Woodbury December 2020

Page 1

Citizen of the Year

Roger Green devotes his life to helping the Woodbury community


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CONTENTS DECEMBER ’20 This December, we celebrate community. Cherish those around you, and remember, always be kind.

in every issue 6 EDITOR’S LETTER 9 NOTEWORTHY 39 ON THE TOWN 4 2 GALLERY 4 4 TASTEMAKERS 4 8 LAST GLANCE

departments 1 4 FACES

Citizen of the Year Roger Green devotes his life to helping Woodbury.

1 6 ENLIGHTEN

That’s a Wrap

—Vivian Shinall PAG E 32

Use green alternatives to wrapping paper.

20 DOING GOOD

PAGE 16

Love Thy Neighbor

Celebrate the holidays with those around you.

22 TASTE

Big Batch Beverages

Self-serve cocktails are the season’s best guests.

features 26

Hunting for Heritage Woodbury native travels the world.

32

Deck the Halls

One stop shop for all winter greenery questions.

4 | DECEMBER 2020

COURTESY OF GERTEN’S, TATE CARLSON

“Embrace and enjoy the cold weather. It’s what keeps our fresh greens outdoors beautiful all the way until March.”


Doing the most goodÂŽ

PARTNERS IN OUR

COMMUNITY. From holiday help to empowering youth. Veteran services to services for the aging. These are just some of the programs our shoppers support when they donate to the Salvation Army. During these holidays and all through the year, please

give generously.

Doing the most goodÂŽ

For more information visit salvationarmynorth.org

5125 Vernon Avenue S | Edina, MN 55436 9625 Anderson Lakes Pkwy | Eden Prairie, MN 55344 7760 Hargis Pkwy | Woodbury, MN 55129

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Love Woodbury Magazine?

from the EDITOR

T

he snow is glistening, cinnamon and warmth fill the air, and the holidays are bestowed upon us once again. In this last issue of 2020, we are happy to be celebrating our community. On page 14, meet Woodbury’s citizen of the year, Roger Green, who has donated his energy to bettering Woodbury and the surrounding areas. Meet East Ridge High School graduate Dylan Eike, who’s traveled across the country and the world in his hunt for heritage (page 26). Also in Woodbury Magazine this month, prepare for the holidays with wrapping paper alternatives (page 16) and cocktail/mocktail recipes (page 9 and 22). Although our holidays, be it Christmas, Kwanzaa, Hanukkah or New Years, may look a little different this year, the celebration of family, Follow us ! friends and traditions continue. Be sure to celSee what we’re doing behind the ebrate your neighbors and community with gifts scenes and around town! of thanks (page 20) and toast to those you cherish woodburymag.com and love. =Woodbury Magazine I’d like to propose a toast of my own: Here’s to @wburymag @woodbury_mag you. Though we endured heartbreak and hardships, we found strength, compassion and generosity as a community. May we not forget the kindness that’s been spread about our community like teacher and photographer Sigrid Dabelstein who offered discounted family portraits during COVID-19; Monica Jones who created Melanated Mamas, the joy-filled space for BIPOC mothers; car parades that celebrates high school graduates and birthdays; StoryArk, an org that amplifies the diverse voices of our community’s youth; and so much more. So, here’s to you, and the welcoming and supportive community that we’ve created together. Happy holidays, Woodbury, I’ll see you next year.

Get Connected & Find Upcoming local events Web exclusive articles Expanded versions of our print stories

Hailey Almsted, editor woodburymag@tigeroak.com

Woodbury Magazine

Citizen of the Year

ON THE COVER Roger Green

woodburymag.com

page 14 TATE CARLSON

6 | DECEMBER 2020

HUNTING FOR HERITAGE // DECK THE HALLS

woodburymag.com

DECEMBER 2020

Visit us online for even more about Woodbury.

Roger Green devotes his life to helping the Woodbury community

PHOTO BY RACHEL NADEAU

PLUS Submit story ideas to Woodbury Magazine


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editorial advisory board PEPE BARTON, South Washington County Schools TANNER IGNASZWESKI, Woodbury High School MIKE LEWIS, 3P Boxing 24/7 LAURIE MORDORSKI, Woodbury Lakes STACEY MORGAN, woodburykids.com MICHELLE OKADA, City of Woodbury Public Safety MARGARET WACHHOLZ, Woodbury Heritage Society, Woodbury Community Foundation, Woodbury Senior Living SARAH SORENSON-WAGNER, South Washington County Schools

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Woodbury Magazine

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NOTEWORTHY W H AT ’ S G O I N G O N I N W O O D B U R Y

Treat yourself to a warm cup of Irish coffee.

Embrace the Holiday Spirit(s) Eat, drink and be merry with these indulgent cocktail recipes.

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he weather outside may be frightful, but these drinks are so delightful. Impress your guests or treat yourself to a fireside beverage with these holiday cocktail recipes courtesy of Haskell’s resident cocktail expert John Farrell.

HOT BUTTERED RUM 2 oz. full-bodied rum (Dark rum is usually best) 1 tsp. butter 3 or 4 cloves Hot water Pour rum in glass or pewter mug, place butter in mug. Add hot water, sprinkle cloves on top, stir and allow cloves to steep in drink for a few minutes. Remove cloves and serve.

IRISH COFFEE 1 cup strong coffee (French roast) 1 oz. Irish whiskey 1 oz. Irish cream liquor (St. Brendan’s or Baileys) ½ oz. whip cream Combine all ingredients and dollop the top with whipped cream. Be ready for seconds!

GROG 2 oz. rum (Dark rum is usually better!) 3 oz. hot cider or hot apple juice Brown or white sugar Lemon juice Cinnamon Combine rum with hot cider or juice in a mug. With cider, add sugar to taste. With apple juice, add lemon juice. Shake, dust with cinnamon.

HASKELL’S 6445 Lake Road Suite 200 haskells.com For additional beverage inspiration, flip to page 22.

