degraded forest habitats • planning the types of plantings, their locations and rates of establishment • building on the scientific assessment established in the Habitat Protection Plan • educating and training new workers in rehabilitation techniques • stimulating local businesses to provide contract services • establishing local nurseries for replanting with indigenous species or others as appropriate • utilising enrichment planting techniques where appropriate • replanting in fire affected and degraded forest areas • applying expert methods for protection of endangered and threatened species • satellite monitoring of progress of rehabilitation, and • regular progress reports on implementation of the Habitat Rehabilitation Plan.

Community Plan The Community Plan defines the needs, projects, community infrastructure and priorities of local forest-dependent communities. The Community Plan is implemented by providing: • expert assessment of locations, populations and profiles of affected communities • community consultation to establish needs and priorities including health, education and the environment • support for local business development and employment to stimulate a sustainable local economy, e.g. ecotourism, non timber forest products such as rattan, flowers, forest fruits and medicinal products, etc. • support for education, skills development, training and scholarships • support for research to improve project designs and outcomes • local employment in implementation of the Habitat Protection and Habitat Rehabilitation Plans, and • regular reports on implementation of the Community Plan.

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6 Management KeeptheHabitat KeeptheHabitat will provide governance oversight of Mamuju Habitat and management of planned activities on behalf of investors. We will provide: • in-country management, monitoring and reporting • oversight and reporting of project expenditure and activities • independent auditors to monitor and report on financial management and accountability • monitoring of forest status and reduced carbon emissions • satellite imagery to monitor and record habitat protection and rehabilitation • technical support for establishment and silviculture of forest plantations, and • oversight and reporting of project implementation on the ground. The capabilities of KeeptheHabitat will be supplemented by specialist staff recruited to oversee technical details of carbon monitoring and development of the plantations programme.

PT Empat Delapan Saudara PT Empat Delapan Saudara (EDS) is governed by an agreement with KeeptheHabitat to: • enter into agreements in Indonesia on behalf of KeeptheHabitat, and • implement the plans designed by KeeptheHabitat, and • monitor and report to KeeptheHabitat on the progress of Project Plans on the ground. EDS was established in 2007 by Ir Julius Djohan and Dr Nigel Turvey to bring Australian technology to the Indonesian rural sector industries including sugar, rice and timber plantations. Other Directors of EDS are Ir A.A. Malik and Ir Bacelius Ruru. Ir Julius Djohan has wide experience in both operational and commodity trading in the oil palm, sugar and rice industries of Indonesia. He is also a private service provider to the Ministry of State-owned Enterprises (BUMN). Ir A.A. Malik was formerly President Director of the State-owned forestry company PT Inhutani II and is currently on the Secretariat of the Plywood Association of Indonesia (APKINDO). He has very strong links within the Ministry of Forestry and has a long and well respected history in the forest industries of Indonesia. Dr Nigel Turvey and Ir Bacelius Ruru are also Directors of KeeptheHabitat.

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PT Inhutani I PT Inhutani I (www.inhutani1.co.id) is a State-owned forest management company operating under the supervision of its shareholder, the Ministry of State-owned Enterprises (www.bumn-ri.com) and the Ministry of Forestry (www.dephut.go.id). It manages forest harvesting operations in a total of 525,000 ha of natural forest and manages 66,000 ha of forest plantations predominantly in East Kalimantan, as well as being involved in twenty additional forest plantation joint venture companies. The company operates wood-working industries in West Java, East Java and East Kalimantan and an eco-tourism facility at Bukit Bangkirai near Balikpapan in East Kalimantan. Inhutani I’s involvement in Mamuju Habitat is as the founding forest concession partner with its 30,000 ha Mamuju concession. The President Director of Inhutani I is Dr Ir Irsyal Yasman.

PT Sulwood Sulwood Group (indonetwork.co.id/sulwood_group) is Sulawesi’s largest integrated forestry company. It manages 75,000ha of forest concession and 15,000ha of forest plantations on the island. Its processing industries include a sawmilling production capacity of more than 50,000 m3/yr, a woodworking production capacity of 20,000 m3/yr, a kiln drying capacity of 20,000 m3/yr and a charcoal industry with capacity of more than 3,000 m3/yr. Since 1996, Sulwood Group has served the timber market and managed a total of 290,000ha of forest concessions. Sulwood Group’s involvement in Mamuju Habitat is as coordinator of private forest concession holders involved in the project. The Chairman of Sulwood Group is Salahuddin (Annar) Sampetoding. Its Vice President, Muhammad Aaron Sampetoding, is coordinating the group’s activities in Mamuju Habitat.

PT Sultani PT Sultani is a joint venture (in the process of incorporation) between PT Empat Delapan Saudara and PT Sulwood. Its objective is to implement a portion of the forest plantations programme of Mamuju Habitat.

