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MANIFEST

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WELCOME TO THE WORLD’S SAFEST DESIGN Kaivokatu

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You can feel even safer than usual on the streets of Helsinki, the World Design Capital: Volvo is the most popular large car of the city. In addition to the latest in Scandinavian design, Volvos are equipped with various safety innovations, including City Safety collision avoidance technology (standard) and the unique Pedestrian Jä Deäkärinkatu tection with Full Auto Brake system (extra equipment). This year, we will be the first in the world to introduce the next-generation V60 Plug-in diesel hybrid model, which will make your daily urban driving emission-free. A car you can recharge from an ordinary electric plug. A car for urbane, enlightened city dwellers. Read more: Volvocars.fi and designdistrict.fi


CAPITAL! Mikonkatu Senaatintori Aleksanterinkatu

Fabianinkatu

Uspenski Cathedral

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na va

Pohjoisesplanadi

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Market Square

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tu

2

Unioninkatu

Kasarmikatu

6

Eteläranta

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Design District Helsinki – 25 streets including: 1

Market Square/Tourist Information

2 Artek 3 Art gallery Galleria G 4 Design Museum 5 Museum of Finnish Architecture 6

Restaurant Olo

7 Tomorrow’s Antique 8 Myymälä2 shop and gallery

iva

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9 Cafe Bar No. 9 10 Gallery Kalhama & Piippo

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THE NEW VOLVO V60 PLUG-IN HYBRID. EQUIPPED WITH CITY SAFETY COLLISION AVOIDANCE TECHNOLOGY.


Welcome new friends. Dark lilac and turquoise are the latest colour guests to join the Alvar Aalto collection. Create your own personal setting and get ready to invite some special guests of your own. If nothing else, it’s just another reason to celebrate spring.


www.iittala.com


W W W.W D C H E L S IN K I 2 0 12 . F I / A P P

CITIES OF HELSINKI, ESPOO, VA N TA A , K AUNI A INE N A ND L A H T I

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Design  to  go?   Please  download   the  WDC  2012   mobile  app  at


MANIFEST

H O M E L E S S

Stop. What happens when a person does not have a home in which to collect design objects? Or if the person has a home but for him or her life means just monotonous homeless dragging on? We live a life of temporary homes at airports, in hotel rooms and work places. We work very hard in order to close ourselves in our homes at the end of the day. We collect and hunt for things in a hurry. When did we forget the original meaning of home and became homeless hunters? Why should we buy any more new chairs when a person can only sit on one chair at a time? Thinking about the home, I think, is a good beginning for Manifest and for an international dialogue. This is why we asked twelve thinkers and design professionals in Finland and around the world to write their own manifestos. In this magazine, these twelve apostles write about the home, each from his or her perspective. We who are making this magazine all have a home, but there are more than 100 million homeless people in the world.  Manifest is a magazine born out of love for design, for writing and for making a new kind of tabloid magazine. We chose the tabloid format because newspaper is associated with knowledge and safety. Newspaper as a material is democratic: it's easily accessible and recyclable. For those without homes, a newspaper provides warmth in the most concrete of senses. Manifest is a collaborative design project made possible through a wide range of corporate partnerships. Manifest is published in Finnish and English, and during the design-theme year it will be distributed selectively in Helsinki, Stockholm, London, Berlin, Milan, New York, Tokyo and Sydney. A magazine does not move mountains or change the fiscal quarter of design. The purpose of the magazine is to make you stop and think, and to inspire you to act so that the coming design generations can have a good life. For a moment, Manifest is the home we share.

In Helsinki, 27th March 2012, the year of the Helsinki World Design Capital.  T I I N A

A L V E S A L O ,

E D I T O R - I N - C H I E F

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BANGKOK | BEIJING | CHONGQING | DELHI | HONG KONG | NAGOYA | OSAKA | SEOUL | SHANGHAI | SINGAPORE | TOKYO

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Fabianinkatu

MANIFEST Pohjoisesplanadi

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Unioninkatu

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Design District Helsinki – 25 katua mm:

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Uspenskin katedraali

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3 Galleria G

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5 Arkkitehtuurimuseo 6

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Portraits by: VanMossevelde+N (Marco Velardi), Marcelo Krasilcic (Felix Burrichter), Alexander Lagergren ( Daniel Golling), Paola Pieroni (Jane Withers), Armin Linke (Marcus Miessen), VVA Ry (Reijo Pipinen)

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10 Gallery Kalhama & Piippo

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MANIFEST

Ravintola Olo

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Sinebrychoffin puisto

Maailman Design-pääkaupungin Helsingin kaduilla voit tuntea olosi tavallista turvallisemmaksi: onhan Volvo kaupungin suosituin iso auto. Uusimman skandinaavisen designin ohella Volvoissa on turvallisuusinnovaatioita: mm. City Safety -turvallisuusjärjestelmä (vakio) ja ainutlaatuinen jalankulkijoiden havaitsemistoiminto automaatJääkärinkatu tisella täysjarrutuksella (lisävaruste). Tänä vuonna esittelemme ensimmäisenä maailmassa uuden sukupolven V60 Plug-in dieselhybridi-mallin, jolla voi ajaa päivittäiset kaupunkiajot nollapäästöillä. Auton, jonka voi ladata tavallisesta virtapistokkeesta. Auton urbaaneille, valistuneille kaupunkilaisille.

UUSI VOLVO V60 PLUG-IN HYBRIDI. VAKIONA CITY SAFETY.

Lue lisää Volvocars.fi ja designdistrict.fi

HOMELESS

2-3 volvo

1-48 sanomapaino

TERVETULOA MAAILMAN TURVALLISIMPAAN

intie

Fabianinkatu

Annankatu

Fredrikinkatu

Unioninkatu

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Design District Helsinki – 25 katua mm:

Fredrikinkatu

Eteläranta

Korkeavuorenkatu

Annankatu 9

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Uspenskin katedraali

Kanavakatu

Kasarmikatu

Yrjönkatu

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10

u Lönnrotinkat

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Mikonkatu

Mannerheim

HOMELESS

Index

Kauppatori

Kalevankatu

Eerikinkatu

12-15 s i v u 4 3 radical capital

Senaatintori

Pohjoisesplanadi

Ruoholahdenk

8 world design capital helsinki 2012

Aleksanterinkatu

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atu

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Porkkalankatu

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DESIGN-PÄÄKAUPUNKIIN.

Kaivokatu

MANIFEST

BANGKOK | CHONGQING | DELHI | HONGKONG | NAGOYA | OSAKA | PEKING | SHANGHAI | SINGAPORE | SOUL | TOKIO

4-5 diesel

1

Kauppatori/Tourist Information

2 Artek

3 Galleria G

4 Designmuseo

5 Arkkitehtuurimuseo 6

8

1

tu

4

9 Cafe Bar No. 9 10 Gallery Kalhama & Piippo

5

H

atu

P o r t r a i t s b y : V a n M o s s e v e l d e + N ( M a r c o V e l a r d i ) , M a r c e l o kr a s i l c i c ( F e l i x B u r r i c h t e r ) , A l e x a n d e r L a g e r g r e n ( d a n i e l g o l l i n g ) , P a o l a P i e r o n i (j a n e W i t h e r s ) , A r m i n L i n k e ( M a r c u s M i e s s e n ) , V V A R y ( R e i j o P i p i n e n )

anta

Hietalahdenk

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p A I N O S

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tu

S u O M E N k I E L I N E N

Fredrikinkatu

Iso

Roobertinka

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H

atu Punavuorenk Sinebrychoffin puisto

Maailman Design-pääkaupungin Helsingin kaduilla voit tuntea olosi tavallista turvallisemmaksi: onhan Volvo kaupungin suosituin iso auto. Uusimman skandinaavisen designin ohella Volvoissa on turvallisuusinnovaatioita: mm. City Safety -turvallisuusjärjestelmä (vakio) ja ainutlaatuinen jalankulkijoiden havaitsemistoiminto automaatJääkärinkatu tisella täysjarrutuksella (lisävaruste). Tänä vuonna esittelemme ensimmäisenä maailmassa uuden sukupolven V60 Plug-in dieselhybridi-mallin, jolla voi ajaa päivittäiset kaupunkiajot nollapäästöillä. Auton, jonka voi ladata tavallisesta virtapistokkeesta. Auton urbaaneille, valistuneille kaupunkilaisille. Lue lisää Volvocars.fi ja designdistrict.fi

UUSI VOLVO V60 PLUG-IN HYBRIDI. VAKIONA CITY SAFETY.

HOMELESS

MA NI FES T

HO ME LE SS

2-3 VOLVO

1-48 SANOMAPAINO

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4-5 dIESEL

M A N I F E S T

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8 WORLd dESIgN CAPITAL HELSINkI 2012

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Stop. Mitä tapahtuu, jos ihmisellä ei ole kotia, johon kerätä designtavaroita? Tai jos hänellä on koti, mutta hän kokee vaeltavansa kodittomana yksitoikkoista elämäänsä eteenpäin? Me elämme väliaikaiskotien kulttuuria lentokentillä, hotellihuoneissa ja työpaikoillamme. Teemme valtavasti työtä, jotta voisimme jonain päivänä sulkeutua kotiimme. Me keräämme ja saalistamme kiireellä tavaroita. Missä vaiheessa me unohdimme kodin alkuperäisen merkityksen ja meistä tuli kodittomia saalistajia? Miksi meidän pitäisi ostaa enää uusia tuoleja, kun ihminen istuu vain yhdellä tuolilla kerrallaan? Kodin pohtiminen on mielestäni hyvä aloitus Manifestille ja kansainväliselle dialogille. Tästä syystä pyysimme kahtatoista ajattelijaa ja designalan ammattilaista suomesta ja maailmalta kirjoittamaan meille oman manifestinsa. Nämä kaksitoista apostolia kirjoittavat tässä lehdessä kodista, kukin omasta näkökulmastaan. Kaikilla meillä lehden tekijöillä on koti, mutta maailmassa arvioidaan olevan yli 100 miljoona asunnotonta ihmistä. Manifest-lehti on syntynyt rakkaudesta designiin, kirjoittamiseen ja uudenlaisen tabloid-lehden tekoon. Halusimme tehdä sanomalehden, koska se symboloi tietoa ja turvallisuutta – mikä koti se on, jossa ei sanomalehteä lueta aamuisin? sanomalehtipaperi on demokraattista: helposti saatavilla ja kierrätettävissä. Kodittomalle sanomalehti tarjoaa suojaa kylmyyttä vastaan. Matkalla on tapahtunut kaikenlaista kompurointia, ja välillä on menty eteenpäin takapuoli edellä. sellaista on kaiketi myös hyvän designin tekeminen: oman mukavuusalueen ulkopuolelle menemistä ja riskin ottamista vallitsevista mielipiteistä piittaamatta. Lehdellä ei siirretä vuoria eikä muuteta vallitsevaa designin kvartaalitaloutta. Lehden tarkoitus on kuitenkin pysäyttää ajattelemaan ja inspiroida toimimaan niin, että myös tulevien designsukupolvien olisi hyvä elää. Manifest on meille kaikille hetken aikaa yhteinen koti.

Helsingissä 22. maaliskuuta World Design Capital -vuonna 2012. pä ä T oi Mi TT aja

T ii Na

a Lv es a Lo

jK. Manifest on yritysyhteistyönä tehty yhteiskunnallinen designjulkaisu, joka ilmestyy sekä suomeksi että englanniksi ja jota jaetaan teemavuoden aikana valikoidusti Helsingissä, Tukholmassa, Lontoossa, Berliinissä, Milanossa, New Yorkissa ja sydneyssä.

K Ku uv vA A s sA AR Ri i P PO Oi ij jä äR Rv vi i: : M MA AN NN NE ER RH HE Ei iM Mi iN NT Ti iE EN N P Pu uH HE EL Li iN NK Ki iO Os sK Ki i, , 1 19 98 80 0 s sA AR Ri i P PO Oi ij jä äR Rv vi i – – K Kj jE EL LL L W WE Es sT Tö ö, , K KA As sA AR Ri i ( (O OT TA Av vA A 2 20 01 11 1) )

9 PääkIRjOITuS

M A N I F E S T

10 FINNAIR

11 INdEx

SI v u

H O M E L ES S

2 0

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12-15 RAdICAL CAPITAL

H O M E L E S S

M A N IF E S T

s i v u

M A N I F ES T

H O M E L E SS

S I v u

4 3

17 MANIFEST III FELIx BuRRICHTER

MANIFEST

2 1

SI vu

HOMELESS

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MANIFEST

HOMELESS

ai wei wei: Meidän on kaikkien otettava enemmän vastuuta toisistamme ja poliittisesta tilanteesta.

tilanjakoon paluusta on havaittavissa esimerkiksi avarina keittiöinä ja tiloina, joita suunnitellaan vieraita varten. Pohjoismaissa aikoinaan yleistyneet ahtaat keittiöt ja keittokomerot ovat kadonneet lähes kokonaan. Koti ei ole ainoastaan paikka, jossa asutaan, vaan siellä kokoonnutaan, vietetään aikaa, syödään, juhlitaan ja tavataan ystäviä ja sukulaisia. I h m I n e n ta r v I t s e e ko d I n lIIkkuessaankIn

A L v ES A L O

m o d e r n I kotI o n m u ut tu va

Ajasta riippumatta kodilla on ollut – ja on edelleen – statusarvo. Se kertoo asukkaan varallisuudesta ja asemasta yhteiskunnassa. Säädynmukaisten arvojen sijaan viestimme kodin kautta yhä enemmän omista vapaista valinnoistamme ja tyylistämme. Funktionalistisen ajattelun mukaista oli se, että kodin tila järjestäytyi keittiöön, makuuhuoneeseen ja olohuoneeseen, jotka palvelivat kaikki tarkoitustaan. Pienet keittiöt yleistyivät, kun salimaiset ruokailutilat hävisivät kaupunkiasumisen myötä. Olohuoneet kalustettiin tavallisesti sohvaryhmillä vieraita varten ja lapset saivat omat huoneet, kun naiset menivät töihin. Viitteitä perinteiseen porvarilliseen edustusasuntomalliin ja

Unelmat perinteisestä kodista eivät ole kadonneet, mutta kodin kokemus ei ole välttämättä enää pysyvä. Yhä useammalle meistä koti on jakautunut lukuisiin eri paikkoihin tai on tilapäinen. Elämme ajassa, jossa turvallinen, kodinomainen tunne voi liittyä

lentokenttään, hotellihuoneeseen tai vaikkapa Skypeen. Vaikka hotelliasuminen on yleensä tilapäistä, yleistynyt ilmiö on se, että modernit kodit voidaan sisustaa hotellihuoneiden näköisiksi. Kaipaamme muuttuvuuden ja tilapäisyyden tunnetta myös kotona. Ajatus kodista voi ulottua myös liikkumiseen ja liikkumisen välineisiin – tunteeseen siitä, että olet kotona autossa, junassa tai lentokoneessa. Kun liikkumiseen paikasta toiseen käytetään paljon aikaa, välineen muotoilu, yksityiskohdat ja viihtyvyys ovat keskiössä. Useimmille meistä paikasta toiseen liikkumisen välineet edustavat ennen kaikkea valittua elämäntapaa, arvoja ja asennetta. Esimerkiksi polkupyörä on välineenä paitsi taloudellinen, myös ekologinen valinta.

s a n a n va Pa u s ta k a a d e m o k r at I a n Sanan- ja ilmaisunvapaus tarkoittaa Pohjoismaissa kansalaisvapauksien

vapaus on Norjan ohella suurin koko maailmassa. Atlas Saarikoski, 29, on Suomen tunnetuimpia anarkisteja. Hän on luotsannut tämän vuoden alusta yli sata-

TE kSTI

artemisia gentileschi: Mikä ei aina ole turvallista. Minun sukupolvelleni, ainakaan naisille, koti ei aina ollut turvallinen paikka. moby: Minä olen siis turvassa, ehkä. Sukupolveni on koditon ja juureton. Minulla ei ole juuria lainkaan. renzo rosso: Sukupolvellasi on enemmän itseilmaisun kanavia kuin meillä oli. Rakastan sukupolveasi, koska olette niin luovia ja innovatiivisia ajattelussanne, tavoissa, joilla lähestytte asioita.

tonta. On muistettava, että laitoksissa

edi rama: Minun maassani Albaniassa on paljon ahdistusta juuri siksi, että ihmiset ovat luonnostaan

22 2OR+ BY YAT

S I v u

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M AN I FE ST

hIljentymIskaPPelI helsInGIn ytImessä

Shigeru Ban japan Emergency Houses, up M p roFi

Keskelle ruuhkaisinta Helsinkiä rakennettu hiljentymiskappeli tarjoaa uskomuksesta tai lompakon paksuudesta riippumatta lohtua niille, jotka sitä eniten tarvitsevat. Kappeli on auki aamusta iltaan, ja siellä voi tavata niin seurakuntien kun sosiaalivirastonkin työntekijöitä.

23 MANIFEST I MARCO VELARdI

HO ME LE S S

Kysyä voi kaikkea alkaen bussien aikatauluista ja hengellisyydestä päätyen siihen, mistä asunnoton voi hakea apua. Muotokieleltään kappeli on eleetön ja helposti lähestyttävä. Se on rakennettu liimapuusta: sisäosissa on käytetty tervaleppää ja julkisivuissa kuusta. Tekijöinä ovat olleet suomalaiset puualan huippuosaajat. Kappelissa kohtaavat ihmiset ja World Design Capital 2012:n

tärkeä teema: kaupunkikuvan pysyvä parantaminen palvelumuotoilun avulla. Kappeli on yksi niistä teemavuoden hankkeista, jotka jäävät pysyviksi elementeiksi kaupunkikuvaan. Arkkitehtitoimisto K2S:n pääsuunnittelija miKKo SummaSen ideana on ollut suunnitella mahdollisimman kaupalliselle paikalle voimakasotteinen pysyvä tila, johon kuka tahansa voi ostamisen sijaan pysähtyä hiljentymään.