WOODBURYMAG.COM | 9


N OT E WO RT H Y

FOOD

Connecting Through Cooking

Not long ago, cooking at home was a little more than a once-a-year event for many people. At holiday time, folks who never otherwise would pick up a basting brush in an attempt to glaze a ham or would try to scallop a potato. They shared a meal with people they cared about and had a great time, no matter how dry the turkey or how lumpy the gravy. And then 2020 happened. The New York Times reported in April that Americans were cooking “on a scale not seen in over 50 years.” But while they’ve had more practice lately, these new home cooks may not be eating with their loved ones this year. The 2020 holiday season may both look and taste quite a bit different for a lot of people. The holidays will look different for me, too. Even though I cook significantly more than most, because I work in the grocery

industry, I’m often tired of holiday foods by now (I’ve typically been testing recipes since June). But this year I plan to prepare a truly festive feast. I’ll make my mom’s sweet potato casserole, my sister-in-law’s seven-layer salad, my dad’s cranberry relish and my mother-in-law’s Swedish rye bread. I’ll even bake the salted bourbon pecan pie everyone always asks me to bring to dinner. I’m hopeful that cooking their signature dishes will connect me with my family even if (for this year) we might not be sitting at the same table. My holiday wish is that I’ll be enjoying their recipes and their company next year. I wish you joyful holidays and a very happy 2021!

RACHAEL PERRON is the culinary & brand director for Kowalski’s Markets, where she specializes in product development and selection, culinary education and communications.

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Find Rachael’s recipe for Salted Bourbon Pecan Pie on our website at woodburymag.com.

10 | DECEMBER 2020


Orthopaedic Specialists

FITNESS

HEALTHY HOLIDAYS Curb the threat of holiday temptations.

Ah, the holidays! Merriment, jingle-jingle, ho-ho-ho and a barrel of foods you shouldn’t eat, but instead you give yourself temporary permission to be naughty. This is a challenge we all face, as work, shopping, planning, socially-distanced parties, family celebrations and stress can combine to make it hard to resist a few traditional treats, which lead to a few more and soon you can’t tell where one cookie stops and the next one starts. Why do we let this happen? This year, you can battle temptation and win. You might find it difficult to lose a lot of weight over the holidays, but you can make it through with your weight-loss goals intact. Let’s dig into a heaping helping of healthy holidays!

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Starting New Traditions

• Eat a nutrient-dense breakfast every day, and continue eating balanced meals and snacks up to party time. Don’t “save up your hunger” knowing tempting treats await. Stable blood sugar helps prevent cravings. • Sample party foods, but don’t give yourself permission to completely fall off the wagon. • Drink lots of water all day long. Being dehydrated (drinking alcohol contributes to dehydration!) can cause you to eat foods that you shouldn’t and more than you should. • During the rush, get your workouts in. You might work out one less day per week, or have to shorten workout times, but even 15 minutes is better than skipping exercise. • Even with the time demands, try to get at least seven hours of sleep per night. At the least, don’t let late nights string together so you’re seriously sleep deprived. Living healthy holidays is as much a mindset as anything else. Be careful when holiday colors come in sugar and fat and stuff like that. Here’s to new traditions in your household—traditions that bring great tidings of health and happiness.

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N OT E WO RT H Y SENIOR LIVING

This Is Us

Welcome your neighbors and friends this holiday season. Elizabeth Bowen, a Dublin writer, once said, “To turn from everything to one face is to find oneself face to face with everything.” It’s a beautiful line, meaning the same thing: when we are looking for the story to speak to the entire human condition, we must find the story that speaks to a single human person. We may be high travelers, have wonderful jobs and titles (or not; perhaps we are learning hard lessons about what really matters in life from some trials and tribulations). But we all seemingly live up the road from Kowalski’s, eat fish and chips at O’Malley’s, hike the river trail at Afton State Park, go antiquing in Stillwater …

We live in a town of nearly 70,000 people, but we might not know our neighbors and community members as well as we like to think. For me, our world is a parish. On trips to my home

country of Ireland, I am staring at the heart of humanity by the chatty curiosity of the locals in my village. If you go visit Ms. Grey and Essie’s cottage, they’ll cut a thick slice of buttered fruitcake for you, so

big and generous that it could be used as a doorstop—the square tablecloth is thrown on the farm table, where we exchange stories of the parish that is the world we live in. I exhale and feel welcomed. In Ireland, to welcome, we say, céad míle fáilte. Translated, it means a hundred thousand welcomes. Although our lives at times feels fractured, especially during the holidays, we can offer a welcome to each other no matter the impasse or circumstances. Like Mrs. Grey and Essie, a true and sincere welcome can open the floor for a meaningful exchange. Our hundred thousand welcomes is generous, but a single “Welcome” is just as beautiful.

MARGARET WACHHOLZ is the campus marketing director at Woodbury Senior Living. In her column, she shares observations and wisdom about aging and senior living in our community. woodburyseniorliving.com

Bark at Me

Give your dog their own gifts.

DONNA CHICONE is an award-winning

author, TEDx speaker and advocate for dogs. She lives in Woodbury. You might find her engaged in pet-assisted therapy work. superpetparent.com

12 | DECEMBER 2020

Holidays are upon us again. The entire family including the dog shares the excitement. Do you put your dog on your gift list? If not, perhaps you will want to this year. When we shop for our dogs it is important to consider a few things. Not all dogs like to wear clothes, and frilly clothes could pose a health hazard with baubles and fringes they can chew and swallow. Coats and booties are fine. Chew treats are best and safest if made in the U.S. Toys are always fun and special treats from one of the many local dog bakeries would be great. A safe raw (not baked) bone to chew on when other family members are eating or visiting is pawsome for the dog.

PET PARENT QUESTION:

How do I keep my dog from getting into all the gift toys for the kids and other decorations? It is good to have a toy box or basket for just your dog’s toys. A dog needs to have his/her own play space and very own toys. He will enjoy chew toys, soft toys and having a large selection to pick from. This will help keep him busy and from getting into your other things. It is still necessary to supervise children and dogs at all times to keep everyone safe. Happy holiday woofs and smiles!

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A little cheer to end the year.

M

asked carolers singing s ix f e et a pa rt,

Sports seasons over before they could start. No teasing the mall Santa about his beard, No office holiday parties, it’s weird.

But home we can safely spread holiday cheer With fewer guests gathered ‘round tables this year. Video chatting with family and friends An d wo nd e ring when 2020 will end. Though miles away, and in spite of the weather, The holiday season still brings us together. With merrier memories to lighten our mood, We’ll sit back an d savor the JOY of good food.

Happy Holidays from our family to yours.

11 Twin Cities Locations |

W W W. K O W A L S K I S . C O M


D E PA R T M E N T S

|

FAC E S Roger Green at the Heritage House, where he serves on the board of directors.

