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Published by Tilston Phillips Magazines Limited

the best of

Suffolk the informative glossy guide to the region

£3.50

Published by Tilston Phillips Magazines Limited

JULY 2010 – JUNE 2011

The GOURMET’S GUIDE to eating out SUFFOLK’S GREAT OUTDOORS

FESTIVALS, EVENTS & local FOOD PRODUCERS

JULY 2010 – JUNE 2011

We supply an extensive range of glass, ceramic and natural stone wall and floor tiles. Our showroom has a comprehensive display with the majority of products being exclusive in our region. To complement the quality of our tiles we also supply the very stylish range of Bisque radiators and are the main Ultima dealer for the wonderful Roca bathroom sanitaryware.

FOXWOOD exclusive ceramic, glass & natural stone tiles

Ipswich: 01473 717717 www.foxwoodceramics.co.uk

your annual A-Z guide to this unique county


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welcome to Suffolk

All Year Farmers Markets

Beccles Beccles Heliport First and third Saturday of every month 9am-1pm Easton Farm Park Fourth Saturday of every month 9am-1pm Halesworth Holton Village Hall Second Saturday of every month 9am-1pm Hoxne Artisan Market Second Saturday of every month Local Produce, Art, Crafts and Café. Hoxne (St Edmund’s) Village Hall, 10am-2pm Lavenham Village Hall Fourth Sunday of every month 10am-2pm Long Melford Village Hall Third Saturday of every month 10am-1pm

Needham Market Alder Carr Farm Third Saturday of every month 9am -1pm Snape Maltings Riverside Market First Saturday of every month 9.30am-1pm Southwold The Conservative Club Hall Fourth Saturday of every month 9am-1pm Stanton Wyken Vineyards Every Saturday 9am-1pm Sudbury St Peters Church Last Friday in the month 9.30am-2pm Jimmy’s Farm Wherstead First Saturday of every month 9am-1pm Woodbridge Community Centre Second and fourth Saturday of every month 9am-1pm

August 1 August British Open Crabbing Championship An annual event for children of all ages held in Walberswick from 2pm onwards explorewalberswick.co.uk 7 August Kesgrave Music Festival Community Centre Fields Kesgrave Tickets £5 under 15’s free kesgravemusicfestival.com 28 July-29 August Theatre in the Forest A Midsummer Night’s Dream Rendelsham Forest until 29th August 01473 288886 theatreintheforest.com 14-16 August Aldeburgh Carnival and Regatta aldeburghcarnival.com 21-22 August Victorian Garden Party Kentwell Hall 11am-5pm. Under 5s free kentwellhall.co.uk

20, 23, 25 August Grusome Grave Tour – Summer Holiday Sutton Hoo 2-3pm Children are invited to a special tour of the burial mounds - don't forget to bring an adult. Places are limited to 30 people per tour so please arrive early and book on the day. Tranmer House, Sutton Hoo, Woodbridge, Suffolk IP12 3DJ 01394 389700 21-22 August Beccles Carnival Family Fun Weekend Friday Evening Fun Fair only Saturday 12.00am till 6.00pm Sunday 1.00pm till 6.00pm Free Admission both days but donations welcome Monday afternoon and evening Fun Fair only Beccles Quay, Fen Lane, Beccles, Suffolk Suffolk NR34 9BB becclescarnival.co.uk

events calendar 2010/11 w w w. b e s t o f s u f f o l k m a g a z i n e . c o . u k

Photo: Kate Barclay

21 August Charity Fishing Match One rod and up to 3 hooks allowed each person. Prize for first, second and third biggest fish. In aid of Lowestoft and District Mencap Society. 12 noon to 5pm. £5.00 each entry free. The South Pier, Lowestoft Suffolk NR33 0AE


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events calendar 2010/11

29 & 30 August Eye Show & Country Fair Fun for all the family! RAF Red Arrows, Welsh Horse Musical Ride, Mega Mini’s Stunt Team, Lawn Mower Racing Event and much more! Live stage music acts included in ticket price. Free Parking. Sunday - Adults £9, Children £4.50, Family Ticket £25: Monday - Adults £10, Children £5, Family Ticket £27. Goodrich Park, Palgrave, Suffolk IP22 1AX eyeshow.org.uk 30 August Summer Bank Holiday Fun Three flying demonstrations of wonderful Owls & other Birds of Prey, Jenny’s Ark Pet Zoo and Punch & Judy all for your entertainment & delight! The Suffolk Owl Sanctuary, Stonham Barns 01449 711425 SEPTEMBER 4 September Yoxford-Oxfayre 2010 This year Yoxford-Oxfayre will be celebrating it’s 19th year! 12 noon until 5pm Free entry. Village Hall, Old High Road, Yoxford Suffolk IP17 3EP

4 September Long Melford Book Fair 28 exhibitors offering a wide range of secondhand, out of print and collectable books for sale. Often also postcards and ephemera. Home made refreshments available. Free parking 10am to 4pm. Admission: Adults £1.00, accompanied children under 15 free Memorial Hall (opp Bull Hotel), Long Melford Suffolk CO10 9LQ missingbookfairs.co.uk

4 September - 4 October Suffolk Open Studios The Autumn Exhibition Kesgrave Arts, 83 Main Road, Kesgrave, Ipswich IP5 1AF

3-5 September Autumn Garden Show The Spring and Autumn Garden Show Trinity Park Ipswich trinityparkevents.co.uk 5 September Seventh Annual Art on the Prom Felixstowe Free contemporary Art Fair artontheprom.org

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Photo: Kate Barclay

5 September Monksfield House - Open Garden for NGS Two acre plantsman’s garden comprising cottage style planting, formal parterre, meadow with native orchids.. Bog garden with alpine planting and waterfall. 1/3-acre woodland with tranquil walks. Exotic plant collection Admission £3.50, Children free. 11am-5pm. Monksfield House, Monk Soham Suffolk IP13 7EX

9-12 September Heritage Open Days Woodbridge Tide Mill The c18th tide mill is an icon of Woodbridge and stands on the Town Quay with commanding river views. heritageopendays.org.uk 11 September-3 October Artworks 11th Annual Exhibition Blackthorpe Barn, Rougham, Bury St Edmunds. Original art by East Anglia’s leading artists. Free admission. Open 10am-5pm daily. artworksinfo.org.uk

11 and 12 September Harvest at Jimmy’s The Festival of Food and Music Jimmy’s Farm, Pannington Hall Lane Suffolk IP9 2AR harvestatjimmys.com 19 September Autumn Plant Sale Helmingham Hall 10.30am-4.00pm Plant lovers are invited to bring their plant problems and apple queries to the autumn plant fair. 01449 736358 Helmingham Estate Office, Helmingham Stowmarket IP14 6EF 24 September-9 October Aldeburgh Food & Drink Festival 2010 Over 70 exhibitors showcasing organic vegetables, fresh and smoked fish, rare breed meat and game, cheeses, frozen yoghurt, jams, beer, wine and lager Snape Maltings Nr Aldeburgh Suffolk IP17 1SR “Trout on a Plate” by Bernard Cheese


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fun days out for family and friends

OCTOBER 2 October Weekend Wildlife Walk Join us for a seasonal weekend walk to look for breeding birds, butterflies, dragonflies and a host of other wildlife highlights that may be present at the time (not suitable for children under 8) RSPB Minsmere nature reserve 9.30 am (3-4 hours) Adults £7, RSPB members £5, children £3.50. 01728 648281 2 & 3 October Ploughs to Propellers Forties Weekend Over 200 aircraft expected to visit, “Forties Cars”, re-enactments with military vehicles, vintage tractors and weekend ploughing, large & miniature steam engines, trade stalls, craft fair and catering units. Adults: £7 Concessions: £5 Rougham Airfield The Estate Office Bury St Edmunds Rougham Suffolk IP30 9LZ

e

11 October Vineyard Discovery Day 11am - 4pm Explore Ickworth’s vineyard with a self guided trail. See where the grapes are grown for the award-winning Ickworth wines. Includes wine tasting. Wear stout

shoes and waterproofs. Adult £3.50, child 50p. Park admission applies. Ickworth House, The Rotunda, Bury St Edmunds Ickworth Suffolk IP29 5QE 24 October Nelson Events Antique Fair Newmarket Racecourse with over 200 covered stands plus external dealers, a wide range of antiques, art deco and collectables will be available. nelsonevents.co.uk/newmarket NOVEMBER 5-7 November Art Craft and Design Show 2010 Millennium Grandstand Rowley Mile Racecourse Newmarket artcraftdesignshow.co.uk

27-28 November Christmas at Blackthorpe Barn A great place for unusual Christmas presents. Craft Market Weekends 4th-5th & 11th-12th December Rougham Bury St Edmunds IP30 9LZ blackthorpebarn.com DECEMBER 4 December Lavenham Christmas Craft Fair This annual event showcases some of the highest quality, genuine crafts in the region & breathes new & exciting life into the craft market. Free admission. Full disabled access. Free Parking. Lavenham Village Hall, Church St, Lavenham Suffolk CO10 9SQ

2011 4 December Southwold Christmas lights switch on Southwold High St, Suffolk 4 & 5 December Jimmy's Farm Christmas Festival (10am - 4pm) Jimmy's Farm, Pannington Hall Lane Ipswich IP9 2AR. 01473 604206

27-29 January Dr Jekyll & Miss Hyde A pantomime by the Debenham Players All performances take place at 7.30pm with a matinee on Saturday at 2.30pm. Gracechurch Street, Debenham, Suffolk IP14 6BL debenham-players.org.uk

events calendar 2010/11 w w w. b e s t o f s u f f o l k m a g a z i n e . c o . u k

Photo: Kate Barclay

5 December Father Christmas Father Christmas arrives by boat at 4.30pm! Mill illuminated at dusk. Presents for all children. Mill open at 3pm. Father Christmas arrives at 4.30pm Pakenham Water Mill, Mill Road, Pakenham, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. IP31 2NB Suffolk IP31 2NB pakenhamwatermill.co.uk


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walktastelookenjoyfunseetodo

FEBRUARY 27 February Sleeping Beauty Performed by The Russian State Ballet & Orchestra of Siberia Box Office on 01473 433100 Ipswich Regent St Helens St Ipswich

30 May Long Melford Open Gardens Lovely gardens to see within the village of Long Melford. Plant sales and refreshments at various gardens. Funds raised helping Holy Trinity Church, Long Melford. 10.00am-5.00pm £4 adult, children free. Village of Long Melford CO10 9DT Suffolk CO10 9DT

Suffolk Festivals

JUNE

15 May Crow’s Hall Country Fayre A traditional country fayre with lots of attractions for all the family with over 60 craft stalls and craft demonstrations 1pm-6pm. Admission £2.00, plus £1 to go around the garden. Under 16 free. Crow’s Hall, Debenham, Stowmarket, Suffolk IP14 6NG onesuffolk.co.uk/CrowsHallCountryFayre

1-2 June Suffolk Show at Trinity Park The Suffolk Show Weds 1st & Thurs 2nd June 2011 Visitors can enjoy showcase displays, a wealth of interactive 'have a go' exhibits, a vast array of animals and some high quality, great value shopping. The Suffolk Show is a great day out for all the family, whatever the weather. Trinity Park, Felixstowe Road, Ipswich, IP3 8UH. suffolkshow.co.uk

High Tide Festival hightide.org.uk

Latitude latitudefestival.co.uk

Bury St Edmunds Festival buryfestival.co.uk

Harvest at Jimmy’s harvestatjimmys.com

Pulse Festival pulsefringe.com

The Aldeburgh Poetry Festival thepoetrytrust.org/festival_events_links

Aldeburgh Festival aldeburgh.co.uk

festivalssuffolk.com Full festival and events listings and a virtual ticket shop with links to the relevant booking pages on partner sites, as well as relevant local information for visitors.

Ip Art Festival ip-art.com The Newmarket Festivalnewmarketracecourses.co.uk

All details correct at time of going to press

Photo: Kate Barclay


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State of the art appliances

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Ever changing and improving appliances to add value, style and efficiency to any kitchen

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Wolf Miele Sub Zero Neff Gaggeneau Britannia Fisher & Paykel Zip/Quooker Boiling Taps Quotations for any market appliance on request Call into our showroom to see these iconic designs. Our fully trained

Official government fuelconsumption consumption figuresmpg mpg(litres (litresper per100km) 100km)for forthe the Mercedes-Benz Mercedes-Benz range: urban urban 11.7(24.1)-53.3 Official fuel figures range: government    (5.3), extraurban urban23.2(12.2)-74.3(3.8), 23.2(12.2)-74.3(3.8),combined combined 17.1(16.5)-64.2(4.4).CO2 CO2 emissions: emissions: 392-116 392-116 g/km. g/km. (5.3), extra 17.1(16.5)-64.2(4.4).       *Average based customerservice servicefeedback feedback fromService Service Eventsheld heldatatthe theMercedes-Benz Mercedes-Benz retailerabove abovebetween between11January January2009 2009and and 31 31 December December 2009. 2009. *Average based onon customer from Events retailer

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the best of Suffolk w w w. b e s t o f s u f f o l k m a g a z i n e . c o . u k

Welcome to

the best of Welcome to the eighth issue of Best of Suffolk Magazine. We hope that this edition will continue to offer an engaging insight into what makes Suffolk the great county that it is. For those of you that are new to the magazine, it offers a succinct visitors guide to the best villages and towns, and highlights some of the key attractions and aspects of the region that no visitor should miss. Enjoy all that the best of Suffolk has to offer...

Many of you may already know that in July last year, the magazine's founder Janette Phillips, sadly died. Deanna and I were very honoured to be approached by Tony, her husband, to merge our companies to continue her publishing vision. Janette was a gifted and well respected publisher and possessed the ability to develop both The Best of Suffolk and The Best of Norfolk in a competitive industry through a dedicated and highly personal approach. She earned the respect of many and it is our hope, as the new publishers, we will continue to build on her success and annually bring you an exciting and informative publication. Suffolk is indeed a glorious place with a wealth of fascinating elements. Its flat coastal topography and undulating inland geography lends itself to exploration. Where to start? the villages and towns, the forests, the sea? There is

so much to discover and so much to enjoy! For us who live here, its obvious what a magical place it is, timeless yet evolving; where there's always a newfound location or experience awaiting. In compiling this year’s issue we have been enormously impressed with the breadth of what is new to explore. This year, for example, we have included a dedicated section on Suffolk Food Producers. As you travel around you'll notice that the county has an abundance of local food. There are numerous farm shops and delicatessens and a disproportionate number of independent butchers, fishmongers and pick-your-owns. They are well worth a visit. You'll also find superb local produce widely available on the menus of pubs and restaurants throughout the county, in a display of local ingredients that links the sea, the soil, wildlife, livestock and, most of all, its people.

View the digital edition of this and other magazines at

w w w. t i l s t o n p h i l l i p s . c o m

Jonathan Tilston Publisher

As Janette observed in a previous issue: "It's the marvellous blend of nature and civilisation that makes Suffolk such an irresistible magnet for visitors and for the many who move here to make a home with a superb quality of life, whether they are young families starting out with their children or perhaps older people retiring here and rediscovering a new energy in their lives.� We very much hope you enjoy this latest edition and, as previously, we warmly invite your feedback and suggestions for future magazines. With very best wishes and thanks to all our contributors and advertisers, all of whom are indispensible in making the magazine the success it is.


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the best of

Suffolk

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outdoors

fashion interiors Contents 2010/11 A–Z of SuffolkTowns 11 13 15 17 19 20 23 26 29 30 34 39

6

Aldeburgh and Thorpeness Beccles Bungay Bury St Edmunds Debenham Felixstowe Framlingham Hadleigh Halesworth Ipswich Lavenham, Kersey and Monks Eleigh Long Melford, Cavendish and Clare

Tilston Phillips Magazines Limited

43 45 49 51 53 55 56 59 62 65 67 68 74

Newmarket Orford Oulton Broad and Lowestoft Snape Southwold Walberswick, Blythburgh and Dunwich Woodbridge Yoxford, Sibton and Peasenhall Across the borders East Bergholt, Flatford and Dedham Secret Suffolk The great outdoors Heritage coast

75 77 79 86 94 101 105 113 116 118 121 130

Market towns Pen and paintbrush Interiors Gourmet’s guide Local food producers The best of the region pub guide The best of Suffolk shopping Beauty Products Why choose Suffolk Suffolk Festivals The best of Suffolk independent education Literary Suffolk


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the best of Suffolk

www.bestofsuffolkmagazine.co.uk

fashion walktastelookenjoyfunseetodo shopping goodfood weekendretreats

eatingout

Portrait of an Acrobat, Mixed Media by Bruer Tidman

pampering

galleries

relaxing outandabout

take a diverse look across the region with us and find the best of Suffolk Publisher Jonathan Tilston Tilston Phillips Magazines Limited

Photography Contributors Kate Barclay Tony Pick (main cover image, generic version only) www.coastalimages.co.uk

Managing Director Deanna Tilston Sales Executive Alistair Moon 07732 468797 Design Chris Saunders Paul Cox Photography Nick Ilott Tony Pick Emma Kindred Editorial Contributors Choose Suffolk, Suzanne Richardson, HC Alexanders, Trulock and Harris, Polly Robinson, Suffolk Book League, Orwells Furniture, Claire Holmes

All rights reserved. Reproduction, in part or in whole, without the prior consent of the publisher is strictly prohibited. The content of this magazine is based on the best knowledge and information available at the time of publication. All times, prices and details of events were correct at the time of going to press. The views expressed by the contributors are not necessarily those of the publisher, proprietor, or others associated with its production.

With special thanks to: All advertisers ŠTilston Phillips Magazines Limited, 2010

We welcome your information and comments. Please send to: Tilston Phillips Magazines Limited 141 Norwich Road, Ipswich IP1 2PP Tel: 01473 286155 Email: sales@tilstonphillips.com

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A to Z of of Suffolk Towns


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Great Days Out Refresh and rejuvenate your body and mind by escaping to the revitalising experiences that Suffolk has to offer in abundance.

I

t is time to simply relax. Our many independent hotels have sumptuous furnishings and character by the bucket-load, our cosy cottages present a home-from-home experience and our B&Bs provide a warm and friendly welcome. Situated off the A12 in 120 acres of historic parkland sits Ufford Park Hotel, Golf and Spa; the perfect place to unwind. Ufford Park has a fullyequipped health club including deck level pool, soft Sauna, Aroma Steam Room, Thermal Suite Spa Hydro Pool, Mineral Grotto, and Relaxation Zone. However, if you feel like doing something more strenuous, Ufford Park offers one of the top golfing venues in the East of England, including an 18-hole, par 71, championship golf course and 27-hole putting green. Nestled in the beautiful rolling Constable countryside lies Stoke-ByNayland Hotel, Golf and Spa resort. Consisting of two championship 18-

hole courses and a superb spa and leisure centre, it is fast becoming one of the most sought-after venues in the East of England for both golf and leisure breaks. If you require more retail therapy than relaxation, Suffolk provides an array of charming market towns that deliver retail extravagance. In Ipswich, independent shops very much complement the recognised high street retail experience. Indeed for that special gift, the Suffolk Craft Society Gallery in the Town Hall Galleries is well worth a visit. Bury St Edmunds, famous for its large open-air market, has the Arc shopping centre to create the perfect mix of bespoke boutiques, cafÊs and high street shops. From farmers’ markets to fresh fish; designer clobber to vintage bargains; antiques to creditcrunching car boot sales, nowhere does it better than Suffolk. Once you have explored our towns and villages why not put your feet up and do nothing! Maybe read a book in a lovely country

garden or catch up with friends or family while enjoying a cream tea or some locally-produced fruit juice. Moving into the evening, Newmarket Races provides the perfect place to have a flutter on the horses, a taste of fine dining and some excellent live music. In previous years Madness and Jools Holland have graced the stage to provide the after-event entertainment. It provides a great night out for all the family to enjoy. Revived, you will be ready to experience our wide, open skies and landscapes which make for invigorating country or coastal strolls or cycling adventures. Our footpaths are plentiful and varied from open meadows, to forest trails to cliff-top paths. Exploring our countryside and villages by bicycle is recommended, too, but do not forget to drop by a country pub en route. Indeed, walk or cycle the landscapes and enjoy the views by eating in one of our many restaurants or pubs that serve local produce. To find out more www.visit-suffolk.org.uk

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Trevor Price

John Lawrence

Creative Inspiration chance meeting with leading landscape artist Paul Evans inspired Julie and Andrew Knibbs to open their art gallery on the Suffolk coast. Aldeburgh Contemporary Arts is now establishing a growing reputation for offering quality artworks at affordable prices, in relaxed surroundings.

A

From the dangerously-collectable watercolour and acrylic paintings of Paul Evans, to the finely-drawn sepia etchings of Suffolk artist Derek Chambers. From the painstaking

A LDEBURGH Visit the gallery, situated prominently on the High Street and prepare to be inspired with a heady mix of contemporary art by more than 60 artists.

C ONTEMPORARY A RTS

detail of Sydney Sykes still-life oils to the texture and colour of landscape painter John Lawrence. Compare the style of watercolours, oils and woodcuts by prominent wildlife artist Robert Greenhalf with the bold aquatint etchings of Susie Perring. View unique ceramics, from the colourful raku of Pat Armstrong to the individually-crafted birds of Michael Richmond to the internationallyacclaimed sculptures of Peter Beard. Be inspired.