S Iv u

kodittomia. Tiranan köyhät ovat ahdistuneita. Miksikö? Koska he eivät omista maitaan. He pelkäävät, että hetkenä minä hyvänsä joku tulee ja vie ne heiltä. Heillä ei ole oikeuksia maahan, koteihinsa. alvar aalto: Kodin pitäisi tarkoituksella paljastaa jokin heikkouksistasi. Miksi kodin yhteydessä pitäisi puhua ”ongelmasta”? Asioista tulee ongelmia, kun niiden perusteet muuttuvat. edi rama: Mutta sitäkö me haluamme tulevaisuudelta? artemisia gentileschi: Meidän on suojeltava itseämme ja kotejamme hyvittääksemme menneet. Turvallisuus alkaa kotoa.

SIvu

HOMELESS

m a r ku s

T E k S TI

T II NA

Arkkitehti k2S Oy

B E r L I N – Persianlahdelle tarvitaan koulutuskeskus, joka tarjoaisi mahdollisuuden yhteiskunnaliseen keskusteluun. Tämän instituution... Pitäisi olla paikallinen, inhimillisen kokoinen keskus. Pitäisi säännöllisesti järjestää kulttuuri- ja koulutustapahtumia yhdessä paikallisten järjestöjen, koulujen ja yksittäisten ihmisten kanssa. Pitäisi pyrkiä vakiinnuttamaan asemansa kriittisen vuoropuhelun mahdollistavana tilana. Pitäisi pyrkiä tasa-arvoiseen, muuttuvaan ja erilaisia näkökulmia sallivaan ohjelmaan. Pitäisi nähdä epäonnistumisten arvo. Pitäisi säännöllisesti järjestää mitä tästä voimme oppia -tilaisuuksia. Pitäisi olla matalan kynnyksen tiedon(tuottamisen) keskus. Pitäisi kyseenalaistaa vakiintuneet instituutioiden rakentamisen tavat. Pitäisi olla romantisoimatta paikallisten sitouttamisen merkitystä. Pitäisi olla jotain muuta kuin amerikkalaismallinen franchising-kampus. Pitäisi tähdätä paikallisen tiedon kärtymiseen. Pitäisi luoda työkaluja, jotka jäisivät alueelle ja olisivat erityisesti ympäristöönsä soveltuvia. Pitäisi olla näkyvä. Pitäisi ottaa pitkän aikavälin vastuuta alueesta. Pitäisi luoda kasvualusta ja mahdollisuus syy-seuraus-ajattelulle. Pitäisi olla paikka, johon voi tukeutua. Pitäisi muodostua arkkityypiksi tilasta, joka mahdollistaa poliittisen mielipiteenvaihdon. Pitäisi tuottaa. Pitäisi tarjota. Pitäisi vaatia. Pitäisi kuluttaa ja käyttää loppuun. Pitäisi sallia poliittisten näkemysten moneus. Pitäisi edistää herkkävaistoisuutta suhteessa paikallisiin ja yhteisöllisiin arjen käytäntöihin. Pitäisi tarjota itseään kokoontumispaikkana. Pitäisi olla turvallinen paikka kokoontua. Pitäisi omaksua kutsumattoman vieraan osa. Pitäisi perustaa toimintansa vieraanvaraisuudelle, mutta vastustaa avoimen tilan ja yhteisöllisen päätöksenteon myyttiä.

A L v ES A LO

2OR+BYYAT Stores

27 PuRTAVAA kATukuLTTuuRIA

SI vu

uu SINA rk Au S

germano celant: Näitä uskomuksia kyseenalaistetaan nykyisin kiihtyvässä tahdissa kaikilla aloilla. Massatuotettujen tavaroiden kenttä on lattea, sillä mikään ei juuri erotu mistään eikä millään ole pysyvää paikkaa.

Kluuvi Yliopistonkatu 6 Helsinki 00100 Finland 28-29 30-31 Eerikinkatu 9 Helsinki 00100 Finland 18 Lahti 15110 Finland MANIFEST VI www.2orplus.comRautatienkatu TuLEVAISuudEN kOTI www.shop2orplus.com www.facebook.com/2orplus jANE WITHERS ON VäLIAIkAINEN

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MA NIF EST

SI vu

H OME LES S

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MA NIF EST

Ne ule mekk o Sa nna, pun ain en t akki jov ovic h-Ha wk. S aapi kkaa t ja vyö vi ntag e.

k u v a: M a ij a H ol m a , A l v a r A a l t o - m u se o

1.

raKKaudella maire

kuvAT SANNA SAASTAMOINEN-BArrOIS, MALLIT NINjA SArASALO & SuvI WEST, STYLINg MILA pENTTI, MEIkkI jA HIukSET MArII SADrAk, kuvAuSpAIkAT rOSA LIkSOMIN ATELjé jA IISALMI

T E k STI

ELS I

Äiti luki paljon ruotsalaista ellen Keytä, aikansa muotifilosofia. Key piti tärkeänä kauneusaistin kehittymistä ihmisessä. Koti oli kokonaistaideteos, jonka rakentaminen oli naisen tehtävä. Kauniissa kodissa ihminen varttuisi arvostamaan kauneutta. va Pa a ta I d e ko u l u

Maire Gullichsenin ensimmäinen Helsingin-koti oli ateljeehuoneisto Vuorimiehenkadun kulmassa. Joulukuussa 1934 Maire Gullichsen esitteli taiteilijaystävilleen ethel theSleFFille , Saara caStrénille ja irja nopoSelle ajatuksen Vapaan taidekoulun perustamisesta. Mallina olivat Pariisin vapaat akatemiat ja tavoitteena saada opiskella maalausta omassa tahdissa, ilman koulumaista pakkoa.

HO MEL ES S

paitsi koti, myös tarvittaessa Artekin esittelytila. 1930-luvun Artekia on pidetty yhtä tärkeänä avantgarde-ryhmittymänä kuin vasemmistolaista kirjailijaryhmä Kiilaa. Ydinryhmään kuuluivat Maire Gullichsen ja arkkitehdit aino ja alvar aalto sekä n i lS -GuStav hahl . Heitä yhdisti paitsi vasemmistolainen 3. ajatusmaailma myös yhtiösopimus: joukko perusti syksyllä 1935 Artekin, huonekaluja ja teollisuustuotteita myyvän yrityksen, joka voitoillaan harjoittaisi myös taidegalleriatoimintaa. Artek-kodin sisustus oli kaikkea sitä, mitä Havulinnan jugend ei ollut: keveää, valoisaa ja tarkoituksenmukaista. Koko Artek-estetiikka perustui ajatukseen puhtaan muodon kauneudesta. Kaikkinaista koristelua pidettiin turhana.

SI vu

32 MANIFEST VII MARCuS MIESSEN

2.

T-paita, Diesel.

Jo tammikuussa 1935 koulu aloitti toimintansa. Pariisissa opiskelleet opettajat toivat mukanaan puhtaan paletin ideaalin, joka oli jotakin ihan muuta kuin suomalaista taidemaailmaa hallinnut synkkyys. Gullichsenit muuttivat näihin aikoihin suurempaan asuntoon Kaivopuistoon, joten ensimmäistä koulutilaa ei tarvinnut etsiä kaukaa. Vuorimiehenkadun koti muuttui koulun ateljeeksi – siihen asti, kunnes eräässä lehdessä julkaistu kuva alastonmallin selästä herätti naapureissa niin paljon pahaa verta, että koulun oli muutettava. m a llI kotI

Kaivopuiston asunnon sisustus oli puhdasta Artekia, ja se olikin

HOMELESS

m I r k ku

vIlla maIrea

Villa Mairea valmistui vuonna 1939 Noormarkkuun. Villan suunnittelivat Aino ja Alvar Aalto, joille hanke oli samalla eräänlainen koelaboratorio uusien ideoiden testaamiseen. Yksittäisessä rakennuksessa oli mahdollista kokeilla ratkaisuja, joiden massatuotanto ei vielä ollut mahdollista. Jos ratkaisut osoittautuisivat hyviksi, niiden tuotantoa voitaisiin yksinkertaistaa ja ne olisivat pian kaikkien saatavilla. Villa Mairea oli Maire Gullichsenin salonkitoiminnan keskus. Siellä kokoontuivat älyköt, taiteilijat ja vaikuttajat eri puolilta maailmaa saman pöydän ääreen. Illalliset kestivät pitkään ja 4. vieraat jäivät usein yöksi. Vaikka

k O S k A ? Paras dyykkausaika on yleensä öisin. Vanhentuneet ruuat heitetään heti sulkemisajan jälkeen roskiin ja hämärällä ei jää helposti kiinni. Toisaalta roskahuoneisiin saattaa olla helpompi livahtaa päivisin. M I T ä ? Kesällä ei kannata dyykata maitoa eikä lihaa, sillä ne pilaantuvat helposti ja saattavat aiheuttaa vatsanväänteitä. Leivät, vihannekset ja juurekset ovat aina hyviä, varsinkin sellaiset, jotka kuoritaan ennen syömistä. Tumma

leipä ei homehdu yhtä helposti kuin vaalea, joten sen syöminen on turvallisempaa. B O N u S T A : Dyykatessa tulee kokeiltua kaikenlaista luksusta, kuten erikoisjuustoja, fenkolia, ahvenfileitä, maa-artisokkia, granaattiomenia ja täydellisesti kypsyneitä avokadoja. Leipomon takapihalta saattaa löytyä kokonainen kermakakku paketissa. Kokkaustaidot kehittyvät raaka-aineiden määritellessä menun.

jonathan franzen: Lopullisten ratkaisujen vältteleminen voi olla jonain historian hetkinä raikasta, jos tarkoitus on ravistella luutuneita kulttuurisia kertomuksia. moby: Luulen, että keinoja on muutamia. Voi tutkia asioita itse ja jakaa tulokset ympäristönsä kanssa. Ja voi pyrkiä vain olemaan esimerkki. Luulen, toimin juuri niin – yritän ymmärtää asiota ja elää hyvin, niin, etten rasita ympäristöä liikaa. Se on luultavasti parasta, mihin pystyn. vivienne westwood: Yritä olla huolehtimatta asioista. Pyri vaikuttamaan niihin.

renzo rosso: Uusi sukupolvi haluaa jotakin käytännöllisempää, demokraattisempaa. Uskon lujasti tähän aikalaisvisioon. ai wei wei: Haluan sanoa: pystyt siihen ja on OK sanoa mielipiteensä. ✖

SI vu

yves behar: Ainoa asia, jota kannattaa pelätä, on se, että lakkaisi yrittämästä.

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25

k e I tä h e o v at ? alvar aalto (1898–1976). suomalainen arkkitehti ja muotoilija. tunnetaan modernistisesta, puhdaslinjaisesta suunnittelustaan. artemisia Gentileschi (1593–1652). Italialainen barokkimaalari. ensimmäinen nainen, joka hyväksyttiin firenzen taideakatemiaan. moby (synt. 1965). yhdysvaltalainen muusikko ja valokuvaaja, joka on ottanut taiteilijanimensä romaanista moby dick. tunnustuksellinen kristitty ja vegaani. edi rama (synt. 1964). albanialainen taidemaalari ja kuvanveistäjä. albanian sosialistipuolueen johtaja ja kotikaupunkinsa tiranan entinen pormestari. jonathan franzen (synt. 1959). yhdysvaltalainen kirjailija. maansa arvostetuimpa nykykirjailijoita, joka tunnetaan erityisesti keskiluokan kuvaajana. ai Wei Wei (synt. 1957). kiinalainen taiteilija ja toisinajattelija. vainottu maassaan poliittisista syistä. yves Behar (synt. 1967). maailman tunnetuimpia nykysuunnittelijoita. syntynyt sveitsissä. kestävän kehityksen puolestapuhuja. vivienne Westwood (synt. 1941). englantilainen muotisuunnittelija, jota pidetään yhtenä punkmuodin äideistä. tunnettu erityisesti sex Pistols -yhtyeen vaatettamisesta. Germano celant (synt. 1940). Italialainen taidehistorioitsija ja kriitikko. yksi arte povera -liikkeen perustajista. renzo rosso (synt. 1955). Italialainen muotivaikuttaja. vaateyritys dieselin perustaja. L äH T E E T Color and Fashion Trends Blog, interview with renzo rosso, 8 October 2008 Interview Magazine, “renzo rosso: No Stopping his Engine”, with Colleen Nika, March 2012 South China Morning post, interview with renzo rosso by jing zhang, 30 December 2011, Inhabitat.com, interview with Yves Behar by piper kujac, 8 May 2011 jC|report, inverview with Yves Behar by Bradford Shellhammer, 16 june 2005 The vogue Living Blog Australia, interview with Yves Behar by Madeleine Hinchy, 20 july 2011 re-public, interview with Edi rama by philippos Savvides and Eleni Christidou, no date The American Mag, “Tirana gets real” by Christopher p. Winner, 1 june 2006 quotations from Artemisia gentileschi adapted from Artemisia by Anna Banti, university of Nebraska press, 1995 perfect Sound Forever, interview with Moby by jason gross, September 1997 MTv Hive, interview with Moby by Eric Spitznagel, 16 May 2011 New York Times, “guggenheim Names Curator”, john russell, 1 December 1988 germano Celant, “Haim Steinbach’s Wild, Wild West”, Artforum, December 1987 The guardian, interview with vivienne Westwood by Stuart jeffries, 3 December 2011 The Independent, interview with vivienne Westwood by Dominic Lutyens, 8 November 1998 The paris review, interview with jonathan Franzen by Stephen j. Burn, winter 2010 Bomb 77, interview with jonathan Franzen by Donald Antrim, Fall 2001 New Statesman, interview with Ai Wei Wei by john Sunyer, 12 October 2010 Alvar Aalto in his Own Words, edited by göran Schildt, Otava, 1997

33

kosuke Tsumuran suunnittelema Final Home -takki. pattereilla toimiva radio Tivoli Audio, Formwerk. Samujin Artekille suunnittelema Tote-kassi. Taskulamppu Fenix, Leatherman, partioaitta.

j o s k u I t e n k I n Pä ätät r a k e n ta a u u d e n k o d I n , k äy tä ä l l ä : www.finalhome.com www.volvocars.com www.iittala.com www.diesel.com artek 2nd cycle pieni roobertinkatu 4-6 00130 Helsinki, Finland Garbo vintage kapteeninkatu 3, 00140, Helsinki, Finland san francisco Gay night Tarkk’ampujankatu 16, 00150 Helsinki, Finland Götan maailma Tarkk’ampujankatu 11, 00120, Helsinki, Finland

SI vu

40

HOMELESS

MANIFEST

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ku llB e r G

luKeva ruumiS

Palu u äI d I n lu o Michelangelo pistoletto: The Orchestra of rags – quartet (1968)

H E L S I N k I – Propaganda. Jo pelkkä sana kuulostaa voimakkaalta. Erilaiset suositukset sosiaalisissa verkostoissa ohjaavat kulutustottumuksiamme päivä päivältä enemmän ja perinteiset markkinoinnin muodot tuntuvat hampaattomilta. Verkostot saavat aikaan kansanliikkeitä, mielenosoituksia ja mellakoita uskomattomalla nopeudella. Aatteet, aktivismi ja anarkismi kiinnostavat. Politiikan kentällä ilmassa on protestimielialaa, eikä syyttä. Idealismi ja vakaumus ovat väistyneet tovereiden agendalta ja tilalle on tullut julkisuuden ja tunnettuuden kipeys. Vallanpitäjät kiemurtelevat korruptio- ja kytkössyytösten alla. Media etsii ja käyttää asemaansa lähes tuomarin roolissa. Olkoon kysymyksessä sitten mielipiteiden ohjaus, manipulointi, mainonta tai propaganda, taustalla on eduntavoittelu.

KU VAT 1. Maire Gullichsen (1907–1990) oli suorapuheinen ja voimakas nainen.

Äitiään Maire Gullichsen palvoi, isä oli pelottavampi hahmo. Molempien vaikutus näkyy Havulinnan sisustuksessa: isä rakasti ylellisyyttä, äiti lämpöä.

ku v a : M a i r ea - s ä ät i ö n a r k i s to

g rand e p ull moha ir- ja v ill aneu le, Anna ruo hone n. Epau leti t, D usty . Täp lik äs k anin karv ahat tu, Hat tuli ike Muot i-A niel a. k aula koru ja ran neke , Fi ona paxt on. Ham e, A nett e ro stel l.

Öiset piiskaamiset loppuivat, kun uninen Maire kerran piiloutui selkäsaunan pelossa eteisen kaappiin ja löytyi vasta, kun kaapin ilma oli jo käymässä vähiin.

l aP s u u d en kotI

Maire Gullichsenin lapsuudenkoti Havulinna Noormarkussa oli jylhä jugend-linna. Gullichsen pelkäsi kotiaan, etenkin kun isot sisarukset pelottelivat häntä pattereissa naksuvilla peikoilla. Öisin hän haki turvaa äidin ja isän sängystä, mutta isällä oli vitsa valmiina ja pieni vaeltelija otettiin vastaan sen kanssa.

katoaisi yhdessä yössä. Ilmastonmuutos hidastuisi 25 prosenttia, metsien hävittäminen loppuisi, sademetsät säilyisivät, veden ja ilman laatu paranisivat, eliniän ennusteet pitenisivät ja syöpätilastoihin tulisi notko. Joten kyllä, sillä yksinkertaisella teolla, että ryhtyy vegaaniksi, yksilö todella muuttaa maailmaa paremmaksi. vivienne westwood: Maailman täytyy olla ennenkaikkea elinympäristö, ei kuolinpaikka, sen on oltava kestävä ympäristö. Se olisi hienoa. yves behar: Muista, että mikään epäeettinen ei voi olla kaunista. alvar aalto: Vanha on kaunista, uusi rumaa. germano celant: Minua on syytetty siitä, että kannatan vääriä asioita. Mutta kyllä minä voin olla subliimin puolella, kauneuden puolella. alvar aalto: Tuttu ja turvallinen ei katoa kokonaan. Juuri nyt on nähdäkseni kyse siitä, että mietimme, miten kaikki linkittyy yhteen. ai wei wei: En luottaisi kykyyni muuttaa tulevaisuutta yksinäni. Kohtalo muokkaa elämiämme. Vaikka jotkut ihmiset ovatkin nerokkaita, kaikki näyttää jo päätetyltä.

yves behar: Ihmiset ajattelevat, että sana eko tarkoittaa lisää hintaa. Minun tehtäväni on todistaa, ettei se pidä paikkaansa. Mielestäni kyse on hyvin yksinkertaisesta yhtälöstä: raaka-aineiden vähentäminen tai valmistusprosessien yksinkertaistaminen pienentää kustannuksia. Pienemmän hiilijalanjäljen pitäisi tarkoittaa halvempaa hintaa. moby: Jos kaikki maailman ihmiset ryhtyisivät vegaaneiksi, iso osa maapallon ongelmista

HOMELESS

r a h at ta k a u P u n G I s s a? helSinKi on kallis kaupunki. Jos raha ei riitä kaikkeen, apua voi etsiä roskalaatikosta. Syömäkelpoisen ruuan etsimistä roskiksista kutsutaan dyykkaukseksi. Manifest kokosi dyykkareiden parhaat vinkit. M I S S ä ? Pikkukauppojen roskikset ovat useammin lukitsemattomia kuin isojen. Kysele ja kuulostele, missä hyväsydämiset ihmiset jättävät ovet ”vahingossa” auki.