Citizen of the Year

Second-time recipient of the Citizen of the Year award, Roger Green, devotes his life to helping the Woodbury community. ROGER GREEN IS KNOWN FOR GIVING HIS TIME and efforts to the community, twice receiving

BY AVA DIAZ PHOTO BY TATE CARLSON

the Woodbury Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year award. Nominated by fellow community members, the Citizen of the Year award recognizes active individuals who bring significant value to the area through their own personal commitment to making Woodbury a more welcoming, functional and philanthropic place. “It is really important to our organization to recognize the businesses and the people who make this community in sync,” president of the Woodbury Chamber of Commerce Laurie Staiger says. “Woodbury is the way that it is because of the people that live and work here.” Green’s love for helping others stemmed from his 38-year career with the HealthEast Care System. Starting his experience in a community relations position, Green worked his way up to be the vice president of strategy pol-

14 | DECEMBER 2020

icy marketing and communications. Though representing the community was an integral part of his roles, he says that his personal aptitude is what drives him to continue to do more for others, even beyond his retirement. “I just can’t tell you how many great people are out there sharing the same passion for trying to improve the community,” Green says. He’s contributed to Woodbury in a multitude of ways, but most recently as the director of the Woodbury Foundation and volunteering with Woodbury Thrives. “The big things is simply that you take more away from volunteering than you give,” he says. “To see the results of what you are doing in terms of helping others in the community, or helping young people grow and evolve, is just extremely rewarding.” About his character, Staiger says, “He is the most humble person I have ever met … And that makes him the most impactful person I have ever met.”


Greg Foote Jewelers GREEN’S CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE COMMUNITY • Serves as the chair for Woodbury Community Foundation board

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• Volunteers with Woodbury Thrives, a foundation he helped initiate in 2014 • Represents the Woodbury Community Foundation on the Healthy Minnesota Partnership • Represents the Woodbury Community Foundation for the Woodbury Heritage Society Board of Directors

Wishing you a Happy Holiday!

HYOUNSOO LATHROP

A name that is hard to say but easy to trust

• Co-chairs the Button Sales Committee for the Woodbury Days Council • A board member of Legacy Senior Services • An active member of Sokol Minnesota, a Czech Heritage Organization, for over 30 years • Places holiday wreaths at the Fort Snelling cemetery through Wreaths Across America • Contributes funding regularly to Great River Greening, Face to Face Health and Counseling, and the Northern Star of Council • Served on the Community Development Agency Board for Washington County in affordable housing and economic development

Growing up, I wished I was Santa Claus so that giving gifts would be my job. With or without a hat, I’m here to help you!

• Served as the treasurer of the Maplewood North Lions Club, where he has been an active member for 35 years • Lead a conversation group with English as Second Language participants through South Washington County Schools Community Education • Served as the Board of Directors and as the chair of the board for the Woodbury Area Chamber of Commerce • Served on the Woodbury Housing Task Force and the Economic Development Commission for 12 years WOODBURY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

700 Commerce Drive Suite 285 651.578.0722 woodburychamber.org

COLDWELL BANKER REALTY Operated by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC

HYOUNSOO LATHROP, REALTOR Cell: 651.233.8527 HLathrop@CBRealty.com www.HyounsooLathrop.com

R

WOODBURYMAG.COM | 15


D E PA R T M E N T S

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ENLIGHTEN

That’s a Wrap Use green alternatives to wrapping paper.

16 | DECEMBER 2020


BY RENÉE STEWARTHESTER

KEEPING A LID ON REFUSE over the holidays

takes extra and creative efforts with the increased volume of mailing boxes, packaging and giftwrap. It’s easier than you think to come up with green alternatives to traditional giftwrap and boxes. PHOTOS BY TATE CARLSON

Reusing gift or mailing boxes is a no brainer, but have you thought of giving a second life to food containers? Tip: Cereal boxes, especially ones adorned with holiday themes, are ideal packages for kids’ gifts.

Don’t toss out outgrown or no-longerused holiday jammies or outfits. Wash and trim them down to reuse as wrapping for smaller items.

For gardening-theme gifts, tuck items inside a clay flower pot. Top it with the drain base, and festoon it with a holiday ribbon around the pot to secure the lid.

When giving cozy mittens/gloves/ hats, wrap them up in a coordinating scarf.

Get the artists in your family to decorate paper grocery bags, and use them as wrapping paper. Tip: Decorate with holiday-themed riddles, poems, song lyrics or trivia.

Dish towels are cuter and more clever than ever. Use them to wrap up cooking and baking tools for your favorite home cook.

Speaking of cooking, how about filling a large pasta or stock pot with pasta and ingredients for your favorite homemade pasta sauce?

With hope and grace, we are leading the way. Applications for Enrollment, Financial Aid and Scholarship Deadline is January 15th, 2021. For information on our Winter Open House or to schedule a tour or shadow day, visit our website at hill-murray.org/admissions/visit/

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WOODBURYMAG.COM | 17


ENLIGHTEN

|

CONTINUED

WISE WRAP

The furoshiki method of wrapping items (gifts to groceries) is steeped in Japanese tradition. Use bandanas, bedsheets, cloth napkins, fabric scraps, tablecloths, tea towels and more to wrap gifts in a more economical and Earth-friendly way.

18 | DECEMBER 2020


Tie repurposed cloth in a bow to keep it all together. Tip: Consider Marcella Hazen’s recipe. The butter will have to come later, but add in a bottle of red blend wine. A generous splash or two gives the sauce a deeper flavor, and the remaining wine is ready to serve at dinner. • If your fisherman’s tackle box or creel is getting a little too, well, fishy, buy a new one, and fill it with bobbers, fishing line, lures, a stringer and more. Tip: Don’t forget a little container of Bactine and bandages. It can get rough out there on the water or in the boat.

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• Remember maps? You know, the kind that were improperly refolded and tucked ( jammed) into cars’ glove or side door compartments. If your maps have been replaced by phone apps, give them new life as wrapping paper, especially for travelers, who no doubt, are chomping at the bit to get driving, flying or however they get going! Tip: Travel cubes aren’t just a trend; they’re a necessity for anyone on the go. Fill them with travel-size goodies, and use the map to wrap. • Who doesn’t love gift wrap with a purpose? Gather or print out coloring contest forms from local newspapers, businesses or towns. Wrap up a kid’s (or kid at heart's) gift, and the material can be used later as an art project. • On a similar note, grab the sports section of your favorite newspaper (or magazine!) to use for any athlete’s perfect present. Tip: Fold the paper into an envelope for a gift card to a local sporting goods store.