Aldeburgh Contemporary Arts can be found at 187 High St, Aldeburgh, and is open six days a week (closed Tuesdays) 10.00am-5.00pm Tel: 01728 454212 www.aldeburghcontemporaryarts.co.uk

Graham Spice

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Tilston Phillips Magazines Limited

Paul Evans

The Gallery


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Aldeburgh and Thorpeness Famed for its associations with the composer Benjamin Britten, its festival and its fish and chips, the little town of Aldeburgh is charming

Old-fashioned seaside charm

An arts heritage village with stylish shopping

The High Street is lined with tempting shops and galleries offering some very tasty retail therapy. Browse here for quality fashion brands, unusual gifts, lovely arts and crafts, good books and all sorts of attractive ‘must-haves’ for the home. Quaint and pretty houses decorate the seafront, and when the town fills up on high days and holidays you can understand why Benjamin Britten and his partner Peter Pears found the intrusion too great and swapped their home in Crabbe Street (marked by a blue plaque) for The Red House in Golf Lane, which continues to house the Britten-Pears Library. The internationally-acclaimed music festival happens in June, most of it based at nearby Snape Maltings, and a growing and highly successful Literary Festival takes place in spring. In August the town fills with holidaymakers and the boating community heads for the Aldeburgh Regatta. The summer carnival is renowned for its Chinese

lantern procession to the beach and firework finale. The town offers a fine golf course, a long pebble and shingle beach, an historic Moot Hall housing a small museum, cosy pubs, good restaurants, some sizeable hotels, its own cinema, and the parish church where Benjamin Britten is commemorated and where Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, Britain’s first woman doctor and first female mayor, worshipped. A seafront stroll in either direction comes highly recommended. Head south beyond the sailing club towards the largest of Suffolk’s Martello Towers and you reach the now-vanished Slaughden, a community that time and tide eventually removed and the birthplace of the poet George Crabbe. Turn in the other direction, and continue north beyond the fishing sheds and boats that testify to the small but determined number of inshore fishermen who still land their

catch on the beach, and you will see Maggi Hambling’s giant scallop shell sculpture crafted in homage to Benjamin Britten. Continue travelling in this direction and you come to Thorpeness, a magical place created in the early 1900s by barrister and playwright Glencairn Stuart Ogilvie, who turned a fishing hamlet into a model holiday village along fantasy lines that would have delighted his friend and ‘Peter Pan’ author, J.M. Barrie. You will feel you are stepping back in time as you row a boat out on to the man-made Meare, view the 19thcentury post mill (moved here bodily from a neighbouring village) or marvel at the glorious ‘House in the Clouds’, a gigantic folly built to disguise a water tower. Thorpeness also has its own 18hole links golf course, laid out by James Braid in 1922, which incorporates a hotel and country club, with bar and restaurant. www.visitsuffolk.com


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THORPENESS VILLAGE STORE Situated in the picturesque village of Thorpeness the 9LOODJH© 6KRS© FDWHUV© IRU© DOO© \RXU© QHHGV© ZKHWKHU© \RX´UH© local or just visiting the area. Freshly baked bread from Smiths, our own mouth watering pastries in the morning°perfect for a leisurely breakfast, coffee and the morning paper. Everything you need for a picnic on the beach° crisps, bread rolls, fruit juices, olives, Suffolk ham, a fine selection of local cheese, delicious homemade sausage rolls and pasties, and plenty to keep the kids entertained°from windmills to beach balls!

& Café Restaurant Farnham (A12 / Aldeburgh junction A1094) A Well Stocked Farm Shop Specialising in Home Grown & Local Produce Open daily 9.00am - 5.30pm (6.00pm in summer)

Specialising in fresh, local produce with veggies home grown on the allotment and jams and fudge made in the village. We also have our own range of ready meals and scrummy local ice cream. Orders are taken and delivery is free.

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THE DOLPHIN INN www.thorpenessdolphin.com 01728 454994

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Beccles Right up at the top of the county, Beccles lies on the River Waveney at the southernmost tip of the Broads

Bustling Beccles

A thriving community, past and present

Beccles stands on the River Waveney, part of the Suffolk Broads but on the border with Norfolk. Beccles was a thriving settlement well before the Norman invasion, and has a colourful history going back more than a thousand years. It has been a port for most of its existence and is able to receive ships large as well as small, making it an important trading centre. The quay remains, and is still a lively spot, especially in summer, with daily boat trips and its own visitor and information centre, café, shop and children’s play area. The imposing tower of St Michael’s church has clocks on three faces, but a blank north wall facing the river. Local legend has it that this is because Beccles folk would not give their Norfolk neighbours anything – not even the time of day! The church of St Michael’s is a striking landmark, and the tower is sometimes open for very fit

people to climb to the top and admire the stunning views. Horatio Nelson’s parents were married here, and his father was rector. Unusually, the tower is separate from the church itself, because it would otherwise have slid down the cliff into the river! For today’s visitors Beccles has a good mix of retail outlets, including well-known national names and attractive local independents selling everything from antiques, gifts and cookware, books, rugs and furniture to model boats. There is an ample range of pubs, restaurants and cafés, as well as many other attractions including the award-winning Upstairs Gallery. Leman House, in Ballygate, is now home to Beccles & District Museum, and well worth a visit for its mix of displays about local life. It is a Grade 1-listed building and was endowed by Sir John Leman as a school back in 1632. Sir John, scion of a well-known local family, made his fortune trading in

butter and cheese and went on to become Lord Mayor of London. The local high school still bears his name, although it is now sited elsewhere and caters for rather more than the original 48 boys. A number of well-known people have attended Sir John Leman High School, including Nobel Prize-winner Professor Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, and the actor Sir John Mills. Walkers can access the marshes on land granted to the town by Elizabeth I in 1584, an act commemorated on the town sign. The town also has a large common, complete with nine-hole golf course, where owners of grazing cattle still have ancient access rights. www.visitsuffolk.com


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Bungay The little town of Bungay is a browser’s delight, whether it is history and legend you are looking for or antiques shopping

Black Dog Days

A browser’s delight of a village

The Butter Cross provides an attractive centrepiece to the town and it is here that you will find the traditional Thursday market. The town holds a number of special street markets during the year, including a big antiques market which stretches the length of Earsham Street and attracts thousands of visitors. As well as antiques, the town has a whole range of individual independent outlets and galleries selling everything from wholefoods, wedding tiaras and wood carvings to pretty pottery, luxury gifts, lovely items for the home and terrific toys. Bungay’s Norman Castle, much ruined over the centuries, is now administered by a trust and happily brought to life by its own visitor centre, shop and welcoming café. Another uniquely local feature is the Bungay Town Reeve – which turns out to be not a place but a person – and is an ancient civic office that has survived

from Saxon times! In 1688 the Great Fire of Bungay devastated the town. The oldest complete building to survive was the round-towered Church of Holy Trinity, which narrowly escaped the blaze and has the plaque to prove it.

Just a few miles out of town, St Peter’s Hall and Brewery makes an interesting and tasty spot to visit, The Otter Trust, at nearby Earsham, houses the world’s largest collection of these engaging animals which you can see at swim and play. www.visitsuffolk.com

Another beautiful church, now redundant, is famous for an enduring piece of folklore concerning the infamous Black Dog of Bungay, which is supposed to have rushed into St Mary’s during a storm in 1577 and killed a number of the congregation. Today, among other things, the Black Dog lends its name to the annual local marathon, run in April. The town has some historic hostelries to enjoy and a series of accessible footpaths to follow. Bungay Museum is to be found in the council office, and local amenities include a golf course, sports hall, bowling green and indoor swimming pool.


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Bury St Edmunds Historic Bury St Edmunds, in the heart of west Suffolk, is one of the region’s biggest and best-loved market towns.

Medieval History

An Abbey, an Angel and a local Ale

The town’s namesake, St Edmund, martyred King of East Anglia, died in the 9th century but his shrine became the focal point for the development of one of the largest and most powerful abbeys in all the land. You can wander round its ruins in the lovely Abbey Gardens, where the Abbey Gate and Norman Tower are the most complete surviving parts of the original vast complex. The gardens are now a pleasing public park, renowned for its bedding

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displays. The grounds include a children’s play area. Hard to miss is the neighbouring St Edmundsbury Cathedral, the county’s only Anglican Cathedral, lately crowned with a magnificent 140ft-tower, which now dominates the skyline as if it has somehow always been there. A little farther along the street – and worth the walk – is another of the town’s fine churches, St Mary’s, where Henry VIII’s sister, Mary Rose Tudor, is buried.

Bury (as it is known locally) is a great place to explore by foot, with delights and surprises around every corner. Among other gems, it can boast one of the oldest working theatres in the country and the smallest pub. Moyse’s Hall, now a museum, also happens to be among the most ancient of the region’s town houses. Charles Dickens famously gave public readings in the beautiful Athenaeum on Angel Hill, staying


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at the neighbouring Angel Hotel, which gets a mention in ‘Pickwick Papers’. Throughout the Middle Ages, Angel Hill was the site of the Bury Fair, attended by traders and entertainers from all over Europe. Today it still attracts visitors from home and abroad, but mostly serves as a car park. Shopping is good, and offers a broad mix of well-known high street names and smaller independents. Wednesdays and Saturdays are market days when lots of colourful stalls fill the Buttermarket. The Market Cross building in the Cornhill originally had an open marketplace below. Now it houses shops and a tearoom,

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with a vibrant art gallery and alluring shop above. There are plenty of restaurants, pubs, hotels, wine and coffee bars dotted in and around the town centre where you can find refreshment and take the weight off your feet. Squeeze into the nearby Nutshell if you want to say you have visited the pub that the Guinness Book of Records lists as the smallest in Britain. Be warned that it features a mummified cat hanging over the bar, a grim reminder of the days when people believed that walling up a poor creature like this in a house would ward off evil spirits.

Some of the region’s best-known and best-loved ales are brewed in Bury and beer lovers will want to make a beeline for the Greene King Brewery Visitor Centre. Nearby is to be found the wonderful Theatre Royal, one of the few surviving Georgian playhouses in England. It reopened in 2007 after undergoing extensive development and renovation. The Bury St Edmunds Festival always offers a rich and varied feast of cultural activity and takes place in May. www.visitsuffolk.com


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Debenham Debenham is close to the source of the River Deben and appears to derive its name from Old English words meaning the village in a deep valley

A Roman settlement

And a great history of success

It has been described as “unspoilt without being a showcase,” which is pretty much spot on. The River Deben has its source here and settlers have been around since Roman times. East Anglia’s Kings are said to have occasionally held court here, and Blood Field, on the outskirts, is apparently named after a great battle against the Danes. The market cross (later converted to a school) and surviving 14th-century timber-framed merchants’ houses at the heart of what is now a conservation

area show that this was also a major centre for the wool trade. In the 18th century dairy production held much sway hereabouts before pasture gave way to more arable farming. The railway never got here, but the village does have one of the first purposebuilt Victorian police houses in the country. Today’s high school, leisure and youth centres are proof that this is a living and breathing community. Some elegant shopping embraces bespoke furniture, a stylish houseware and kitchen shop and a children’s book shop with lots going on. Many are family businesses, some with long histories. Follow the signs to the Teapot Pottery for a fun-filled exploration of the way the national drink has combined with people’s passion for collectables. Not only can you enjoy the mad designs you can stay and paint your own at the ceramic café. En route to or from Debenham, several other places may catch your eye. Towards Stowmarket, Stonham Barns has every species of British owl

plus various other birds of prey on show. Also on site is a variety of country shopping with a choice of crafts, gifts, clothing and furniture. Not to mention golf, crazy putting and a restaurant. Towards Ipswich, another worthwhile detour is Helmingham Hall, where you can visit the park and stunning gardens of the Tollemache family’s moated Tudor house. No less a gardening authority than Alan Titchmarsh counts this among his favourites. The house is not open to the public. www.visitsuffolk.com


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Felixstowe Felixstowe is one of Suffolk’s larger coastal towns, enjoying a long stretch of coastline and a reputation for little rain and lots of sunshine

Don’t miss the ferry

A seaside town with a fort and a port

It succeeds in blending elements of traditional seaside – sandy beach, pier amusements, ice-cream, candy floss, serried rows of beach huts – with daily life as a fair-sized centre of population with a huge modern container port on its doorstep. A look out to sea soon reminds you of the traffic that today makes Felixstowe one of Europe’s biggest and busiest container ports. A visit to the dockside is fascinating and brings you also to the local museum and to the historic Landguard Fort which for centuries has been guarding this vulnerable river entrance from wouldbe invaders. This area also supports an important coastal nature reserve. Back in the town centre the mix of shops along and beyond the main shopping street embraces national chains as well as some enterprising and intriguing independents selling fashion,

cookware, second-hand books, flowers and chocolates. There is no shortage of eating places, here or along the front. Or simply sit and enjoy the pretty gardens with their sea-views. There are echoes here of a bygone Edwardian elegance, and it was at a house near here that Mrs Simpson stayed while awaiting the divorce that would rock the British Royal Family and pave the way to the abdication of a King. Felixstowe’s Spa Pavilion is also at this end of town, offering a varied range of year-round entertainment and with its own restaurant overlooking the sea. Continue out of town by the coast road that crosses Felixstowe’s golf course and you will reach the hamlet of Felixstowe Ferry. Here you can take your pick of two good pubs or dine on fish and chips cooked by the ladies in the Ferry Café – a wonderful institution

popular with locals and visitors alike (and where they also serve a hearty breakfast). You can buy fresh fish to take home with you down at the boatyard. Then take a walk out across the expansive countryside, passing the jolly houseboats and mud-flats that border the river and listening out for skylarks as you go. Or, if you want to stay in sight of the sea, skirt the sailing club and get on to the path that heads back towards Felixstowe. From here you can see across the river to Bawdsey Manor, famous for its associations with the development of radar during the Second World War. A small passenger ferry travels the short distance between Felixstowe Ferry and Bawdsey Quay and in summer crabbing is a popular pastime from both jetties. www.visitsuffolk.com


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It takes something special to stand out from the crowd...

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hy not try a little selfindulgence and experience a fresh approach to affordable styles of head turning jewellery at Polly Pringle Silver.

W

ith a distinctive outlet in Suffolk offering an intimate and somewhat magical atmosphere, Polly Pringle continues to create a unique shopping experience for her growing band of loyal customers.

T

he winning combination of contemporary, modern and exotic designs sourced from around the world and timeless elegance provides something to catch the eye, whilst also highlighting a good balance of price points. It maybe an understated necklace in Mexican silver or perhaps discover your fun side with a vibrant resin bracelet from her funky Danish range, guaranteed to raise a smile.

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he Parisian jewellery is Polly's range she is most proud of. A carefully chosen selection of silver-plated pewter, designed and handmade in Paris all exclusive to Polly Pringle Silver. The designs are not for the faint-hearted‌ they are bold designs of understated elegance and enduring quality. Very modern and very distinctive and are very quickly becoming collector's pieces.

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he interior of the shop is small and intimate, with soft lighting that creates a warm and welcoming atmosphere, set against the cool, clean lines of the carefully chosen white & oak shop interior. Unlike many other retail jewellers, Polly Pringle Silver steers away from locking everything behind glass cabinets, instead inviting you to handle the jewellery.

P

olly Pringle (her real name) founder and busy mother of three began her career some 15 years ago at Camden Lock Market. Having moved from the big city, her experience and enthusiasm found herself back in her native Suffolk, expanding into shops which offered her a much wider opportunity to explore & stock a broader range of jewellery.

P

olly's aim is to create a thriving outlet for unusual, beautiful jewellery that cannot be found on the high street. With friendly and knowledgeable service, Polly & her team are on hand to help you choose the correct present or to select an item of jewellery to go with a certain outfit. What ever your needs we shall endeavour to cater for you.

7a Market Hill, Framlingham, Suffolk IP13 9AN Tel: 01728 724772 email: pollypringle@btconnect.com www.pollypringle.co.uk


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Framlingham Recently voted one of the best places to live in Britain, Framlingham has been described as “the essence of the English market town”

Ancient castle ramparts

A fortification of royalty, power and status

Steeped in history, its biggest visitor attraction is its wonderful 12th-century castle, which could have stepped from a children’s picture book and is one of the finest surviving examples of its kind you will see anywhere. Built by Roger Bigod, one of the Earls of Norfolk, it has been adapted and used as many things over the centuries, including a poor-house and a court. Today it is in the care of English Heritage and hosts a programme of events and reenactments that greatly enhance a visit. The castle also contains a small museum of fascinating domestic and agricultural bygones amassed

by local collector Harold Lanman, along with photographs and pictures and a complete collection of the Framlingham Weekly News from 1859 to 1938. It is here, too, that you can find echoes of a clock-making industry that once made Framlingham tick. Once you have “done” the castle, head for the Market Square which forms part of a conservation area at the heart of this thriving community. Here you will find quality shops to explore and eateries that range from a café to a coaching inn. The mixture of independent retail is happily traditional and caters for the needs of the locals as well as for visitors keen to spend their money on something to take home. On your way home, pay a visit to The Crockery Barn, situated on the B1077 towards Ipswich. A quick tour of the town includes everything from a ducking pond and Tudor almshouses to a Victorian pillar-box, which is still in use. Also

not to be missed is the beautiful church of St Michael’s with its magnificent tombs and effigies. The area surrounding the castle, Framlingham Mere, is another Bigod legacy and makes for a lovely walk. It provides a haven for wildlife as well as offering views of the castle and of Framlingham College, a private school founded in memory of Queen Victoria’s husband Prince Albert in 1864. Former pupils include the artist Alfred Munnings. www.visitsuffolk.com


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Bruisyard Hall

Perfect for FamilyGatherings…

B

special occasions, weddings, reunions and family holidays

ruisyard Hall is a wonderful country house – a 14th-century Abbey of the Poor Clares converted into an Elizabethan manor house, now available as a single let for up to 20 people. It offers relaxing self-catering weekends, holidays and opportunities for other events, business meetings, weddings and our latest venture – the option for a day out with the conservation officer. The hall enables you to hold your own party in style and comfort – ideal for a special anniversary, family or friends’ reunion. It would also provide a perfect setting for a gathering, with closest friends, to celebrate the naming of a new member of the family. Businesses can host a dinner with room for guests to stay in a home rather than an hotel and enjoy the house for quiet and totally private discussions. Bruisyard Hall is licensed for weddings and while many couples enjoy the

freedom to choose and organise their own celebrations, we can also offer contacts for caterers, marquee hire, florists and even a wedding planner should you wish. The grounds provide unique photo opportunities. The house itself retains an historic atmosphere with oak staircases, a priest’s hole and a warren of unfurnished rooms in the attics. Downstairs, the hallway with its 16th-century beams, leads into the Drawing Room, with oak floor, stone fireplace and tall windows looking out over beautiful, wooded countryside. The ancient site on which Bruisyard Hall stands faces south to the upper reaches of the River Alde and is surrounded by meadows, with a moat and fishponds. There are 10 bedrooms, sleeping 20 in comfort, and five bathrooms. The Master Bedroom has wonderful views across the valley from two south-facing windows. The attic bedroom is ideal for children. Indeed,

the whole house is a paradise for children, who will spend happy hours exploring its nooks and crannies. The house is equipped to a high standard throughout while outside, there is trout fishing in the large 13thcentury fishpond and wonderful walks can be had along the River Alde or the farm and woodland behind the house. Contact: Robert and Teresa Rous Dennington Hall Farm, Dennington, Woodbridge, Suffolk IP13 8AU Tel: 01728 638712 Email: dennington@farmline.com www.bruisyardhall.co.uk


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Hadleigh One of the East Anglian towns that derived its prosperity from its wool and cloth industries. It has a 15th-century timber-framed Guildhall and many fine examples of timber and brick listed buildings

A perfect little town

Make a date with history in Hadleigh

To get a sense of its historic heyday you need look no farther than the main street, where timber-framed houses and decorative plasterwork – often conveniently dated – soon establish that this was once a town grown rich, like nearby Lavenham and Long Melford, on the proceeds of wool and cloth. Seek out St Mary’s Church, which understandably attracted the artistic attentions of both Gainsborough and Constable (Turner, too) and you will also find the town’s picturesque timberframed Guildhall and Tudor redbrick of the tower of what was to have been Archdeacon Pykenham’s grandiose Deanery (the rest never got built).

Agriculture also underpinned the local economy and regular livestock sales were once held in the marketplace. You will find the restored Corn Exchange nearby, now used as council offices.

oldest) and the town’s pleasant Riverside Walk – with a picnic perhaps. The River Brett, which winds its way from the north edge of the town, goes on eventually to join the River Stour in Constable Country.

The town’s long High Street presents an intriguing mix. Literary types can idle over books new and second-hand, there is a shop with everything a doll-lover could need, and others to tempt those with a weakness for shoes – or sweets! There is a deliciously tiny delicatessen, and one of the bigger premises belongs to that rare bird an independent hardware store, where you can buy everything from a sit-on mower to a saucepan. Market Day is Friday and the town is usually bustling on a Saturday.

Between Hadleigh and Sudbury lies Boxford, a pretty village with a stream running through and an attractive 17thcentury church nestling beside the village school. Its timber-framed pub, the Fleece, is famous for hosting jazz gigs that have turned this medieval village into a Mecca for music-lovers.

A choice of pubs, restaurants and cafés cater for most of the casual visitor’s needs. And if it is a bigger culinary experience you are looking for, then that is here, too, in the shape of an innovative local business offering cookery courses. A stroll around some of the back streets will give you a better idea of the size and scope of what is clearly a community-focused town with much to offer the tourist (rather than the other way around). On a nice day, that stroll should definitely take in Toppesfield Bridge (one of Suffolk’s

More famous names than you can shake a stick at have performed here since the club started, almost by accident, back in 1993, and it is worth checking out the programme (and the availability of tickets) if you plan to be there on a Friday night. www.visitsuffolk.com


Italian Ristorante Authentic Italian Cuisine served with flair

Open Tuesday to Sunday Sunday 0 - 9.30 9.30 12 noon - 2.30 and 5.30 n - 4pm pm Sundays 12 noon

Fully Refurbised En-Suite Accommodation Bed & Breakfast From ÂŁ40 a night White Hart, Bridge Street, Hadleigh, Tel: 01473 822206

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The Cut, Halesworth

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he Cut is one of Halesworth’s treasures. Once a maltings it is now an exciting independent arts centre that provides exhibitions, workshops and classes for the local community and beyond. As a charity it has received funding for the conversion of the building but receives no grants for every-day running costs and depends heavily on loyal volunteers. Part of The Cut’s remit is to subsidise experimental theatre and dance. An annual event is the HighTide Festival,

NEWCUTARTS

a fortnight of plays by new writers performed by professional actors, sessions with producers and directors, screenings and readings. This is followed later in the year by the Halesworth Arts Festival with international performers and artists. The Malt Room is a wonderful space in which to stage art exhibitions as is the Concourse which also houses the café and the box office. The Auditorium accommodates an audience of 220 on raked seating. Cinema Night is every Wednesday showing recent releases,

classic favourites, foreign films, animation and documentaries. Three times a year there are Open Mic nights when local talent has the opportunity to tread the boards. If you are interested in Creative Writing, Tai Chi Chuan, Iyengar Yoga, Pilates, Contemporary Dance, Youth Theatre, Music Workshops, Painting Classes, Ballet, Belly Dancing, Wild Goose Qigong, singing in a choir and more, then The Cut is the place for you.