33 MANIFEST SuRVIVAL kIT

MANIFEST

39

ovet myös suurelle yleisölle. Ensimmäinen kesänäyttely esitteli suomalaista taidetta Gullichsenin ja muiden keräilijöiden omista kokoelmista. 1980-luvulta lähtien villa on ollut kaikki kesät avoinna yleisölle. Alkuvuosina näyttelyissä saattoi vierailla yli 20 000 ihmistä kesässä.

Oli yksi koti, jota Maire rakasti, vaikka se poikkesi täysin hänen elämänsä muista tärkeistä paikoista. Äidin lapsuuden kesäpaikka Honkala oli täynnä keveitä verhoja, pitsiä ja heleitä värejä. Maire Gullichsen ei koskaan yrittänytkään muuttaa talon romanttista tunnelmaa vaan piti sitä yllä. Jos jokin astia hajosi, hän hankki tilalle uuden yhtä romanttisen. Elämänsä loppupuolella Gullichsen alkoi viettää Honkalassa yhä enemmän aikaa ja sopi jopa haastattelut usein juuri sinne. Monissa 80-luvun lehdissä onkin kuvia, joissa Mairen taustalla pilkottavat hempeät verhot. ✖

ympär i llämme on lukuisia propagandaverkostoja naamioituneina eri tavoin. Propagandaverkostoiksi ne eivät halua tunnustautua sanan negatiivisen kaiun takia: Hitlerin Saksassa propagandan kohteiksi joutuivat eri uskonnot ja kansat kansallissosialismin voitontavoittelun pyrkimyksissä. Neuvostoliiton tehokkaan propagandan mahdollisti keskitetty tiedonvälitys. Yhdysvalloista lähetettiin toisen maailmansodan jälkeen rautaesiripun toiselle puolen mielikuvaa kapitalistisesta onnelasta propagandististen radio-ohjelmien välityksellä. Kiinnostavinta ja vaikuttavinta propagandaa ovat julisteet. Neuvostoliiton kommunismia popularisoivissa julisteissa on selkeää sukulaisuutta hitlerin natsipropagandaan. Vahva graafinen ilme on tunnistettava niin värien kuin kuvituksenkin tasolla. Sotilaat ja diktaattorit olivat voimansa tunnossa viestiensä ympäröiminä.

2. Havulinnan sisustus oli jylhää ja raskasta. Omissa kodeissaan Gullichsen arvosti keveyttä, valoa ja selkeyttä.

alkoi kirjoittaa jopa kirjeensä kalkkeripaperin kanssa ja säästi itselleen kopiot yksityisimmistäkin viesteistään. Gullichsen käänsi itseensä kohdistuvat uteliaat katseet edukseen ja opetteli elämään niiden kanssa. Hän avasi jopa kotinsa vieraille ja teki niistä arteklaisen elämäntavan näyteikkunoita.

ai wei wei: Kaikki haluavat osalliseksi keskusvallasta, joten valheita ja syytöksiä on kaikkialla. Minulle taide on keino paeta tätä järjestelmää.

MANIFEST

sInulla on vIIsI mInuuttIa aIk a a jät tä ä kotI. mItä otat muk a an?

v I

propagandaa? monesti kyse oli edustusillallisista, tunnelma oli boheemi ja rento. Erään vieraan kerrotaan kerran intoutuneen esittelemään akrobaatintaitojaan ja tekemään kesken illallisen sarjan voltteja

5.

HYT TINE N

maIre GullIchsen olI 1900-luvun suomalaIsen ku lt t u u r I n vo I m a h a h m o ja : m e s e n a at t I , k e r ä I l I jä , lIIkenaInen ja vä symätön or G anIsa at tor I. kotI olI y ks I h ä n e n lu ov u ute n s a n äy t tä m ö I s tä .

millaiSta oliSi syntyä niin etuoikeutettuna, ettei koskaan voisi olla varma, näkevätkö ihmiset sinut vai rahasi? maire GullichSen (1907–1990) ei juuri pohtinut tätä julkisesti. Ahlströmien teollisuussuvun tytär oli toimen nainen eikä harrastanut jossittelua. Gullichsen löysi taidemaailmasta tilaa olla muutakin kuin rikas tyttö: hän maalasi ja vaikutti pohjoismaisen suunnittelun ja arkkitehtuurin kehitykseen. Hän oli mukana perustamassa Vapaata taidekoulua ja Artekia. Gullichsenista on sanottu, että ilman hänen innostustaan ja varojaan suomalainen 30-luvun avantgarde olisi saavuttanut paljon vähemmän. Jo varhain hän tuli tietoiseksi siitä, että hänen yksityinen elämänsä oli myös julkista. Hän

jonathan franzen: Voimme järkyttyä globaalisti, mutta kärsimme paikallisesti, siellä missä asumme.

maniFeSt Survival Kit

Pitäisi viestiä vahvasta johtajuudesta. Pitäisi olla läpinäkyvä kansalaisinstituutio. Pitäisi kehittyä toimijaksi, jonka kautta poliittiset ja muut jännitteet voitaisiin kanavoida organisoidummaksi ja produktiivisemmaksi keskusteluksi. Pitäisi kyseenalaistaa sekä kouluun että paikallisiin tiloihin ja käytäntöihin liittyvä normatiivisuus. Pitäisi olla Chantal Mouffen ajattelun mukainen tila, jossa ollaan samaa mieltä eri mieltä olemisen arvosta. Pitäisi olla ristiriitaisten, mutta väkivallattomien kohtaamisten paikka. Pitäisi lopettaa järkeily. Pitäisi olla syntymäisillään oleva yhteisö. Pitäisi olla horisontaalisesti saavutettava tila. Pitäisi uskoa tilassa olemisen monikerroksisuuteen. Pitäisi ruokkia demokraattista moniarvoisuutta. Pitäisi toimia poliittisissa konflikteissa ja yhteiskunnan muutoksessa. Pitäisi osaltaan opetella pois normatiivisista, vakiintuneista läntisistä opettamiseen liittyvistä rooleista, malleista ja konventioista. Pitäisi luoda kaksisuuntaisia yhteyksiä paikallisen ja ei-paikallisen välille. Pitäisi kantaa rajatonta vastuuta toiminnastaan. Pitäisi elää toimintansa seurausten kanssa. Pitäisi pyrkiä yhdistelemään toiminnassaan erilaisia käytäntöjä, suhteita ja sosiaalisia verkostoja. Pitäisi olla uutta luova, optimistinen ja energinen. Pitäisi ajatella itseään muiden toiminnan mahdollistajana, joka ei odottele lupia keneltäkään. Pitäisi perustua kysymiseen pikemmin kuin vastaamiseen. Pitäisi olla tasapainoa järkyttävä voima. Pitäisi saastuttaa toisten mielikuvitus. Pitäisi olla autonominen, toimia ja tuottaa suhteessa tiettyyn tilanteeseen ja niihin tunteisiin, joita se synnyttää yleisössä. Pitäisi lietsoa erimielisyyttä. Pitäisi mahdollistaa vaihtoehtoisia tuottamisen malleja. Pitäisi syleillä epävarmuuksia. ✖ kirjoittaja on arkkitehti ja tilastrategioihin ja kriittiseen kulttuurianalyysiin keskittyvän berliiniläisen studio miessenin perustaja. hän halusi lahjoittaa kirjoituspalkkionsa amnesty Internationalille.

m a n I fe s t

”Kartonki on lämmintä kuin puu.”

k uv a : M a i r ea - s ä ä ti ö n ar k i s to

HOMELESS

MANIFEST

Millaisia asioita on huomioitava

”Tärkeintä on huomioida suunnitte-

Photography: Jeremy Stigter

34

ruud ull inen vil lahu ivi sek ä ti ltat yönä tot eut ettu nil sivy ö, saa mel aist aite ilij a Ma ire Sai jets . ku llat tu h ope ahel avyö , v alm ista ja N orja n pa jat, kas aus Lai ti p ette ri A tel jé S amek ki. pu nain en s ilkk imek ko, Dia ne v on F urst enbe rg. pu nai nen pill erih attu , H attu liik e Mu oti- Ani ela. ken gät, Die sel.

SI vu

Mistä idea kierrätettyjen kartonkiputkien käyttämiseen taloissa tuli, Shigeru Ban? ”Käytin kartonkiputkia kalliin puun sijaan ensi kertaa vuonna 1986 suunnitellessani Alvar Aalto -näyttelyn rakenteita.” silloin, kun suunnittelussa ja rakentamisessa hyödynnetään kartonkia? lussa sekä putken muoto että kohteen rakenneratkaisut.” Millaista palautetta talojen asukkaat ovat antaneet?

k u va : A l va r A al t o -m u s e o

kaik ki r isku -so ljet , La iti pett eri Atel jé Same kki. ruu dull ine n vi llah uivi , Ma ire Sai jets . Su vin mel eera ttu top pi, 2or +byY at. Har teil la S anna n ne ule viit ta. N inja n r/ H-ne ulee ssa on pitk ät m usta t h apsu t.

HOMELESS

alueen jälleenrakentamiseen lahjoittamalla hankkeeseen kierrätettävää komposiittimateriaalia, jota käytettiin talojen ulkokäytäviin ja niiden edessä olevien yli kolmekymmentä metriä pitkien terassien rakentamiseen. Makuuhuoneita asunnoissa on yhdestä kolmeen. Niissä on toimivat sähköt, kaasut, vedet ja viemärit. Terassilankuissa on käytetty kahta väriä, jotka osoittavat, mihin suuntaan ovet aukeavat ja missä lapset voivat turvallisesti leikkiä.

vivienne w estwood: Itse asiassa järjestelmällinen valehteleminen on pahinta. Ajattelumalli, jonka mukaan kuluttaminen on pakollista ja poliitikot puhuvat järkeviä.

32

m I e s s e n

rakentakaa dialogia

”Tavoitteena oli luoda vaihtoehto

Mitä teidän piti ottaa huomioon? ”Halusimme suunnitella inhimillisen Miten uskotte kaupunkilaisten

k aksI er Il aIsta kotIa k auk ana toIsIsta an. molemPIen tehtävä on tarjota lohtua . kumma s sakIn oll a an vaIn hetkI, ja sIt ten Pal ata an Pysy vä än.

humanitäärisestä työstä esimerkiksi Haitissa, Japanin Kobessa ja Turkissa. Nyt Ban rakensi väliaikaisasunnot lähes kahdellesadalle perheelle. Yhdeksään rakennukseen tehtiin satakahdeksankymmentäkahdeksan asuntoa. Asukkaiden yhteiseen käyttöön suunniteltiin kirjasto ja taidegalleria. Talot on tehty materiaaleista, jotka on kierrätetty tai voidaan kierrättää. Perusrakenne tulee päällekkäin ladotuista konteista, jotka on tuettu teräspylväillä. Suomalainen UPM osallistui

edi rama: Nämä ajatuksethan päin vastoin syventävät identiteettikriisiä. Meidän on mietittävä arvomme uudestaan ja pyrittävä uudelleen kohti poliittista aktiivisuutta pelkän talousorientaation sijaan – ja kun sanon talous, tarkoitan taloudellisia intressejä sellaisina kuin ne tänä päivänä ilmenevät.

24-25 10 kESkuSTELuA jOTkA MuuTTIVAT MAAILMAA

MANIFEST

3 1

Mikko Summanen, miksi päätitte suun-

nitella kappelin keskelle ruuhkaisinta Helsinkiä?

kaupalliselle ja vilkkaalle kaupunkitilalle.”

rakennuksen.”

kokevan rakennukseen? ”Kappeli vilkkaan aukion laidalla luo järjestystä ja jäsentää alueen paremmin toimivaksi kun ennen.” ✖

Mirna di r z eyn al ov : The Fisherman’s House (201 1) Image cou rt es y of philli ps de p ury & C ompany

tulevaiSuuden Koti on väliaiKainen vä l I a I k a I s a s u n n ot

jaPan In ma anjär I s t ys – alueella

Viime keväänä Japaniin iskenyt tsunami pyyhkäisi yli Onagawan satamakaupungin tuhoten viidessä minuutissa koko keskustan. Ihmiset menettivät kaiken. Kierrätetyistä materiaaleista ja kartonkiputki-innovaatioista tunnettu arkkitehti Sh iGeru ban halusi auttaa maanjäristyksen uhreja. Hänet tunnettiin jo entuudestaan

26 MANIFEST VIII SuVI WEST

ju LIE

mItä s eur aIsI, jos erI aIk ak ausIen vIIsa at kokoontuIsIvat saman P öydän ä är een?

alvar aalto: Jokaisen on asuttava jossain.

asuvien kehitysvammaisten tai mielisairaiden naisten oikeuksia sama valtio lähinnä kontrolloi ja rajoittaa.” ✖ EH

M AN IF ES T

s a a m e l a I s e t o vat e u r o o Pa n u n I o n I n a l u e e n a I n o a a l k u P e r ä I s k a n s a . a l k u P e r ä I s k a n s at P o lv e u t u vat I h m I s I s tä , j o t k a a s u I vat m a a s s a j o e n n e n n y k y I s t e n va l l a n P I tä j I e n t u l o a . s a a m e l a I s I a o n y h t e e n s ä 7 5 0 0 0 . h e I s tä n o I n 8 7 0 0 a s u u s u o m e s s a .

vivienne westwood: Meidän on muutettava etiikkamme ja talousjärjestelmämme ja koko se tapa, jolla ymmärrämme maailman. artemia gentileschi: Miehiltä se ei käy helposti. Minä näytän, mihin nainen pystyy. vivienne westwood: Miehet loivat kapitalismin. Siinä on kyse maan yksisuuntaisesta hyödyntämisestä. Rikkaat rikastuvat ja köyhät köyhtyvät, ja väitetään, että ainoa tie ulos tästä on jatkuva kasvu. Mutta kasvu perustuu velalle. Se vain pahentaa tilannetta. jonathan franzen: Materialismille annetaan liikaa arvoa. Sellaiselle materialismille, joka keskittyy aivoihin ja tarjoaa lääkkeitä, joilla voimme muuttaa persoonallisuuksiamme, ja sellaiselle, joka liittyy kulutuskulttuuriin, tarjoaa loputtomasti viihdykettä ja kannustaa tavoittelemaan yhä lisää tavaraa.

Hotelli Helka, Pohjoinen Rautatienkatu 23, 00100 Helsinki, Finland, Tel. +358 9 613 580, Fax +358 9 441 087, reservations@helka.fi, www.helka.fi

”Ristiriidat ovat kiinnostavia. Niiden tutkimiselle on tilaa myös perinteisen feminismin tyyssijassa. Kun kerrotaan yhä uudestaan tarinaa heinätöissä – tai nykyään hoivatöissä – uupumattomasta vaaleaveriköstä, ketkä unohdetaan?” Suomalaisen naisliikkeen saavutuksista Saarikoski arvostaa esimerkiksi naisten mahdollisuutta jättää koti ja lähteä töihin sekä oikeutta lasten päivähoitoon. ”Feministisen liikkeen sitoutuminen hyvinvointivaltion rakentamiseen ei kuitenkaan ole minusta ongelma-

vuotiaan naisjärjestön Naisasialiitto Unionin Tulva-lehteä. Mitä ihmettä nuori radikaali tekee perinteisen naisjärjestön kodissa ja palkkalistoilla?

SPRING SUMMER 2012

MANIFEST

renzo rosso: Kapinallisuuden käsite on muuttunut. Ennen olimme vihaisia ja meillä oli tarve kapinoida jotain vastaan ilmaistaksemme itseämme. yves behar: Vastuun suhteen ajattelen, että pyrkimys ympäristön ja yhteiskunnan kannalta kestäviin ratkaisuihin on ensiarvoinen työkalu. Pyrkimys kestäviin ratkaisuihin on mielestäni paras keino, jolla me suunnitteleijat voimme yrittää muuttaa maailmaa.

KeSKuStelua jotKa muuttivat maailmaa

Ihminen tarvitsee kodin, pysyvän turvallisen tukikohdan, oli elämä miten liikkuvaa hyvänsä. Valinnanvapaudesta ja modernin kodin eri ilmentymistä huolimatta ihmisellä – meillä kaikilla – on unelma turvallisesta omasta kodista. Juuri tämä unelma saa meidät liikkumaan ja tekemään työtä tavoitellen sitä, että jonakin päivänä voisimme vain olla turvassa ja käpertyä omaan kotiimme. Amerikkalaisen yhteiskuntaaktivistin, myös bell hooksina tunnetun Gloria jean watKinSin mukaan kodin ihmiselle luoma turvallisuus on tärkein ja voimaannuttavin tunne nykyaikaisessa kulttuurissa. Se antaa voimaa ihmisarvoiseen elämään ja toimimiseen myös tärkeiden yhteiskunnallisten muutosten puolesta. ✖

ja muidenkin ihmisoikeuksien toteutumista. Suomen on aivan äskettäin todettu olevan valtio, jossa sanan-

H O TE L L I H E Lk A

turvattomaksi. Voimme kokea kodittomuuden tunteen fyysisessä tilassa, jos koemme vierauden ja outouden tunnetta paikkaa ja ihmisiä kohtaan. Henkinen kodittomuus pitää sisällään tunteen ulkopuolisuudesta: ei ole sitä jotain, mihin kuulua.