Our child-led, Reggio Emilia inspired curriculum fully prepares children for kindergarten, while encouraging exploration, discovery, and curiosity.

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WOODBURYMAG.COM | 19


D E PA R T M E N T S

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DOING GOOD

Love Thy Neighbor

Share traditions, celebrate the holidays and create memories with those around you. BY AVA DIAZ

THE HOLIDAY SEASON

brings forth a variety of traditional celebrations and a part of loving thy neighbor is acknowledging their differing cultures, practices and beliefs. “I think that it is necessary to recognize that we all don’t celebrate the same thing, but the fact that we all have the opportunity to celebrate is important,” community Chaplin with the Jewish Family Service of St. Paul Rabbi Lynn Liberman BCC says. “Everybody should be able to observe their traditions in the way that they would like to, without fear or intimidation.” Learn more about the different ways our community members connect with one another during the holiday season.

"Our residents love it and they keep and cherish [holiday mail]. It lifts their spirit as well." —Margaret Wachholz

Commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, Hanukkah is an eight-day celebration that honors the miracle of the oil and the victory for everyone to have opportunity to celebrate religious freedom. Through a lit Hannukiah (a specialized menorah), spinning dreidels, fried potato pancakes and jelly-filled donuts, this home-based celebration represents the fundamental message of “light into freedom,” represented by the Hannukiah, and “joy,” represented by food, Rabbi Liberman says. Though Hanukkah is a holiday that the religion doesn’t want to overemphasize, it has become a more prominent holiday due to its proximity to Christmas. With this exposure, Rabbi Liberman emphasizes the need for all to acknowledge varying cultural traditions during this season. Through the universal idea of granting freedom for all to safety worship, she says that Hanukkah celebrations are most welcome for everyone to share and join together. JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE OF ST. PAUL

1633 Seventh St. W., St. Paul 651.698.0767 jfssp.org

LETTERS OF LOVE

In an effort to connect generations with one another, the Woodbury Senior Living Community encourages com-

20 | DECEMBER 2020

munity members to reach out to seniors via snail mail. Sending anything that you feel compelled to share, such as photos, artwork, hand-written letters or poetry, provides a refreshing glimmer of happiness to the seniors. “Our residents love it and they keep and cherish them,” campus marketing director at Woodbury Senior Living Margaret Wachholz says. “It lifts their

spirit as well.” After sending your letter to the home, staff members evenly distribute the mail to the seniors across the three buildings. So grab the pencils and markers, and consider sending some holiday mail! WOODBURY SENIOR LIVING

7012 Lake Road woodburyseniorliving.com 651.735.6000

PHOTO COURTESY OF WOODBURY SENIOR LIVING

HANUKKAH


MADE WITH LOVE

Woodbury resident Samia Abdelal shares her family’s traditional, yet simple Egyptian cookie recipe. With memories of baking these sweet treats with her mother during the holiday season, Abdelal says these cookies are meant to be shared and enjoyed by your loved ones. So bake a batch, and deliver them to your neighbors, friends and family.

GHORAYEBA COOKIE Serving size: 60 small sized cookies or 30 large cookies

4 cups all-purpose flour 2 cups unsalted butter 1 cup powdered sugar 2 Tbsp. milk or ½ cup dried milk (optional but highly recommended, this gives the cookies a richer flavor) A pinch of salt 1 tsp. vanilla Unsalted roasted peeled almonds or pistachios Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Whip room temperature butter in a large electric mixing bowl until light and fluffy. Add powdered sugar and vanilla, continue whipping on low speed until well blended. In a separate bowl, combine flour, salt and milk, and gradually add to the whipped mixture. Mix until a dough-like consistency is formed. Remove the dough from the bowl and knead until it has a soft and moist consistency. Roll one tablespoon of dough into a ball and place onto a cookie sheet, one inch apart, and press lightly into the center of the ball. (If the dough cracks after pressing, add a splash of room temperature milk to the dough to increase moisture.) Top each cookie with an almond, pistachio or nut of choice. Bake 8–10 minutes, or until the cookies are firm and the bottoms are golden brown. Remove from oven and rest until cooled.

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WOODBURYMAG.COM | 21


TA S T E

| D E PA R T M E N T S

Non-Alcoholic Punch

BY NINA RAEMONT PHOTOS BY TATE CARLSON

22 | DECEMBER 2020

Big Batch Beverages Self-serve cocktails are the season’s best guests.


Making Room Christmas Eve In-Person Worship

Wednesday, Dec. 23 – 5:00 & 7:00 p.m. & Thursday, Dec. 24 – 1:00, 3:00, 5:00 & 7:00 p.m. Registration required for In-Person services—for details, or to watch services online and on-demand, go to

www.kingofkingswoodbury.org THE COUNTDOWN STARTS NOW— time to eat, drink and be merry—with December holidays and New Year’s all in the mix. Speaking of mix, how about hosts gift themselves with big batch beverage recipes, which add extra cheer to any gathering? Signature cocktails have become de rigueur at home events, and we’re not complaining. But standing post at the beverage cart or bar area can take the fun out of any party for the host. By offering big batch beverages, hosts can mix and mingle, rather than mix, serve and repeat. John Farrell of Haskell’s Wine and Spirits offer beverage recipe recommendations to not only spice up the holiday season, but also to save time and money.

NON-ALCOHOLIC PUNCH

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Cheers to a fruity drink for the tots, teens and teetotalers. A day before: Using a Bundt cake pan, add a variety of fruits (berries and orange and apple slices)—the more the merrier. Fill the pan with water to cover the fruit; put in the freezer. The day of serving: In a punch bowl, add 2 liters of Sprite and 2–3 oz. of grenadine syrup; stir together. Take the Bundt pan out of the freezer, remove the ice mold from the pan, and place the ice mold in the punch bowl. The ice mold will not only serve as a beautiful centerpiece to your liquified work of art, but it will also keep the drink cold.