Café and Galleries open Tuesday–Saturday, 10.00am-4.00pm www.newcut.org


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Halesworth While it is easy to see why visitors focus on the coast when they get this close to Southwold, the little town of Halesworth is worth making a short detour inland to visit

A heavenly haven

With a thoroughfare to inspire all tastes

There is a pleasant shopping centre with interesting and individual shops and businesses focused on everything from fashion and food to furniture, including Katharine Ellen Designs specialising in soft furnishings. Visitors often remark on the wonderful selection of shops, saying they were not aware such places still existed, thus making their visit even more memorable. There is also a market every Wednesday. The town can be reached by rail as well as by road, and if you arrive by train your very first port of call should be the town’s museum, housed at the station. Not far from here is The Cut, a vibrant local arts centre providing space for dance, drama,

film, exhibitions and music, all housed in a converted Maltings with its own café. Halesworth packs a lot of history. Dating from Saxon times, the town’s population doubled in the 17th century, by which time it could boast various coaching inns and taverns like the Angel and White Hart, which are still very much in evidence. In the 19th century it became a major centre for brewing and malting, and wherries would have sailed up to Halesworth’s quay from Blythburgh and Southwold. The last such trip was in 1882. You can still locate the house where local maltster and keen botanist Sir William Hooker lived, and where his son Joseph was born. If you are wondering where you have heard the name before, the plant-hunting father and son eventually became consecutive directors of Kew Gardens in London during Queen Victoria’s reign.

Rather more somberly it was in Halesworth in 1862 that Victorian policeman, Ebenezer Tye, was murdered. The man convicted of the crime was the last person to be publicly hanged in Suffolk. Coming up to date, Halesworth’s Gig in the Park, held in early August, is a major event on the music festival scene. At the end of August is the renowned Halesworth Antique Street Market organised by The British Heart Foundation. The annual ‘Thoroughfare’ takes place towards the end of June. It is a big food, drink and crafts fair that attracts thousands of visitors and helps to raise funds for local causes. As well as its park, Halesworth has the Millennium Green, created from 44 acres of grazing marsh close to the town centre. Here, if they are lucky, nature lovers may catch a glimpse of a kingfisher, an otter or a water vole. www.visitsuffolk.com


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Ipswich Ipswich is one of the fastest-growing and changing places in the East of England. And after scooping a national award in 2007, officially one of the cleanest, too

Historic port and town

With an exciting Waterfront development

One of the main up-and-coming areas in Ipswich is the Waterfront. Redevelopment here is going on apace. With the attractive Victorian Custom House surviving as a centerpiece, there are tempting bistros, bars and an art gallery to explore alongside the smart apartments, a classy hotel and busy marina. Exciting developments include a prestigious dance-house for the region and a new university. The port of Ipswich has been an important one since Anglo Saxon times

and the ships that sail up river under the massive span of the Orwell Bridge still include commercial traffic as well as pleasure craft and the increasing number of private yachts that moor up here. River trips are available. Check out Fore Street, Tacket Street, St Nicholas Street and the other small thoroughfares that run between the Waterfront and the town centre for stylish, small, independent fashion and interior design shops, restaurants and bars.

The Buttermarket and Tower Ramparts shopping centres flank the main street in the town centre, and it is here you will find most of the usual high street names, plus pubs, coffee shops and wine bars. Do call in at the grand Victorian-built Town Hall where you will find exhibitions of contemporary visual and decorative arts, crafts and community history. Entry is free. An outdoor market is held outside the Town Hall on the Cornhill on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays.


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Come in + join in + enjoy! What will you discover at Colchester Castle? Beautiful Castle + exploring 2000 years of history + hands-on displays + historical objects + britain + value for money + tour the roman vaults + fun + touch the foundations + temple of claudius + invasion by the normans + be amazed + medieval treasures exhibition + rare objects + much more!

The Saatchi Collection at Ipswich Art School FREE admission Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 5pm World renowned + saatchi collection + unique access + seven international artists + experience + six month exhibition + contemporary art On display until 9th January 2011

Don’t forget to visit our other museums and art galleries this summer for

FREE! Hollytrees Museum + Natural History Museum + Tymperleys Clock Museum + Christchurch Mansion + Ipswich Museum + Ipswich Town Hall Galleries + Ipswich Art School

Ipswich Art School providing a venue to experience world-class exhibitions

For more information on our summer events programme, museums and art galleries please visit www.colchestermuseums.org.uk or www.ipswich.gov.uk/museums or call 01206 282938 today! the best of Suffolk 31


Best of Suffolk 2010 pp 5-36:bos sect 1 p5 09

If you arrive by rail look out for the cluster of small shops selling snacks, beverages, highly-individual gifts, bags, scarves and jewellery on Platform One. Not far from the railway station is Ipswich Town Football Club, home of the Blues. Ipswich is rich in history – not all of it immediately obvious. A guided tour is your best bet, and you can pick up details from the Tourist Information Centre, housed in St Stephen’s Church, one of five redundant medieval churches that are gradually finding new and interesting uses. Nearby, in the Buttermaket, is the lovely timberframed Ancient House with its

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elaborate exterior plaster carvings. It is worth taking a look inside, but be prepared to come away with more than you bargained for – it is now an outlet for Lakeland. A short walk from the centre brings you to Christchurch Park, an unexpectedly vast green space right in the middle of town which comes complete with its own Tudor mansion, children’s play area, arboretum, tennis courts, bowling green and even a croquet lawn. Lots of events are held here including a Music in the Park day which is part of Ip-art, the town’s lively and expanding annual arts festival fortnight in June and July.

Christchurch Mansion is run by the local museum service and has period-room settings and a gallery displaying the town’s renowned collection of paintings by Gainsborough and Constable. Ipswich Museum, sited in the High Street, also has much to see, including a life-size recreation of a woolly mammoth and a Victorian natural history collection complete with (real) 17ft giraffe in a towering glass case. On the edge of town is the volunteer-run Transport Museum. www.visitsuffolk.com


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beautiful . simple . useful

Discover something unique... • Home-made Lunches & Cream Teas • Large Selection of Gifts and Cards • Stylish Home & Garden Accessories • Corn Dollies & Silk Flowers • Traditional Toys & Games • Garden Nursery • Marlborough Tiles showroom

Bridge Farm Barns

Opening times Mon-Sat 9.30am-5pm Sunday 11am-5pm

karlsson

Monks Eleigh, Nr Lavenham, Suffolk IP7 7AY

Karlsson Scandinavian Design Ltd, 8 Tacket Street, Ipswich, Suffolk IP4 1AY. Telephone: 01473 288308 www.karlssondesign.co.uk

T: 01449 740456

www.bridgefarmbarns.co.uk


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Lavenham, Kersey and Monks Eleigh Lavenham claims to be England’s finest medieval town. It is easy to see how it must have looked in the prosperous Middle Ages, with most of the buildings dating from between 1400 – 1500

Picture perfect!

Tudor timbers and a medieval wool trade

The older buildings are to be found around the marketplace where once they held bear-baiting contests. Photography: Rod Edwards Lavenham’s 16th-century Guildhall is now owned by the National Trust, and on your travels you should also find a Great House (now a hotel) and a Little Hall. The Wool Hall is another half-timbered treasure and it does not take long to see how the Crooked House (now an art gallery) got its name.

The magnificent Church of St Peter and St Paul has the tallest tower in the county, and as you might expect, is one of the best ‘wool churches’ in Suffolk. Guided walks are regularly available and will introduce you to all this and more. Inquire also about audio tours. In among the streets of half-timbered cottages and fine town houses lie a variety of interesting and attractive gift and china shops, including some you may not expect (like the one featuring knitwear from Peru!) There are booksellers and a whole collection

of lovely and lively art galleries in which to browse and buy. And enough tearooms, coffee shops, restaurants and hotels to prevent you from going at all hungry or thirsty. On a sunny day it is difficult to think of a more idyllic spot to people-watch than from a pavement table. Despite its tourist appeal, do not imagine that Lavenham is preserved in aspic. The local community is very much alive as you will discover if you arrive on August Bank Holiday Monday. The picturesque and perenniallyappealing village of Kersey is always worth a detour, whether you combine it with a trip to Lavenham or set out to reach it from nearby Hadleigh or Boxford. However you come upon it, the chances are that you will instantly recognise the scenery from a hundred calendars, photographs or paintings. Lined with thatched cottages and tiled and half-timbered houses, its steep

main street leads down from the church at the top to the ford or water-splash at the bottom, which is seemingly always attended by requisite ducks paddlepatting about, waiting to have their pictures taken. Between Lavenham and Kersey lies the beautiful village of Monks Eleigh. The 14th-century flintstone church looks down over the picturesque village green which is boarded by a collection of fine, typical Suffolk thatched cottages. For a small village, Monks Eleigh has two fantastic destinations to visit. The Swan Inn, renowned for its awardwinning cuisine, and Bridge Farm Barns, where you can stop for a traditional cream tea or light lunch and browse the wonderful array of unusual products, gifts and crafts on show in the barns. www.visitsuffolk.com


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Long Melford • Suffolk • CO10 9BA www.kentwell.co.uk • 01787 310207

Magical Moated Tudor Hall OPEN Weekends, School Holidays & some other weekdays Also ideal for Renowned for its long term restoration Garden Weddings & Functions and its period costume & other events. Tearoom A Kentwell Calendar • February - Snowdrop Walks • March - Lambing & Daffodils • Easter WE - Tudors, Egg Hunt, Quiz • May Day WE - Tudor May Day Fun • Whit WE - WWII Home Guard & 1940s Fete • Jun/ Jul - Main Tudor Re-Creation • July/Aug - Open Air Shows Season • Aug Bk Hol WE - Tudor Re-Creation • Michaelmas - Tudor Re-Creation • Oct - Scaresville - the site for a fright • December - A Victorian Christmas & much more

Always call to check What’s On


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TROWMANS R A N G E C O O K E R S – S TOV E S – F I R E S

At Trowmans, we are here to help and, as a family business, we pride ourselves on offering the best possible service to all our customers, from initial advice regarding the selection of an appropriate appliance, right through to installation and aftercare.

OUR PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR ALL YOUR HOME COOKING, HEATING, WOODBURNERS AND HOT WATER NEEDS s7OODANDMULTI FUELSTOVEINSTALLATIONSINCLUDINGFULLCENTRAL HEATINGMODELS s &IREPLACERENOVATIONSINCLUDINGALLBUILDINGWORK s 'AS /IL 7OOD -ULTI&UEL 'ROUNDAND!IRSOURCEHEATPUMPS BIOMASS ANDSOLARTHERMALHEATINGANDHOTWATERSYSTEMS s ,INKUPSYSTEMSOFMULTIPLEFUELSHARMONIZEDINTOONESYSTEM s 2ANGECOOKERSINCLUDINGFULLCENTRALHEATINGMODELSANDEVEN CONDENSINGMODELSWITHEFFICIENCYSABOVE s 3TOVESERVICINGINCLUDINGCHIMNEYSWEEPINGSERVICE s /ILBOILERREPLACEMENTANDSERVICINGINCLUDING!GAAND2AYBURN 2AYBURN'UILD1UALIFIED s &REESITESURVEYSANDQUOTATIONS

As well as caring for our customers, we also endeavour to care for the environment. For this reason we actively promote the use of wood as an energy source. It is a non-fossilised, sustainable natural product and is one of the most CO2 neutral heating fuels. WOODWARM

Unit 2, Foundr y House , Hall Street, Long Melford, Suffolk Tel: 01787 313699 Email: info@trowmans.co.uk Web: www.trowmans.co.uk

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Crystal Clear Beauty Clinic

The Trinity Gallery

Landers Bookshop

Crystal Clear Beauty Clinic offers its customers the very latest in beauty technology, with a full range of beauty treatments on a personal one-to-one basis. The principal, Charlotte Eaton Beauty Specialist, is fully qualified and registered with the Care Quality Commission to provide Ellipse Superlight is the most upto-date, “Rolls Royce”, and effective Intense Pulsed Light (IPL/laser) system, offering a number of treatments for Hair Removal and Thread Vein removal. Also offered are many other treatments including Microdermabrasion Facials, Bio Sculpture Gels Overlays, 3D Lash Extensions, Remedial & much more. Book yourself in for a purely relaxing but result driven treatment.

If you are interested in creating, commissioning or investing in works of art, then you simply must pop into The Trinity Gallery, which hosts a permanent exhibition of paintings and drawings by Gordon Parkinson. Gordon lives and works on the premises and specialises in watercolour paintings of local views. Gordon warmly welcomes commissions, including house portraits, which make a unique and personal present for anniversaries and special occasions.

Landers Bookshop is a flourishing independent bookshop in the heart of the village. Open Mondays to Saturdays 9.30 to 5.00pm you can browse among a wide selection of new titles for all the family. In addition to books and maps we sell quality greetings cards, gifts and cds.

Tel: 01787 882477

Tel: 01787 464022

Tilston Phillips Magazines Limited

The Trinity Gallery also offers a picture-framing service and carries a comprehensive range of mouldings and mounts. Drop by to browse, chat or see Gordon at work.

We offer a very fast ordering service with most current items available to collect the next day. We can also search for, and order, out of print titles for you. Landers_bookshop@btconnect.com

Tel: 01787 378957


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Southwold With its signature lighthouse, pier and colourful beach huts, Southwold is often depicted as the sort of old-fashioned seaside that everyone thought had vanished

Suffolk’s coastal jewel

Sophistication with a nostalgic edge

While it is true that this compact and pretty seaside town evokes nostalgia for simple pleasures and a time gone by, it has also become increasingly trendy. And although simple tastes are still catered for, there are a lot more sophisticated things going on – particularly when it comes to shops, restaurants, hotels and pubs. If you have not visited Southwold before, there are a number of must-dos: Sample a glass of Adnams beer within sight – and smell – of the famous brewery, situated in the very heart of the town; visit the beautiful Church of St Edmund

and see Southwold Jack (also on the wall outside the brewery); speculate on the going rate for one of the brightly-painted beach huts; look for amber on the beach (or just go to the Amber Shop and look at it there); visit the pier; stand on Gun Hill beside the ancient cannons and imagine you are watching the historic battle of Sole Bay out at sea; drop into the Sailors’ Reading Room; walk down to the harbour; go shopping. Traditional and long-established favourites rub shoulders with newer arrivals in the main shopping street, where you will find shoes, quality clothes and fashion, wine, pet supplies, hardware, sweets, art, souvenirs, antiques, bric-a-brac, gifts and interior design accessories for the home. There are good local food shops, too, including a fishmonger, butcher and greengrocer who cater for the permanent residents as well as the holiday-makers who fill the town in summer. Adnams also has its own wine cellar and kitchen store here. Southwold Museum is a little gem. The Southwold Summer Theatre

season runs from July through to midSeptember, and the small but perfectlyformed Electric Picture Palace has a programme of films old and new. There are plenty of places to take coffee, tea or lunch and some fine places to dine. Down at the harbour there is even an eatery in a glorified fish shed where you can take along your own wine to dine on the latest catch! There are walks or cycle rides to be taken over the marshes, along the beach (in both directions) and across the common, where you will also find the golf course – so listen out for cries of “Fore!”. www.visitsuffolk.com


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Great Days Out

Inspire... Whether it is trying something new or indulging a passion that you have never had time for, Suffolk provides a wealth of inspiring activities that will keep you entertained mentally, spiritually and physically.

M

any literary legends have lived in or visited Suffolk including George Orwell, Beatrix Potter, Enid Blyton, John Donne, George Crabbe and Geoffrey Chaucer. The landscape has inspired many famous artists, including John Constable and Thomas Gainsborough. Benjamin Britten, the classical music composer, recognised the coast and countryside as musical landscapes. Take a walk along our many footpaths and see the light, as many of our celebrated cultural icons once did. Suffolk Open Studios is a unique and creative initiative in its own right. These open-access artist studios allow visitors to appreciate the artwork on display and ask artists about their approach and inspirations. DanceEast lets you go one step farther and become a dancer for a day. No matter what your age or training, DanceEast provides classes for a variety of different skills and dance genres. If you would rather be a spectator than join in there are a variety of performances available.

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Tilston Phillips Magazines Limited

The Aldeburgh Music concert hall ensures that the Suffolk coast remains a world-renowned meeting place for artists, students, audiences and academics. Presenting a packed yearround arts programme encompassing music and related art forms and a world-class festival every June, Aldeburgh Music is certainly a venue worth visiting for anyone with even a slight interest in cultural activities. Suffolk has a range of open gardens throughout the year to provide inspiration to all those with green fingers. Set in a 400-year-old deer park, Helmingham Hall is surrounded by a wide moat with a drawbridge. A classic parterre flanked by hybrid musk roses and a stunning walled garden with exquisite herbaceous borders will stir your senses. Open from May every Sunday and Wednesday from 2pm-6pm. Glemham Hall, dating from the 16th century provides a wealth of wonders in its classic walled rose and herbaceous gardens. A magnificent early Victorian residence in Anglo-Italian style,

Somerleyton Hall features stunning ornate stonework, sumptuous state rooms and 12 acres of beautifullylandscaped gardens that include one of Britain’s finest mazes. Ickworth House contains majestic curved corridors or step outside to explore the idyllic grounds; you will never find a place quite like it. However, if you are more interested in the ecclesiastical architecture of buildings, Suffolk's cathedral and many churches provide plenty of inspiration. St Edmundsbury Cathedral with its Gothic-style lantern tower, completed in 2005, new cloisters and chapel continues the tradition of offering a warm welcome, a chance to enjoy this sacred space, its architecture, stained glass and treasures. Huntingfield Church, near Halesworth, has a stunning painted ceiling which, as legend goes, was painted by the vicar’s wife in the 19th century but it has also been suggested that she may have embellished an existing medieval remnant.


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Walberswick, Blythburgh and Dunwich Sweeps of marsh, sandy heathland, rich in wildlife, create the backdrop to this corner of Suffolk, much of it protected and designated as an area of outstanding natural beauty

Three coastal treasures

For artists, writers and nature lovers

Pretty Walberswick, beloved of artists and writers, lies on the coast, across the river from Southwold. You can easily walk between the two, the only decision being whether to cross the Bailey bridge or secure a passage on the tiny foot ferry. Arriving by boat and passing the harbour huts, you can either follow a path through the sand-dunes to the beach, or continue up the main street to the village green, where you will find lovely crafts and art shops and galleries, a tea shop and visitor centre. There is another good tearoom, with a garden, farther into the village. And some good pubs. Each year, the British Open Crabbing Championship is held at Walberswick, attracting hundreds of visitors. So be warned, if you visit here on Sunday, August 1, the place will be mobbed by children carrying buckets and lumps of bacon on string! Farther along the coast you will find Dunwich – or what is left of it. Much of

the early town famously disappeared under the sea a very long time ago.Most visitors sensibly head for fish and chips by the beach or a pint in the pub while contemplating the enormity of the disappearance of what was once a thriving medieval township. The rot set in after a devastating storm in 1328, when 400 houses and a number of churches were destroyed. Dunwich lost its harbour and its trade to Walberswick and as coastal erosion continued to do its stuff the town was slowly reclaimed by the sea. There is a small museum where you can check it all out.

Dunwich Heath coastal centre and beach is a nature reserve and conservation area owned by the National Trust. There are lovely walks, and families with children can find plenty to do. Maps and further information are available from the converted coastguard cottages where there is also a licensed tea-room and shop. Blythburgh lies a little farther inland, along the River Blyth. You cannot miss its church, sometimes known as the Cathedral of the Marshes. Vastly out of proportion to the size of its surroundings, Holy Trinity manages to distinguish itself in a county full of special churches, and is truly worth a visit. The devil himself is reputed to have called here, hotfooting it from Bungay during the awful storm of 1577 and leaving telltale scorchmarks on the door. The village itself is bisected by the busy A12, church one side, pub the other. www.visitsuffolk.com

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Woodbridge A centuries-old tradition of boatbuilding continues down at the quayside where the chief visitor attraction is the picturesque Tide Mill

Delightful riverside views Plenty to discover A centuries-old tradition of boatbuilding continues down at the quayside where the chief visitor attraction is the picturesque Tide Mill, a rare surviving example of its kind. It was restored in 1973 and has working models and various displays inside. The railway station is also at this end of town, as is the swimming pool, cinema and Riverside Restaurant, which will serve meals to fit in with film performances, and a branch of Adnams wine cellar and kitchen store. A pleasant walk with views along the Deben will take you past a children’s play area towards Kyson’s Hill, now owned by the National Trust, and once a favourite spot of the Victorian landscape painter, Thomas Churchyard. If you keep going you can walk over the hill and all the way round and back into the town centre.

Everywhere you go there are interesting streets of pretty houses to explore. In the town centre there is a good selection of specialist shops, many of them independents, selling books, foodstuffs, local provisions, fashion, shoes, gifts, china and furnishings. There is another good kitchenware shop here, too. The town can also provide some very attractive pubsand restaurants. Recommended coffee stops include one of the bookshops. For centuries, Market Hill was the nucleus of the town and here, you will find the Shire Hall, which is home to the town council and also to a museum dedicated to the Suffolk Punch heavy horse. Here, too, is another very attractive cluster of little shops and tempting eating places. The Shire Hall building dates back to 1575, and the time of Tudor bigwig

and local benefactor, Thomas Seckford, whose name lives on in a Seckford Street and the beautiful period Seckford Hall, now a hotel. You can discover more about Thomas Seckford and other famous townsfolk at Woodbridge Museum, which also records the spectacular finds at the nearby Anglo Saxon ship burial site of Sutton Hoo, now in the care of the National Trust. History of a different kind is to be found at Buttrums Windmill, in Burkitt Road, a restored six-storey tower mill which you may catch sight of as you approach the town. If you are inclined to venture farther afield, there is also much of interest at the Air Museum at nearby Parham, one of a number of former USAF bases positioned in this part of East Anglia during the Second World War. www.visitsuffolk.com


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Boutique

Laura Jane is chic and stylish fashion at affordable prices; offering a unique and enjoyable shopping experience. 89/91Thoroughfare, Woodbridge, IP12 1AW Tel: 01394 386686 laurajaneboutique.co.uk Mon-Sat, 9:30am 5:30pm

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S ibton W hite h orSe i nn Suffolk

Sibton is set in the heart of the Suffolk countryside yet just five miles from the A12 and only ten miles from the Heritage coast. Here you will find the White Horse, built during the sixteenth century, it’s a rather fascinating pub, definitely one of those pubs that are a joy to discover. Off the beaten track with the sound of bird song rather than traffic, and a somewhat feeling of time standing still, the White Horse is the perfect place to drink, eat or stay overnight. Whatever the reason for your visit you will find the hospitality friendly and relaxed, from the welcoming ambience to the attentive service. Call the White Horse a gastro pub and you won’t be thanked. Neil and Gill Mason have painstakingly maintained all the traditions of this wonderful country pub and yes it’s a foodie heaven, but drinkers and guests don’t miss out either. Enter the pub to be surprised, no gimmicks here, just pure origins of years gone by. The pub has many areas in which to enjoy real ales, fine wines and of course some great food. The bar with its charming raised gallery has a real pubby atmosphere where locals and travellers engage, and then there is an elegant dining room with its heavily beamed low ceiling and a secluded courtyard that is reminiscent of a Mediterranean garden in the summertime. Housed in an adjacent converted building are six most comfortable rooms, well appointed and offering the comforts expected of a four star silver rated inn. With ample parking, many rooms overlook the green and the fields beyond. The White Horse was awarded ‘Suffolk’s Best Food Pub’ in both 2008 and 2009, the only pub to have won this prestigious accolade twice.