Moderni koti ei ole korvannut vanhaa asumisen mallia yhtäkkisesti, vaan muutos on ollut jatkuvaa. Vähitellen funktionalistinen kodin malli korvasi sitä edeltäneet säädynmukaisen asumisen muodot: työväestön hellahuoneet, maaseudun tuvan ja kamarin sekä yksityisiin ja talousosiin jakautuneet porvarilliset edustusasunnot.

20-21 POHjOISMAISET STATuSSYMBOLIT

uuSHEIMO, TEkSTI TIINA ALvESALO & ELSI HYTTINEN

TI I N A

Tunnemme kodin paikkana, johon ankkuroitua. Samalla se on fyysinen tila, joka on jatkuvassa muutoksessa. Perinteisesti koti on ymmärretty naisten ja lasten paikaksi. Tosin pohjoismaiset feministifilosofit ovat todenneet, että länsimaisessa ajattelussa naiset äiteinä edustavat miehille paikkaa – kotia – ja tuntevat jäävänsä lopulta itse kodittomiksi. Tällä viitataan naisten kokemuksiin ulkopuolisuuden tunteesta fyysisessä paikassa, omassa kodissaan. Käsitys kodista on joka tapauksessa on vahvasti historiallinen: sidoksissa aikaan, paikkaan, kulttuuriin ja yhteisöön. Myös kodin yksityisyyden ja julkisuuden aste voi vaihdella. Henkinen kodittomuus määritellään yleensä tunnetilaksi, jossa tuttu ja turvallinen muuttuu

STYLINg MILA pENTTI, kuvA TuOMAS

T E k S T I

19 ANNA RuOHONEN

10

II T TA L A T E M A

v O Lv O v 6 0

pohjoiSmaiSet StatuSSymbolit P ohjoI s ma at tunneta an m od er nIn ko dIn Id e a sta , jok a PItä ä s I säll ä än Pysy v y yden, mut ta myös lIIkkuvuuden, turvallIsuuden ja sananvaPauden.

mitä KaiKKea tarkoitamme, kun puhumme modernista kodista? hanna johanSSon in ja K irSi Saar i KanKaan toimittamassa kirjassa Homes in Transformation: Dwelling. Moving, Belonging (2009) moderniin kotiin liittyviä muutoksia tuodaan esille yllätyksellisesti. Kodin käsite, vaikka emme ole sitä ehkä havainneet, on muuttunut ajan mukana radikaalisti. Koti ei ole enää välttämättä vain pysyvä fyysinen tila, vaan se liikkuu ja kulkee ihmisen mukana. Kodin rajat venyvät ja laajenevat samalla, kun vapaus liikkua ja matkustaminen lisääntyvät. Jo pelkkä siirtyminen paikasta toiseen ja ajan viettäminen liikenteessä ovat luoneet modernille kodille uudenlaisia merkityksiä.

18 MANIFEST Ix ANTTI NYLéN

k u v a: A r te k / A l va r A al t o -m u s e o

Hietalahdenr

AASIAAN Lennä nopeinta reittiä suoraan Helsingistä Aasian suurimpiin kaupunkeihin. Euroopan ensimmäinen suora yhteys Chongqingiin, Kiinan suurimpaan kaupunkiin, aukeaa 9. toukokuuta 2012. Osta lentosi jo tänään osoitteessa finnair.fi

Annankatu

atu H O M E L E S S

Uudenmaank

200 f

200 f

Ravintola Olo

7 Tomorrow’s Antique 8 Myymälä2

Bulevardi

M A N I F E S T

100 m

100 m

Laivasillanka

78 SUORAA LENTOA VIIKOSSA

lautasten yli, pitkän pöydän päästä päähän. Tämä sallittiin. Vapaa taidekoulu järjesti maalausleirejä Villa Mairean tiloissa. Vuonna 1972 Maire avasi villansa

3. Vapaa taidekoulu aloitti toimintansa Maire Gullichsenin ensimmäisessä Helsingin-kodissa. 4. Kaivopuiston asunto palveli tarvittaessa myös Artekin näyteikkunana. 5. Villa Mairea oli Aino ja Alvar Aallon mestarinäyte, josta on myöhemmin tullut myös suosittu kesämatkailukohde.

Propagandakulttuuria on mahdotonta tarkastella ilman sen historiakytköksiä. Propaganda liikuttelee meitä kuitenkin yhä, vaikka sitä ei sellaiseksi haluttaisi kutsua. Poliittisilla kentillä käydään yhä taistelua vääristyneen ja puutteellisen tiedon avulla. Poliittiset kriisit eri puolilla maailmalla ovat yhä arkipäivää. Niiden kytkökset talouden koneistoihin tarvitsevat entistä tarkempia tiedotusstrategioita. Panokset ovat kovat.

TE kSTI kuv A

op e t tae S San i maai lman eri yliopistoissa olen alkanut tuntea kasvavaa huolta KIRJAN katoamisesta nykyelämästä ja tietoisuudesta. Kulttuurissa ja kouluttautumisessa on kyse tiedon vähittäisestä kertymisestä, ja jos tätä kerrostunutta traditiota ei ole, opettamisesta tulee alkeellista ohjeiden antamista. Nykyisin hakukoneet korvaavat yhä useammin kirjan, ja tieto redusoituu informaatioksi. Kirjan hylkäämisen seurauksena menetetään käsitys elämän ja asioiden eeppisestä mittakaavasta ja syyseuraus-suhteista, ja tiedon fragmentit ottavat kertomuksen paikan. Sitä paitsi hyvän kirjallisuuden lukeminen tarjoaa mitä arvokkaimpia oppitunteja etiikasta ja inhimillisestä myötätunnosta – mikä kaikki menetetään, kun kontekstin, keston ja kausaalisuhteiden todellisuus ei enää ole osa kokemusta.

viime vuoSina taiteen, arkkitehtuurin ja designin kohtaamiset ovat olleet jossain määrin arvelluttavia. Nousukaudella on lieveilmiönsä. Vallan ja talouden nosteessa tehdyt arkkitehtitoimeksiannot ovat saattaneet karata käsistä tilaajan ajatuksissa ja arkkitehdin työpöydällä. Rajoja on rikottu uhmaamalla mittasuhteiden, tarkoituksenmukaisuuden ja kaupunkikuvan arvoja. Arkkitehtuurin merkitys ja pysyvyys ihmiskunnan historiassa on kuitenkin aivan eri luokkaa kuin muotisesongin mallistoilla. Ympäristöstään irralliset jättiläisveistokset seisovat paikoillaan vielä pitkään. Design leikkii muodin ja taiteen välimaastoissa ja tuotteita syntyy kiihtyvällä tahdilla vaikka kysyntä vähenee. Kuluttajat kyllästyivät ennen kuin tekijät. Kriittinen kuluttaja nosti päätään jo kymmenen vuotta sitten, ja ajattelevien kuluttajien määrä kasvaa koko ajan. Lama ja talouden kaaos ovat aiheuttaneet positiivisen kriisin myös alan toimijoille. Tuotekehitysprosessit etsivät uusia tarvepohjia tuotteille. Tarinat ja syväosaaminen ovat ajankohtaisia. Asioista puhutaan. Ja propagandaa tarvitaan jälleen. ✖

meillä on taipumus ajatella, että vain silmiä ja kielellisiä kykyjä, ehkä myös visuaalista mielikuvitusta, tarvitaan lukiessa, mutta kaikki syvälliset lukijat tietävät, että me osallistumme intensiiviseen lukemiseen koko ruumiillamme, aisteillamme ja mielikuvituksellamme. Itse asiassa kirja käy dialogia koko elämänkokemuksemme ja minäkuvamme kanssa. walter ben jami n sanoi, että näennäisestä visuaalisuudestaan huolimatta arkkitehtuuri ja elokuva ovat taidetta kosketusaistille. Sama väite pitäisi esittää kaikista

kirjoittaja on artekin toimitusjohtaja.

m a n I fe s t

Ix

j u HANI pALLASMAA MA rk O rANTANEN

taiteenlajeista, myös kirjallisuudesta. Se älyyn ja mielikuvitukseen perustuva toiminta, jota lukeminen on, synnyttää aistimuksia tekstuurista, lämpötiloista, kosteudesta, painosta ja valaistuksesta. Voimakkailla sanoilla ja kirjallisilla ilmauksilla on tilansa, painonsa ja tuntunsa. Ne synnyttävät oman materiaalisen ja kokemuksellisen universuminsa. Tsekkikirjailija bohumil hrabal kuvaa elävästi lukemisen ruumiillisuutta: ”Kun luen, en oikeastaan lue: laitan suuhuni kauniin lauseen ja imen sitä kuin hedelmäkaramellia, tai siemailen sitä kunnes ajatus imeytyy kudoksiini kuin alkoholi, läpäisten aivoni ja sydämeni ja matkaten veren mukana jokaisen suoneni päähän. elaine Scarry kysyy: ”Mikä on se ihme, jonka avulla kirjailija pystyy synnyttämään meissä mielensisäisiä kuvia, jotka eivät muistuta haavekuviamme vaan […] havaintojamme maailmasta?” Hänen mukaansa suuret kirjailijat homeroKSeSta, FlaubertiSta ja rilKeStä sellaisiin nykypäivän kirjailijamestareihin kuin SeamuS heaney ovat intuitiivisesti sanoillaan tavoittaneet tavan, jolla aivot havaitsevat kuvia. Ajatus siitä, että kirjailijat tiedostamattaan jäljittelisivät aivojen toimintaa ja siksi pystyisivät aktivoimaan ja ohjailemaan lukijan aistimuksia ja mielikuvitusta, kuulostaa kaukaa haetulta. Kuitenkin Sem i r zeK i , vaikutusvaltainen

neurobiologi, esittää samantapaisen väitteen visuaalisesta taiteesta: ”Karkeasti tarkasteltuna tavassa, jolla taide toimii ja tavassa, jolla aivojen visuaalinen hahmotus toimii, on kyse samasta asiasta, tai ainakin taiteen tavoitteet muodostavat suoran jatkumon aivotoiminnan kanssa.” Zeki tekee vielä tunnustuksen: ”Toisin kuin monet olen sitä mieltä, että taiteilijat ovat jossain määrin neurologeja: he tutkivat aivoja omilla keinoillaan, ehkä tietämättä mitä tekevät, mutta yht

www.annaruohonen.com

34-35 STOLEN LANd

36 MANIFEST IV MARk kIESSLINg

Belgiassa siitä rakennettiin silta. kiinassa kirnu. Ja saksassa tuhansia terasseJa.

38-39 RAkkAudELLA MAIRE

40 MANIFEST II MIRkku kuLLBERg

46 MANIFEST xII REIjO PIPINEN

47 jOPO

37 MANIFEST V dANIEL gOLLINg

M A N I F E S T

H O M E L E S S

M A N I F E S T

H O M E L E S S

s i v u

41 LukEVA RuuMIS

4 7

Belgialaisen Gentin kaupungin historiallisessa keskustassa on upea kävelysilta. Se on rakennettu satoja vuosia vanhojen rakennusten vieressä virtaavan kanavan päälle.

42 MANIFEST x CARLOTTA dE BEVILACquA

43 MANIFEST xI kAj kALIN

Näin vanha kohtaa uuden; historialliset rakennukset ja moderni kävelysilta muodostavat viihtyisän, harmonisen kokonaisuuden.

44-45 uMP ProFi

Silta on rakennettu UPM ProFi Deck -komposiittilaudasta. Samasta ympäristöystävällisestä materiaalista, josta tehtiin Suomen “Kirnu”-paviljonki Shanghain maailmannäyttelyyn. Nyt myös tuhannet tavalliset terassinrakentajat eri puolella Eurooppaa ovat löytäneet UPM ProFin. Tuotteen suosio vuonna 2011 ylitti kaikki odotukset! UPM ProFi on ainutlaatuinen materiaali. UPM ProFi valmistetaan pääosin kierrätysmateriaaleista, jotka syntyvät tarralaminaattituotannon sivutuotteina. UPM ProFi on syntynyt oman tutkimus- ja kehitystoimintamme tuloksena. Ajattelemalla eri materiaalien koko elinkaarta — ja ympäristöä.

48 ARTEk

Metsä on täynnä mahdollisuuksia. www.upm.fi www.upmprofi.fi

EdITOR-IN-CHIEF TIINA ALVESALO | MANAgINg EdITOR ELSI HYTTINEN | PROduCER MILA PENTTI | CREATIVE AdVISOR kAj BERg | SuB-EdITOR PIA SIEVINEN ENgLISH EdITINg juLIE uuSINARkAuS | TRANSLATION SuSAN HEISkANEN, jAANA SHELBY, ERIk MILLER | CONTACT MANIFESTPEOPLE@gMAIL.COM gRAPHIC dESIgN TSTO CREATIVE AgENCY, WWW.TSTO.ORg | WEBSITE VALVE, WWW.VALVE.FI | PuBLISHER ARTEk | PRINTINg SANOMAPAINO WWW.MANIFESTMAgAzINE.FI | ISSN 2242-7546 UPM ProFi Deck -terassilauta on ihanteellinen tuote patioihin, terasseihin, laitureihin, leikkikentille ja moniin muihin kestävyyttä ja kauneutta vaativiin kohteisiin.

9 M A N I F E S T letter from the editor

10 finnair

The Green Good Design Award on arvostettu kansainvälinen palkinto, joka annetaan parhaille kestävän kehityksen periaatteita noudattaville materiaaleille. UPM ProFi sai palkinnon vuonna 2010.

Green Good Design™ -palkinnon myöntävät The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design ja The European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies.

Suomen paviljonki Shanghain EXPO 2010 -maailmannäyttelyssä oli näyttävä “Kirnu”. Sen verhoiluun käytettiin 25 000 UPM ProFista tehtyä paanua.

Vuonna 2011 UPM ProFi Deckin kansainvälinen kysyntä ylitti kaikki odotukset. Suomessa tuotetta myyvät Puukeskukset ja K-raudat.

11 index

H O M E L E S S

coNV

a oN Ha cHaNg d H Wo d

No d c a u M o

Hotelli Helka, Pohjoinen Rautatienkatu 23, 00100 Helsinki, Finland, Tel. +358 9 613 580, Fax +358 9 441 087, reservations@helka.fi, www.helka.fi

19 anna ruohonen

20-21 nordic status-symbols

SPRING SUMMER 2012

o

27 an edible urbanism

28-29 manifest V jane withers

30-31 the home of the future is temporary 2OR+BYYAT Stores

Kluuvi Yliopistonkatu 6 Helsinki 00100 Finland Eerikinkatu 9 Helsinki 00100 Finland Rautatienkatu 18 Lahti 15110 Finland www.2orplus.com www.shop2orplus.com www.facebook.com/2orplus

oV Ma

MANIFEST

34-35 stolen land

36 manifest VIIsilta. Belgiassa siitä rakennettiin markJa kiessling kiinassa kirnu. saksassa tuhansia terasseJa.

24-25 10 conversations that changed the world

MaN u V Va

d

H HoM o H u u M o a

aN d u aN M

26 manifest IV suvi west

23 manifest III marco velardi

22 2or+ by yat

32 manifest VI marcus miessen

33 manifest survival kit

Photography: Jeremy Stigter

18 manifest II antti nylén

H

ad Ng od

HOMELESS

38-39 love maire

40 manifest IX mirkku kullberg

41 the reading body

46 manifest XII reijo pipinen

47 jopo

48 artek

37 manifest VIII www.annaruohonen.com daniel golling

M A N I F E S T

H O M E L E S S

s i v u

4 7

Belgialaisen Gentin kaupungin historiallisessa keskustassa on upea kävelysilta. Se on rakennettu satoja vuosia vanhojen rakennusten vieressä virtaavan kanavan päälle.

42 manifest X Carlotta de Bevilacqua

43 MANIFEST XI kaj kalin

Näin vanha kohtaa uuden; historialliset rakennukset ja moderni kävelysilta muodostavat viihtyisän, harmonisen kokonaisuuden.

44-45 upM ProFi

Silta on rakennettu UPM ProFi Deck -komposiittilaudasta. Samasta ympäristöystävällisestä materiaalista, josta tehtiin Suomen “Kirnu”-paviljonki Shanghain maailmannäyttelyyn. Nyt myös tuhannet tavalliset terassinrakentajat eri puolella Eurooppaa ovat löytäneet UPM ProFin. Tuotteen suosio vuonna 2011 ylitti kaikki odotukset! UPM ProFi on ainutlaatuinen materiaali. UPM ProFi valmistetaan pääosin kierrätysmateriaaleista, jotka syntyvät tarralaminaattituotannon sivutuotteina. UPM ProFi on syntynyt oman tutkimus- ja kehitystoimintamme tuloksena. Ajattelemalla eri materiaalien koko elinkaarta — ja ympäristöä. Metsä on täynnä mahdollisuuksia. www.upm.fi www.upmprofi.fi

UPM ProFi Deck -terassilauta on ihanteellinen tuote patioihin, terasseihin, laitureihin, leikkikentille ja moniin muihin kestävyyttä ja kauneutta vaativiin kohteisiin.

The Green Good Design Award on arvostettu kansainvälinen palkinto, joka annetaan parhaille kestävän kehityksen periaatteita noudattaville materiaaleille. UPM ProFi sai palkinnon vuonna 2010. Green Good Design™ -palkinnon myöntävät The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design ja The European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies.