@

Contact Brooke Beise 612.548.3208 brooke.beise @tigeroak.com

WOODBURYMAG.COM | 23


TA S T E

|

CONTINUED

Mulled Wine

24 | DECEMBER 2020


Dr. Dan Ehrmanntraut, DDS

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“Rosemary, bourbon and maple syrup— how can you go wrong?” Farrell says. • • • • • • • •

2 oz. simple syrup 2 sprigs fresh rosemary 4 oz. bourbon 2 oz. fresh lemon juice 2 tsp. orange marmalade 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 1 Tbsp. fresh orange juice 1 egg white

Boil simple syrup and one sprig of rosemary in a small saucepan; cool. Discard rosemary, and transfer syrup to a cocktail shaker with bourbon, lemon juice and marmalade. Add ice, shake until chilled, and strain into a highball glass filled with ice. Add maple syrup, orange juice and egg white to the shaker; shake until frothy. Spoon the froth over the top of the cocktail; garnish with remaining rosemary sprig.

MULLED WINE

Here’s a perfect excuse get the slow cooker away from the entrée and into the beverage mix. Mulling spices are available at most wine stores during the holiday season, but if you can’t find them, put star anise, cinnamon, cloves and allspice in a tied cheese cloth. Add a bottle or two of red wine to your crockpot or slow cooker of choice. Add the mulling spices. Use the lowest setting, and warm the wine, making sure to not boil or cook the beverage. Serve in your favorite mugs.

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BeCharming.com WOODBURYMAG.COM | 25


HUNTING FOR HERITAGE Woodbury native travels the world through unique social experiences.

written by Hailey Almsted photos by Tormod Leet

26 | DECEMBER 2020


D

ylan Eike has always had a knack for adventure. From traveling and odd gigs to his personable and loving character, he’s on a constant hunt for the next antic. But after driving across the country in the Planters NUTmobile, working with Discovery, Inc. and starring on a Norwegian reality TV show, Eike’s unsure of what’s the next path less traveled.

WOODBURYMAG.COM | 27


28 | DECEMBER 2020


DYLAN EIKE

BOTTOM LEFT PHOTO IS COURTESY OF KRAFT HEINZ COMPANY

(bottom right) with Alt For Norge castmates (left) and with the Planters brand specialists (bottom left).

GROWING UP IN WOODBURY, Eike participated in youth sports, as well as student council and theater at East Ridge High School, where he was part of the first graduating class in 2011. “Every time I’m back in Woodbury, I see that it’s constantly evolving and changing … I love to see it, because [Woodbury] will always be my home.” After high school graduation and a quick semesterlong stint at a small private college in North Carolina, he found himself another home at the University of Missouri. There, Eike participated in a fraternity and helped to plan the biggest Greek event of the year; he was also a tour guide and orientation leader, convincing people to love “Mizzou” just as much as he does. “[The University of Missouri] shaped me and made me feel comfortable with myself,” Eike says. “I lived closeted for most of my life and I just found a lot of people who accepted me as I am.” Post-graduation, Eike landed a job as a Planters Peanutter (a brand specialist) with the Planters NUTmobile—a 26-foot long, 13,000-pound peanutshaped vehicle—where he and other recent graduates drove around the country, traveling to events, promotional appearances and even celebrating Mr. Peanuts 100th birthday. “We would go to grocery stores or make a news appearance … We also worked the NHL All-Star game and went on Good Morning America,” he says. Following his travel around the continental U.S., he traveled Europe and moved to Washington D.C. for a public relations internship. Just four months later, he began work at Discovery, Inc. as a media coordinator , running on-air advertisements and working with the network creatives to execute advertisement visions. “After traveling for a year, moving around and missing the birth of both my niece and nephew, I decided I wanted to move back home,” Eike says. Eike settled with his parents in Cottage Grove, where he began working at an advertising agency and eventually Woodbury’s Cycle Bar. With eagerness looming around the corner, Eike knew it was time for his next adventure. “I always find myself in wild adventures and weird situations,” he says. “And that’s my whole joke … I always say, ‘Stay tuned for what comes next!’” What came next is his reality TV debut, when he applied to join the cast of Norwegian TV show Alt For Norge—a reality show featuring Norwegian Americans interested in learning about Norwegian history and culture, with a chance to reunite with distant

WOODBURYMAG.COM | 29


NORWEGIAN If you’ve ever fancied Germanic languages, Norwegian may be the one for you! Here are a few common Norwegian phrases from a personalized book, which Eike received as a parting gift from Alt for Norge. Hei Hi Hadet Goodbye Hvordan går det? How are you? Ja Yes Jeg elsker Norge! I love Norway! Jeg elsker deg I love you Jeg heter My name is Jeg snakker bare litt norsk I only speak a little Norwegian. Morn Good morning Natta Good night Nei No Unnskyld I’m sorry

30 | DECEMBER 2020

Norwegian relatives. The application process required him to gather more information on his family, including family trees and birth certificates. “It already started to uncover things I didn’t know about my family,” he says. He was then brought out to Chicago, Ill. to meet with show executives, but later discovered he wasn’t cast. “I was so excited, because I put all my eggs into one basket,” Eike says. “But I’m not one to give up easily, and if I want something, I get it.” The following year, open casting calls for season 10 were held at Mall of America, where Eike ended up repeating the nearly six-month-long application process. “I was on the rooftop of a parking garage when I received the call,” he says. “There’s snow all around and the casting director said, ‘Pack your bags,’ and I screamed at the top of my lungs and teared up.” Eike received the call in March and traveled to Norway the following May. Ten contestants made up the cast, alongside the “show mamas,” who tell the contestants things like where to be and what to wear. Comparing the show to The Amazing Race combined with Who Do You

Think You Are?, Eike says the premise is team competitions and challenges, sending home one competitor every other week until the finals. “Toward the beginning, I was so unsure of myself and so rattled,” Eike says. “During the first challenge, I thought ‘Oh my gosh, I’m going home first,’ and that was my greatest fear. But something in me said ‘This is my moment and I’m going to grab it.’” Although Eike thought he was headed home first, he placed second overall, saying the experience was beyond incredible. “I came back a changed person … You come back with clarity,” he says. “I had that clarity when I came out, and this felt like a new coming out. I became more familiar with myself and allowed my family to become more familiar with our family name as well.” “But I am incredibly lucky and every day I think about all of my amazing experiences,” Eike says. “I pinch myself and that puts everything into perspective. Some people will never even get to do one of these things, so I must humble myself … I’m just so thankful for the experiences and my parents for raising me to throw myself into anything.”