Sibton White Horse Inn. Halesworth Road, Sibton, Nr Saxmundham, Suffolk. IP17 2JJ. Tel: 01728 660337. Email: info@sibtonwhitehorseinn.co.uk www.sibtonwhitehorseinn.co.uk


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Yoxford, Sibton and Peasenhall Head slightly inland from Suffolk’s heritage coast and you will find yourself in an area sometimes known as the ‘Garden of Suffolk’

Two of a kind

On the London to Yarmouth route

The delightful village of Yoxford lies at its heart and can be reached by rail as well as by road, providing you realise that the station is actually at nearby Darsham. Yoxford’s pretty main street incorporates a mix of architectural periods and styles, and is a good deal quieter now than it must have been a couple of centuries ago when all the London-to-Yarmouth traffic came this way, providing coaching inns like the Griffin (here since the 14th century) with a roaring trade. Yoxford has a church with a spire and good brasses and there are local shops and pubs to enjoy. The village is surrounded by glorious swathes of parkland belonging to no fewer than three big private country house estates, Cockfield Hall among them. This is where Elizabeth

I had her cousin Katherine Grey (younger sister of the even more illfated Lady Jane) placed under house arrest following her stretch in the Tower of London. She died soon after and is buried here. A stone’s throw away from Yoxford, the smaller village of Peasenhall is also

interesting, not least because it has an industrial as well as an agricultural past, having become a major production centre for a new and improved early 19th-century seed drill invented by one James Smyth. The church is right next

door to where the Suffolk Seed Drill Company used to be. Having been selected for mention by no less a champion of local produce and producers than Rick Stein, today’s local hero is the proprietor of Emmett’s village stores. Trading here since the 1840s, Emmett’s sells all sorts of delicious things but is most famous for its traditionally-made bacon and hams, and in particular its Suffolk black ham. Visitors are welcome not only to buy, but to observe these being produced on site. If you head off towards the coast you will find you are not far from Dunwich, the once great town famously lost to the sea, and Minsmere, the nature reserve run by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. www.visitsuffolk.com


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and The Shed


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An annual visit to way back when

he old coast Gold Coast Stanley Gibbons’ days are the days I’m looking back to. A page of russet oblong stamps, with one of the Georges ‘ovaled’ out next to St Kitts Nevis. Torch off and out like a light to an Eagle Annual picture cloud of chums sweating it out on the approach into Timbuktu. Oops, it’s daytime and everyone is being grown up.

when I picked up an advertising card at a favourite breakfasting hole on the A12. Many times I passed and never stopped until one day, two years on, I pulled over, pulled in by a shop front and pavement display of old bathtubs, watering cans, bygones and newgones, period folding chairs, and the whole show just clouted me back way beyond fifty years.

Twice a year, like many other returnees, I do the family and friends round robin gig to the north Suffolk coast. It’s a joy and I always look forward to it. I get out and about and soak up the laid back slowness and, like the enthusiast I am, end up at some point quenching a bit of a thirst where I will without fail overhear “it’s like going back fifty years”, and it is. Once a year for the past three years the only (so called) work I do whilst getting laid back and slow is a piece of writing to the glorious indulgence that is Campaign and The Shed. To fulfil this task I am required to make “the visit”.

The atmosphere is “way back when” but also very now, probably because the design theory is just about as basic as it gets. Put old next to new, round beside square, hard with soft and rough close to smooth and, unless you are a complete no-goer when it comes to colour, it should work most of the time. Of course, the feel and mix is also due to the creativity and skill of the two owners Carolyn Smith and Les Rayner. As Les (owner of Campaign) says, “It’s personal. This is us and it is as it is.” And boy oh boy, is there a lot of personal stuff around; so much so that it could raise the question “Am I in a shop?”, or even “When is a shop not a shop?” I raised this topic and had my retail horizon broadened somewhat.

I first became aware of Campaign and its fledgling, The Shed, a few years back

Carolyn and Les are not members of the silent order of retailers, so it’s “a talking shop”. They also delight in describing it as being “all over the shop”, although I suspect it may be planned that way just to make the act of discovery add a bit more to everyone’s day. Well, whatever the perspective, I once again had a highly entertaining and instructive couple of hours, leaving with a boot full of lightly rusted tubs and troughs, some very pretty 1930’s china and my annual chair purchase. Home is beginning to resemble Campaign and The Shed. You can visit Campaign and The Shed at Peasenhall on the A1120, three miles inland from Yoxford on the A12 (IP17 2HJ). Opening times are Wednesday to Saturday, sunny Sundays and all through Bank Holiday weekends 10.00am to 5.00pm. Contact numbers are displayed on the main door and, if closed, it is not a pain if you care to telephone. Shop 01728 660550 Studio 01728 660238


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Across the Borders Suffolk has much to offer, but there is much to be said for venturing farther afield

North, south and west

Journey to the edge, for the best of the rest

With its lovely long coastline taking care of the eastern extremities, there is a three-way choice of cross-border terrain as Suffolk meets Essex to the south, Cambridgeshire to the west and Norfolk to the north. In the south west of the county, where Suffolk rubs shoulders with Essex, you can weave your way through beautiful countryside that has links both to Constable and to Gainsborough. Any one of a number of pretty villages will justify a detour. Stoke-by-Nayland, for example, offers appealing pubs and eateries, a lovely church and challenging golf courses. And the historic village of Bures actually straddles the county boundary

with children living on the Essex side of the River Stour crossing a footbridge to reach their school in Suffolk. Just over the border into Essex lies the small (some say England’s smallest) town of Manningtree. It enjoys a dubious claim to fame as the place where, in the middle of the 17th century, Witchfinder General Matthew Hopkins began to cast his long shadow. With its Georgian façades hiding even older architecture, there are some interesting shops, good pubs and places for tea. Its rail links with London mean this is where many workers start or finish their daily commute. From the train there are attractive views over the river estuary and if you alight at the station here you may be pleased to discover a rather quaint pub-like bar on the platform. Follow the waterside (and the swans) a short distance and you will come to the neighbouring village of Mistley. This area was once at the heart of the brewing industry and evidence of the old maltings and quay can still be seen. Mistley also once had (unrealised) ambitions to turn itself into a spa. The incongruous Mistley Towers (designed

by Robert Adam) and Swan Basin in the High Street are pretty much all that remain of this venture. You will find places to eat and drink here, too. Heading out west in Suffolk it pays to get a little lost and to meander off the beaten track through some of the delightful villages around and beyond Clare and Bury St Edmunds. Many have excellent pubs. Carry on to Newmarket and you will find yourself criss-crossing the border with Cambridgeshire. The county border cuts right across the town and its famous racecourses. Aiming north, the market town of Diss just tips into Norfolk and has its own mere (another name for a lake). Nearby, Scole offers inns and antiques and if you travel a little farther over the border you will find Bressingham Gardens and Steam Museum – a nostalgic delight for trainlovers of any age. The River Waveney provides a natural border with Norfolk and over in the north east, Suffolk encompasses the southern tip of the Broads, a unique stretch of inland waterway eagerly beloved by those who love messing about in boats. www.visitsuffolk.com


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Bressingham

Legendary Steam Museum and Gardens

H

ow do you describe a place like Bressingham? Except by saying that there is not anywhere else quite like Bressingham! For where else would you be able to ride on a Victorian roundabout, indulge a passion for all things steamdriven, wallow in nostalgia for one of television’s best-loved comedies and glory in gardens that offer a glimpse of horticultural heaven? Add a couple of railways running around and across the site, a genuine old signal box, a museum, restaurant and picnic place, and the mix soon promises something for everyone, young and old alike. And to think that none of it might be here if one-time owner, the legendary Alan Bloom, had not happened to

combine his passion for plants with an enthusiasm for steam locomotives and traction engines. Or if his son, Adrian, had not in turn continued to develop the gardens, including the famous, and now 40-year-old, Foggy Bottom! The Dad’s Army Collection is another piece of serendipity. Some of Bressingham’s vehicles were used in the much-loved sitcom when it was filmed around Thetford. Now Bressingham has extended the wartime spirit by recreating Walmington-on-Sea in its museum. Situated close to the town of Diss, Bressingham’s main season runs from Easter to the end of October, with steam and non-steam days throughout. There is also a calendar of special events. Rides include trips on the narrow-gauge railway and a chance to get into the saddle

aboard the Gallopers, the beautiful painted horses that eternally travel ‘up and down’ and three abreast around Bressingham’s restored steam carousel. For fans of the footplate, the newest excitement includes the return, after restoration, of the Royal Scot. The gardens, with upwards of 8,000 species and varieties, reward a visit any time of year. You can even stay as a bedand-breakfast guest in Alan Bloom’s old home of Bressingham Hall. Or failing that, take home a Bloom’s bloom from the adjacent garden centre. Bressingham Steam Museum & Gardens Low Road, Bressingham, Diss IP22 2AA Tel: 01379 686900 For more details visit www.bressingham.co.uk or www.bressinghamgardens.com


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East Bergholt, Flatford and Dedham There is no doubt at all who this beautiful bit of Suffolk belongs to

A close-up of Constable country

Stop off at Dedham Vale and Stour Valley

The artist John Constable was born in East Bergholt in June 1776 and went to school in nearby Dedham. His love for his native countryside, so manifest in his paintings, still defines what many people see in their mind’s eye when they think of a quintessentially English landscape. Even if you have never knowingly seen a single copy of ‘The Haywain’ (and it is hard to imagine how you have avoided it) you will not regret getting better acquainted with Constable Country. You can see Constable’s celebrated river scene, complete with Willy Lott’s Cottage, when you visit Flatford Mill, the area’s biggest tourist attraction. Today it is part of a complex in the care of the National Trust which accommodates a visitor centre and a field studies education centre as well as a teashop and a restored dry dock. A longer walk along the River Stour will reward those with the time to take it. Before moving on from East Bergholt make a point of seeing St Mary’s Church, where Constable is said to have fallen in love with the rector’s granddaughter, Maria Bicknell. East Bergholt Place garden and arboretum also come highly-recommended, with

the gardens especially lovely in spring and early summer. Follow Constable’s path to Dedham, another of the area’s ancient towns built on the wool trade, which is where the artist went to school. It has some excellent local shops and is well-known for the Art and Craft Centre, housed in a converted Victorian church, where local artists are given a showcase and where shoppers will delight in three floors’ worth of interesting and attractive browsing, plus a vegetarian restaurant and tearoom. It would be a shame to miss a look inside Dedham’s glorious church, another St Mary’s also with Constable connections. And check to see whether

your visit will coincide with opening times of Castle House, a museum and memorial to another famous artist who once lived here – Sir Alfred Munnings. (1878-1959). There is an abundance of pubs and tearooms hereabouts, with some very lovely hotels and restaurants offering some wonderful food. If you cast your net to include other nearby villages, like Nayland and Stoke-by-Nayland, you will definitely be spoilt for choice. Visitors who stray a little farther over the border into neighbouring Essex will find more of interest to enjoy at Manningtree and Mistley. www.visitsuffolk.com


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There was a time when pretty much the whole of Suffolk was a well-kept secret. Nowadays it is happy to share its many charms with all sorts of visitors and incomers, and ramblers, golfers, sailors, artists and bird-watchers all flock to their favourite spots.

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The fact that it is so close to London means the county exerts an increasing pull on those who need easy access to the capital but do not necessarily want to bring up their kids or spend every weekend there. Keep your eyes peeled if you enjoy celebrity spotting. Fortunately, there are still places and things about Suffolk that not a lot of people know. If in doubt, head for a church. There are hundreds of them, and few will fail to reward a visit. If you are feeling fit there are 50 miles of wonderful and walkable coastline with an abundance of nature to enjoy. For those who prefer two

wheels to two legs the Suffolk Coastal Cycle Route is a 100-mile circular signed route taking in many beauty spots. Alternatively, Thornham Walks at Thornham Magna just off the A140 offer something a little more manageable. Or pay a visit to Alton Water, a reservoir not far from Ipswich. Do not be taken in by what looks like a church in the nearby village of Tattingstone. Known as the Tattingstone Wonder, it is a secret disguise for the 18th-century workaday cottages that the local landowner did not want marring his view!


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Secret Suffolk

. . . w h e r e

s e e i n g

i s

b e l i e v i n g

Photogragh: Tony Pick

Another secret glory of Suffolk are its rivers and river estuaries. Waldringfield is a pretty little boaty place within easy reach of Ipswich. Or travel out along the Shotley Peninsula under the Orwell Bridge to find the waterside community of Pin Mill and enjoy a view across the moorings where picturesque sailing barges are a common sight. En route look out for the small village of Freston and Thomas Gooding’s fabulous folly, a six-storey Elizabethan tower overlooking the estuary of the River Orwell. Shingle Street is not so much a secret as an enigma. Rumours have

long abounded that “something terrible” went on here during the Second World War, with speculation revolving around chemical warfare, a friendly-fire incident or a thwarted German invasion. Certainly the village was evacuated during the war and never went back to the little fishing hamlet it once was. This atmosphere of secrecy extends to nearby Orford Ness, now peacefully in the hands of the National Trust, but once the test site for various hush-hush military establishments, including Atomic Weapons Research. A boat-trip out to this shingle spit is a must for nature-lovers as well as those enthralled by military secrecy.

If you are in the mood, there are plenty of old RAF and USAF airfields, often with volunteer-run museums attached, where you can relive the Glenn Miller era and discover what little places like Wattisham, Parham and Rougham did in the war. It is worth bearing in mind, too, that secret Suffolk is rich in privatelyowned medium-to-grand houses, steeped in a history you would not otherwise be privy to, which have converted to something new like providing up-market B&B.

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The Great Outdoors

Shooting in Suffolk S

hooting is a very popular pastime all year round in Suffolk. Shooting takes a number of forms, but shotgun shooting is the most popular and diverse. Game shooting is centred on the winter months; roughly from September through to February. On the game side there is rough shooting, pigeon shooting, wildfowling and formal game shooting. Much of the countryside that we enjoy today in Suffolk and throughout the UK has been influenced by game shooting. Many of the rural estates that make our county unique had their woodlands set out with shooting in mind. Although game shooting does not appeal to everyone it does have benefits for the countryside and wildlife as a whole. Land where game shooting takes place is tended by a gamekeeper, who feeds the game and protects it from predation, which promotes the wild bird and mammal population in general.

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Clay pigeon shooting is an all-yearround sport, but is probably busier during the warmer seasons. Within clay pigeon shooting there are various disciplines including sporting, trap and skeet. But broadly speaking, clay pigeon shooting started as a way of simulated game shooting for practice. Today it has evolved into an Olympic event at its highest level, yet it is still a sport that is open to all. As well as the fresh air and exercise, which can be gained from clay pigeon or game shooting; it is game shooting that also gives access to many parts of the county that you wouldn’t otherwise see. Youngsters and women are making increasing inroads into the shooting field. Closely supervised tuition is obviously a must for those starting in the sport. A thorough understanding of safety when shooting makes the experience that much more

enjoyable. For youngsters, an introduction into shooting helps to instil a greater sense of responsibility and trust in themselves. Kate Harris - Trulock & Harris

TRULOCK & HARRIS

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We stock most makes of Shotgun, Rifles and Air Rifles Ladies, Childrens Clothing & Boots Sporting Guns Fishing Tackle & Equipment Full Range of Fishing Accessories & Fresh Bait

Stockists of Le Chameau Laksen Hoggs Aigle Beretta Deer Hunter Musto Top Gun Stag Hucklecote Driza-Bone

Stuart Clay Traps Ltd 3a & 3b Wilford Bridge Road Melton Woodbridge Suffolk IP12 1DG Tel: 01394 385567 Email: sales@stuartsgunsandtackle.com

www.stuartsgunandtackle.com


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Sailing

Sail the Sunny Horizon in Suffolk Fancy dipping your toe in the water? Suffolk's waters, comprising beautiful coastlines and tranquil inland waters, are some of the most stunning in England. So, why see the sights of Suffolk by car when you can discover them by water? Those wanting to swap the hustle and bustle of the city for the cool and invigorating breeze of the east coast have a lot of options to choose from in Suffolk. With opportunities for the more experienced sailor and those never sailed before, there's something for everyone. Viking Mariners, based by the river Orwell, offer a large variety of sailing trips designed to meet your needs whatever you're after: spend a day on the river Orwell relaxing with afternoon tea or having a go at the helm if you wish, or enjoy a unique two nigh retreat, either staying at the local

Kesgrave Hall or sleeping onboard one of Viking Mariners' luxurious yatches. Departing from Southwold harbour, Coastal Voyager also offers a range of trips. The river cruises provide a peaceful way to see the beautiful views of the Blyth Estuary or, alternatively, a high speed blast trip can provide a thrilling half an hour. With a rich history of sailing, Suffolk waters have a long-standing reputation and if you're interested in boats of the past, Topsail Charters could provide an unforgettable experience. At the beginning of the 1900s there were over 2,000 traditional Thames Sailing Barges, but only a few remain now. Topsail Charters offers a unique chance for visitors to see some of the sights of Suffolk in these beautifully converted historic barges. You can choose between four hour cruises or whole day sails which both begin at the Ipswich


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Sailing

dock and pass through Woolvestone and Pin Mill among others. Beautiful scenery can also be seen by Flatford Mill, and many may recognise these local sights from John Constable's famous paintings. Here, rowing boats are available to hire and visitors can peacefully navigate the river while taking in the surrounding countryside.

Alternatively, if you're feeling adventurous perhaps you could try your hand at some of the water sporting activities available in this region? Kiteboarding UK offer lessons to people of all levels in Kessingland, and Kitesurf East Anglia also provides courses in Suffolk. Aswell as this, Learn Scuba offers the opportunity to take scuba diving courses in Lowestof

Whatever takes your fancy, discovering Suffolk's waters - especially if the sun is shining - can help open your eyes to wealth of beauty hidden away in our unspoilt coastlines and inland waters.

1 Wherry Lane, Ipswich, Suffolk, IP4 1LG 08453 707053 www.vikingmariners.co.uk

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Golf Thorpeness Golf Club The Golf Course at Thorpeness was designed by the renowned Scottish architect and 5 times Open Champion, James Braid, and opened in 1923. Laid out in 150 acres of wonderfully natural heath land and only a few hundred yards from the North Sea, the golf correspondent and course designer, Donald Steele, wrote that it was reminiscent of the inland glories of Sunningdale and Woodhall Spa. The course has a PAR of 69 and Standard Scratch of 71 and, whilst being one of East Anglia’s sternest tests for good players, is also highly enjoyable for the holiday golfer. Typically, for heath land courses, Thorpeness has wonderful, quick draining, sandy soil that makes it playable throughout the year, without temporary greens. The fairways wind their way through pine trees and silver birch, flanked by gorse and heather, giving a feeling of tranquillity and seclusion. Besides these usual heath land hazards, Thorpeness

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has a short pond hole and its signature hole, the 3rd,, runs beside and easily in reach of the famous Meare. The head greenkeeper, Ian Willett, is extremely proud of his course and, in particular, the abundance of flora, fauna and bird life that it boasts. The course has won a number of environmental awards and is designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest. Night Jars, Hobbies, Linnets and Woodlarks can all be spotted and the sound of the booming Bittern can sometimes be heard from the Meare. Visitors are very welcome at Thorpeness and the 36 bedroom hotel, which combines to provide the club house, offers a full bar service and an excellent range of food at all times. The hotel has a terrace and lovely gardens that run down to The Meare, where guests can enjoy a drink or a meal while watching the boating activity on the lake. Green fees are £40 during the week and £45 at weekends, but only £25 after 3.00 pm, when the course is often at its most

calm and beautiful. Tuition is available from two PGA qualified professionals and there is an excellent practice ground. The golf course is an important part of the overall offering of the village of Thorpeness. Originally conceived at the start of the 20th Century, the Ogilvie family developed the holiday village over the next 50 years. Today, almost 100 years after the opening of The Meare and The Country Club, it still appeals to families looking for an active, outdoor holiday with contemporary standards, in much the same way as when Glencairn Stuart Ogilvie, assisted by his friend JM Barrie, had his original dream.