Suomen paviljonki Shanghain EXPO 2010 -maailmannäyttelyssä oli näyttävä “Kirnu”. Sen verhoiluun käytettiin 25 000 UPM ProFista tehtyä paanua.

Vuonna 2011 UPM ProFi Deckin kansainvälinen kysyntä ylitti kaikki odotukset. Suomessa tuotetta myyvät Puukeskukset ja K-raudat.

editor-in-chief tiina alvesalo | managing editor elsi hyttinen | producer mila pentti | creative advisor kaj berg | sub-editor pia sievinen english editing julie uusinarkaus | translation susan heiskanen, jaana shelby, timo luhtanen, elina needham | contact manifestpeople@gmail.com graphic design tsto creative agency, www.tsto.org | website valve, www.valve.fi | publisher artek | printing sanomapaino www.manifestmagazine.fi | ISSN 2242-7546


MANIFEST

H O M E L E S S

PH O T O

sari

poij ä rvi : telephone booth on mannerheimintien , helsinki S ari P oij ä rvi – K jell W est ö , K asari ( otava 2 0 1 1 )

PAGE

1980

12


MANIFEST

H O M E L E S S

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13


MANIFEST

H O M E L E S S

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14

Radical city P H O T O S

stefan

te X T T iina alvesalo bremer : new romantics in

helsinki

1 9 8 1-1983

N o r d i c c o u n t r i e s a r e k n o w n f o r t h e i r w e l f a r e s t a t e a n d m o d e r ni s t i c functionalist design. Those who have grown up here also know the o t h e r s i d e o f t h e m y t h : u g l in e s s , r o u g h n e s s a n d r e v o l t .

A rebellious spirit, anarchistic attitudes and the desire to challenge prevailing values in society have always created new and surprising cultural dimensions that have affected design, architecture and fashion – or entire cities. A rebellious spirit usually results from a long and static state of affairs that eventually triggers change. Moments and movements of change have one thing in common: the people involved never know for certain where the change will lead them. People overcome with the spirit of rebellion often share a romantic dream of a better world

and the will to act, so that the dream can one day become a reality. In the early 1980s, the atmosphere in Helsinki was conformist and rigid and favoured modesty. A group of radicals – mostly art students and musicians representing various subcultures – grew tired of the stale spirit. They created an entirely new type of club scene and nightlife in Helsinki, something that the city had never witnessed before. The general public learned about these radicals through their music and their performances in art galleries.


MANIFEST

H O M E L E S S

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For a moment, Helsinki became a radical city. At the same time, culture and the economy were undergoing upheavals. Local radio stations emerged, breaking the Finnish Broadcasting Company’s monopoly, and new magazines were founded. The members of Jack Helen Brut, an avant-garde group, expressed themselves with – and without – their clothes in their shows, and punk rockers marched for peace. It all started, practically by accident, at a party organised by the magazine Uusi Laulu (“New Song”) in a restaurant on an island called Klippan near Helsinki in July 1981. Their manifesto was “Style is a fundamental right of the poor”. Dressed in gloomy outfits, radicals fought for a more tolerant future. The radicals in their imaginative outfits were given many names: Futurists, New Romantics, Goths and the Black Lips. Their style was based on the idea that all people are unique works of art. Their favourite colour was black, which communicated a feeling of homelessness. For its members, this movement gave a new feeling of home and the freedom to belong – to be what you want to be. Their rebellion may have been fuelled by the anxiety caused by the conformist aspects of Finnish culture as well as a strong desire to create something new: fashion, art, a unique language of form and a life of rock’n’roll. For a moment, Helsinki was like Berlin between the wars: filled with encounters between different groups of people, new ideas and long parties in an atmosphere marked by the Cold War and George Orwell’s 1984.

However, their dark defiance was short-lived. Their rebellious street fashion soon became mainstream, and their ideas went out of style. Six decades earlier, in the 1920s, a group of young writers, musicians and artists had rebelled against prevailing values much in the same manner. They sought to rid Finland of the rural culture of the time and redefine Finnishness through modern art and urbanization. They called themselves the Flame Bearers. The group was strongly influenced by European trends, including Filippo Tommaso’s Futurist Manifesto and Tristan Tzara’s Dada Manifesto – until life took them in different directions in the early 1930s. Shortly after this, four rebellious idealists – Aino and Alvar Aalto,

Maire Gullichsen and Nils-Gustav Hahl – decided to a start a company that would become the propaganda centre for the new ideology of living. This marked the establishment of Artek. They also created a business plan that inspired their fellow anarchists. The plan was divided into three sections: art, architecture and design, and propaganda. Their dream was to create an everyday environment in which synthesis between different forms of art would contribute to the development of architecture and design. In the late 1960s, the greyness of everyday life in Helsinki was disrupted by cultural and student radicalism in academic circles. In addition to bohemian clothing,

the hipsters of that time expressed themselves through pacifism and protest songs. Now, in the 2010s, the time has come to think, proclaim and act again. The atmosphere in society is active once more. People are interested in politics, human rights and environmental issues – and feeling a little rebellious. Helsinki has become a window to a diversity of cultures, and people are not afraid to proclaim their opinions. The atmosphere is inspiring, with young designers and design communities creating a new type of aesthetics and new artefacts – and a new type of city. My Helsinki has opened itself to new people and ideas. My Helsinki has become the design capital of the world, where people are free to express themselves in terms of style, form and vision. However, Helsinki is situated far from the dynamic and energetic centres of the world, which may explain why the atmosphere is still somewhat rigid and introspective. In my opinion, design needs to become radical again. Design is a thought that needs a little more heart. It needs more courage and proclamation. We have already seen enough shushing and suffocating praise. This year of design calls for intelligent content and the right attitude. Instead of the mainstream, we should once again allow ourselves to be inspired by marginal groups and learn from them. We need design anarchy. Intelligence and anarchy are an irresistible combination, and we have what it takes to be irresistible. We may be facing something entirely new, something completely unpredictable. ✖


Hotelli Helka, Pohjoinen Rautatienkatu 23, 00100 Helsinki, Finland, Tel. +358 9 613 580, Fax +358 9 441 087, reservations@helka.fi, www.helka.fi


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Manifesto for the Modern Home

Jani Leinonen: Kerjäläiskyltit (Beggar signs) (2009–)

– Manifesto for the Modern Home, via a few of Felix Burrichter’s favorite architects and designers:

Build, install, hang and arrange everything symmetrically.

Doors should always be floor-to-ceiling apertures, so as to not break up the geometry of the wall.

Never put a nail into a wall. Always use doublesided tape! Stick it, post it!

NEW YORK

roger bundschuh, architect, berlin

Never paint your ceilings white if the walls aren’t – it’d be like wearing white socks with a tuxedo. And have at least one mirrored wall in your home. ricky clifton, designer, new york

Consider wall-to-wall carpeting. There’s nothing more amazing than a pattern that looks like it’s going to swallow you up. bethan laura wood, designer, london

Include inglenooks whenever possible. david kohn, architect, london

etienne descloux, architect, berlin

jürgen mayer h., architect, berlin

Only buy furniture you plan on having and using for the rest of your life. philippe malouin, designer, london

Our culture overuses walls. Put your books, art and plants on the floor in an organized manner. Your place will feel taller and bigger. You will have less space for furniture, but the pieces you keep will be more important in your life. ben aranda, designer, new york

Every home should have a built-in espresso machine that serves professional hot espresso at all times of the day. winka dubbeldam, architect, new york

Aim for improved indoor air quality and calibrated light levels through non-stop electronic air filtering and doses of 2500 lux. ville kokkonen, designer, helsinki

Avoid overhead lighting, smartly placed floor and table lamps create a more comfortable home. leon ransmeier, designer, new york

Pay attention to RCP (reflected ceiling plan), which is all the stuff that goes on your ceiling. so–il, architects, new york

Don't confuse a House with a Home. Instead, try to create a Houme (House X home). Architects design Houses but people live in Homes.

Always have a sunken room…always! matt olson, designer, minneapolis

dominic leong, architect, new york

Have as many statement pieces as you want. And don't cover up materials. Just let them be what they are and do what they do best.

Avoid paper towels. Instead use lots and lots of white washcloths and white dishtowels. Also, drink wine out of crystal, not glasses. In the bedroom, always use cool colours — and no electronics!

fredrikson stallard, designers, london

rafael de cárdenas, designer, new york

andreas angelidakis, architect, athens

When hanging pictures on a wall, a Petersburg or Salon style of hanging should always be counterbalanced with a single, large and preferably abstract piece on the opposite or adjacent wall.

Don’t buy the furniture that you think you need, just buy/find/steal good stuff as it comes along. Things need to come trickling in, even if that means that for a while you’ll have three good tables but no chairs.

Always hire an architect or a designer.

johnston marklee, architects, los angeles

sam chermayeff, architect, berlin

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Organize your possessions into piles, climb on top and read important books while enjoying the view.

ashe + leandro, architects, new york ✖

The writer is an architect and the founder of PIN-UP Magazine, based in New York. He requested that his fee be donated to New York's first AIDS support center GMHC.


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The Right to Leave Home

Aurora Reinhardt: Self-Portrait, Dedicated to Teemu Mäki (1996)

– The difference between home and prison is that you can leave home. One viable definition for home could be: a place that can be abandoned. All homes, like animal lairs, are temporary. Homes are born where human or other beings consent to live. Prisons are absolute; homes are relative. One houses objects, the other subjects. When children play with toy animals, they like to build them cages and pens, stalls or coops. For surely an animal shouldn’t just roam around. An animal must have a home. But if you point out what has been specifically built, the result is a prison. Well, children are children! (It is also possible that they identify with animals and put them in the position where they themselves are too. From the day they are brought into the world, they are told: this is your home, you mustn’t leave here on your own!) When adults, normal and intelligent people, play with real animals, they often act precisely like children with their toy animals. Or, they claim, they don’t play, they... do what? They trade. Make money out of beings – living beings – who have freedom and a will of their own. One modern expression of gender politics in meat is that animals are shut up in facilities where the conditions are splendid and safe, as defined by law – quite similarly to how women in the old world were shut up in their homes, where they had full power but not the right to leave, no independence. Freedom is too dangerous and difficult for animals, the same as it used to be for women. They need to be freed from freedom, for their own good. In nature, out in the world, they would be left at the mercy of many cruel forces and predators! helsinki

This kind of talk – we are thinking about the welfare of animals! – is common wherever criticism is voiced towards the animal industry. The reply is: “We would gladly raise our pigs in spas if we got paid for it accordingly. Now we have to keep them in boarding houses with only shared accommodation.” Or: “A ranch fox has a cushy life in its home cage if you compare it to the wild fox. It even gets its food served to it every day.” The stupidest answer is one of the most commonplace: “Cows would never survive alone in the woods.” Talk that propagates warm images of home covers up the truth and the crime: animals in the animal industry suffer death sentences as innocents in the top-quality modern cells we have constructed. The same could be said for zoos, even if the cells have all the luxury amenities. Because we are clever beings, we very well know where animals can have a good life, what kind of “homes” are good for them – although the animal protection laws in Finland, at least, pretend to be blissfully unaware of the matter – but there is only one power in the world that makes us lock them up there for the brief remainder of their lives. The power of evil. We must give animals, too, the possibility to have homes of their own. We have to kick them out of our quarters. May freedom be the fate and fortune of every living being. ✖ The writer is an essayist and translator. He requested that his fee be donated to the Zimbabwe AIDS orphans organization.

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www.annaruohonen.com

Photography: Jeremy Stigter


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VOLVO V60

Nordic status symbols teksti

tiina

alvesalo

The Nordic countries are known for the modern idea o f h o m e , w h i c h in c l u d e s n o t o n l y c o n t in u i t y , b u t a l s o m o bi l i t y , s e c u r i t y a n d f r e e d o m o f s p e e c h .

What are we talking about when we talk about a modern home? Homes in Transformation: Dwelling, Moving, Belonging (2009), a book edited by Hanna Johansson and K i rsi Saar i kangas , offers fresh and surprising insights into changes related to the modern home. The idea of home has changed dramatically over time, even though we may not have noticed the changes. A home is not necessarily a permanent physical state any longer – instead, it moves and travels with us. The boundaries of home are stretching and expanding as we become increasingly mobile and travel more than before. Simply by moving from one place to

another or spending time in traffic, we create new meanings for the modern home. Home is a place where we anchor ourselves. At the same time, it is a physical space that changes constantly. Traditionally, home has been regarded as a place for women and children. However, according to Nordic feminist philosophers, mothers end up feeling homeless, because they represent a place – home – for men in Western thinking. They experience feelings of being outsiders in their own home. The idea of home is strongly historical: it is tied to time, place, culture and community. The level of privacy and publicity in homes may vary. Emotional homelessness usually refers to an emotional state that

results from something safe and familiar turning into something unsafe. We can feel homeless in a physical space if we perceive the place and the people in it as distant and strange. Emotional homelessness involves a feeling of being an outsider, a feeling of lacking a place in which to belong. The modern home keeps c h a n g in g

The modern, functionalist idea of home has gradually replaced traditional ideas, such as those of the estate-based society: the tiny one-room dwellings of workers, the farmhouses with a main room and one bedroom, and the luxury residences of the

bourgeois with their private and business sections. Homes have always had – and continue to have – status value. A home communicates its owner’s social status and level of wealth. However, instead of estate-based values, we are now increasingly communicating our individual styles and choices. Functionalist thinking divided a home into a kitchen, bedroom and living room, each with its specific purpose. Small kitchens became more common as dining halls became obsolete in cities and towns with urbanization. Living rooms were usually furnished with a sofa for guests, and children were given rooms of their own as more and more women became working mothers.


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There are already signs of the revival of the bourgeois home, however. In modern apartments, these signs include spacious kitchens and spaces designed for guests. Small kitchens and kitchenettes, which used to be common in the Nordic countries, have practically disappeared. A home is a place not only for living, but also for gathering together, spending time, enjoying food, celebrating and meeting friends and family. We need a home – also on the move

The dream of a traditional home has not vanished. Experiences of home, however, are not necessarily permanent any longer. For an increasing

number of people, home consists of several places or is temporary. In our time, a safe feeling of home can be associated with an airport, hotel room or even Skype. Even though hotel rooms are spaces in which people stay temporarily, many people furnish their homes to resemble hotel rooms. Even when at home, we seem to miss the feeling of change and temporariness. The thought of home may also include moving and the means of transport – feeling at home in a car, on a train or on an aeroplane. The design, details and comfortableness of the means of transport are important for people who spend a great amount of time travelling from one place to another. For most of us, our chosen means of

transport represents our lifestyle, values and attitude. A bicycle, for example, is not only an economical choice, but also an ecological one. We need a home, a permanent base, no matter how mobile a life we lead. In spite of our freedom of choice and the diverse manifestations of the modern home, we all dream about the safety of home. It is this dream that makes us work and move – our dream that, one day, we will be able to curl up and simply enjoy the safety of our home. According to G l o r i a J e a n Watkins , an American civic activist, the safety of home is the most important and empowering feeling for people in our modern culture. It empowers us to lead a life of dignity and work for important changes in society. ✖

HOTELLI HELKA

Freedom of speech ensures democracy In the Nordic countries, freedom of speech and expression ensures the realization of civil rights and human rights in general. According to a recent study, Finland and Norway are the world leaders in terms of freedom of speech. Atlas Saarikoski, 29, is one of the bestknown anarchists in Finland. Since the beginning of 2012, she has headed Tulva (“Flood”), a magazine published by the Feminist Association Unioni, which was founded in 1892. What is a young radical doing in a place like this – in the home and on the payroll of a traditional women’s organization?

“Contrasts are fascinating. When we keep telling the traditional story of healthy and heroic blondes tirelessly toiling away at haymaking, or in care work in the modern version of the story, who are we forgetting?” Of the achievements of the women’s movement in Finland, Saarikoski appreciates the opportunity to leave the home and seek employment as well as the right to childcare, for example. “In my opinion, however, the feminist movement committing itself to building the welfare state presents problems. We should keep in mind that for those mentally ill or disabled women living in an institution, for example, the same welfare state does not do much other than control and limit their rights.” ✖ EH


SPRING SUMMER 2012

2OR+BYYAT Stores

Kluuvi Yliopistonkatu 6 Helsinki 00100 Finland Eerikinkatu 9 Helsinki 00100 Finland Rautatienkatu 18 Lahti 15110 Finland www.2orplus.com www.shop2orplus.com www.facebook.com/2orplus


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Peter Fankhauser: Poor Animal (2011) Still from colour video TRT 3:00 minutes, looped I mage courtesy of Phillips de Pury & Company

– As I was growing up during my teenage years in Italy, I’d always imagine that having my own home would be such a natural and straightforward thing. Like something you would graduate to after going to university – purely a matter of passing a final test and there you would be, sitting in your living room reading a book from your carefully organized and dust-free bookshelf, cooking tasty recipes out of an endlessly filled fridge and having a wonderfully loving cat who wouldn’t scratch any of your record covers. Well, probably this wasn’t my exact picture of life as a grown-up, but I was definitely ignoring a lot of the things that I would later have to come to realize. After all, finding a place that you can call home is not that easy a task, and it doesn’t come without a good dose of mistakes and possibly a few headaches. It took me three years, a painful breakup and lots of self-questioning, but in the end there I was, sitting in an empty flat wondering how to fill it without spoiling the freshly painted walls. I realized that I didn’t really own much besides way too many boxes cramped with books and magazines, a mobile phone and an old laptop – still no bookshelf or fridge in sight. I wasn’t ready for the idea that the apartment would begin to get older. That, after time, the milano

walls would show the signs of their inhabitants, that plants could get overwatered and die from one day to another. I always questioned whether it was me being careless, or if everything that was happening was just the slow daily process of transforming a house into your own personal space. And even if I thought I had it all sorted in my mind and I was making room for tiny errors here and there, I realized I wasn’t even close to the bigger picture until last year, when all of a sudden it was two of us calling these four walls a home. Life as I knew it completely changed, toothbrushes became two, mugs multiplied, and breakfast in the morning didn’t taste the same anymore: it was actually much better. I slowly rearranged life around our new formation, and it got me thinking of all the new unexplored aspects of life I didn’t even know existed. A home is both fun and exhausting, it involves a lot of sharing and giving, but more than that, it is an endless possibility of journeys, which is what makes it special for me. ✖ The writer is the editor-in-chief of the magazine Apartamento and a creative consultant at his own design agency SM Associati in Milan. He requested that his fee be donated to Médecins Sans Frontières.