MINNESOTA’S NORWEIGANAMERICAN COMMUNITY According to the most recent U.S. census, there are more than 4.5 million NorwegianAmericans living in the United States, with most living in the Midwest. In Minnesota, one in six state residents claim Norwegian ancestry. If you’re interested in learning more about your potential ancestry, check out these Minnesota resources.

NORWAY HOUSE

According to Minneapolis’ Norway House, the organization is dedicated to “Establishing, renewing and advancing connections between contemporary Norway and the United States ...” There are several programs, including the Gallery at Norway House, the Minnesota Peace Initiative and the Edvard Grieg Music Initiative—all of which invite guests to experience art, design and music. Norway House 913 East Franklin Ave., Mpls. 612.871.2211 // norwayhouse.org

NORWEGIAN LUTHERAN CHURCH

Standing next to the Norway House is Den Norske Lutherske Mindekirken, the Norwegian Lutheran Church. Founded in 1922 by Norwegian immigrants who wished to worship in their native tongue, the church offers worship in both languages (English and Norwegian) and serves as a link between the Midwest and Norway. Mindekirken 924 East 21st St., Mpls. 612.874.0716 // mindekirken.net

SONS OF NORWAY

Founded in Minnesota in 1895 by 18 Norwegian immigrants, the Sons of Norway was a fraternal benefit society, aimed at protecting members from financial hardships. Now, the purpose includes preserving Norwegian heritage and culture. Sons of Norway 1455 W. Lake St., Mpls. 612.827.3611 // sofn.com

in digital format! Never miss an issue of Woodbury Magazine with free, anytime access to our digital editions. Full screen viewing on your digital device allows easy cover-to-cover reading. You can zoom in on text or images as well as share your favorite Woodbury Magazine stories with friends and family.

Learn more at woodburymag.com WOODBURYMAG.COM | 31


DON’T harvest and prune spruce and pine trees from your landscape, this pruning can damage growth points and distort growth. You can rob a few pinecones and interesting twigs. Those bits of nature won’t mind.

32 | DECEMBER 2020


k c e D s l l Ha the

Here’s your one stop shop for all winter greenery questions.

W

inter scenes of magnificent evergreens dusted with snow are a hallmark of the holiday season. As we make both the outdoor and indoor spaces of our homes festive and cozy, there’s no better way to harness some of that majesty than by incorporating winter greenery into your decorating. To give you the best tips on greenery, we chatted with Gerten’s gardening expert Cindy Wellman.

Vivian Shinall photos by Sarah Dovolos written by

WOODBURYMAG.COM | 33


GREENERY DO’S AND DON’TS DO add fresh greenery to your winterscape, it is about six months till you can plant fresh color again. DO embrace and enjoy the cold weather. It’s what keeps our fresh greens outdoors beautiful all the way through March! DO choose cold weather tolerant containers that can handle our freeze and thaws.

*** DON’T skimp. You will be enjoying these containers as much as your spring, summer and fall ones. DON’T use hot burning lights in your fresh greens, they can be a fire hazard. Opt for LED lights instead. DON’T be afraid to create your own winter pots, and décor. There are no rights or wrongs when it comes to design!

34 | DECEMBER 2020

DO be sure to add some bling, natural accents, ribbons and lights to add interest and personality.


Woodbury Magazine: What are the best options for greenery? Cindy Wellman: Spruce tips are a well-known staple when it comes to fresh greenery. These are harvested from boughs and hold up well in winter decorating outdoors. In addition, homeowners can expect to find a wide variety of pine, juniper, cedar, spruce, balsam as well as accent winter greenery including magnolia, oregonia, eucalyptus, dogwood branches, winterberry and birch poles. WM: Where can we include greenery around the house? CW: Although porch pots are the most popular way to use fresh greenery, decorating can go further for added interest! Drape railings and mantels with garland, adorn your dining table for guests, hang swags and wreaths on walls indoor and out, and don’t forget light poles and mailbox posts to complete the look.

easily used outdoors and provide you with a more cost-effective, natural look while giving that wonderful evergreen fragrance. If you choose to use fresh winter greenery and accents indoors, just know it will not be long lasting and should be used with caution around hot lights and candles. WM: When nervous about greenery drying out and needles dropping. What to do? CW: Many homeowners will wonder if their fresh greenery will last through the winter without drying. Most fresh greens inserted

CUTOUT COURTESY OF GERTENS

WM: Should we use artificial or real greenery? CW: The question often arises, should I use fresh or fake greenery to decorate? Each of these have their place. Indoors, fake or life-like greenery can provide a long-lasting look without drying inside your home. Many textures and types of greenery have been manufactured that look and feel very real. Everything from trees and wreaths to garlands and smaller picks can be used for simple decorating without drying and shedding inside. Typically, the cost will be much higher than fresh product, but longevity is important. Fresh greenery can be

WOODBURYMAG.COM | 35


DO use a variety of textures, colors and greenery to make your containers pop with interest.

36 | DECEMBER 2020

natural, over time for fresh greenery to shed a bit, simple sweeping will remedy that. WM: What’s the best way to secure the greenery? CW: When creating porch pots, inserting the greenery snuggly into potting soil, and moistening the soil when complete will freeze it into place for the winter months. Use wire, twist ties and even cable ties to hold accents like pinecones, berries, ribbons, lights and garlands where you want them.

GERTEN’S 5500 Blaine Ave. E., Inver Grove Heights gertens.com // 651.450.1501 Gertens @gertens_ @Gertens

CUTOUT COURTESY OF GERTENS

into soil will, absolutely! That is why it is very important when creating winter green containers that you fresh cut the stems and insert them into potting soil and moisten the soil not only to freeze them into place but to also supply a bit of moisture. Since greenery is a fresh product, it can dry out under certain conditions, such as greenery you hang. If your area is a west or south exposure, and has drying winter winds, you may wish to spray your foliage with an antidesiccant such as Wilt Stop. This natural wax coating will help to prevent premature drying out of the greenery. It is



WOODBURY CARES PROGRAM

ARTIS SENIOR LIVING CARES ABOUT WOODBURY As we look back over our lives, it’s our experiences, achievements and pastimes that define who we are. While a person’s needs change and memories fade, the core of a person’s identity and their passions remain. That is the foundation of The Artis Way, our approach to Memory Care Assisted Living provided within a secure, intuitively designed community. Artis has over 20 communities in operation in various regions of the United States. Artis Senior Living of Woodbury broke ground in 2019 and opened in June 2020 with the mission of helping those with Alzheimer’s and other dementias live a richer, more fulfilling lifestyle. We have several Artis associates and leadership team members who have long histories of raising families and working in Woodbury. Some, in fact, know exactly why Radio Drive is called Radio Drive! (KDWB was totally rockin’ in the 70’s right in Woodbury.) It’s the people of Woodbury that make this community such an inviting place to come to work.