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THE TILLEY Acknowledged as the finest outdoor and adventure hat in all the world. LOCAL STOCKISTS: ALDEBURGH O & C Butcher (Outfitters) Ltd 01728 452229 AYLSHAM Morston Country Sports 01263 735577 BECCLES Coes Mans Shop 01502 712283 BILLERICAY Allweathers 01268 293712 BISHOP’S STORTFORD Nomad Travel Store 01279 653694 BURNHAM MARKET The Hat Shop 01328 738267

BURY ST EDMUNDS Cotswold Outdoor 01284 749310 Stepping Out 01284 763150 CAMBRIDGE Open Air 01223 324666 CANVEY ISLAND Camping & General 01268 692141 FELIXSTOWE Coes Mans Shop 01394 282414 FRAMLINGHAM Trulock and Harris 01728 724776

GLANDFORD Cley Spy 01263 740088

KINGS LYNN Goddards 01553 772382

GREAT DUNMOW Jacks of Dunmow 01371 872483

LOWESTOFT Coes Mans Shop 01502 573751

HARWICH Coes Mans Shop 01255 502080

MALDON Maldon Outdoor Leisure 01621 853108

HOLT Morston Country Sports 01263 713932

NEWMARKET Goldings of Newmarket 01638 664682

IPSWICH Action Outdoors 01473 211647 W D Coes 01473 256061 Fox’s Chandlery 01473 689111

NORWICH Cotswold Outdoor 01603 232223 Gallyons Country Clothing 01603 622845 Norwich Camping 01603 717600

SAFFRON WALDEN Jacks Outdoor Wear 01799 521197 SAXMUNDHAM Suffolk Marine Centre Ltd 01728 605522 ST IVES R C Cadge Ltd 01480 462194 STOWMARKET Outdoor People 01449 675511 WROXHAM Norfolk Marine 01603 783150

For a full list of UK retailers or to request a brochure, please call 0800 374353 or visit www.Tilley.com


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Heritage Coast

The

Suffolk

Coastline

An enchanting, beautiful shoreline Photogragh: Rod Edwards

The 48-mile-long Suffolk Coastline is a most enchanting, beautiful shoreline with a mixture of solitude, romance, mystery, music and history all dominated by the North Sea which has, over thousands of years, eroded the East Anglian coastline. There are two commercial ports along the coastline, Felixstowe and Lowestoft, fortunately situated at the northern and southern extremities of the Suffolk coast. This leaves what is known as the Heritage Coast situated between the built-up areas, a scattering of small towns and villages along the shore interrupted by the Rivers Blyth, Ore and Deben. Each settlement has its own characteristic quality. Walberswick is a charming village situated, along the River Blyth, ‘a place for romance and artists’. Bridges built over small inlets in the early 20th century were called ‘kissing bridges’. To the south, isolated Shingle Street has an air of solitude combined with secrecy, because of Second World War activities. Aldeburgh is very historic. Its ancient Moot Hall is evidence of this. A large Martello Tower is all that remains of

the small port of Slaughden, part of Aldeburgh lost to the sea. The influence of Benjamin Britten envelopes the town, especially during the Aldeburgh Festival. The small village of Dunwich is all that remains of a great medieval port with its 17 churches, chapels and monasteries all lost to the sea by storm and coastal erosion. Evidence of the former medieval city is visible around the village. The ruinous Greyfriars Monastery comes into view at the western approach to Dunwich. In the grounds of the present church are the ruins of a leper chapel, and one of the buttresses from the last church to fall down the cliff, All Saints, has been re-erected in the churchyard. Walking along the clifftop, the remains of All Saints graveyard is marked by a lone gravestone. Human bones protrude from the eroding cliff face. An excellent museum in St James Street portrays the loss of the medieval city. The classic seaside resort of Southwold, with its lighthouse in the middle of the town, is to the north of Dunwich. This is the home of Adnams Brewery, creator of many fine ales. Attractive houses line the many well-kept greens. A new pier adds to the attractive

beach area and boats of all sizes and types are moored on the River Blyth in the south part of this prosperous town. In between the various settlements are beautiful areas of marshlands and sandy cliffs. The notable Minsmere Bird Reserve occupies one of these areas, adjacent to the National Trust Dunwich Heath. To the north of Southwold are the Easton, Covehithe and Benacre Broads, a haven for wildlife and occupied by man in the early medieval period. The true Suffolk treasure is Orford with its 12th century royal castle. The unspoilt town is situated on the River Ore. Across the river is Orford Ness with its banded lighthouse standing on a 10-mile-long shingle spit extending from Aldeburgh. Part of the spit is now owned by the National Trust. Orford is renowned for good food, especially seafood, available in its restaurants and shops. The town radiates history. The massive tower of St Bartholomew’s Church seems to have been built in competition with the castle keep – both are 90 feet high. Orford Museum is housed inside the castle. Suffolk Underwater Studies Museum is above the Craft Shop.


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Market Towns Needham Market, Stowmarket and Wickham Market. Suffolk is full of small and individual market towns or large villages, the majority of which will happily reward a visit

Historic high street havens Architechtural and retail delights

Just off the A14, heading inland from Ipswich, Needham Market stretches along a lengthy High Street sprinkled with intriguing buildings and small shops that invite closer inspection. Housed in the Old Town Hall is an antiques and collectors’ market. Elsewhere, you can shop for enviromentally-friendly paint and building products, curtains, garden accoutrements, fashion and country clothing and even hire a fancy-dress costume. The town’s historic market disappeared along with much of its prosperity at the time of the Plague in the 1660s. Happily, much of architectural interest has survived and the whole of the High Street is now a conservation area. The church has an amazing hammer-beam roof. Needham Lake and nature reserve is a fabulous local amenity at the site

of erstwhile gravel extractions. A few miles west is Stowmarket, home to the Museum of East Anglian Life which delivers a blast of the rural past across an enormous outdoor site within walking distance of the town centre.

Sudbury lies in a loop of the River Stour and was important during the glory days of the wool and silk weaving trade. Once a river port, the last industrial building by the riverside is occupied by the Quay theatre.

Wickham Market, off the A12 between Woodbridge and Aldeburgh, about 15 miles from Ipswich, is a large village rather than a town. It is a gem of a place with some interesting retail including a shop specialising in quilts. Shoppers in the know travel quite a distance to buy the local butcher’s sausages, female fashion and accessories. Wickham Market is conveniently close to a number of other attractions including Easton Farm Park, where there is a lot to see and do and Valley Farm, the only Carmague Stud in the country, which offers a range of horsey activities.

The artist Thomas Gainsborough (1727 -1788) grew up and went to school in Sudbury and his birthplace, the elegant Gainsborough’s House in Gainsborough Street, is a delightful museum housing a permanent collection of his paintings, drawings and etchings.

Close to the Essex border the town of

Gainsborough’s statue overlooks Market Hill (where markets are held on Thursdays and Saturdays). The surrounding mix of shops includes plenty small independents as well as bigger high street names and you do not have to look far to find a comfortable place to eat or drink. www.visit-suffolk.org.uk


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Art Galleries

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Kesgrave Arts

of galleries ready to offer

Ipswich, Suffolk IP5 1AF Email: info@kesgravearts.co.uk www.kesgravearts.co.uk

As much a shop as a gallery, RE+new in Woodbridge has been open for just over a year. Offering contemporary original artwork, design furniture – both retro and modern and finally a range of RE+new’s own stationery product, this place is a must for anyone interested in art and design. Owner Geoff Witts is delighted that RE+new is becoming a regular destination for like-minded folk, whether local artists and craftspeople or customers who simply want to buy something special for their homes. RE+new, 63a Thoroughfare, Woodbridge, Suffolk IP12 1AH Open: Tuesday - Saturday 9.30am – 5.30pm Email: geoffwitts@aol.com

you something different.

Tel: 01473 333553

Tel: 01394 386314

Whether you are on a day out

Kesgrave Arts belongs to South African artist, Theronda Hoffman. On display are a selection of paintings, etchings, ceramics, jewellery and crafts. Prices to suit your pocket. Something different, especially for you. Traditional watercolours of local scenes as well as colourful oil paintings. Exquisite handmade products. Indulge yourself in art, crafts, colour and jewellery. Ongoing exhibitions by different artists. Exhibitions held for charities. We also do workshops in water mixable oil, watercolor, life drawing, printing, ceramics, silver clay and graffiti. Art classes for adults and children. NEW for 2009 – picture framing.

browsing or looking for that

Kesgrave Arts 83 Main Road, Kesgrave,

in the

region special gift, here is a selection

The Saatchi Collection at Ipswich Art School The Giant has arrived in the gallery! A giant sleeps in the gallery alongside a giant pair of shoes made of black liquorice, a mini-mummy and a stuffed sloth. You will find all these things, and more, in this first contemporary art exhibition at the Ipswich Art School! From the Saatchi Gallery, works by seven artists have been selected for display at Ipswich. Alexandra Bircken + Thomas Houseago + Matthew Monahan + Will Ryman, Francis Upritchard + Rebecca Warren + Andy Yoder. These art works have never been shown together. All are sculptural using unexpected materials from liquorice to scraps of wool. The artists play with the idea of size so everyday objects become larger than life. Maggi Hambling said: "My beginnings were at Ipswich Art School. Its restoration as a place of vision would re-focus attention on to the vital richness of this place and its continuing inspiration for artists." The Saatchi Gallery has been running for over 20 years and provides an innovative forum for contemporary art. It presents work by mostly unseen young artists or by international artists who rarely exhibit in the United Kingdom. This is their first major loan to the Eastern region. 76

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The ‘Saatchi Gallery at Ipswich Art School’ exhibition is on for 6 months . The gallery is free admission and will open from Tuesday – Sunday 10am – 5pm. Once again the Ipswich Art School building becomes a space for artists and art. The Saatchi Gallery at Ipswich Art School 10th July 2010 – 9th January 2011 At Ipswich Art School, 1 Upper High Street, Ipswich Follow on facebook and twitter /IpswichArtSch


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Pen and Paintbrush

Artists and authors continue to draw inspiration from Suffolk’s landscape, coastline and way of life

T

Do not miss out on the wealth of here is definitely something about Suffolk that inspires the creative. contemporary art either. Maggi Artists and writers just cannot get Hambling’s giant scallop shell on Aldeburgh beach is not the only enough of the place. modern talking piece. For art lovers the joy lies in tracking Authors, past and present, are the famous, like Thomas Gainsborough similary drawn to Suffolk. Dickens and John Constable, and seeing the includes a number of recognisable fields, woods, rivers and great big Suffolk locations in his works. Those skies that inspired their works. queens of crime, Ruth Rendell and P. D. James, both have Suffolk connections. But there are other wonderful George Ewart Evans, whose books of paintings and other celebrated names reminiscences conjure a bygone Suffolk, to check out. To find out what is where, lived at Needham Market. Adrian Bell, get hold of a copy of the brilliant Oil father of Martin (he of the white suit) Paintings in Public Ownership for wrote of rural life from his own Suffolk Suffolk, recently published by the experiences and had a home at Public Catalogue Foundation. And Redisham near Bungay. even then, you will only be scratching the surface. Dodie Smith based Cruella de Ville’s dog-knapping hideaway in Suffolk. And Alfred Munnings went to school Kathleen Hale‘s beautifully eccentric in Framlingham and lived at Dedham. Southwold and its pretty neighbour Walberswick have attracted the likes of Philip Wilson Steer and the architect and designer Charles Rennie Macintosh (who painted pictures of the local flora).

Orlando (the Marmalade Cat) A Seaside Holiday, features the feline family enjoying the delights of a post-war Aldeburgh – thinly-disguised as the fictional Owlbarrow. George Crabbe was born next door to Aldeburgh at vanished Slaughden and is commemorated in the same parish church as the composer Benjamin Britten, who took the poet’s fisherman Peter Grimes and turned him into an opera. Eric Blair pinched his pen-name (George Orwell) from the Suffolk river. And John Lydgate, the ‘monk of Bury’, took his surname from the Suffolk village of Lidgate where legend has it he found sanctuary as a young and nameless boy in the latter part of the 14th-century. Lydgate had huge literary pretensions and churned out ballads, hymns and poetry by the yard for his Royal patrons, little of which remains. He was a great admirer of Chaucer. What Chaucer thought of him is unrecorded.

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Contemporary GLaSS StruCtureS by

CONSERVATORY AND ORANGERY SHOWSITE Notcutts Garden Centre Ipswich Road, Woodbridge, IP12 4AF countrysidehi.co.uk 01394 38 66 66

SPECIALIST TIMBER WINDOW AND DOOR SHOWROOM 8 Fornham Business Court Bury Drift, Fornham St Martin, Bury St Edmunds, IP31 1SL countrysidetimberwindows.com 01284 760 222 KM 508677


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the best of

suffolk interiors


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No two handles are the same.

Even if they are the same.

Handcrafted home furnishings

Lighting

Curtain Poles

Soft Furnishings

Furniture

Ironwork

Call 0844 414 1630, email sales@jim-lawrence.co.uk or visit www.jim-lawrence.co.uk


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Kitty’s Homestore is a well established Home Furnishings store in the beautiful market town of Framlingham. A fine collection of furniture, lighting, soft furnishings and fabrics, wonderful garden furniture, lanterns and candles. Beautiful table linen, crockery, glass and kitchenware. A tempting collection of fashion accessories, handbags, jewellery and scarves. Catherine House, 22 Well Close Square, Framlingham IP13 9DS Shop: 01728 723295 Open Monday to Saturday 9am - 5pm Email: info@kittyshomestore.com www.kittyshomestore.co.uk

Trading for over 30 years

reassuringlyexclusive surprisinglyaffordable

Showrooms: 212 Mile Cross Lane, Norwich NR6 6SE T: 01603 404644 31 Newgate, Beccles, Suffolk NR34 9QB T: 01502 711210

www.mulberrykitchens.uk.com

Mulberry

Kitchen Studios

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Jayrest Interiors

Bespoke British Style One of the few remaining British furniture manufacturers, Jayrest is a family-run company which has been successfully manufacturing bespoke upholstered furniture using traditional methods for more than forty years

Jayrest was founded by Alan James in a small workshop in Ipswich, Suffolk, just over forty years ago. It has gradually progressed to its current large premises with the factory and an adjoining large showroom located just down the road in Hadleigh. The company is renowned for the quality and value of its upholstered products, all made from solid beech frames and manufactured by craftsmen using traditional methods. All raw material is sourced in Great Britain and locally whenever possible - the beech frames are made in East Anglia, coil springs are English and all leather used is all from

top quality English hides. Only the finest fillings are used for the upholstery cushions (foam, fibre and Suffolk sourced feathers) and fabrics from most of the major houses such as Sanderson. Swaffer, J.P & G Baker, Romo and Parkertex can be selected by customers for their furniture.

bigger or smaller than usual, Jayrest craftsmen can alter the seat depth or the back height to make the piece of furniture perfect for the client. Chairs can be individually designed in this manner as part of a suite and there is no additional charge for this service!'

Much of the success of the company lies with the quality and experience of its staff, all of whom have a long history with Jayrest - the newest employee joined the company twenty-one years ago and the longest serving member of staff has achieved a record forty-one years and still counting.

Jayrest craftsmen can also design a sofa to fit into an exact space within a home or even build a sofa within the customer's

The contemporary trend in upholstered furniture is for natural fabrics in a plain or semi-plain design although many customers still prefer the traditional styles, while the antique designs such as the Knowle or Queen Anne have a continuing appeal. Leather suites are the newest addition to the company portfolio and they are increasing, in popularity at a steady rate. Jayrest offers a unique service to its customers, as each piece of furniture can be sized to suit individual requirements. Therefore, if the customer is shorter, taller,

home if access is limited (this would involve some extra charge). The attention to detail may sound expensive but the company retains realistic prices because it does not have High Street or retail park overheads. Locally based, their showroom has over twenty models on display - why not pay them a visit?

Jayrest Interiors 47 Lady Lane Industrial Estate, Hadleigh, Suffolk, IP7 6BQ 01473 822683 or 828268 www.jayrest.com

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a gourmet’s guide the best of eating out


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the best of eating out

County class he highest rated hotel on the East Anglian coast, few can come close to the indulgence of the Brudenell Hotel on Aldeburgh’s cosmopolitan seafront. Re-opened for Easter 2010, it has been transformed into a luxury destination, worthy of its new gradings - 4 AA Stars and an 85% merit award and the Gold Hotel Award from VisitEngland (formerly the English Tourist Board), one of only two in the whole of Suffolk.

T

Spread out over all floors, including at ground level, the 44 cosseting bedrooms either look over the town and river marshes to the rear or at the front enticingly out to sea over the beach below. Bedecked with calming colours and interesting soft furnishings, the array of accommodation suits all needs, from romantic deluxe rooms to spacious family ones, as well as catering for those less able. The ground floor and the extensive

public areas are very much the centre of the new look Brudenell. There has been a dramatic change to the dining experience with a whole new interior design, but the talents of our Head Chef, Justin Kett, holder of two AA Rosettes for the high quality of his cuisine, remain as do the magnificent sea views from our trademark picture windows. At the new eye-catching cocktail bar, there is seating to one end for seafood dining with an allnew Pinney’s of Orford menu where linking up with the famous fish suppliers and smokehouse just down the coast, Justin is making use of their excellent products, proving popular with diners seeking a true coastal flavour. The whole restaurant has been given a smart face lift, including atmospheric ‘mood lighting’ which changes to give different ambiences at different times of day. Having arrived back in early 2008 from the Michelin starred Castle Hotel in Taunton, Justin is an avid fan of the

whole county foodie scene, especially the superb local produce at his fingertips from our excellent artisan producers surrounding us here in East Suffolk. Justin’s cuisine is very much about reworked classics which are perennial favourites, but given a little twist alongside more innovative dishes which show off his finesse with layered textures, bold intense flavours and an obvious understanding of those fabulous fresh seasonal ingredients. Whilst the Brudenell’s tempting menus make it hard to choose, a signature meal might start with the Brudenell’s own smoked Wester Ross salmon with tempura oyster, marinated limes and mizuna leaf; a main course duo of slow roast belly and pan-fried tenderloin of Dingley Dell pork with vanilla and apple purée; and ending in style with white chocolate and raspberry mousse, lemon biscotti and a fresh raspberry milkshake. A true taste of Suffolk at the Brudenell, where coast meets country.


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a gourmet’s guide Milsom Hotels and Restaurants – the finest places to eat, drink and stay … The Milson Group of hotels and restaurants is rather special. It all started with Le Talbooth, the flag ship of the group. With its idyllic garden setting beside the river Stour, the award winning two AA rosette restaurant is perfect for an intimate dinner for two or an elaborate celebration in the marquee on the upper terrace. Also in Dedham is milsoms, a contemporary bar/brasserie with an AA rosette, where you can eat outside under the huge architecturalsail. There’s a no booking at milsoms so turn up when you please – the full menu is available from noon until 9.30pm(10pm on Saturdays) so there's no rush. A short drive away is The Pier at Harwich, a unique property in an equally unique location. The Pier is right beside the quay in Harwich old town and has two superb restaurants. The Harbourside with two AA rosettes on the first floor with fine views over the Stour and Orwell estuaries. It specialises in locally caught seafood and also serves the best steaks in town! On the ground floor the Ha’penny Brasserie has a relaxed, contemporary feel, serving delicious fish and chips and like milsoms in Dedham is open all day with no booking – perfect if you’re arriving by sea! Last but by no means least, milsoms Kesgrave Hall, a magnificent Georgian mansion in 38 acres of lawn and woodlands. The kitchen champions local Suffolk produce and the restaurant is open all day from noon again no booking is required. To sum up – five fabulous restaurants all with individual style and character with real synergy of food, atmosphere, service and true hospitality - where you can also stay! Visit our website www.milsomhotels.com and see for yourselves

the finest places to eat, drink, stay...

Hall Road, Kesgrave 01473 333741

Gun Hill, Dedham

01206 323150

Stratford Rd, Dedham The Quay, Harwich

01206 322795

01255 241212

Gun Hill, Dedham

01206 323150

Stratford Rd, Dedham

01206 322367

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the best of eating out Bistro on the Quay, Ipswich Bistro on the Quay is situated within a row of historic wet dock buildings in the centre of Ipswich’s waterfront redevelopment area which combines modern and traditional buildings resulting in a dramatic skyline. The restaurant is housed in a former salt warehouse overlooking the new marina and is easily accessible by foot, car or sail. The Bistro serves excellent food and wine at sensible prices in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. Both fixed price and à la carte menus are always available, a light lunch menu is also on offer Monday-Saturday. Private dining is also available by special arrangement in the upstairs dining area which can accommodate up to 30 people. This is an ideal venue for meetings, boardroom lunches, intimate wedding breakfasts and celebration meals for friends and family, with menus tailored to your individual occasion. Reservations Lunch noon-2pm daily, noon 2.30pm Sundays Dinner 6.30-9.30 (closed Sunday evenings)

Th e O ld e Bull In n - Barto n Mills We lc o m in g, re laxin g an d q uirky! The Olde Bull Inn at Barton Mills, is a little gem on the Suffolk/Norfolk border. The Inn has undergone extensive refurbishment since Wayne & Cheryl bought it in 2007, their teams passion and dedication to quality shines through in everything they do, from the fantastic home cooked meals made from the finest quality ingredients to the best local suppliers, the amazing wine list and the award winning real ales. Our team of young and enthusiastic chefs prepare and cook our AA rosette award winning food all day every day. You can choose to eat in our charming bar area or of an evening or Sunday lunch you can relax and enjoy the atmosphere of our Oak room restaurant. On a balmy summers day why not chill out with a glass of wine and some tasty fresh seasonal food with friends in our delightful courtyard. You can even make a night or weekend of your visit and stay in one of our individually designed boutique bedrooms.

Special Light Lunch Menu Situated on the historic waterfront of Ipswich

Bistro on the Quay Wherry Quay, Ipswich, Suffolk IP4 1AS Tel: 01473 286677 www.bistroonthequay.co.uk the best of Suffolk 89


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a gourmet’s guide The Angel Hotel, Bury St Edmunds

Salthouse Harbour Hotel, Ipswich

The Angel Eaterie with it’s stunning artwork and cool design, you will enjoy a stylish award winning meal whilst overlooking one of the prettiest Georgian Squares in the country.

The unique art collection, sculptures and high ceilings enhance the vibrant atmosphere of the Salthouse Eaterie. Enjoy award winning food whilst overlooking Ipswich’s waterfront.

Executive Head Chef Simon Barker believes in keeping food simple. He takes the best local seasonal ingredients and develops his dishes from there, producing good, honest flavours. Some of his trademark dishes include pan roasted scallops with cauliflower puree and pancetta, squid with sweet chilli, tomato and pepper salsa, roasted beetroot salad with buffalo mozzarella.

Executive Head Chef Simon Barker believes in keeping food simple. He takes the best local seasonal ingredients and develops his dishes from there, producing good, honest flavours. Some of his trademark dishes include pan roasted scallops with cauliflower puree and pancetta, squid with sweet chilli, tomato and pepper salsa, roasted beetroot salad with buffalo mozzarella.

Aside from bottled wines we have over 30 wines by the glass that means you are spoiled for choices to compliment your dishes.