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Conversations that changeD the world text

j u lie

u u sinarka u s

What would happen if all b r illiant m in d s f r o m d i f f e r e n t e r a s c a m e to g ether around the same tab le?

alvar aalto: Every human being must live somewhere. artemisia gentileschi: Which is not always safe. In my generation, home, at least for women, was not a safe place. moby: Perhaps I have safety, then. My generation is homeless and rootless. I don’t have any roots. renzo rosso: Your generation has everything – Facebook and all – you have more outlets. But I love your generation because you are so creative and innovative in how you think, how you approach everything. edi r ama: In my country, Albania, there is so much anxiety

because people are naturally rootless. The poor in Tirana live in anxiety. Why is that? Because they have no title to their land. They fear that at any time someone can come and take it away. They have no right to stay on their land, on their home. alvar aalto: Your home should purposely show some weakness of yours. Why should we speak of a “problem” in discussing the home? Something becomes a problem when all the factors on which it was previously based change. edi rama: But is this what we want for the future? artemisia gentileschi: We need to protect ourselves and our

homes to make up for the past. Protection must start from home. jonathan franzen: We may freak out globally, but we suffer locally, where we live. vivienne westwood: Actually, organized lying can be the worst. It is the frame of reference that people have – that they must consume, or that politicians are speaking sense. edi rama: On the contrary, these attitudes deepen the crisis of identity. We need to reshape our values in order to become again much more politically oriented than just economically – and when I say economically I refer to the economic interests as they are expressed today.

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ai wei wei: We all need to take more responsibility for each other, for the political situation. renzo rosso: The concept of rebellion now is different from the past. Then, we were angry and needed to rail against something in order to express ourselves. yves behar: In terms of responsibility, I feel that environmental and social sustainability are essential tools. I think sustainability is the biggest opportunity we have as designers to achieve massive change. vivienne westwood: We have got to change our ethics and our financial system and our whole way of understanding the world. artemisia gentileschi: Men do not change these things easily. I'll show you what a woman can do. vivienne westwood: Men created capitalism. The capitalist system is about taking from the Earth. The rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer, and the only way out of it is supposed to be growth. But growth is debt. It's going to make the situation worse. jonathan franzen: There is too much focus on materialism. The new materialism of the brain, which has given us drugs to change our personalities, and the materialism of consumer culture, which provides endless distractions and encourages the endless pursuit of more goods. germano celant: These beliefs are being challenged more and more today in contemporary thought of all fields. The field of the mass-produced object, a flat field in which very little distinguishes itself from anything else and even less has a permanent place. ai wei wei: Everybody wants to be part of the big power, so there are lies and false accusations everywhere. For me, art is an escape from this system. yves behar: People think that ‘eco’ means to be more expensive. I am out to prove that that is not the case. There is a very simple equation in my mind: removing materials or using simpler processes removes costs. Less carbon footprint should equal less cost. moby: Certainly, if the entire world decided to become vegan tomorrow, a whole host of the

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world's problems would disappear overnight. Climate change would decrease by 25 percent, deforestation would cease, rainforests would be preserved, our water- and air-quality would increase, lifeexpectancy rates would increase, and our rates of cancer would plummet, so certainly, with that one action of becoming vegan you are quite effectively making the world a better place.

W ho a r e the y ?

vivienne westwood: It has to be a world in which people live rather than die, a sustainable world. It could be great.

Moby (born 1965). A North American musician and a photographer whose stage name Moby comes from the novel Moby Dick. Openly Christian and vegan.

yves behar: Remember that if it is not ethical, it cannot be beautiful. alvar aalto: The old is beautiful, the new is ugly. germano celant: I have been blamed for being on the wrong side. But I can support the sublime, the beautiful. alvar aalto: What we have come to trust won’t disappear entirely. Right now I feel that we are looking for how it all fits together. ai wei wei: I am not optimistic about being able to change the future on my own. Our whole lives have been designed by fate. And although some humans are brilliant, everything looks like it has already been settled. jonathan franzen: Aversion to closure can be refreshing at certain historical moments, when ossified cultural narratives need to be challenged. moby: I think that there are a few ways. One is trying to do a little bit of personal research and share what you find out with other people. Another is by just being an example. I think that's my case – I’m just striving to figure things out and striving to live well and live without too much environmental impact. I think that it's probably the best thing I can do. vivienne westwood: Try to use your time not worrying. Try to get involved. yves behar: The only thing to be afraid of is that you stop trying. renzo rosso: The new generation wants something more practical, more democratic. I very much believe in this contemporary vision. ai wei wei: I want to say: you can do it and it is OK to speak out. ✖

Alvar Aalto (1898–1976). A Finnish architect and designer. Known for his modernist design that aims to reveal pure forms. Artemisia Gentileschi (1593–1652). An Italian Baroque painter. The first woman ever to become a member of the Accademia di Arte del Disegno in Florence.

Edi Rama (born 1964). An Albanian sculptor and a painter. The leader of the Socialist Party of Albania and previously the mayor of his hometown Tirana. Jonathan Franzen (born 1959). A North American novelist. One of the leading contemporary writers of his country, Franzen is known especially as a depicter of the middle class. Ai Wei Wei (born 1957). A Chinese artist and a dissident. Constantly persecuted in his own country for political reasons. Yves Behar (born 1967). One of the world's best-known contemporary designers. Born in Switzerland. An advocate for sustainability. Vivienne Westwood (born 1941). An English fashion designer, considered as one of the mothers of punk. Known especially for styling the Sex Pistols. Germano Celant (born 1940). An Italian art historian and a critic. One of the founders of the Arte povera movement. Renzo Rosso (born 1955). An Italian fashion entrepreneur. Founder of the fashion brand Diesel. Color and Fashion Trends Blog, interview with Renzo Rosso, 8 October 2008 Interview Magazine, “Renzo Rosso: No Stopping his Engine”, with Colleen Nika, March 2012 South China Morning Post, interview with Renzo Rosso by Jing Zhang, 30 December 2011 Inhabitat.com, interview with Yves Behar by Piper Kujac, 8 May 2011 JC|Report, inverview with Yves Behar by Bradford Shellhammer, 16 June 2005 The Vogue Living Blog Australia, interview with Yves Behar by Madeleine Hinchy, 20 July 2011 Re-public, interview with Edi Rama by Philippos Savvides and Eleni Christidou, no date The American Mag, “Tirana Gets Real” by Christopher P. Winner, 1 June 2006 Quotations from Artemisia Gentileschi adapted from Artemisia by Anna Banti, University of Nebraska Press, 1995 Perfect Sound Forever, interview with Moby by Jason Gross, September 1997 MTV Hive, interview with Moby by Eric Spitznagel, 16 May 2011 New York Times, “Guggenheim Names Curator”, John Russell, 1 December 1988 Germano Celant, “Haim Steinbach’s Wild, Wild West”, Artforum, December 1987 The Guardian, interview with Vivienne Westwood by Stuart Jeffries, 3 December 2011 The Independent, interview with Vivienne Westwood by Dominic Lutyens, 8 November 1998 The Paris Review, interview with Jonathan Franzen by Stephen J. Burn, winter 2010 Bomb 77, interview with Jonathan Franzen by Donald Antrim, Fall 2001 New Statesman, interview with Ai Wei Wei by John Sunyer, 12 October 2010


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Richard Hambleton: Horse & Rider (2009) Acrylic on canvas 112 x 65 inches I mage courtesy of Phillips de Pury & Company

– “They’re just so charming and beautiful”, is what many non-Sámi people say when they decorate themselves with elements detached from traditional Sámi dress. Accessories may be picked out from dresses of different regions, and the same person may wear elements from both men’s and women’s dresses. Westerners think they have the right to do anything. You don’t. But I can’t forbid you, either. So I wish people from outside the Sámi region would learn to understand how important the dress is, how much it means to its bearer. It’s not just a pretty piece of clothing; each part of it says something about the person wearing it, about her or his family, place of residence, history. More than anything I hate the fake costumes used in tourism. They resemble the real Sámi dress, but when it comes to code, they’re sheer crap. Don’t Finns see their own culture as interesting enough to find elements in it for building experiences for tourists? I don’t blame individual people, even though I sometimes feel like giving them a piece of my mind. They’re not being deliberately rude. I blame lack of information: the fact that people are not taught in schools about Sámi people and our culture. Finns know more about North American Indians than about their own minorities. It sometimes feels as if Finland is purposefully trying to kill the Sámi with silence. I got my first Sámi dress when I was 14, for my confirmation. It was a major event, part of my transition from child to adult. My mother had sewn the costume; my father had bought the two golden risku brooches and the golden belt. The silk, the shoes and the tenojoki

embroidery were made by Sámi women, each part by someone who had mastered that specific skill. I still wear the dress when I’m abroad; since it’s light, it doesn’t get wrinkled, and it’s not all that valuable any longer. I wouldn’t wear it anymore when I’m around other Sámi people because we are very particular about what the dress should look like and how it should be put on. I have many other dresses too: a traditional one, an army-patterned one and even an entirely pink one, just to mention a few. I like them all, but the most important one for me is the traditional, blue dress. It’s also the most practical. No one would wear a pink dress to church, or at least I wouldn’t. If a Sámi person has only one dress, I’d say it should be blue. People shouldn’t play around with different dresses until they have a deep and clear relationship to the traditions and customs. One has to know the code in order to know what one is going against. A few years ago I organized a demonstration together with my friends in Rovaniemi against the exploitation of the Sámi dress. It was great to see Sámi people from four different countries come and join us. “Sámi culture for Sámi people” was the slogan we shouted out. And I’m not calling for respect just for the Sámi dress. I wish Westerners would consider in general whether they are entitled to any old thing they think is beautiful. I think moccasins are beautiful shoes. But I would never buy them. Moccasins belong to Indians. ✖ The writer is a media worker from the Teno River valley in Finnish Lapland, currently engaged in finding humor in the Sámi, other minorities and mainstream Finns on the TV show titled Märät säpikkäät (Njuoska bittut). She requested that her fee be donated to the homeless children of St. Petersburg.

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AN EDIBLE URBANISM text

Helsinki witnessed two culinary insurgency movements in quick succession. One was fixed in space and had the outward appearance of an elegant van parked outside Lasipalatsi. The other was fixed in time, manifesting itself as a distributed festival of pop-up restaurants, sudden flashes of inspiration appearing and disappearing on a single day. Each would hint that a new city was emerging. The first was the Camionette, a mobile créperie that – by not being a sanctioned “grilli” or “kioski” (i.e. local street food vendor) – suggested an entirely new kind of street food, and street life, in the city. The second incursion was Restaurant Day. This started with a small group who were frustrated at the paperwork required to start a café in Helsinki. So they set themselves the lowest bar possible; they simply declared that a certain Last summer,

d an

day would be Restaurant Day and anybody could open any kind of restaurant anywhere on that day. And that's what happened. From frog's legs to flat whites, the city's food palate expanded radically. But more importantly it reimagined the use of public space, demonstrating to Helsinki's citizens what their streets could do. Although the resulting 'restaurants' were right at the edge of the City's legal boundaries, if not well over, there was little the City could do about it. For one thing, there was barely any organization there. Restaurant Day is essentially a set of instructions, and you can hardly arrest a set of instructions. It's a demonstration of the power of an emergent urbanism, enabled through social media and platform thinking, driven by an appetite for participation at the hyper-local level.

hill

The only problem with Restaurant Day is The Day After Restaurant Day. It's as yesterday never happened, and here we see the limits of the intervention, of the tactic as opposed to the strategy; it is too transient and variable to change a system. The original motivation – addressing the inabilty to easily set up a café – has not been addressed. But can we see these examples of emergent urbanism as 'lead users', indicating what a diversifying Helsinki needs to be? Street food is interesting precisely because it is a carrier for cultural change, through its highly visible quotidian accessibility, and the wider systems it sits within, ultimately touching most aspects of modern life. The shift from cold, impassive “grilli”, designed for heavy drinking and poor eating in darkness, to the

colour, verve and diversity of Restaurant Day is both profound and explicable. If we were to write a manifesto for a more resilient Helsinki, would street food give us a platform for prototyping systemic change within the city? Can every day be Restaurant Day? And more strategically, can we use street food systems to sketch a more sustainable Helsinki, with a more active street life, strong service culture and start-up scene, and a diverse set of cultures at play? As unlikely as it may seem, rethinking the humble hot dog might just unlock a new kind of urban design, centred on citizens, culture and replicable systemic change rather than concrete one-offs. ✖ www.ravintolapaiva.com www.restaurantday.org low2no.org/food


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Water Manifesto

Jiri G eller: Like a Million Dollars (2009)

– It goes without saying that water is life; it feeds earth's ecosystem, flows through our cities, our homes and our bodies. It’s essential to existence and a portal to our dreams. And yet largely through the way we use and abuse this precious resource, we face a global water crisis. What can design do?

1 % W at e r

lon d on

Respect & ( r e ) c o nn e c t

The first step towards a sustainable hydrological future is no more complicated than respect. Arguably that's what we’ve forgotten. In Waters of Forgetfulness philosopher Ivan Illich describes how since water came on tap, we take it for granted as this clean, clear and limitless stuff that is piped invisibly into our lives and used to flush waste out. We can no longer afford that luxury.

Although 70% of earth’s surface is water, just 3% percent is fresh water and less than 1% of is readily available to us (the rest is in deep aquifers or ancient ice). Use it wisely. Drier & Thirstier

From the drying out of the Colorado River to decaying Lake Chad or rusting ships in a barren Aral Sea – these powerful images of the changing water environment are all primarily caused by our over-utilization of fresh surface water. With a world population of over 7 billion and growing fast, in just 20 years demand for water could be 40 percent higher than it is today, and by 2050 it’s probable half the world’s population will face severe water shortages. Wherever we are in the world, we need to be more aware of our water consumption.

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Water is H2O, hydrogen two parts, oxygen one, but there is also a third thing that makes it water and nobody knows what it is. —D.H. Lawrence

H o w m u c h w at e r d o y o u EAT ?

F l u i d m e m o r y: I s th e pa s t th e futu r e ?

No, that isn’t a typo. It takes about 3000 l of water to produce our daily food ration, about 1000 times what we need for drinking. In northern Europe we are relatively fortunate in our water resources, but a significant part of the food and products we consume originate in areas with limited water resources. The water footprint is a new but increasingly important tool for understanding our water consumption and using water responsibly and sustainably. Armed with the right information, we can begin to understand the global flows of water in food production and choose the rice, meat, vegetable or tea that has a relatively low water footprint, or that has its footprint in a region of the world that doesn’t have high water scarcity. As agriculture is by far the largest slice of the global water footprint, what we choose to eat really can make a difference.

So many of the habits, rituals and practices that were common water sense to our ancestors make sense for us. Why wouldn’t we capture rainwater? Or steam sociably in the communal sauna or Turkish baths rather than in the gluttonous extravagance of the over-scaled bath or power shower? Can we combine ancient water management principles and the latest green technologies to shape a more sustainable future?

T h e F u t u r e i s d r y…

So what can design do? So many of the ways we use and abuse water today are no longer appropriate for a water-stressed future: a drier planet requires the imagination of designers to challenge paradigms and come up with new ways to use water, not just more frugally and responsibly, but also more imaginatively and more pleasurably. S o w h at m i g h t a d r i e r home look like?

Over 70 years ago Buckminster “Bucky” Fuller, seer of sustainable design, prototyped a house without mains supplies, where water was delivered daily in bottles along with the milk and used sparingly. Bucky’s homemakers would use a Fog Gun to take hot water vapour showers that require only a cup of water. Crazy to use precious drinking water to flush the loo? Bucky specified a waterless toilet that packaged our waste for composting. "Nature designed humans to separate urine and excrement", he observed. "Both are valuable chemistry and should be collected and compacted for further use."

S a c r e d w at e r s

From the floods that washed Noah’s Ark onto Mount Ararat to aquatic divinities and monsters, every culture has its mythologies and rituals around water. Historically, these tales of draught and flood, scarcity and excess acted as warnings teaching respect for water as a destructive as well as a nurturing force. But now that we have drained water of meaning, we are surprised by Hurricane Katrina or the Japanese tsunami, famine in Kenya or drought warnings in London. Perhaps designers should weave watery tales back into our culture? Perhaps tapping into ritual and mythology can help protect natural water resources and our hydrological future? I c a m e h e r e f o r t h e w at e r s . . .

We value other natural resources – coal and pearls, oil, gold and gas – so why not water? Water has always been accorded a metaphysical and spiritual dimension, a dual nature as a lifegiving material substance, a religious and spiritual force and a wellspring of the imagination. Historically, waters were celebrated for their magical properties and miraculous powers and as the source of the creative imagination. Springs were sites of worship and their sacred waters used sparingly for the common good. We should venerate and take pleasure in our natural waters. We treat water as if it’s limitless, worthless and wonderless: it’s time to change. ✖ The writer is a design consultant and curator based in London. She requested that her fee be donate to WWF Finland.

W on d erwater d evelops projects aro u n d the worl d aime d at raisin g awareness of g lobal water iss u es an d d esi g n for s u stainable f u t u re . W on d erwater C af é is a pop - u p event to help raise awareness of the water footprint . T he first W on d erwater C af é took place in B eijin g Desi g n W eek 2 0 1 1 . I n 2 0 1 2 W on d erwater C af é s are planne d for H elsinki , L on d on an d S han g hai .


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Shigeru Ban Japan Emergency Houses, UPM ProFi

The Home of the Future is Temporary text

T iina

alvesalo

T wo d i ffe r e nt h o m e s fa r away fr o m e ac h oth e r . B o t h w i t h t h e p u r p o s e o f g i v in g c o m f o r t . B o t h m e a n t f o r j u s t s p e n d in g a m o m e n t t h e r e a n d t h e n r e t u r nin g t o s o m e t h in g p e r m a n e n t .