We have been welcomed with open arms by the city, the Chamber of Commerce, faith communities and public services. We know how hard the journey of dementia is and we know it truly takes a village of support to deal with it. We want to be your community partner by providing free monthly educational and support events for families, caregivers and professionals. We are also launching an Action Team through ACT on Alzheimer’s in partnership with Woodbury Thrives, to bring dementiafriendly initiatives to the City of Woodbury to enhance the lives of residents who are living with dementia. We are thrilled to be working on this project with great volunteers from all aspects of Woodbury’s community; residents, businesses, nonprofits, county, health care and senior services because when we raise up a few, we lift the whole boat!

“We know how hard the journey of dementia is and we know it truly takes a village of support to deal with it."

8155 AFTON RD WOODBURY, MN 55125 612-444-9286 WWW.THEARTISWAY.COM/WOODBURYMAGAZINE


ON THE TOWN W H AT ’ S G O I N G O N I N W O O D B U R Y

Celebrating from Home Make New Year’s memories from home this year with these tips.

W

ho says you can’t ring in the new year from the comfort of your own home? Hunker down for a cozy celebration this winter without compromising any of the fun. Pop the Champagne, or the sparkling apple cider, and be merry with these family-friendly New Year’s activities.

MAKE DINNER AN EXPERIENCE

Just because you’re at home doesn’t mean you need to be in sweats. Make the night feel special by having everyone dress in their best black-tie attire (sparkles encouraged).

Let the family pick from a buffet of goodies without breaking a sweat making dinner. Instead of a traditional meal, opt for a night of appetizers. Take a trip down your local freezer aisle and grab pigs in a blanket, shrimp cocktail supplies and whatever small bites that catch your eye.

DO HOURLY ACTIVITIES

COLLECT YOUR THOUGHTS

Each hour on the hour leading up to

Encourage your family to sit down

MAKE IT A FORMAL AFFAIR ISTOCK.COM/ RGSTUDIO

midnight, play a fun game to ramp up the anticipation. The possibilities are endless, think Minute To Win It style (cup stacking contests, egg-spoon races, trivia games, etc.).

and think back on the year. What went well? What are you grateful for? What are you looking forward to in the new year? While New Year’s resolutions are often quickly forgotten, entering the year thoughtfully can set you off on the right foot. CHEAT THE COUNTDOWN For families with rambunctious kids (who may not know everything about time zones yet), turn on the countdown from New York to give them the full countdown experience, while still getting the kiddos in bed at a decent hour. Added bonus, you can celebrate the real countdown in peace. —Vivian Shinall

WOODBURYMAG.COM | 39


O N T H E TOW N

COMPILED BY SAMANTHA DELEON, ANITA STASSON AND HANNAH TIERNEY

bird hike at Washington County Parks. All levels of bird watchers are welcomed out for the opportunity to get up close with nature. Free with parking permit ($7 daily). 9–10:30 a.m. 1515 Keats Ave. N., Lake Elmo; 651.430.8370; co.washington.mn.us

28 Artrageous!

Young artists in the making will learn about the Pop Art movement by creating outrageous pizza pillows, clay candy creations, a self-portrait and more! In this camp, kids will explore many art techniques, including collage, drawing, sculpting and painting. Ages 5–12. $78. 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Kidcreate Art Studio, 1785 Radio Drive; 651.735.0880; kidcreate.com

A

lthough Santa’s world is looking a little different nowadays, he and his elves are taking a toy break to celebrate with cookies and crafts! Kiddos will have the chance to tell Santa their Christmas wishes and take a sociallydistanced photo together. Santa’s elves are even packing a special take-home bag full of cookies and a recipe for Santa’s all-time favorite cookies! Recommended ages 2 and up with an adult. $8 per child (only children need to register). Saturday, December 5, 9 a.m.–12:50 p.m. Eagle Valley Golf Course Banquet Room, 2600 Double Eagle Lane; 651.714.3583; woodburyrecreation.com —Hailey Almsted

LOCAL EVENTS

4–18 Ninja Training

Ninja Obstacle Training is a fun and unique way to develop confidence, strength and friendships. Rec teams will learn techniques to develop their ninja skills with over 40 different obstacles. Ages 6­–13. $163. 5–6 p.m. Conquer Ninja Gyms Woodbury, 707 Commerce Drive Suite 120, Woodbury; 952.378.1285; conquerninja.com

7–14 Line Dancing

Grab your best pair of boots and your cowbody hat because it’s time to line dance! Listen to music while dancing in line with Tracia Woods her team of all professional ballroom, Latin, swing

and country dance instructors on Mondays. All ages. $10 per person, per week. 4:45–5:30 p.m. Dance and Entertainment Studios, 6063 Hudson Road Suite 110; 651.605.5784; danceandentertainment.com

10 Pallet Workshop

Come and get crafty with over 200 projects to choose from! You select the design, stain and paint color to make your own of a kind sign. All ages. Price ranges vary. 6:30–9 p.m. 3rd Act Craft Brewery, 4120 Radio Drive, Woodbury; 763.898.2482; greenmartinipaintco.com

19 Bird Hike

Take to the outdoors and take a guided

AREA EVENTS

1–31 Gingerbread Wonderland

The sixth annual Gingerbread Wonderland returns to the Gallery at Norway House. From local bakeries to first-time gingerbread makers and families, all are encouraged to enter their tasty cookie-creations. All ages. By appointment only. $10 general admission, $5 members, seniors and children, ages 4 and under free. Norway House, 913 E. Franklin Ave., Mpls.; 612.871.2211; norwayhouse.org

4 European Christmas Market

Shop for unique, handmade holiday gifts and decorations from local vendors, based on festive Christkindlmarkets that pop up in Germany, Austria and all over Europe, over three full weekends starting December 4. All ages. Free. 4–9 p.m. Union Depot East Plaza, 240 E. Kellogg Blvd., St. Paul; 651.647.6250; stpaulchristmasmarket.org

TO HAVE YOUR EVENT CONSIDERED email woodburymag@tigeroak.com by the 10th of the month three months prior to publication.