Aside from bottled wines we have over 30 wines by the glass that means you are spoiled for choices to compliment your dishes.

Our monthly food calendar has been drawn up to feature seasonal ingredients which are used to inspire some of our favourite dishes.

Our monthly food calendar has been drawn up to feature seasonal ingredients which are used to inspire some of our favourite dishes.

Visit our website for details of events and menus www.theangel.co.uk/eaterie

Comfortable, relaxed & stylish

Enjoy an award winning meal in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. We make everything on site from the fresh baked bread every day to the homemade soups and sauces to produce the finest dining. Why not stop by for a spot of lunch or unwind with an evenings conviviality. Book a table now and enjoy. The Angel Hotel, Angel Hill, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk IP33 1LT. Reserve by telephone 01284 714000.

www.theangel.co.uk

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Visit our website for details of events and menus www.salthouseharbour.co.uk

Stimulate your senses Dine in our boutique restaurant where Simon Barker and his team prepare modern British food sourced locally.

Wherever you sit you can enjoy the hotel’s collection of contemporary paintings, sculptures and interesting nic-nacs. In summer, dine alfresco and watch the harbour from our patio. Book a table now and enjoy. Salthouse Harbour Hotel, Neptune Quay, Ipswich, Suffolk IP4 1AX. Reserve by telephone 01473 226789.

www.salthouseharbour.co.uk


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the best of eating out Wentworth Hotel, Aldeburgh

Seckford Hall Hotel

Overlooking the shingle beach, the Wentworth provides a wonderful setting for morning coffee, an informal lunch or a candlelit dinner.

Seckford Hall Hotel near Woodbridge has to be one of Suffolk’s premier 4 star hotels, set in the most wonderful setting.

In addition to the restaurant, there are comfortable lounges, a sun terrace and a newly-designed garden, all with terrific sea-views. The cooking style is a combination of classical-modern English with Mediterranean influences.

With its elegantly laid tables and monastic oak panelling, the main Hotel Restaurant has been awarded two prestigious AA Rosettes in recognition of the high standard of cuisine on offer. A less formal bistro-style experience awaits you in the Club Restaurant, which is housed in a converted Tudor Tithe barn with outdoor seating, offering light lunches and teas by day and a stylish bistro by night. You will find a wide selection of dishes in both restaurants, with an emphasis on seasonal local produce.

All dishes are freshly prepared from local produce, including seafood from Butley Oysterage, poultry, game and beef from farms in Norfolk and Suffolk. Owned and managed by the Pritt family since 1920, the hotel has a relaxed and informal ambience, attracting frequent visits by local residents and guests from farther afield.

For a quick business lunch, or to catch up with family and friends, enjoy the cosy atmosphere of the Tudor Bar and Lounge. Available Monday to Saturday lunchtimes, enjoy tasty home cooked food, including sandwiches, bar meals and snacks.

‘ A fine seaside Hotel & Restaurant where you can relax and enjoy great hospitality

The Wentworth Hotel, Aldeburgh, Suffolk Tel: 01728 452312 Fax: 01728 454343 Email: stay@wentworth-aldeburgh.co.uk www.wentworth-aldeburgh.com the best of Suffolk 91


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a gourmet’s guide Thorpeness Hotel, Thorpeness

White Lion Hotel, Aldeburgh

Thorpeness Hotel is situated in a peaceful setting on the banks of the Meare. Its spacious restaurant offers an elegant, yet relaxed ambience and lends itself well to a variety of special occasions.

The White Lion Hotel has a longestablished reputation for serving fresh fish and seafood, in addition to a variety of traditional British dishes, all of which are lovingly created by the hotel’s talented brigade of chefs.

The informal Patio Bar offers an exciting selection of light bites, including panini, succulent local sausages, homemade Adnams beer-battered cod and a variety of other dishes. The patio, which overlooks landscaped gardens, is ideal for alfresco dining in the summer.

Choose from dining in the oak-panelled, AA-rosette restaurant or in the informal sea-facing bar. Open throughout the day for morning coffee, lunch, light snacks, afternoon tea and dinner. Traditional roast served on Sundays.

Open daily for morning coffee, lunch, light snacks, afternoon tea and dinner. The hotel has a reputation for its traditional Sunday lunches.

The bar is stocked with a variety of real ales and an interesting selection of fine wines, designed to complement a variety of meals and occasions.

1

A proper sunday lunch... Thorpeness Hotel is a wonderful setting for a traditional Sunday lunch.

Enjoy succulent roasts with all the trimmings and imaginative vegetarian and fish dishes, all using fresh, local produce. After lunch take a stroll around Thorpeness Meare.

Situated on the seafront in the delightful town of Aldeburgh, The White Lion Hotel is perfect for short breaks, whatever the time of the year. • Magnificent sea views

• All rooms with en-suite facilities

Now that’s what Sundays are all about!

• Comfortable lounges and bar

• Delicious fresh food served in our • AA rosette Restaurant or sea-facing Bar

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AA ###

thorpeness

hotel & golf club

EST.1922

Thorpeness Hotel & Golf Club Lakeside Avenue Thorpeness IP16 4NH 01728 452176 www.thorpeness.co.uk

• Open for morning coffee, lunches, • light snacks, afternoon tea and dinner

For more information please contact 01728 452720 or info@whitelion.co.uk www.whitelion.co.uk


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the best of eating out The Swan Hotel at Lavenham

Brudenell, Aldeburgh

The Swan is the perfect destination for food lovers. Tudor oak beams and inglenook fireplaces blend beautifully with its elegant and classic décor, providing a warm and inviting ambience.

Dining at the Brudenell is not pretentious, nor is it extravagant. It is relaxed and informal and provides a wonderful setting for a variety of occasions… and special occasions. Our AA two rosette restaurant has panoramic sea views with a décor that is inspired by the vibrant colours that can be found on the coast throughout the year.

A variety of dining options are available, including the elegant AA two rosette Gallery Restaurant, informal Garden Lounge, nostalgic Old Bar or alfresco in the hotel’s tranquil gardens during the summer. Open daily for morning coffee, lunch, light snacks, afternoon tea and dinner. Traditional roast served on Sundays. A broad range of fine European and ‘new world’ wines are designed to complement a wide variety of inspired dishes, for which The Swan is fast gaining an impeccable and envied reputation.

Your table is ready... Dine in our elegant AA two rosette Gallery Restaurant, relax in the informal Garden Lounge and Bar, or experience alfresco dining in the garden and enjoy the 15th Century charm of The Swan. Join us for morning coffee, lunch, afternoon tea, dinner and traditional Sunday lunch. Our fresh seasonal menus are sure to please! Flair and imagination you can taste

01787 247477 AA ★★★★ www.theswanatlavenham.co.uk

Our menus are the inspiration of head chef, Justin Kett, who has a veritable passion for using the very best ingredients that he can find to produce simple dishes that ooze unadulterated flavours. Suffolk has the reputation of being the country’s richest producer of locally-grown organic food and Justin pays homage to this with his firm ethos of using sustainably and ethically sourced local produce. The outstanding and consistent feedback which he receives throughout the year is testament to this.

New season, new menus and a fabulous seaside setting

Experience the new look Brudenell, where our fabulous beachfront setting and seasonally-inspired menus blend effortlessly with indulgence and informality. The Brudenell Hotel, The Parade, Aldeburgh, Suffolk IP15 5BU Telephone: 01728 452071 www.brudenellhotel.co.uk

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a gourmet’s guide Hintlesham Hall Hotel, Ipswich

The Crown at Woodbridge

Hintlesham Hall’s award-winning cuisine is not just for formal dining or celebrations.

A boutique townhouse inn with award-winning dining and Londonesque glass-roofed bar, this stylish newcomer has caused quite a stir in the world of Suffolk restaurants.

The hall is a stunning venue in which to savour a lighter bite from Harry’s menu, our informal dining menu. The eclectic, mouth-watering selection of dishes can be enjoyed in any of our sumptuous public lounges. Depending on the season, you can choose to eat by a roaring log fire or, in summer, dine alfresco on our extensive terraces and enjoy our magnificent gardens. Either way, you will be served by our professional, friendly team. Harry’s menu is available from 7.30am to 10.30pm daily so why not pop in for a steak sandwich and a coffee or maybe a plate of pasta and a glass of wine?

I I I I I I I I

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Magnificent 16th Century Manor House Hotel Excellent location – 4 miles west of Ipswich Award winning restaurant – 4 Red Stars Harry’s Menu for casual dining, available all day Stunning conference rooms (exclusive use available) Licensed for Civil Ceremony – Beautiful gardens Helipad – Health Club – Associated Golf Course Complimentary broadband WiFi internet access throughout

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Its iconic terrace may have stood in part for over 500 years at the heart of this charming riverside market town but it now offers a far more modern indulgent destination. Michelin listed and 2010 winner of a prestigious national award from travel guru Alastair Sawday, its cosmopolitan take on ‘R & R’ in ten soothing designer bedrooms upstairs and refined earthy dining downstairs is quite unique; as much a place to celebrate on special occasions as to come for a simple midweek supper to escape the hassle of cooking at home.


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the best of eating out The Orwell Hotel, Felixstowe

The Crown Inn, Framlingham

Close to the Town Centre, the Hotel which dates back to 1898, has spacious public areas, traditionally decorated with the charm and elegance you would expect. These are tastefully combined with modern facilities including a Wi Fi network throughout the building.

Built in 1553 as a traditional coaching inn, The Crown Hotel is not just a residential hotel with 14 well appointed bedrooms, it's a vibrant part of this Market Town's community, providing a superb environment for locals and visitors alike.

Ideal for short breaks or longer holidays, The Orwell offers comfortable accommodation with 58 tastefully furnished en-suite rooms, including five suits.

The restaurant offers outstanding dishes using seasonal and local ingredients from local suppliers. In the summer the outside courtyard is a joy to discover; created from the original coaching thoroughfare and filled with flowers, it offers wonderful secluded alfresco dining - the perfect place to wind down and relax. In the winter months the wood-burning open fires and oak beamed bar and restaurant offers an atmospheric and cosy retreat.

The Orwell Hotel has lots of places to enjoy, including Westerfield’s Restaurant, Abigail’s Buttery and many areas to sit and relax. Enjoy excellent cuisine, fine wine and ales in a friendly atmosphere all provided by highly trained staff. The hotel can cater for Weddings, Meetings or Events, plus there are regular organised events. The Orwell is just a call away or why not drop in and see us. With lots to offer and lots going on, it would be a shame not to!

The Crown is a vibrant part of this market town’s community, providing a superb environment for locals and visitors alike Market Hill, Framlingham, Suffolk, IP13 9AN Tel: +44 (0) 1728 723 521 www.framlinghamcrown.co.uk the best of Suffolk 95


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Sampling Food at its Source S

taying in Suffolk doesn't just involve seeing beautiful countryside, walking alluring coastal paths or discovering the rich history of the buildings... it's also about sampling the wonderful locally produced food. Suffolk's agricultural heritage is a long and proud one. We're recognised as having one of the most productive, dynamic and progressive farming sectors anywhere in the world and boast a large number of established food and drink manufacturers as well as countless restaurants using locally sourced products. Supplying a roll-call of internationallyrenowned large-scale manufacturers, including the likes of Muntons, Greene King, Birds Eye, Adnams, Premier Foods and Aspalls, Suffolk ingredients are found everywhere - from Maltesers and Branston Pickle, to a pint of Old Speckled Hen. Many of these are now common household names and have certainly made their mark in Suffolk. From Aspalls Cider, established in Suffolk since 1728 and Palmers Bakery, providing the local community with warm bread since 1752, to the likes of the relatively new Paddy and Scots, coffee roasters based in Earl Soham, and Nethergate Brewery in Clare, famous for its coriander beer, Suffolk has proved a haven for those who are passionate about fresh, local produce. Agriculture plays a strong role in Suffolk and, interestingly, this county was the

birthplace of Lady Eve Balfour - the founder of the Soil Association. It's no wonder then that as well as arable farming, poultry and pig production are important areas of activity. In fact, an impressive 20% of the UK's organic, outdoor-reared pork comes from our county and we have the highest population density of pigs as compared to any other county.

Among others, the free range pork from Jimmy Butler's herd of 18,000 pigs in Blythburgh has proved a popular choice among shoppers. His policy of using no antibiotics or growth promoters coupled with a strong commitment to sustainable farming has earned him the prestigious 'Pig Farmer of the Year Award' from Farmer's Weekly. Another farming name emerging from the depths of Suffolk is Jimmy Docherty: owner of Jimmy's Farm. Made popular from the TV show, the 93 acre farm was derelict for fifteen years before Jimmy took over in 2003. Now a full working farm, the area is home to rare Essex pig breeds as well as a 30 acre woodland, nature trail, Farm Shop, Adventure Play Area and Field Kitchen and accepts visitors seven days a week. 2009 saw the first ever festival here: Harvest at Jimmys. Bringing together the best music and the best food from all around, Harvest aims to provide an inspiring and relaxing end to summer. Last year's lineup included the likes of Jamie Oliver's Fifteen, James Martin, Gino D'Acampo, KT Tunstall Athlete and Jose Gonzalez and this year's plans are just as attractive.


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photography Emma Kindred

Food Producers

It's apparent that fresh, locally sourced food is an integral part of Suffolk life. While large-scale production remains Suffolk's focus, our smaller producers have successfully responded to the demand for high-quality, niche food and drink products that are locally made and can be traced to their source. The result is a diverse range of products everything from free range pork and hand-made cheeses, to rapeseed oil, outdoor organic chickens, cider, beer and oysters.

So, what does this all mean for Suffolk visitors? Such a mouth-watering menu of freshly caught fish, home-grown meat, delectable vegetables, herbs and mouthwatering fruit, means nothing less than a number of award-winning farm shops, farmers' markets, restaurants, pubs and eateries spread across the county for all to delight in. There is a huge variety of restaurants and cafes which have proved popular with locals, tourists and food critics alike: examples include the famous Fish and Chip shop in Aldeburgh, Mains Restaurant in Yoxford, the Bildestone Crown and the Lowhouse in Laxfield to name but a few. For those who like a drink or two, there are also vineyard and brewery tours galore: why not visit Shawsgate vineyard in Framlingham, Adnam's brewery in Southwold or Green King in Bury St Edmunds? Farmer's Markets, local shops and Food Festivals also give visitors a chance to

sample some locally produced food: Food shops such as Focus Organic in Haleworth, Southwold and Ufford Produce and Provision Co in Lower Ufford are just two of the fantastic shops stocking a diverse range of fresh produce. Eye Country market is well worth a look - this was shortlisted on the BBC Good Food Programme Best Food Market 2009, and other farmers markets include those held at Snape Maltings, Southwold Pier, Stowmarket Market Place and Easton Farm Park. A current list of the farmers' markets available during your stay is available to view at: www.visit-suffolk.org.uk The Suffolk Food Hall is also one for the list. Providing a showcase for quality local food, this is a popular place for visitors. It houses multiple food specialists all under one roof and is also home to a cafe stocked full of local produce and a restaurant boasting fantastic views of the River Orwell. Finally, if you're in the area during September and October, Aldeburgh's Food and Drink Festival is a must. Showing over 70 exhibitors with organic vegetables, fresh and smoked fish, rare breed meat and game, cheeses, frozen yoghurt, jams, beer, wine and lager, the festival is a fantastic introduction to what's on offer in Suffolk. The main festival weekend event includes talks, workshops and cookery demonstrations from top chefs. For more information visit: www.aldeburghfoodanddrink.co.uk Alternatively, if you want some more hands on experience, why not go on a 'Food Safari'? Described as 'gourmet

food experiences', this recently launched business offers a unique opportunity to go behind the scenes at some of Suffolk's best food and drink producers. Through its workshops and events, encompassing farm walks, tours, butchery classes and cookery courses, you can meet committed local producers, hear their fascinating stories and gets hands on experience. These events cover a diverse range: those wanting to explore a pig farm are able to visit Blythburgh Free Range Pork, near Southwold, see a pork butchery demonstration and attend a hands-on sausage-making workshop. Alternatively seafood lovers are able to visit the traditional oyster beds and smokehouse of Pinney's of Orford, where the Pinney family have been smoking fish using whole oak logs in a smokehouse and cultivating oysters for over fifty years. Visitors here can learn how to carve a whole smoked salmon and shuck oysters before enjoying a delicious seafood lunch at Butley Orford Oysterage. Other Food Safari days take you behind the scenes of Suffolk Farmhouse Cheese, Wild Meat Company and the Pump Street Bakery For more information about these events and workshops, please visit: www.foodsafari.co.uk As a county, Suffolk has a diverse and wonderful landscape and this is reflected through the delightful range of local food which is produced in this region. From Coppella fruit juice and Lowestoft's fresh fish to award winning pork and mouth-watering cheese, sampling Suffolk's food and drink at its source really is a special experience. the best of Suffolk 97


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The Wild Meat Company The Wild Meat Company is one of Rick Stein's Food Heroes and has been highly praised by Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall. It was established in 1999 by Robert Gooch and Paul Denny with the aim of taking the muck and mystery out of buying, preparing and eating game. All their game is harvested from their own or neighbouring farms and estates in East Anglia. Robert has worked in farming all his life and knows many of the farms that harvest the game. Paul, a gamekeeper's son is a qualified butcher and is the expert in preparing meat for the table. For further information visit www.wildmeat.co.uk

Blythburgh Pork Blythburgh free range pork has made a name for itself as the premium pork brand in the UK market. The secret to its quality is that the pigs are truly free range with no antibiotics or growth promoters resulting in a happier, slower growing pig and ultimately a better flavour. Father and son, Jimmy and Alistair Butler have been a widely praised for their commitment to sustainable farming and are winners of the Farmer's Weekly 'Pig Farmer of the Year Award'. For further information visit www.freerangepork.co.uk

Pinney's Of Orford Back in the 1950's Richard Pinney took the first steps to resurrect the oyster beds at Butley Creek, where oysters had been cultivated for centuries. Alongside the oyster beds he created a smokehouse using a unique but traditional method using whole Suffolk oaks. A restaurant and shop, The Butley Orford Oysterage, in Orford's pretty market square followed in the 1960s. Three generations on, the family are still running the enterprise. Their own fishing boats produce a regular supply of fresh fish, including sole, mullet, lobster and crab and fish is still smoked daily in the Smokehouse at Butley Creek. For further information visit www.butleyorfordoysterage.co.uk

Sutton Hoo Chickens The Nash family rear free range and organic chickens on grassland next to ancient Sutton Hoo burial site with beautiful views across to the river Deben and Woodbridge. It's a combination of factors that help their Suffolk White chickens taste so good, firstly they have time to grow; intensively reared birds are often killed at 5 weeks, Sutton Hoo chickens average at 12 weeks; secondly the chickens always have access to fresh grazing grass; and thirdly they've got 40 acres of space to run around. All this contributes to a happier, leaner and more naturally-grown bird with great texture and tone, and a delicious flavour. For further information visit www.suttonhoochicken.com

Suffolk Farmhouse Cheese Suffolk Farmhouse Cheeses is a family-run business established in July 2004 by Jason and Katharine Salisbury. From the milk of their own herd of pedigree Guernseys, they produce fine hand-made cheeses by traditional methods including Suffolk Gold and Suffolk Blue. They also make other dairy products and rear their own beef and pork. For futher information visit www.suffolkcheese.co.uk

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Food Producers Peakhill Farm Organics The White Family have been farming at Peakhill, near Saxmundham, for nearly 40 years and from the start always had a 'wildlifefriendly' and have been certified organic since 2000. As well as their 40-strong suckler-herd of South Devon cattle they grow organic vegetables and salads. Rob White is a passionate advocate of local and organic food production and all the animals live as naturally as possible, spending as much time as possible outdoors. Peakhill's meat and vegetables can be bought at the farm. For further information visit www.peakhillfarm.co.uk

Shawsgate Shawsgate is one of East Anglia's oldest commercial vineyards producing a range of white, red and rosé wines from seven different grape varieties, and is perhaps best known for its Bacchus dry wine which has consistently won national and international awards over the last five years. The winery itself was built in the late 80s and is equipped with over 300 stainless steel tanks based on a New Zealand model. For further information www.shawsgate.co.uk

Stokes Stokes Sauces is the main brand of dressings, sauces, condiments and mustards produced by Rick Sheepshanks and his team at Rendlesham under the umbrella name of Essfoods. Other brands are Suffolk Mud and Staverton Ewe whilst The Suffolk Saucery makes products for other leading brand names such as Jamie Oliver and Gressingham Foods. The key principles of Stokes Sauces are: production in small batches; use of the best and finest ingredients and making and taking time to do it right. Rick's vision was to produce the best tasting preserved sauce you can buy in a jar. For Futher information www. stokessauces.co.uk

10 Ways to Eat 'Slow'

3. Think global, eat local. Search out farmers and producers near to your home through farmers markets, farm shops and delis. Not only does this reduce food miles but it keeps your money in the local economy.

Polly Robinson runs Food Safari. I founded Food Safari because of passion for sourcing, cooking and eating the abundance of good food available in Suffolk. Here are my tips for how to shop, cook and eat well and, most importantly, enjoy! 1. Give yourself (some) pleasure. Indulge all your senses. Eating well doesn’t have to be serious! 2. Bring the seasons to the table. Each season rediscover the pleasure of tastes you haven't experienced for a year.

4. Eat something you have grown… …and grow something you eat. Food you’ve grown yourself is surely the best tasting food in the world! 5. Meet farmers, growers, artisans and specialized sellers in person. Farmers’ markets, Country Markets and food festivals are great places to start.

8. Cook! It’s the best way to know exactly what you are eating! Creating food to share with family and friends is satisfying and doesn’t need to be a chore. 9. Shop wisely. Buying local produce isn’t necessarily more expensive than shopping in a supermarket. Like for like small producers and retailers often provide better value as well as better quality. 10. Become a taste explorer. Share your pleasure in shopping and eating good food with children, family and friends.

6. Be Inquisitive. When in a shop, restaurant, bar or supermarket, ask questions about where the products are from or how it’s produced. 7. Choose meat and fish with particular care. Search out free-range or grass-fed meat and choose line-caught and sustainable fish species. the best of Suffolk 99


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The Jolly Sailor The Jolly Sailor is a 16th century pub, offering fantastic vi ews, a wide range of Ale’s and wines and possibly the best food in Suffolk.