T e m p o r a r y h o u s in g in J a p a n ’ s e a r t h q u a k e area

Last spring the tsunami that hit Japan swept over the harbour town of Onagawa, destroying the whole town centre in a matter of five minutes. The people there lost everything. Architect Shigeru Ban, renowned for using recycled materials and cardboard paper tubes, wanted to help the victims of the earthquake. Ban is known

for his earlier humanitarian work in, for example, Haiti, Japan’s Kobe and Turkey. Now Ban has built temporary housing for nearly 200 families. A total of 188 apartments were built into nine buildings. A library and an art hall were designed for collective use. All of the building materials were recycled or recyclable. The temporary apartments were built out of containers piled on top of each other and held up by steel poles. The Finnish

company UPM ProFi took part in the reconstruction work by donating deck composite made of recycled material to Ban’s project. It was used for building the interior corridors and 30-meter-long terraces outside the houses. The apartments have one to three rooms, electricity, gas and plumbing. Two colours have been used in the terrace decking to show which way the doors open and where it is safe for children to play.

Shigeru Ban, where did you get the idea for using recycled cardboard paper tubes for temporary houses? “I used paper tubes for the first time as an alternative material for wood, which is generally expensive, in 1986 when designing the scenography of an Alvar Aalto exhibition.” What is the most important thing that must be taken into account when designing and using paper tubes? “How to combine the shape of the tube and the structural system in design.” What kind of feedback have the people living in the temporary houses given? “Warm as wood.” ✖


MANIFEST

t h e C h a p e l o f Si l e n c e in t h e h e a r t o f H e l s in k i

Arkkitehti K2S Oy

The Chapel of Silence built in the middle of the busiest section of Helsinki offers comfort to those who need it the most, regardless of creed and wallet size. The chapel is open from morning to evening, and visitors can meet employers of both congregations and social services there.

H O M E L E S S

Questions are answered about anything from bus schedules and spiritual matters to how to seek help for the problems of homelessness. The chapel is simple in design. It is built of wood and has a sculptural form. It is a place where people and an important theme for World Design Capital 2012 meet: permanent improvement of the cityscape through service

design. The chapel is one of those design year monuments that will remain a part of the Helsinki city landscape. The main idea of Mikko Summanen, chief architect from K2S Architects, has been to design an impressive permanent space into a location that is as commercial as possible, where anyone can, instead of shopping, stop and spend a moment of silence.

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Mikko Summanen, why did you want to build a chapel in the middle of the busiest city center? "The aim was to create an alternative to the restless buzz and the commerciality of the city." What did you need to take into account? "We wanted to design a humane building." How do you think citizens experience the building? "The chapel brings order to a busy square and reorganizes the space so that it becomes more functional." ✖


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Mi e s s e n

Build Dialogue

M i r nadir Z eynalov: The Fisherman’s House (2011) I mage courtesy of Phillips de Pury & Company

– Manifesto for an educational institution as a societal agent in the Gulf region. This institution... Should be a localized, small-scale hub. Should regularly perform cultural and educational activities in collaboration with local NGOs, schools and individuals. Should aim for a long-term local presence as a critical platform for exchange. Should enact a non-preemptive, roaming and non-consensual programme. Should appreciate the value of failure. Should institutionalize a frequent regime of “learning from” scenarios. Should be a low-threshold space of knowledge (production). Should question the default modes of institution building. Should foster non-romantic forms of local engagement. Should set itself apart from the US-model of franchised campuses. Should generate local knowledge. Should generate toolboxes that will remain within the region and are specific to the context in which they are situated. Should be visible. Should assume permanent local responsibility. Should generate a turf for the concept and reality of consequence. Should be a space for support. Should be thought of as a spatial typology for political exchange. Should produce. Should provide. Should demand. Should consume and exhaust. Should be a non-profit space that accommodates an opposition, not in the sense of being “against” something, but a space which is based on the notion of both political autonomy within the context in which it is situated as well as putting forward an autonomous institutional framework, which is deliberately introduced from the outside, yet embeds itself within the actors, realities and questions of local and regional practices. Should allow for a decentred perspective of politics. Should promote a sensitization towards the everyday practice of the local and communal. Should promote itself as a gathering space. Should be a protected space for congregation. Should assume the position of an uninvited outsider.

berlin

Should be based on a regime of hospitality yet opposing the myth of an open public space of participatory decision-making. Should wear a strong directorial voice. Should be a transparent civic institution. Should become an agent through which political and other tensions can be channeled into more organized and productive forms and formats of discussion. Should question both the normativity of the space of the “School” as well as the normativity of those communal spaces and practices. Should be a Mouffian space in which one agrees to disagree. Should be a space of oppositional but non-violent encounter. Should stop making sense. Should be a community in the making. Should be a horizontally accessible space. Should believe in spatial complexity. Should entertain democratic pluralism. Should be an agent of political contention and social change. Should assist in un-learning the normative and default Western roles and educational models and conventions. Should produce reciprocal links between the local and that which is not. Should assume limitless responsibility for its actions. Should inhabit the consequences of its production. Should attempt to maneuver between a diverse set of practices, relations and social networks. Should be proactive, optimistic and energetic. Should understand itself as a self-authorized enabler. Should be based on an underlying principle of questions rather than answers. Should introduce a destabilizing momentum. Should contaminate the imagination of others. Should perform itself as an autonomous agent, enacting and producing in relation to the given context and its specific audience-producing affect. Should instigate a zone for dissensus. Should enable alternative formats or frameworks of production. Should engage contingency. ✖ The writer is an architect and the founder of Studio Miessen, a collaborative agency for spatial strategy and cultural analysis. He has requested that his fee be donated to Amnesty International.

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Manifest Survival Kit

STYLING

MILA

PENTTI,

PHOTOS

T u omas

U u sheimo , T E X T

tiina

alvesalo

&

elsi

hyttinen

YOU HAVE F I VE M I N UTES TO LEAVE HOME . WHAT DO YOU TAKE W I TH YOU ?

p e nn y l e s s in t h e c i t y ?

an expensive city. If you’re short of money, look towards your nearest dumpster. The practice of dumpster diving for discarded, edible food is called freeganism. Here are some useful tips from Manifrest collected from experienced freegans: W H E R E ? Shops are required to keep their waste collection rooms locked. Ask around and sound out Helsi nk i is

where kind-hearted people “accidentally” leave the doors open. W H E N ? Nights are usually the best time for foraging. Food past its expiration date is usually thrown away right after closing time, and your chances of getting caught are smaller as it starts to get dark. On the other hand, it may be easier to slip into a waste collection room unnoticed during the daytime. W H A T ? In summer you should avoid foraging for dairy products because they spoil easily and may

cause stomach ache. Bread, vegetables and root vegetables are always good, especially the type you have to peel before eating. Dark bread doesn’t get mouldy as fast as white bread, so it’s safer to eat. B O N U S : A freegan gets to try out all kinds of luxury foods such as special cheeses, fennel, perch fillets, Jerusalem artichokes, pomegranates and perfectly ripened avocados. Your cooking skills develop when your menu is determined by the available ingredients.

Final Home jacket by Kosuke Tsumura Battery-operated radio Tivoli Audio Tote Bag by Samu-Jussi Koski for Artek Torch Fenix, Leatherman

H ow e v e r , I f yo u d ec i d e to b u i ld a new home, check these: www.finalhome.com www.volvocars.com www.iittala.com www.diesel.com Artek 2nd Cycle Pieni Roobertinkatu 4-6 00130 Helsinki, Finland Garbo Vintage Kapteeninkatu 3, 00140, Helsinki, Finland San Francisco Gay Night Tarkk’ampujankatu 16, 00150 Helsinki, Finland Götan Maailma Tarkk’ampujankatu 11, 00120, Helsinki, Finland

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MANIFEST

T h e s á m i a r e t h e o n ly in d i g e n o u s p e o p l e l i v in g w i t h in t h e b o r d e r s o f e u r o p e a n u ni o n . T h e t e r m r e f e r s t o p e o p l e t h at d e s c e n d f r o m t h o s e w h o l i v e d I n a c e r ta in a r e a b e f o r e i t w a s c o n q u e r e d b y t h o s e w h o t o d ay h av e p o w e r o v e r t h e i r l a n d . T h e r e a r e 7 5 , 0 0 0 s á m i s in t h e w o r l d . Ab o u t 8 7 0 0 o f t h e m l i v e in f in l a n d .

D iesel.

stylin g M ila P entti S anna S aastamoinen - B arrois

T-shirt by

PHOTOS

PAGE

Plaid scarf and the handmade belt by Sámi artsan Maire Saijets. Gold-plated silvery belt: parts made by Norjan Pajat, compilation by Laiti Petteri Ateljé Samekki. Red silk dress by D iane von Furstenberg, red hat by Hattuliike Muoti-Aniela, shoes Diesel.

All traditional "risku" buckles by Laiti Petteri Ateljé Samekki. Plaid woolen scarf by Maire Saijets. Suvi's top 2or+byYat. Knitted cloak by Sanna. Ninja's knitted top by R/H has long black fringes.

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Gr a nde Pul l kn i tte d to p of moh a ir a nd w ool by A nna Ruo h one n . E p aul e ts by D u sty . Sp o tte d ha t of rab b it f ur b y H a ttu l iik e Mu o ti- A nie l a. Je w ell e ry b y F i ona Pax t on. D res s by Ane t te R ost e ll.

MO DELS N inja S arasalo & Su vi W est , MAKE- U P AN D HAIR M arii sa drak , LOCATIONS R osa L iksom ' s atelj ĂŠ an d I isalmi

G rande Pull knitted top of mohair and wool by Anna Ruohonen. Epaulets by D usty. Spotted rabbit fur hat by Hattuliike Muoti-Aniela . Jewellery by Fiona Paxton. D ress by Anette Rostell.

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Mar k

PAGE

Ki e s s l in g

Stack Them!

Mark Kiessling (2012)

– Unlike the bookshelf, a pile of books is rather demanding, aggressive and always in flux. It keeps loitering on your desk, stands in your way, gets dusty and conceals titles you may have been looking for some time or may have long forgotten. A good pile of books will keep you busy. It can be a spark of inspiration and will always remind you of something you were about to do or have done. Going through a good pile of books is perfectly pleasurable and never a waste of time. Since I am in the business of future readings, piles of books influence my life more than ever. I have never been a very orderly person, but since running do you read me?! it really exceeds acceptable levels. They are everywhere. Piles of samples. Piles of review copies. Piles of printed matter that promote the ones to come. Piles of readings that we decided not to include in our range, which have found their way to us nevertheless. Piles of titles that I have put aside for myself. Piles of treasures that I gathered when researching other bookstores. There are beautiful piles of books with an almost architectural appeal, and then there are ugly ones. Some you long for to go through, and some you want to get around. ✖ BERLIN

Mark Kiessling is founder and co-owner of the magazine and bookstore »do you read me?!« in Berlin, Germany.

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D a ni e l

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G o l l in g

Design

R a u h a Mäkilä & Juliana Harkki: Dima & Galia (2011), combination of photography and painting

There is furniture and there is design furniture. There are hotels and there are design hotels. And there are museums and design museums. This might not seem like such a big deal, but with a word like design there is every reason to be cautious. For what indeed happens when the word design is used as a prefix? (Or should I say “reduced” into one.) STOCKHOLM –

The word design

has its origins in the Latin word designo. Perhaps we shouldn’t dwell too long on how that word was used by Vitruvius, but originally designo could mean a number of things, from the depiction of something to the designation of someone. More important than its ancient origin, however, is the way the word is used today. Let me give you an example. In a recent interview, a manager of one of the high end furniture stores in my hometown Stockholm expressed his desperation about the poor level of design consciousness among his fellow countrymen. He stated that in Denmark it was not unusual for high school students to receive ”design furniture” as graduation presents. When I reacted to this strange statement by saying something like, ”Shouldn’t this guy know that furniture is always designed?”, the answer I got from a friend was a deep sigh followed by, ”You know what he means”. Of course I do. He’s probably saying that Danes have the love for Poul Henningsen’s PH lamps in their genes and that they pass that along to future generations. And that if the Swedes only had the decency to do the same, his business would be very good.

The use of the word design as a prefix, when it isn’t needed, is deceitful. It wrongly implies that when the prefix is missing, an object isn’t designed. exist before design hotels? Yes. Were they furnished? Of course. Furniture has existed long before Philippe Starck. The klismos chair, created some 400 years BC in ancient Greece and conceived by an anonymous person, is designed. Its outcurved legs and gently curved backrest are not only pleasing to the eye, these are also features that separate it from other chairs. Moreover, the shape and form given to this chair are a response to functional needs particular of the context in which it came into being: with the outcurved legs, the klismos didn’t sink into sand or gravel so easily. The approach to the task of whomever created the klismos is similar to that of designers active today. Although it’s not industrial design, it is design. Most objects throughout history have been created with a sense of economy and given a shape and form that will support their function. Did hotels

Currently in Sweden there is a public debate about

the need for a design museum. Listening to the debate, you could get the impression that design is currently without a home. Maybe we should be asking: is a museum a proper home for design? I’m not sure. But let’s put it this way: a design museum is a perfect home for design, as long as it’s not reduced to “design”. ✖ The writer is a Swedish journalist specialized in architecture and design and the editor-in-chief of FormMagazine.

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1.

Love Maire te X T

elsi

hyttinen

M a i r e G u l l i c h e n w a s o n e o f t h e l e a d in g f i g u r e s o f 2 0 t h c e n t u r y Finni s h c u l t u r a l l i f e : a p a t r o n , a c o l l e c t o r , a b u s in e s s w o m a n a n d a n u n t i r in g o r g a ni s e r . H o m e w a s o n e o f th e a r e n a s fo r h e r ow n c r e ati v it y.

What would it be like to be born so privileged that you could never be sure whether people see you or your money? Maire Gullichsen (1907–1990) didn’t reflect much on such matters in public. The daughter of the Ahlström industrial family was a woman of action, not of ifs and buts. She made room for her self in the art world to be more than a rich girl: she painted and played a decisive role in the development of Nordic design and architecture. Gullichsen was one of the founding members of both the Free Art School in Helsinki and Artek. It has been said that without her enthusiasm and funds the Finnish avant-garde of the 1930s would have achieved far less.

Already at an early age she became aware that her private life was also public. She started to write her letters with carbon paper and kept copies of even her most private communications. Maire Gullichsen turned the curious gazes directed at her to her own advantage and learned to live with them. She even opened up her homes to strangers and made them showcases of the Artek lifestyle.

the radiators. At nights she sought comfort from her parents’ bed, but her father was always prepared with a wicker stick, ready to greet the little wanderer with it. The nightly

punishments ended when a sleepy Maire once, in fear of a lashing, hid in a wardrobe in the hall and wasn’t found until the air was already starting to run out.

CH I LDHOOD HOME

Maire Gullichsen’s childhood home, Havulinna in Noormarkku, southwest Finland, was a handsome Jugendstil castle. She was afraid of her home, especially since her older siblings liked to frighten her with the bogeymen rattling in

2.


MANIFEST

H O M E L E S S

blood among the neighbours that the school had to relocate.

were bound together, not only by a leftist worldview but also by a business partnership: in the autumn of 1935 the group founded Artek, a company selling furniture and industrial products, committed to using its profits for art gallery activities aswell. The decor of the Artek home was everything that Maire Gullichsen’s Jugendstil childhood home was not: light, bright and purposeful. The whole aesthetics of Artek was based on the concept of the beauty of pure form. Ornamentation of any kind was seen as useless.

MODEL HOME

V I LLA MA I REA

The decor of the Kaivopuisto residence was pure Artek, and it served not only as a home but also as a showroom for Artek when needed.

The construction of Villa Mairea in Noormarkku was completed in 1939. The villa was designed by Aino and Alvar Aalto, for whom

3.

Maire Gullichsen adored her mother. Her father was a more intimidating figure. Both their influences can be seen in the decor of Havulinna: her father loved luxury, her mother loved warmth. Her mother spent a lot of time reading the works of Ellen Key, the fashion philosopher of her time. Key gave importance to the development of the sense of beauty in a human being. Home was an overall work of art and it was the woman’s task to build it. In beautiful homes, people would grow up to appreciate beauty.

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The Free Art School organized painting camps on the Villa Mairea grounds. In 1972 Maire opened up her villa to the general public as well. The first exhibition featured Finnish art from Gullichsen's collection as well as others. Since 1980 the villa has been open to the public every year in the summertime. In the first years a summer exhibition could receive more than 20 000 visitors. B ACK TO MOTHER

There was one home that Maire loved dearly even though it was very different from the other important places of her life. Her mother’s childhood summer house, Honkala, was full of light curtains, lace and dreamy colours. Maire Gullichsen never even tried to change the house’s romantic atmos-

FREE ART SCHOOL

Maire Gullichsen’s first home in Helsinki was a downtown atelier apartment. In December 1934 she introduced the idea of establishing a free art school to her friends Ethel Thesleff, Saara Castrén and Irja Noponen. It was modelled after the free academies in Paris, and the aim was to allow students to study painting at their own pace, without school-like constraints. The school started to operate already in January 1935. The teachers, who had studied in Paris, brought along the ideal of a clean palette, which was something totally different from the starkness prevailing in the Finnish art world. Around that time the Gullichsens moved into a larger apartment in the Kaivopuisto park district, wich meant that they didn’t have to look far for a space for the new school. The downtown apartment was transformed into a studio – until a picture in a newspaper of the back of a nude model caused so much bad

5.

5.