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7 About KeeptheHabitat Our Vision Tipping the Balance in Favour of Sustainable Rainforests Habitats and Communities.

Our Mission To create collaborative, real-world solutions to combat deforestation, and promote forest rehabilitation working with businesses, communities and governments.

Our People Dr Nigel Turvey BSc, MSC, PhD, FAICD – Founder and Executive Chairman For more than thirty five years Nigel has navigated a path through education, plantation forestry, agribusiness and biotechnology. His career has spanned academic and research institutions (University of New England, University of Melbourne), large and small publicly listed companies (Shell, Amcor, ForBio), unlisted public companies (Sylvatech, GRO Securities), small private companies (Fortech, Greenfield Resource Options), and joint venture businesses in south-east Asia (Shell Forestry Nusantara, Monfori Nusantara with Monsanto in Indonesia). Nigel’s professional background is as a forester specialising in plantation silviculture and as a soil scientist. A period managing the development of forest plantations on Imperata grasslands in South Kalimantan for Shell International Petroleum Company introduced him to the rainforests of Borneo where he felt he should and could do something to slow the rate of loss of its ancient forest habitats – KeeptheHabitat is the result. Nigel grew up in London and gathered degrees from the New University of Ulster, University of Papua New Guinea, and the University of New England. He is an Adjunct Principal Research Fellow in the School for Environmental Research at Charles Darwin University, a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and an awardwinning author.

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Mr Bacelius Ruru S.H., LL.M – Deputy Chairman Bacelius Ruru, formerly Chairman of the Indonesian Stock Exchange (2001-2008), has a long career in senior positions in the Indonesian Ministry of Finance, including Head of the Legal and Public Relations Bureau, Chairman of the Capital Market Supervisory Agency (BAPEPAM), and Director General of State-owned Enterprises. He held a number of senior positions in the Ministry State-owned Enterprises, including Secretary of the Ministry, after it was split from the Ministry of Finance. Bacelius has also held the positions of Chairman of the Jakarta Initiative Task Force, and is currently Executive Secretary of the National Team for the Enhancement of Exports and Investments. In addition, he is also Chairman of PT Perusahaan Pengelola Asset, Chairman of PT Tuban Petrochemical Industries, Chairman of PT Jababeka Tbk, Chairman of Polychem Indonesia, and Member of the Board of Executives of Saint Carolus Association. Bacelius was born and raised in Kakaskasen, North Sulawesi, and graduated from the University of Indonesia majoring in International Law and Corporations and also from Harvard Law School with LL M Degree majoring in International Law, Corporations and Foreign Investment.

Ms Tricia Caswell BA BEd FAIM – Executive Director Habitats and Communities Tricia is best known as an advocate and practitioner of environmental sustainability, particularly in the forestry sphere. She is currently a Board Member of the PNG Sustainable Development Program Company in Papua New Guinea. During her career, Tricia has held the diverse positions of Executive Director of the Australian Conservation Foundation, Executive Director of Plan International Australia (an aid and development organisation), Founding Executive Director of The Global Sustainability Institute at RMIT University, Melbourne, and Chief Executive Officer Victorian Association of Forest Industries. Tricia was a teacher at secondary, TAFE and tertiary levels before she became Secretary of The Technical Teachers’ Union of Victoria, an elected Industrial Officer of the Victorian Trades Hall Council, and a member of the ACTU Executive. She is also a former member of The National Council for UNESCO, the Australia Council, RMIT University Council, the Board of Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park, the International Assurance Group for The Mining and Minerals for Sustainable Development Project, and was Chair of Circus Oz. Tricia was born and raised in Brisbane and graduated from the University of Queensland. She followed post graduate studies at the University of Western Australia and Latrobe University. She is a member of AICD, a Fellow of AIM, a Fellow of IPAA, and recipient of the 1996 Inaugural Australian Medical Association’s President’s Award for leadership in environmental advocacy, the 1998 Victorian Trades Hall Council’s Award for Service and received two scholarships to the USA.

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Mr Wimar Witoelar BS MS MBA – Executive Director Media and Communications Wimar is best known as a journalist, a socially concerned commentator on Indonesian public affairs, and host of the television talk-show Perspektif; activities which resulted in political isolation and detention by the Suharto government. Later, Wimar was recruited as Chief Presidential Spokesman for reformist President Abdurrahman Wahid. As a journalist, Wimar has been published widely in Time, Newsweek, The International Herald Tribune, The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Straits Times, the Sydney Morning Herald and the Australian Financial Review. Wimar is Adjunct Professor in Journalism and Public Relations at Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia and has published five books. Wimar founded the first privately owned Venture Capital Company in Indonesia and holds the Chairmanship of the Subcommittee on Venture Capital at the Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry. His company, InterMatrix, provides media and public relations services as well as event organising. Wimar was born in Padalarang, West Java, educated in Bandung and graduated from George Washington University in Washington D.C.

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