As well as fantastic food, we also have newspapers to read, games to play, and there is always music to while away an evening or two, from sea shanties to Jazz and Opera in the garden.

Quay Street, Orford, Woodbridge, Suffolk, IP12 1LG T: 01394 450243 E: hello@thejollysailor.net W: www.thejollysailor.net


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the best of the region

Pub Guide Whether you are looking for refreshments on a hot sunny day, or a cosy corner on a winter’s evening, our guide can point you in the right direction…

The Moon and Mushroom

Nikki and Martin welcome you to their award winning 16th Century Inn. A PUB FOR ALL SEASONS In spring and summer enjoy a delicious homemade meal outside amongst our gorgeous vines and flowers with a glass of superb New World wine.When the nights draw in come inside and sit near a blazing log fire and treat yourself to some fine game or a casserole while drinking award winning local cask ales.Whatever your taste we will have something for you. Visit us soon!!

Tel: 01473.785320 www.moonandmushroom.co.uk

High Road Swilland, IP6 9LR

The Crown, Snape

The Anchor, Woodbridge

The Crown Inn Snape is located in the village of Snape between Aldeburgh and Orford on the Suffolk heritage coast. With its old beams, brick floors and probably the finest double Suffolk settle in existence around the inglenook fireplace which makes it so welcoming in the cold months of winter, we also have a spacious garden which is ideal for summer dining. With a strong emphasis on food, our menu offers dishes cooked from locally sourced seasonal produce including our own home reared meats and produce from our own allotment. We are only 5 minutes walk from Snape Maltings and we offer pre and post concert dining. (Booking is advisable).

A wonderful 16th Century pub situated just across the road from the River Deben, the Woodbridge Tide Mill and Marina. Featuring a real old-style interior with gorgeous oak beams and open fires. Since taking over two and a half years ago,Vernon Blackmore and his team have established the pub as the best place to go for quality traditional pub food and also East Asian dishes derived from Venon’s traditional heritage. Superb Greene King real ales and an extensive wine list just adds to its appeal. Improvements this year include more outside seating to the side of the building to add to the already popular tables to the front. All year round its the place to visit. See you soon!

Tel: 01728 688324 www.snape-crown.co.uk

Tel: 01394 382649

Bridge Road, Snape, IP17 1SL

19 Quay Street, Woodbridge, IP12 1BX the best of Suffolk 101


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Pub Guide The King’s Head, Woodbridge

Pub Classics include: Locally caught broadside battered cod, hand cut chips, homemade mushy peas & tartar sauce. Five winds farm caramelised onion pork sausages, buttery mashed potato, caramelised onion gravy & seasonal vegetables. Dry aged ribeye or sirloin, handcut chips & roasted garlic tomatoes.

The Ship Inn at Levington, overlooking the beautiful banks of the River Orwell, is thriving under the new ownership of Susan and Adrian Searing. With the experienced manager Paul Kruse at the helm, this popular pub continues to produce some of the finest food in the Ipswich area. Using local produce wherever possible, this kitchen offers very varied choices, innovative recipes and many favourite classics, combining to give guests an excellent dining experience. The exciting new wine list has been created by Willy Lebus of Bibendum Wines, and it offers choices for all palates and all wallets. It is hard to beat the sensation of sitting on the terrace in the early evening sun sharing a chilled bottle of Chateau d'Astros Rose Cotes de Provence – certainly one of life’s little pleasures, and right here on your doorstep… So whether you are ambling the riverside paths, or bringing an important client to lunch, The Ship at Levington is a real treasure, for a memorable meal with professional service.

Tel: 01394 387750

Tel: 01473 659573

17 Market Hill, Woodbridge, IP12 4LP

Church Lane, Levington, Ipswich, IP10 0LQ

The Affleck Arms, Dalham, Newmarket

Ye Olde Bell and Steelyard, Woodbridge

Situated six miles from Newmarket and the famous racecourse, in the thatched village of Dalham, The Affleck Arms dates back to the 16th century. This friendly pub offers a cosy restaurant and a sleepy bar with original beams and a prominent inglenook fireplace. It carries Cask Marque accreditation, two cask ales from local breweries and holds annual beer-fests every June. The homecooked food is exceptional and very well-priced catering for families, racegoers and walkers. There is a large car park at the rear, front riverside garden overlooking this picturesque Suffolk village, en suite accommodation available.

The antidote to your busy day

Located in the historic Market Hill, The King's Head offers real beer, real food and real welcome. With its attractive beer garden and outdoor dining area you can choose to while away the hours here or in the cosy Barrack Room Restaurant which is also available for parties. Local Seasonal produce used to create an exciting selection of daily specials together with a classic pub menu. Children and dogs are especially welcome.

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The Ship Inn, Levington

Located in the historic town of Woodbridge Ye Olde Bell & Steelyard was built in 1540 and is one of the last two steelyards left in England, it is also grade 1 listed so it is steeped in history. You can be sure of a warm welcome. Our food is home cooked from fresh local produce and our menu changes daily. We have a large tranquil beer garden, dogs and children are welcome and we host live music every weekend. We are a cask marquee accredited

Tel: 01638 500306 Email: the.affleck@live.co.uk

Tel: 01394 382933

The Affleck Arms, Brookside, Dalham, Newmarket, CB8 8TG

103 New St (off Market Hill), Woodbridge, IP12 1DZ

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Pub Guide The Tuddenham Fountain

Proprietors Scott Davidson and Charles Lewis, Together with Head Chef Matt McCarthy and his wife/Manageress Sharon McCarthy, and the team welcome you to the The Fountain. Located in the lovely old village of Tuddenham St Martin, only three miles from the centre of Ipswich. We are an informal restaurant in an oldie worldly 16th century country pub with great food, great service and great value. The Fountain is the place to be, with our extensive modern menu and relaxed, friendly atmosphere. We have just celebrated 4th anniversary and are enjoying serving a large number of very welcome regular customers as well as many new ones.For the summer months we have a 60 seat patio covered by a giant umbrella plus a lawned garden with seating for 80 people.

The Brewery Tap

Tel: 01473 785377 www.tuddenhamfountain.co.uk

The Brewery Tap is a traditional English pub overlooking the Orwell River next to the historic Tolly Cobbold Brewery. It has a wonderful inviting atmosphere with spectacular locally brewed real ales on offer. Our home cooked menu is fresh everyday and locally sourced from the finest suppliers in the area. Visit the website to see our menu and for details about our events Tel: 01473 225501 www.thebrewerytap.org

The Street, Tuddenham, Ipswich,IP6 9BT

1 Cliff Rd, Ipswich, IP3 OAY

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the best of

suffolk retail


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H C Alexander Limited was established in Woodbridge in 1927, and has become synonymous with supplying high quality men’s and ladies clothing, together with an informed and friendly level of service. Stockists of many leading brands, together with a full service for Morning and Evening wear.

ALEXANDER’S OF WOODBRIDGE 10-12 THORO’FARE WOODBRIDGE, SUFFOLK TEL: 01394 382585

Stockists of

BAILEYS


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Fashion

Men's Dress Shoes - The Most Important Detail

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ny investment of time, money, and care taken in dressing the body is squandered by the man who neglects his feet. Unlike suits and ties, a man rarely risks appearing overdressed in fine shoes, so they offer today's man a way to bring a little class to his weekend attire without drawing snide comments from his tshirted family and friends.

the investment will, assuming the shoes are cared for, pay dividends long after the cost is forgotten. Quality shoe leather actually improves with age, as it develops a deep, rich shine from years of polish, and provides the wearer with comfort, value, and service over a considerable period of time.

Whilst the price of a good quality dress shoe may cause some to recoil in shock, Once you have invested in a decent pair of shoes, you must care for them properly if you wish them to last. The leather uppers will require regular cleaning and polishing with the appropriate wax polish or shoe cream. The leather soles, being a natural product, are breathable and flexible. Because of their porous nature, it is essential that they are not worn in consistently wet conditions.

If your shoes should get wet, allow the leather to dry out at room temperature away from hot pipes, radiators or fire. It is advisable after cleaning to use a pair of cedar wood shoe trees, as these will help retain the shoe's original shape and prevent the shoes from creasing. It is also recommended to prolong the life of your shoes by alternating your shoes daily, allowing each pair time to rest. Due to the quality of the materials used in the original manufacturing process, most manufacturers are able to offer a full refurbishment service. The shoes are stripped down and put on their original lasts, which means they retain their fitting qualities, shape and

appearance. The refurbishment uses only the best materials, and the shoes follow the same production line they did when they were first made. Once the new soles are fitted and stitched using the traditional Goodyear welted process, the heel is attached, and the shoes are passed to the finishing room for cleaning and polishing before being re-socked, checked and returned to the owner to continue the shoe wearing pleasure.

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Wibbling Wools 24b Angel Hill Bury St Edmunds Suffolk IP33 1UZ

‘

Open: mon 10am – 3pm Tues – Sat 9.30- 5pm

‘

Contact: 01284 749555

lynz@wibblingwools.co.uk

‘

please check our website for updated list of classes at

www.wibblingwools.co.uk

photos courtesy of Emma Osborne

W&M SMITH

We stock a huge range of florist sundries including:

• Smithers Oasis® range in almost its entirety • Glassware of all shapes and sizes • Large selection of silk, latex, parchment and dried flowers • Bridal accessories • Ribbons • Baskets and much much more NO ACCESS FOR CHILDREN All major credit cards accepted

Come along and wander at your leisure in our spacious location Monday & T hur sday 10.00a m- 7.00pm Tuesda y, W ednesd ay & Fri day 10.00a m-5.00pm Open 10.00a m- 4.00pm sel ecte d S atur day & Sunda y

The Pig htl e Barn , Black smi ths Lane, Mi ddlewood Green, Stowmarket IP14 5EU Tel: 01449 711014 Fax: 01449 711815 Email: wensmith@lineone.net

www.wandmsmith.co.uk the best of Suffolk 109


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ELIZABETH GASH KNITWEAR Elizabeth Gash Lorry Marshall The Quernstone Gaeltarra Sophie’s Wild Wollens Mary Davis Knitwear Noa Noa Flax OSKA Cut Loose Adini Natural Wave Sea Salt Shirley Pinder eseoese 86 ST Johns St, Bury St Edmunds 01284 766045 36 Market Place, Lavenham Tel: 01787 248561 Open 10.00am-5.00pm daily (Bury St Edmunds Closed Sundays) www.discoverlavenham.co.uk


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Elizabeth Gash

S

itting on Lavenham’s picturesque market place in a pretty timber framed building, is knitwear designer Elizabeth Gash’s eponymous first shop. Her second opened only one year ago in Bury St Edmunds and is down St. John’s St, one of the longest runs of independent retailers in Britain. Step inside either shop and you enter an Aladdin’s cave of colour, texture and pattern. Both shops have traditional oak beam interiors with shelves stacked with knitwear and clothes in jewel-like colours, the urge to forage is irresistible. Most of Elizabeth’s knitwear is inspired by the beautiful designs of eastern nomadic textiles and rugs. Her distinctive graphic patterns and deep rich colours owe much to traditional kilim designs. The range, which can be made to measure, includes jackets, waistcoats, hats, bags, scarves and cushions, and each piece, no matter how small, is imbued with Elizabeth’s trademark flair for colour and pattern. The success of the shops in Lavenham and Bury St Edmunds is the culmination of more than20 years’ hard work. Elizabeth started her knitting career with a stall in Covent Garden, and as her following grew, she took on more knitters and sold her knitwear to other select shops and a knitwear catalogue ‘Penny Plain’. It was ten years ago, after encouragement from a friend, that the first shop was openedin idyllic Lavenham, a short drive from her home in Rattlesden. All of Elizabeth’s work is undertaken here in Suffolk: Elizabeth designsand makes the swatches on her knitting machine, andthen the garments are hand framed locally in beautiful Scottish silk and lamb’s wool yarn

This veritable treasure trove of gorgeous knitwear has become a showcase for leading British textile designers. Having sold from a stall for so many years, Elizabeth’s aim in opening a shop was to create a thriving outlet for unusual, beautiful garments made by talented designers living in the UK. Stocking a carefully-chosen selection by Lorry Marshall, Bill Baber, Sophie’s Wild Woollens. Mary Davis, The Quernstone and Irish company Gaeltara it has become an absolute must visit for wool lovers. Look out for designs by Terry Macey and Angelika Elsebach whose lovely creations in linen, silk, velvet and wool are new in this year. As well as a fantastic array of knitted designs, Elizabeth has included clothes by Flax, Noa Noa, Cut Loose, OSKA, Otural Wave and Adini, all hand-picked to complement her own range perfectly. And even accessories are catered for: she has got a great range of bags, scarves and gloves, and a beautiful display of semi-precious and silver jewellery, including pieces by jewellery designers Annie Mundy, Travels Afar and Sara Withers.


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Cabana is East Anglia’s first one-stop holiday boutique. Prompted by the surge in people taking sunshine breaks all year round Cabana opened its colourful oasis in September 2006. With swimwear in every shape and size (sizes 8-26, cups A-H including mastectomy) plus mouth-watering cotton and silk kaftans, dresses, shorts, linens, beach bags, flip-flops plus roll-me-and-go hats, Cabana is confident it can make every lady feel fabulous on the beach. Due to high demand Cabana now stocks luxury lingerie from Marie Jo, Prima Donna and Aubade with cup sizes from A-I and new to arrive is beautiful silk nightwear from Marjolaine in France. Vix • Maryan Mehlhorn • Seafolly • Eda • Lidea Charmline • Papillon Bleu • Holster • Debbie Katz Helen Kaminski • OndadeMar • Aubade Marie Jo • Prima Donna • Marjolaine 26 Hatter Street, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk IP33 1NE Tel: 01284 700204

www.cabana-uk.com


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hair and beauty Ufford Park Hotel, Golf & Spa

John Olivers Hairdressing Group

Looking for somewhere to relax, revitalise or restore?

Look good and feel great at John Olivers Hairdressing Group in Suffolk. John Olivers was first launched in 1965 and has grown to 10 hairdressing salons throughout Suffolk and Norfolk, offering everything from haircuts to hair colouring plus professional retail products, see our website for details www.johnolivers.com

Then look no farther than the Ufford Park Spa near Woodbridge. Set in 120 acres of parkland this 87-bedroom hotel with golf course and luxury spa is everything you would expect and the reason why it is the ‘gateway to Suffolk’s heritage coast’. Come for the day with friends or your partner or make a weekend of it. With spa experiences starting from as little as £20 per person and one-night spa breaks from only £85pp – how soon can you get here? Our thermal suite is the perfect solution for a special birthday party, your hen celebrations, a romantic anniversary or a corporate informal meeting – it can also be hired for exclusive use* if you want something really special (*Min. numbers apply). Ufford Park Spa is open seven days a week and open to non members. Call 0844 477 6498 to book or visit www.uffordpark.co.uk for more details.

Our business is a combination of people and image. Our salon stylists are professionals who interpret each client’s hairdressing needs to create a truly individual haircut look. Our work does not finish when you leave our salons. Home care is important and we are discerning in the hairdressing products we use and recommend: Redken, KMS, GHD, Wella SP. and now all your favourite salon products are available on our new website johnoliversonline.co.uk At John Olivers we passionately believe in the benefit of a high standard of training for our teams to give you a fantastic hairdressing experience. The Next Generation by John Olivers is our 'graduate' salon. This busy Ipswich hairdressing salon is close to both the Page 1 town and smart waterfront redevelopment.

U F F O R D PA R K H E A LT H & S PA JOHN OLIVERS HAIRDRESSING GROUP

IPSWICH 6-8 Gt Colman Street 01473 211107 22a Fore Street 01473 287402 The Retreat 15 Fore Street 01473 286363 WOODBRIDGE 3-5 Gobbits Yard 01394 387048

W H E R E I T I S A L L A B O U T YO U

BURY ST EDMUNDS 15 Langton Place 01284 761332

L ux ur y The r mal Su it e wi th H yd ro Pool, M ine ra l G rot t o, Fo o t S p a s , A r o m a S t e a m Ro o m , S o f t S a u n a , Fe a tu r e S h o w e r s , R e l a x a t i o n Z o n e & I c e Fo u n ta i n . D a y S p a E x p e r i e n c e s fr o m £ 2 0 p p . R e s i d e n t i a l S p a B re a k s f ro m £8 5 p p . O pe n t o non mem ber s , 7 da y s a w ee k.

Call 0844 477 6498 or visit

www.uffordpark.co.uk/spa Yarmouth Road, Melton, Woodbridge, Suffolk IP12 1QW.

U

UFFORD PARK HEALTH & SPA

www.johnolivers.com Stockists of: WELLA

SP • KMS • REDKEN • GHD the best of Suffolk 113


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Weddings

Wedding rings

An historic symbol of love

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emories of your wedding day will stay in your mind for ever, and you will look at your wedding rings every day for the rest of your lives. The wedding ring, that most famous and instantly recognisable symbol of the, hopefully perpetual, joining of two people as husband and wife in the institution of marriage, has a long widespread and mysterious history. Wedding bands have been a symbol of love throughout the pages of history. The shape of the circle with no beginning and no end is also the symbol of the sun, universe, earth, holiness and peace, along with many emotions and promises such as love, commitment, fidelity, eternity and honour. The hole in the centre of the ring is not just space, it is as important in its own right as the symbol of the gateway or door leading to things and events both known and unknown.

placed on the finger but around the extremities. Since the mortality rates were high and life expectancy was low, people came to the conclusion that a person’s spirit could just flow out of the body ending his life, and often tried interesting and superstitious ideas to keep it intact. For example, a husband would wrap twigs and grass around his new wife’s ankles and wrists, believing this would prolong her life. In ancient times, the Egyptians and the Romans shared the belief that a vein from the fourth finger lead directly to the heart and, as such, it seemed the logical place to wear the wedding band. This practice was passed down and the same finger is universally known as the

ring finger. Science has since disproved this theory but it is still romantic to think that our wedding rings are on a direct path to our hearts. Wedding bands for men are a fairly recent innovation. Throughout history, men have been dominant and either owned wives or lead harems, so there was no need for them to be burdened by symbols of marriage and commitment. Even after modern thinking outlawed all forms of slavery and polygamy, the fingers of men were still unadorned. All of this changed during the Second World War, when it became fashionable for men to wear bands to remind them of their loving wives waiting back home. The use of wedding rings by men increased again during the Korean War and today most men choose to wear a band regardless of military status. No matter if you choose patterned, diamond set or plain, your wedding rings are a constant reminder of your partner, your love and commitment to each other and your past, present and future together.

The earliest wedding rings were not

THURLOW CHAMPNESS 114

14 ABBEYGATE STREET, BURY ST EDMUNDS, SUFFOLK IP33 1UN TEL: 01284 754747


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The Limited Edition Mikimoto Debutante Necklace

THE ORIGINATOR OF CULTURED PEARLS SINCE 1893

THURLOW CHAMPNESS & SON, 14 ABBEYGATE STREET, BURY ST EDMUNDS. SUFFOLK IP33 1UN TEL: 01284 754747 WWW.THURLOWCHAMPNESS.COM


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The Future is... Why Choose Suffolk? Why Choose Suffolk? For innovation, a determined entrepreneurial spirit, excellent transport links and great quality of life, Suffolk’s many assets make it an unrivalled business location. Across an impressive array of business arenas our county is forging ahead. Suffolk is staking its claim to a sustainable, low carbon future on its coastline; trading with the world through its ports and associated transport infrastructure and developing cuttingedge IT and Communications technology. The sheer diversity of its key sectors, which also encompass biotechnology, tourism and food and drink, all serve to demonstrate Suffolk’s flair for creating innovative products and supporting an extensive business portfolio. It’s what sets the county apart. We’re also very well connected. The entire UK and mainland Europe are highly and quickly accessible via convenient links by road, rail, sea and air. London and the South East are within easy reach on the A12, A11 and M11 – so your business partners are never far away. The A14 creates a high-tech corridor connecting Suffolk to Cambridge and onwards to the Midlands and the North. By rail, London is just an hour away and the cross-county network links to the Midlands and the North. The county’s key ports at Felixstowe, Ipswich and Lowestoft service international trading routes, along with nearby Harwich International, all seamlessly linking into the UK’s rail and road freight network. Visiting Suffolk by air is also simple, touching down at London Stansted across the border in Essex, which serves

more European destinations than any other airport worldwide. Live in Suffolk and you experience the best things in life. We have room to breathe in the wide open spaces of our county’s countryside and coastline, while an enticing mix of traditional market towns and timeless villages are complemented by bustling town centres with great shopping, places to relax and the best in entertainment. Suffolk’s food and drink has an enviable reputation, made by passionate producers, it’s packed with field-to-fork flavour and freshness. In Suffolk you will discover a county that has all of the benefits of cosmopolitan living, without any of the negative drawbacks found in more urbanised areas. The county’s employment costs are 13% lower than the rest of the UK and an impressive 30% less than London. And a skilled and dedicated workforce, backed up by progressive academic institutions, ensures that we contribute to the East of England’s highest business survival rates of any other region outside of London. Why Choose Suffolk? Just an hour from London, it’s a county of endless opportunities where running a successful business is a real pleasure. Tourism Suffolk’s serene beauty, varied landscape and towns and villages have inspired artists for generations. From peaceful countryside to wide open seascapes, it’s a space that invigorates the senses, refreshes and relaxes. This, combined with our colourful history, creative cultural landscape and excellent local food and drink, attracts thousands oful


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Choose Suffolk

visitors each year in search of an exceptional experience. And as we’re so accessible to areas with high density populations, we’re a popular destination for domestic visitors, alongside international tourists arriving in London Stansted, Luton and Norwich airports. Whether seeking a great day out with the family or a longer escape, we welcome some twenty five million day and staying visitors every year. It all adds up to a tourism sector that is worth an annual £1.63 billion to the county and employs over 30,000 people spanning 2,000 businesses in one of Suffolk’s key drivers of economic activity. Recognising the clear importance of the sector, Suffolk sets its standards high to maintain its position as one of the UK’s premier tourism destinations. From the quality of our accommodation and attractions, to the excellent levels of service delivery, the sector works hard to continually improve its offer. Fully supported by public and private collaboration, Suffolk’s tourism providers benefit from a range of peer-to-peer networking, marketing and sector training that are all designed to encourage best practice and business development. As a county that boasts countless assets of wide-ranging appeal, tourism in Suffolk is a sustainable sector that is set to experience continuing expansion in future years.

innovative ways of working to produce a diverse range of products and services. It is an approach that, when combined with our evident entrepreneurial spirit, makes us stand out from the crowd. Take Adnams, for example, as a brewer with a centuries-old connection to the county and located in the celebrated seaside resort of Southwold, it’s one Suffolk business that is setting the standards in sustainable manufacturing methods. In recent years, it has constructed an eco-distribution centre, complete with a living roof, lime and hemp walls and rain harvesting facility. Adnams has also invested in a state-of-the-art energy-efficient brew house and commenced production of the UK’s first carbon neutral beer, East Green. Then there is Newmarket, internationallyrenowned as the home of horseracing. Since the 17th Century, the town has thrilled millions who visit to experience the high-octane excitement of a day at the races. Today, the town supports a multimillion pound equine industry and acts as a Centre of Excellence for breeding, research and the welfare of horses. It is home to The National Stud, Tattersalls Bloodstock Sales, the Newmarket Equine Hospital and many of the world’s leading racehorse training yards, making it the recognised world centre for The Sport of Kings. These are the kind of progressive businesses that are pushing at the boundaries of business development from their home in Suffolk.