Artek in the 1930s has been regarded in Finland as an equally important avant-guard group as the leftist writer group, Kiila. Maire Gullichsen and the architects Aino and Alvar Aalto and Nils-Gustav Hahl were among the group’s core members. They

4.

the project concurrently served as a kind of laboratory for testing new ideas. It was possible to try out in an individual building solutions that weren’t yet ready for mass production. If the solutions proved good, their production could be streamlined, and they could soon be made available to all. Villa Mairea was the centre of Maire Gullichsen’s salon activities. Intellectuals, artists and other prominent members of society from all over the world gathered around the same table there. The dinners were long, and guests would often stay the night. Even if they were usually formal dinners, the atmosphere was bohemian and relaxed. The story goes that a guest once got carried away showing off his acrobatic skills and performed a series of somersaults over the plates, from one end of the long table to the other. This was allowed.

phere but kept it up. If a dish was broken, she would replace it with a new one wich was just as romantic. In the later years of her life Maire Gullichsen started to spend more and more time in Honkala and even arranged to give most of her interviews there. Many papers from that era feature pictures of her sitting, not amidst severely modernist design, but with wistful curtains flowing behind her. PHOTOS 1 . Maire Gullichsen (1907–1990) was an outspoken and strong woman. 2. The furniture in Havulinna was dark and heavy. In her own homes Gullichsen appreciated lightness, brightness and clear lines. 3. Free artschool started operating at Maire Gullichsen's first Helsinki home. 4. The apartment in Kaivopuisto served also as a showcase for Artek. 5. Villa Mairea was a masterwork created by Aino and Alvar Aalto, and has later developed into a popular place for holidaymakers to visit.


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Propaganda?

Michelangelo Pistoletto: The Orchestra of Rags – Quartet (1968)

– Propaganda. The word alone sounds powerful. Various recommendations in social media guide the way we consume more and more every day, and traditional forms of marketing seem toothless. Social media bring about movements, demonstrations and riots at an incredible speed. Ideas, activism and anarchism are interesting. In politics, there is a mood for protest, and not without reason. In the agenda of the comrades, idealism and conviction have been replaced by a thirst for publicity and recognition. Those with power writhe under the accusations of corruption and conflicts of interest. The media seeks out and uses its position, almost assuming the role of judge. In the background there is always the promotion of interest, whether the purpose is the control of opinion, manipulation, advertising or propaganda. helsinki

We are surrounded

by numerous propaganda networks disguised in various ways. They do not want to be recognized as propaganda networks because of the negative connotations of the word: in Hitler's Germany, propaganda targeted various religions, nationalities and states when the National Socialists were seeking power. Centralized media facilitated efficient propaganda in the Soviet Union. After the Second World War, the United States broadcast beyond the Iron Curtain an impression of a golden land of capitalism using a propagandistic radio programme. Posters are some of the most interesting and impressive items of propaganda. The posters popularizing the Communism of the Soviet Union have a clear affinity with Hitler's Nazi propaganda. The strong graphic impression must be recognized both as colours and as images. Soldiers and dictators felt arrogantly powerful surrounded by their messages.

It is impossible to examine propaganda culture

without its links with history. We are still affected by propaganda, although we do not like to call it that. In the field of politics, the battle is still fought using misleading and deficient information. Political crises in various parts of the world are still part of everyday life. The connections with the economic machineries still need more accurate communications strategies. The stakes are high. In the past

few years, the encounters between art, architecture and design have been somewhat disconcerting. The economic boom has had its downside. The architecture generated in the whirlwind of a growing economy and power may have got out of hand in the thoughts of the client and on the desk of the architect. Boundaries have been broken by defying the values of proportions, purposefulness and the city's image. In human history, the significance and permanence of architecture have been on a different level than those of the fashion seasons. Gigantic statues disconnected from their surroundings continue to stand firm for a long time to come. Design interplay between fashion and art and new products are generated at an accelerating pace, although demand is waning. Consumers get bored before the creators do. Critical consumers already emerged over a decade ago, and this group of thinking consumers is growing. The depression and economic chaos have brought about a positive crisis for the actors in the sector. Product development processes are seeking a new need base for products. Stories and profound competence are topical. People talk about things. And propaganda is needed again.✖ The writer is the CEO of Artek.

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Walter Benjamin, “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction”, Illuminations, Hannah Arendt, editor. Schocken Books, New York, 1968, 217-251. | Bohumil Hrabal, Too Loud a Solitude, Harcourt, Inc., San Diego, New York, London, 1990, 1. | Elaine Scarry, Dreaming by the Book, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 2001, 7. | Semir Zeki, Inner Vision: An Exploration of Art and The Brain, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1999, 1. | Charles Tomlinson, “The Poet as Painter”, in JM McClatchy, editor, Poets on Painters, University of California Press, Berkeley, Los Angeles, London, 1990, 280. | Maurice Merleau-Ponty, as quoted in Iain Mc Gillchrist, The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World, Yale University Press, New Haven and London, 2009, 409.

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THE READING BODY text J u hani P allasmaa P hoto M A R K O R A N T A N E N

During my teaching tasks in various

universities around the world, I have become increasingly worried about the disappearance of THE BOOK from contemporary life and consciousness. In essence, culture and education are gradual accumulations of knowledge, and when this layered tradition is missing, teaching turns into mere primitive instruction. Today, books are increasingly replaced by search media, and knowledge is reduced to information. As a consequence of the rejection of the book, the epic dimensions and causations of life and things are lost, and narratives are replaced by mere detached fragments of information. Besides, reading good literature offers the most important lessons in ethical judgement and human compassion, but it is all lost when the reality of context, duration and causal interactions of things is not an ingredient of the experience. We tend to think that only the eyes

and linguistic faculties, and perhaps visual imagination, are active in the act of reading, but all profound readers know that we participate with our entire body, senses and imagination in intense reading. In fact, the book initiates a dialogue with our entire life experience and sense of self. Walter Benjamin argued that regardless of their apparent visuality, architecture

and cinema are tactile arts, but the same argument must be made of all arts, including literature. The mental and imaginative act of reading brings about the sensations of texture, temperature, moisture, weight and illumination. Powerful words and literary expressions possess their spatiality, gravity and tactility. They project their own material and experiential cosmos. The Czech writer Bohumil Hrabal describes vividly the embodiment that takes place in reading: “When I read, I don’t really read: I pop up a beautiful sentence in my mouth and suck it like a fruit drop, or I sip it like a liqueur until the thought dissolves in me like alcohol, infusing my brain and heart and coursing on through the veins to the root of each blood vessel.” Elaine Scarry asks: “By what miracle is a writer able to incite us to bring forth mental images that resemble in their quality not our own daydreaming but our own […] perceptual acts?”. In her view, great writers from Homer, Flaubert and Rilke to today’s master writers, such as Seamus Heaney, have intuited, by means of words, how the brain perceives images. The suggestion that writers would intuitively imitate the neural processes of the brain and thus be able to activate and direct the reader’s sensory imagination sounds

farfetched. However, Semir Zeki, an authoritative neurobiologist, makes a surprisingly parallel argument in the case of visual art. “In a large measure, the function of art and the function of the visual brain are one and the same, or at least the aims of art constitute an extension of the function of the brain.” Zeki confesses further: “I hold the somewhat unusual view that artists are in some sense neurologists, studying the brain with techniques that are unique to them, but studying unknowingly the brain and its organization nevertheless”. of art originate in the body of the maker as existential sensations, and they return back to the body and the existential mode through the ideated experience of the reader/beholder/listener of the work. Charles Tomlinson, the poet, points out this bodily involvement in painting and poetry: “Painting wakes up the hand, draws in your sense of muscular coordination, your sense of the body, if you like. Poetry, also, as it pivots on its stresses, as it rides forward over the line endings, or comes to rest at pauses in the line, poetry also brings the whole man into play and his bodily sense of himself.” This is exactly where the integrating power of literature lies; the simultaneous activation of the intellectual, All works

emotive, embodied and imaginative domains. We are simply more complete beings when we read. argues that the literary arts differ from all the other art forms in not possessing direct sensory imageries, only printed letters on a page. Consequently, in her view, the reader is obliged to create the imagery in his/her imagination in accordance with the writer’s instructions contained in the text. This is certainly true, but in all forms of art, the factual sensory imagery of the work gives rise to an imaginative world that actually contains the poetic and affective reality of the work. All works of art are thus co-creations of the author and reader/viewer; we create an imaginative and meaningful world by means of the suggestions of the artist, and we place ourselves in it. Every artistic work creates a world, not a picture, scene or episode. As Maurice Merleau-Ponty notes, “we come to see not the work of art, but the world according to the art work”. Elai ne Scarry

our most reliable friends, and they keep a world of possibilities open to us. Books do not exist merely for the purpose of entertainment or killing time. They are sources of perpetual growth and means of getting to know not only the world but oneself. ✖ Books are


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Note to Self

Aarno Rankka: Madonna (1998)

I N SP I RAT I O N AL PR I N C I PLES

I universal thinking

Ideas are more powerful than matter The plan, supported by a strong idea, proposes a global vision of man as the main inspirational ideal. Matter gives expression to the concept and becomes a sensitive and communicative interface.

II eco-effectiveness

Our common future A 360° open view on the world that aims at a total change of those environmental and social values that concern our life.

III listen to differences

Knowledge and equilibrium The plan is a dialogue and a listening experience of “other”, unheard voices, an ongoing combination of different competences and understanding to create the conditions for higher expressions of knowledge.

IV less

Reduce to innovate A more critical and sensible approach based on a “subtractive” principle to get to the essence of the plan, acknowledging a strategic value to the “bare minimum” as a valueadded solution.

TASKS t o a d v i s e

PROV I DED R I GHTS

V responsible consumption

Conscious ethics Awareness that our resources are limited becomes the perfect stimulus to creativity in terms of innovative solutions and design that can excite our respect for the environment.

VI transparency

To be aware of background layers Honest design expressions that reveal the structural qualities of each product. The essence, the design principles and the communicative objective must be sharp and comprehensible.

VII long term

Against the short term dictatorship Due to new discoveries and opportunities “durable” has become synonymous with high quality. Intelligent and selective choices of materials and processes help generate a caring relationship between the user and his/ her product.

VIII open positive system

To coordinate innovation In order to become even more innovative, an approach based upon principles of knowledge exchange and quality coordination and teamwork.

IX quality

An upgrade of values The quality concept is a fundamental right for a durable and satisfactory relationship between the user and the product. Quality is an immutable choice, while matter is subject to a natural and inevitable deterioration. Quality is a necessary prerequisite for the achievement of genuine social and environmental innovation.

X perceptive experience

Individual rights The sensorial and perceptive properties of a product for the gratification of the senses: such an experience creates an intimate relationship between the user and the product itself.

XI accessibility

Use of common resources Full access to shared resources: to become more in tune with local companies and cultural realms and be in the position to give them prompt feedback for wellness improvement throughout the territory.

XII fluidity & freedom

Self-affirmation in space and time A sense of belonging so that one can interact with the environment at one's own pace. Attentive project management to respond intelligently to the ever-changing surrounding habitats. ✖

The writer is an Italian architect and a designer who has led her own design office since 1983.

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Design Moneyfest 2012 - Helsinki - Nobody needs design. Globally thinking, design is a rare need. It’s hard to know anything about it. In a designer hotel, someone died of designer drugs. Design: A class trip and status picnic. The latest cell phone model upgrades a consumption worker. Design: The rank of nobility for products. Design: Products whose existence is motivated by looking and talking. Design: Well-planned desires realized in a disciplined manner. Good manners are not enough; we need laws. Imagination is not enough; we need business. Realism should not be confused with rationality. The most important things in life don’t require nuclear power plants. Everyone needs well-designed and safe products. Especially if you can’t walk or brush your teeth. Or if you lose a leg, an arm or an eye. Things happen. A deadly and fascinating combination: Technology. Technology is not based on progress but on the power of the few, novelties and greed. Technology feeds boredom, rage and world-weariness. Technology invents social styles. Handwriting is disappearing. We leave behind radiation waste. In large companies, designers don’t struggle with their consciences. Thousands of in-house designers are acting against their better judgment. On summer vacation, everyone carves a bark boat with a birch rind sail. Made in Nuremberg: They were only following orders and doing their duty. Question: When does the age of design begin? Answer: When a child learns table manners. The goal of life is not happiness but other people. No matter how seductive products may be. In spite of it all, we are mortal. Whatever appeals to emotions touches. Half of memory is smell and skin. Only touching can make the feeling of existence reality. Touch is a fundamental sense; it anchors us to the world. The strength of the squeeze of a newborn baby’s fingers is startling. The first dialogue with the world takes place through squeezing and sucking. Awareness of touch is the first mental capacity of humans. There is no authenticity in the world of products and art. Just authentic pieces of copies. The painting guarded in the museum was a disappointment. The colours were not the same as in the poster hanging on the wall at home. Publicly authentic mostly means... how to phrase it... generally fasist. When art is real, the person who creates or experiences it has a moment in heaven, when no one else is around. What makes something real can hurt, and it may not necessarily be pleasant or beautiful but is absolutely good. Esthetics is a question of belief. The only supernatural experience. The only possible miracle. Successful resuscitation on the side of a highway. Big and complex questions can be answered by simple means. As long as the right preconditions exist. It is a question of the human need for safety. This means a state that strengthens concentration and allows a degree of peace and quiet. Made it, home. Characters with Spaces: Event is the space between two people, humanity. Come closer! Go through! ✖ H elsinki

Kaj Kalin, Cultural journalist and design curator. Honorary member, Finnish Association of Designers Ornamo. Nordic Design Prize 1998. Kalevi Jäntti Foundation Literature Prize 1994.

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IN BELGIUM, THEY USED IT TO BUILD A WALKWAY. IN SHANGHAI, EXPO IN BELGIUM, THEY USEDA ITWORLD TO BUILD A PAVILION. AND IN IN SHANGHAI, GERMANY, THOUSANDS WALKWAY. A WORLD EXP OF TERRACES PAVILION. AND AND PATIOS. IN GERMANY, THOUSAND OF TERRACES AND PATIOS.


PO DS

In the heart of the historic Belgian city of Ghent, you’ll find a magnificent pedestrian walkway. It spans a charming canal and borders historically significant buildings. This is where old meets new; architectural heritage sitting alongside a sleek modern structure to create a harmonious space. The walkway is built of UPM ProFi composite. The very same environmentallyfriendly material which was used to construct the Finnish Pavilion at the Shanghai World Expo. Now thousands of homeowners in Germany are utilising its benefits to build their terraces and patios. UPM ProFi is a truly unique material. It is manufactured mainly from recycled by-products of self-adhesive label manufacture. The result of our own research and development, UPM ProFi shows consideration for the entire lifecycle of materials – and the environment. The forest is full of opportunities. www.upmprofi.com

UPM ProFi Deck is perfectly suited for patios, terraces, piers, playgrounds and other uses where beauty and durability are required.

Green Good Design™ Award is a distinguished international recognition awarded to the best sustainable solutions and materials. UPM ProFi received this award in 2010. Green Good Design™ is Awarded by The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design and The European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies.

The Finnish Pavilion at the Shanghai World Expo 2010 was titled “Giant’s kettle”. 25.000 injection-moulded shingles made of UPM ProFi decorate the impressive construction.

UPM ProFi Deck’s international demand has exceeded all expectations.


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Finally Home

S ED IA 1 design Enzo Mari 1974 / Autoprogettazione T h e p roduct is delivered as sawn parts to be assembled. 

– The man is excluded from society, marginalized, but life has to go on somehow. Scores of solutions have been offered to him, but he wants to be at least relatively free. He is one of the last Mohicans who have not yet been strapped down by society’s bonds. A modern tramp can spend the night in paid, portable toilets that churn out warm, filtered air. Stairways are now just a dream. The man used to know a janitor who had allowed him a small corner of a stairwell and, in wordless agreement, had let him sleep there at night. The need for sleep can also be satisfied in trams and underground trains. Of course, you can get by without paying for a ticket, but you may be given a fine that could lead to repossession. On the other hand, the man knows that, by law, a guarantee pension cannot be garnished. He’s just sometimes too embarrassed to get on a tram or the subway in his smelly, worn-out clothes. The man is relatively healthy, apart from some aching in the joints, a remnant from working at construction sites when he was young. He also has his own shack in a small patch of woods, in an urban environment. When it’s very cold in the winter, he cannot sleep there because the shack is flimsy and can’t be heated in any way. Every night without exception, he has to helsinki

wander the streets to stay warm. While doing that, he can collect empty cans and bottles. The work is not taxable, although some civil servant, having a wet dream, once suggested that it should be. Sometimes there’s alcohol as a warming substance, but his small guarantee pension certainly doesn’t allow him to indulge in it every day. The libraries are also a good place to keep warm in the daytime. In some of the newer libraries, he can tend to the smaller sanitary procedures for his earthly abode. He also has to deal with clothing, and there’s a good trick that market stall women have known since time immemorial. Some newspaper stuffed between layers of clothing will keep you warm. The paper collection bins have also sometimes served as a place for him to sleep. One just has to be careful not to end up in the arms of a collection truck’s compactor. Life is a dour battle. His grandmother had put it well: life is a battle, from cradle to grave. ✖ The writer works for Vailla vakinaista asuntoa ry (No Fixed Abode), an NGO founded by homeless people themselves. He is also an expert in homelessness with first-hand experience, having survived altogether six years of a combination of alcoholism and homelessness.

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JOPO WANTS TO BE YOUR FRIEND.

jopo bikes have been putting smiles on faces since 1965. jopo combine a classic design with uncomplicated mechanics. Having revolutionised people’s attitude towards cycling jopo bikes are now taking to the road and going international. Not familiar with jopo? Don’t wait for an introduction, just hop on and say hello! www.jopobikes.com

SMILE AS STANDARD.


Artek was founded in 1935 by four visionaires whose ideology and radicalism are today more vibrant than ever. With a firm belief in a grand synthesis of the arts, Alvar and Aino Aalto, Maire Gullichsen and Nils-Gustav Hahl have created innovative and modern archetypes for human living. While entering a new era, the continuity of traditional methods of production ensures that Artek furniture ages in style and lasts forever. Make it yours. artek.fi


MANIFEST no1. HOMELESS  

Manifest is a collaborative design project made possible through a wide rangeof corporate partnerships. Manifest is published in Finnish and...

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