Only in Suffolk Skilled Suffolk From producing carbon neutral beer and dominating the UK’s import and export trade; to training the world’s leading thoroughbreds and developing the next generation ICT solutions, Suffolk does things differently. We have an impressive portfolio of businesses all displaying

In both the league tables for schools in the independent and public sector, our secondary education institutions are performing well. And in further education we are developing centres of academic excellence.

At the forefront of this move is University College Suffolk (UCS) in Ipswich, which opened in 2007. UCS delivers a modern approach to higher education with centres across the county complementing the campus development in Ipswich. It is an approach that focuses on accessibility, community, enterprise and innovation designed to meet the needs of both students and employers alike. West Suffolk College (WSC), located in the traditional market town of Bury St Edmunds, enjoys student success rates that place it within the top 5% of colleges in the country. With over 100 different venues across the county, WSC is accredited with the Training Quality Standard, designed to bridge the gap in the UK’s skills base by bringing together trainers and employers. To the east, Lowestoft College offers a broad range of subjects, including apprenticeships and training aligned to business need. As one of the UK’s leading providers of maritime training to the shipping and off-shore oil industries, a range of new courses and facilities are focussing on the opportunities within the low carbon energy sector. Our county’s top businesses also deliver pioneering examples of joint sector-specific study. At BT, for example, a post-graduate research, teaching and outreach programme is complemented by the on-site presence of four academic institutions, including University College London and UCS. Similarly, Suffolk’s close proximity to the South of England and Cambridge, with its centres of academic excellence, ensures the county has a potential supply of graduates across a wide range of disciplines. the best of Suffolk 117


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F o r m o r e i n f o r m at io n c o n tac t: w w w. f e s t i va l s u f f o l k . c o m


for music and the arts

A PLACE OF ENERGY AND INSPIRATION

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‘Here, following tradition is never a timid choice, because the Aldeburgh tradition, as put in place by its founders ... is so dynamic’ The New York Times The timeless beauty of the Suffolk coastline, its broad horizons, skies and landscapes was a major inspiration for the music of Benjamin Britten and it was here that he, together with his friends Peter Pears and Eric Crozier created the first Aldeburgh Festival. That was in 1948. Since its acclaimed early years, the Festival has flourished, and Aldeburgh’s reputation is now three-fold: as an international venue for outstanding music performances, centred around Snape Maltings Concert Hall, renowned for its superb acoustics; a place where top musicians and emerging musical talents come together, with the first training scheme for professional musicians, the Britten–Pears Young Artist Programme; and also as a focus for wide ranging education and community work. Today, Aldeburgh is the UK’s largest provider of performance training for the world’s young professional musicians, and the courses at the Britten–Pears Young Artist Programme, as well as the Aldeburgh Residencies, keep going from strength to strength. With a recent major capital expansion to create a much expanded music campus, this is an exciting time to experience Aldeburgh’s musical landscape.

For more information about the Aldeburgh Festivals, the Britten–Pears Young Artist Programme, Aldeburgh Residencies, Aldeburgh Education or Aldeburgh Young Musicians, visit www.aldeburgh.co.uk

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a schools guide

the best of independent education

the best of Suffolk 121


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The Royal Hospital School provides exceptional academic and extra-curricular education for boys and girls aged 11 to 18 years.

...a happy and fulfilling educational experience ISI Report March 2010 Academic, Music, Art, Sailing and Sports Scholarships. Generous discounts for Service Families Means-tested Seafaring Bursaries.

For more information visit

www.royalhospitalschool.org or contact Susan Lewis on 01473 326210 or email admissions@royalhospitalschool.org

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Independent Education

A well-rounded education

M

ore than 500,000 children benefit from an independent education in one of the Independent School Councils (ISC) 1,276-member schools. Independent schools offer a wealth of facilities and high teaching standards that enable students to achieve great results year after year. Independent schools are in the unique position to provide a truly bespoke education for your child. Choosing the right school for your child is an important decision that takes plenty of time and research. Thankfully help is at hand for parents in the form of the Independent Schools Council information and advice service (ISCias). ISCias has a free helpline, 0845 SCHOOLS (7246657), that gives free impartial information and advice to parents as well as providing an informative website www.isc.co.uk Photos: Royal Hospital School

Results One of the reasons parents continue to choose an independent education for their child is thanks to high teaching standards and this clearly reflects in the grades that our schools post year after year. In 2008 over half of A-level entries from pupils at ISC schools were awarded a grade A. Also, pupil/teacher ratios continue to fall in ISC schools reflecting many schools’ commitment to teaching a wide range of subjects even if class sizes are small. There is now one teacher to every 10 pupils, allowing children to receive a uniquely supported and bespoke education. Independent schools are excellent at providing breadth of education as well as flexibility. The one-size-fits-all approach to education is long gone in the independent sector and it is now up to the parent to choose the right school for their child.

Facilities and extracurricular In 2007/08 ISC schools spent nearly £300 million on new buildings, demonstrating their commitment to constant improvement of facilities for

pupils. Total spending on facilities and equipment stood at nearly £700 million, roughly equating to £1,400 per pupil. However, it is not just academic facilities such as Information Communications Technology (ICT) centres, science laboratories and state-of-the-art classrooms that schools are committed to improving. With great sporting facilities, too, schools can offer everything from athletics, rugby and football to squash, tennis and lacrosse. Independent schools are committed to providing children with a rounded education filled with both sporting and academic successes. Indeed, many ISC schools have produced some of the best sportsmen and women in recent memory. The 2008 Beijing Olympics was dominated by independent schooleducated stars such as Chris Hoy and Ben Ainslie. The England rugby team also boasts a horde of independent school alumni, Jonny Wilkinson, Matthew Tait and Lewis Moody to name but a few. By Liam Butler – Senior Information Officer


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Schools a choice guide Saint Felix School, Southwold (co-educational 1-18) Set in 75 acres of outstanding natural beauty with Southwold and the sea on its doorstep and a backdrop of stunning Blyth Valley countryside, Saint Felix’s thriving Nursery, Junior and Senior departments offer the ideal setting for a child’s education by providing a safe and healthy environment for study and recreation where pupils cannot fail to be inspired. As a result the school not only offers a challenging range of academic subjects, but it also provides extensive extracurricular activities and sports. The on-site multi-activity sports centre boasts an indoor swimming pool, 200 seat Silcox Theatre, equestrian cross-country course, purpose-built gymnasium and fitness centre. The school has achieved national success in sport, especially swimming, and has been awarded the Gold Artsmark by the Arts Council twice in recognition of the creative work of the pupils in Drama, Music, Photography and the Arts. For further details or to arrange a visit please call Mrs Judy Ellard, Registrar, on (01502) 727026 or email jellard@stfelix.suffolk.sch.uk.

Ipswich School Ipswich School is situated in an attractive area of Ipswich, next to Christchurch Park. Facilities include a library, three Information Communications Technology (ICT) centres, a performing arts complex, an indoor heated swimming pool and a design technology suite. A modern sports hall and cricket field are on site and another 30 acres of playing fields are 10 minutes’ walk away. A new preparatory school building opened in September 2006. Ipswich School is fully co-educational. Personal development, pastoral care and academic achievement are considered equally important. Ipswich School also has a fine reputation for music, art, drama and sport. The usual points of entry for the senior school are Years, 7, 9 and 12 and pupils attend as day pupils or full, weekly or occasional boarders.

Woodbridge School Woodbridge School is a thriving, forward-looking co-educational community with a boarding house for pupils aged 13+, set in 80 acres of wooded grounds overlooking the historic market town of Woodbridge. The school attracts pupils from a wide catchment area covering Suffolk, Norfolk and Essex, and offers a continuous education to girls and boys from ages four to 18. The younger children attend Woodbridge’s own preparatory school, The Abbey, which includes a pre-preparatory department, Queen’s House. At the age of 11 they move to the senior school, where they are joined by a large intake from primaries and other prep schools. The school has a proud reputation of excellence in education, with sciences, maths and languages being particular strengths – with more than 98 per cent of students continuing to their selected universities. International exchange programmes offer pupils the opportunity to study in Australia, China, India, Oman and South Africa as well as countries within the EU. The school’s reputation for music is well-deserved, described by school inspectors as “exceptional”. With the opening of the state-of-the-art Seckford Theatre drama is growing in popularity with a large number of school productions each year. To find out what a Woodbridge education can offer your son or daughter, please contact us to arrange a visit.

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I PSWICH S CHOOL INDEPENDENT DAY AND BOARDING SCHOOL FOR GIRLS AND BOYS AGED 3 TO 18

Our aim at Ipswich School is to provide girls and boys with an education that encourages them to become balanced, confident and fulfilled young people

Academic and sporting excellence as well as high standards in music and drama Scholarships and means tested bursaries available at 11, 13 and 16 Strong pastoral provision and commitment to personal development Extensive network of bus clubs covering the whole of Suffolk and north and east Essex Full, weekly and occasional boarding Preparatory School for girls and boys aged 3 - 11

For further information please contact the Registrar. Ipswich School, Henley Road, Ipswich, Suffolk IP1 3SG. Tel: (01473) 408300 Fax: (01473) 400058 Email: registrar@ipswich.suffolk.sch.uk www.ipswich.suffolk.sch.uk Ipswich School is a charity (reg no 310493) educating children


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Discover a new world at OBH Standing in its own beautiful 75 acre park, Old Buckenham Hall offers a rare setting for the achievement of excellence. It is a happy, busy place where children are encouraged to discover and then develop their talents, passions and interests; where relationships matter and are cherished; and where children are equipped to face the world of work into which they will emerge in a few short years’ time. Come and meet us, talk to the staff and children and get a glimpse of the education you could give your child.

 Traditional boarding school with contemporary

AN INDEPENDENT DAY & BOARDING SCHOOL FOR BOYS & GIRLS AGED 3 -13 YEARS

edge, for boys and girls aged 2 1/2 to 13  Broad educational offering developing skills for life  Thriving academic and sporting heritage

For a prospectus or details of Open Days, email registrar@obh.co.uk, visit www.obh.co.uk or call 01449 740252 Old Buckenham Hall, Brettenham, Suffolk, IP7 7PH Registered Charity No. 310490

 Caring and close-knit pastoral structure  Full programme of after-school, evening and

weekend hobbies and activities  In tune with the modern family with flexible

collection times and home weekends


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Independent Education

A school with a love of sailing

T

he Royal Hospital School is a coeducational full boarding and day school for 11 to 18-year-olds, set in 200 acres of countryside overlooking the River Stour. As a result of its unique and proud seafaring heritage, the school has a dedicated sailing department second to none. With a fleet of 40 dinghies ranging from beginner boats like Optimists to Olympic pathway craft such as the Laser 1 and 29ers, every level of sailing is catered for. On joining the school, all Year 7 pupils take part in a week-long sailing course when they are taken through the basics, while pupils joining in other year groups have the opportunity to learn to sail in the afternoons. Those with more experience can also choose this as their regular games afternoon option, sailing up to five times a week.

The school has regular fixtures against other schools and the elite sailors compete at both national and international level. As a recognised RYA training centre, the highest levels of safety and tuition are maintained

the reservoir with a smile running from ear to ear after just three days, can only demonstrate how sailing can invigorate every one who has a go. I believe that the Royal Hospital School is unique in its commitment to sailing and I am personally very proud to be able to pass on my passion for this most individual of sports.� This thriving independent school has a dynamic and purposeful atmosphere. As well as being encouraged to develop intellectually, each and every pupil has the opportunity to pursue a huge range of interests and activities and to develop important values of self-discipline, service and commitment that will last a lifetime.

and pupils regularly gain qualifications at every level of sailing as well as in power boating, windsurfing and dinghy sailing instruction. The school also has a fleet of four traditional Cornish Shrimpers. These cruising boats can be seen every weekend of the summer term meandering the local waterways. Director of sailing at the Royal Hospital School, Mr Andrew Nutton, says: “Sailing is a sport that teaches children the ability to deal with everything that the elements can throw at them. To see an 11-year-old helming a dinghy around

To find out more, arrange a visit by contacting Susan Lewis on 01473 326210 or admissions@royalhospitalschool.org or go to www.royalhospitalschool.org

The Royal Hospital School Holbrook, Ipswich, Suffolk IP9 2RX Tel: 01473 326 200 Email: admissions@royalhospitalschool.org www.royalhospitalschool.org the best of Suffolk 127


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ORWELL PARK SCHOOL LEADING INDEPENDENT PREP SCHOOL CO-EDUCATIONAL, BOARDING 21⁄2 TO 13 YEARS

AND

DAY

“Orwell Park provides an excellent, academically challenging, stimulating, happy and fulfilling, all-round educational experience for its pupils.” ISI Inspection 2009

Achieving academic excellence with one third of pupils winning scholarships to senior schools

Flourishing music, sport and arts where every pupil is encouraged to develop their individual interests

Freedom to play, explore and learn in one of the most beautiful school settings in England

“Boarding: the overall quality is outstanding”

OFSTED 2009

To visit please call

t: 01473 659225

www.orwellpark.co.uk email: admissions@orwellpark.co.uk Orwell Park, Nacton, Ipswich, Suffolk IP10 0ER Registered charity number: 310481


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Literary Suffolk

Words with Meaning... S

uffolk has a wonderful cultural heritage, where you can visit places that writers have lived and set their works. There’s nothing better when you are on holiday than reading books that have a connection with the area that you are visiting. Below are a selection of some of our favourite local writers taken from The Suffolk Book League’s Leaflet: Literary Suffolk. Writers who lived in Suffolk George Orwell ( the alias of Eric Blair, 1903- 1950) who took his name from the Suffolk river and is remembered especially for his political satires Animal Farm and nineteen eighty four, lived at Montague House, High St Southwold, during the thirties. His novel The Clergyman’s Daughter is partially set in the town. There is a plaque on the house commemorating this.

At Martlesham near Ipswich Judge John Drabble (1906-1982), father of Margaret Drabble and AS Byatt, lived at St Mary’s just off the A12 when he became a County Court judge for Suffolk. He

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wrote two novels Death’s Second Self (1971) and Scrawsby (1977). You can still take the walk he loved, along by the Deben at Waldringfield. Sir Henry Rider Haggard (1856-1925) who was born in Norfolk and educated at Ipswich School, bought The Grange at Kessingland as a holiday home in 1990, five years after the publication of his successful novel King Solomon’s Mines. Here he wrote The Poor of the Land in 1905, a survey of the plight of the agricultural worker, and here, in 1914, his close friend Rudyard Kipling came to stay.

view of the country’ by swimming across ponds, pools lakes and rivers up to Scotland. In his last book, Wildwood, his own woodland inspired him to explore some of the world’s oldest forests, learning a few of the traditions arising from the human love of wood.

Rosamond Lehmann (1901-1990) a best selling novelist of the twenties and thirties with Dusty Answer, A Note in Music and The Weather in the Streets, owned Coach House Cottage Yoxford, from about 1971 to 1987. These books, and her later works, have recently enjoyed a resurgence in popularity. A writer in the tradition of John Clare, Richard Jefferies and Ronald Blythe, Roger Deakin (1943-2006) wrote that he had lived through the poignant closing years of what might be called the old rural Suffolk: the northern stretch of the county broadly defined by the valley of the River Waveney Walnut Tree Farm, on the northern edge of the green at Mellis near Diss, was the inspiration and start of many of the journeys recorded in his books. The idea for Waterlog came when he was swimming in his moat, and decided to gain ‘a frog’s eye

The American crime writer, Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995) lived at Bridge Cottage, Earl Soham from 1964 to 1967. She completed The Glass Cell and wrote A Suspension of Mercy there. Hammond Innes (1913-1936) the successful adventure and thriller writer lived at Ayres End, The Green, Kersey. In novels, such as The Mary Deare or Campbells’s Kingdom he saw himself as one of the ‘last romantics’ in the tradition of Rider Haggard, RL Stevenson or Rudyard Kipling. His novels were described by the Guardian as ‘man’s everlasting struggle against the enormous stature of nature’.


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Children’s Writers Arthur Ransome (1884-1967) set We Didn’t Mean to go to Sea on the Orwell when he was living at Broke Farm at Levington (1935-1939). Ransome also wrote Secret Water set in Hamford West, near Walton-on –the-Naze, in Essex, while he was living at Harkstead Hall, on the Shotley Peninsula (19391941). When King’s boatyard had finished building Ransome’s boat Selina King, he gave a dinner for all the workmen at The Butt and Oyster, Pin Mill on 29th September 1938.

Twinkle Twinkle Little Star must be one of the earliest rhymes we ever learn as children. It surprises people to discover it was actually composed, rather than handed down in folklore, and the author Jane Taylor (1983-1824) grew up in Lavenham. Her father, Isaac Taylor, was a successful engraver who moved from London. The house, Shilling Old Grange, now marked with a blue plaque, was large enough for his growing family. Briefly the family moved next door into Arundel House, but when war with France broke out in 1793, and the European market was closed to English engravers and printers Isaac Taylor faced ruin and was forced to move to a tiny house in Colchester. He trained all his six of his children as engravers, even the girls. By 1803, Jane and her sister Ann were writing verses for The Minor’s Pocket Book, and when publishers wrote and offered payment in books or cash they responded enthusiastically, ‘Books good

but cash better’. Twinkle, Twinkle was included in Rhymes for the Nursery (1806) and one of Jane’s hymns, Lord I would Own Thy Tender Care, in Hymns for Infant Minds (1810) for which she also did the engravings is still included in Hymns Ancient and Modern. In Lavenham Guildhall the National Trust have a permanent exhibition on the Taylor family, including paintings, books and personal belongings. In 1945, far away from Malibu, Dodie Smith (1896-1990) sat down to write a novel set in a house in Wingfield Suffolk 1934, a house which was part of a castle. In I Capture the Castle, the heroine, Cassandra Mortmain, remembers ‘ How strange and beautiful it looked in the late afternoon light. I can still recapture that first glimpse- see the pale yellow sky, the reflected castle stretching towards us on the brimming moat, the floating patches of emeraldgreen water weed’. Wingfield Castle is not open to the public but you can still see the Castle and its moat from the road. The Castle was licensed to be built in 1382 after the Peasant’s Revolt. Later, Dodie Smith settled in Finchingfield in Essex where she wrote One Hundred and One Dalmatians and put the evil Cruella de Ville living in the fictional village of Dympling, near Sudbury. Another castle, Framlingham, has been important to Anthony Horowitz and he says it is where his love affair with Suffolk began. ‘what has always delighted me’, he said,’are the Tudor chimneys that rise, incongruously, above the walls.’ Framlingham Castle is the setting for one of the early, pre Alex Rider stories, The Devil and His Boy and the extraordinary chimneys are the starting point for the adventure, set in the reign of Elisabeth 1. Suffolk hosts three literary festivals a year

The Aldeburgh Literary Festival – This annual festival of literature is organised by the Aldeburgh Book Shop on a weekend at the beginning of March 01728 452587 www.aldeburghbookshop.co.uk The Aldeburgh Poetry Festival – An annual festival of contempoary poetry is held at the beginning of November and is held around various locations in Aldeburgh town centre. Organised by The Poetry Trust. 01986 835950 www.theportrytrust.org Way with Words – Whilst a number of national literary festivals are organise by Way with Word, they hold a five day literary festival in Southwold every November 01803 867373 www.watwithwords.co.uk Long Melford Book Fairs- Regular monthly book fairs in Long Melford with lots of independent book retailers exhibiting 01284 723512 thebookman@btinternet.com wwwlongmelfordbookfairs.co.uk To read the complete leaflet online please go to www.sbl.org.uk Founded in 1982, the Suffolk Book League promotes the pleasures of reading by bringing distinguished writers to speak in Ipswich. You can join the Suffolk Book League at via the website or by post. Although you are not required to be a member in order to attend events, membership ensures that you receive the quarterly newsletter Book Talk as well as reduced price entry and the ability to purchase advance tickets. the best of Suffolk 131


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BOS COVERS 2010 Qk 6:2010 06/08/2010 11:40 Page 1

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Published by Tilston Phillips Magazines Limited

the best of

Suffolk the informative glossy guide to the region

£3.50

Published by Tilston Phillips Magazines Limited

JULY 2010 – JUNE 2011

The GOURMET’S GUIDE to eating out SUFFOLK’S GREAT OUTDOORS

FESTIVALS, EVENTS & local FOOD PRODUCERS

JULY 2010 – JUNE 2011

We supply an extensive range of glass, ceramic and natural stone wall and floor tiles. Our showroom has a comprehensive display with the majority of products being exclusive in our region. To complement the quality of our tiles we also supply the very stylish range of Bisque radiators and are the main Ultima dealer for the wonderful Roca bathroom sanitaryware.

FOXWOOD exclusive ceramic, glass & natural stone tiles

Ipswich: 01473 717717 www.foxwoodceramics.co.uk

your annual A-Z guide to this unique county

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Best of Suffolk Magazine  

Annual A4 high-quality glossy magazine targeting a wide audience through- out Suffolk, showcasing the best of the county

Best of Suffolk Magazine  

Annual A4 high-quality glossy magazine targeting a wide audience through- out Suffolk, showcasing the best of the county