Due to the fluidity being experienced in the current environment, please note that some events/dates and even some business operations may have changed since these pages went to print. Please visit woodburymag.com for updates.

40 | DECEMBER 2020

ISTOCK.COM/GRAFNER

Cookies and Crafts


Start your year with a new career! n o w h i r i n g c o m pa s s i o n at e c a r e g i v e r s at s a i n t t h e r e s e

Our senior community is thoughtfully integrated with a wealth of amenities, services and access to a full continuum of care so we’re with our residents every step of the way.

@SaintThereseMN

We strive to make every day special for our team just as we do for seniors. Employees are cherished members of our community— each bringing unique values and a voice to drive our mission. It’s something we celebrate by providing benefits and resources that make Saint Therese a great place to work and grow.

See openings & apply: sainttherese.org/careers Call us anytime for assistance: 651.209.9100 Warmly welcoming all

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Financing solutions as unique as

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Raise Your Expectations

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Vice President, Commercial Banking Officer NMLS 1053166 (651) 200-4022

WOODBURYMAG.COM | 41


GALLERY

PARKER GOLF PHOTOGRAPHY

Royal Dog Days

The Royal Club helped to officially launch Minneapolis-based pet-calming CBD brand Kradle at the Royal Dog Days event in October. Forty-five dogs (and their families!) joined in Lake Elmo for a day of golf, food, fun and a dog costume contest. The Kradle King and Queen were crowned by Crunch, the Minnesota Timberwolves mascot.

To view more pictures from these events, as well as others, visit woodburymag.com. To have your event considered send date, time, location and contact information to woodburymag@tigeroak.com.

42 | DECEMBER 2020


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TA S T E M A K E R S

SMOKED GOUDA FONDUE

44 | DECEMBER 2020


Liquid Gold MELT THAT CHEESE, CUBE SOME BREAD, IT’S TIME FOR FONDUE. BY NANCY EIKE

PHOTOS BY TATE CARLSON

Spending an evening gathered around a bubbling fondue pot of melted cheese with some delicious dippers in which to sop up that glorious cheesy goodness, well, the winter months don’t get much better than that. Add a deliciously decadent chocolate fondue with an assortment of fruit, pound cake and scintillating sweets for dessert, and you’ve got yourself, in the words of Heidi Rathbun, FoodE expert with Lunds & Byerlys, a “FUN-Do.” And a super easy one at that. Lucky for us, Rachael Perron, culinary and branding director for Kowalski’s Markets, and the aforementioned Rathbun, share a few of their favorite cheese and chocolate fondue recipes, along with practical tips to help your next fondue night come off without a hitch. And Perron offers up some tasty morsels of history and interesting insight into the craze that has its culinary roots in the cloud-kissed mountains, hills and plains of Switzerland, when Swiss folks were looking for a way to use their day-old bread and leftover cheese. So, melt that cheese, cube some bread, cut some fruit and get that chocolate a-melting, because it’s time for fondue.

FONDUE FUN FACTS Submitted by Rachael Perron • Fondue is a European tradition that made its way into the United States in the 1960s. It has its history in and is to this day enjoyed widely in Switzerland, Italy and France. It’s an unpretentious, simple and uniquely fun dish that amounts to little more than melted cheese served in a communal pot. • The term fondue is often generalized to include any dish in which food is dipped into a pot of hot liquid such as chocolate, oil or broth. Nonetheless, traditional cheese fondue is by far the most popular type of fondue. • The French name for a fondue pot is caquelon, but you don’t need one to enjoy fondue. Small slow cookers are very effective at keeping fondue warm for serving. A makeshift double boiler for gently cooking the fondue and melting the cheese is easy to create on a stovetop with a bowl set over a pot of simmering water. With care, fondue can even be made directly in a saucepan over very low heat. • The introduction of cornstarch to Switzerland in 1905 made it easier to make a smooth and stable emulsion of wine and cheese and probably contributed to the success of fondue in the years that followed. It was promoted as a Swiss national dish by the Swiss Cheese Union in the 1930s as a way of increasing cheese consumption.

WOODBURYMAG.COM | 45


TA S T E M A K E R S

— RECIPES FOR YOUR NEXT FONDUE NIGHT — Classic Fondue

Smoked Gouda Fondue

Serves 6

Serves 6

• 1 clove garlic, crushed

• 1 clove garlic, halved

• 1 cup dry white wine

• ¾ cup dry white wine

• 1 Tbsp. cornstarch

• 1 ½ tsp. fresh lemon juice

• 2 Tbsp. cold water

• 8 oz. finely shredded Swiss Gruyère cheese

• ⅓ lb. grated Emmental cheese

• 4 oz. finely shredded smoked Gouda cheese

• ⅓ lb. grated Gruyère cheese

• 1 Tbsp. flour

• ⅓ lb. soft cheese, such as Kowalski’s brie, rind removed

Rub the inside of a medium saucepan with cut sides of

• ½ tsp. Kirsch, to taste

garlic; discard garlic. Add wine and lemon juice to the

• 1 pinch freshly grated nutmeg

pan; bring to a simmer over medium heat. Reduce heat

• freshly ground Kowalski’s black peppercorns, to

to medium-low. In medium mixing bowl, toss cheeses

taste • dippers, your choice: lightly toasted French

with flour. Add cheese mixture to the saucepan in handfuls, stirring constantly after each addition until

or pumpernickel bread, cornichons (French gher-

cheese is melted and smooth. Transfer to a small slow

kins), boiled new potatoes and raw or blanched

cooker or fondue pot for serving; serve immediately

vegetables such as carrots, asparagus, broccoli or cauliflower

Rub the inside of a fondue pot or saucepan with

Chocolate Fondue Serves 4–6

crushed garlic; discard garlic. Add wine; bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Dissolve cornstarch in

• ¾ cup heavy cream

water; whisk into wine. Bring to a boil; cook for 2 min.

• 4 oz. 70 percent bittersweet chocolate

Reduce heat to low; whisk in cheeses a bit at a time. Stir in Kirsch; season with nutmeg and pepper. Serve hot with your choice of dippers.

Blue Cheese Fondue Serves 6

(if using a chocolate bar, break into smaller pieces) • 8 oz. 60 percent semisweet chocolate (if using a chocolate bar, break into smaller pieces) • 1 Tbsp. unsalted butter • 4 Tbsp. liqueur (see note below) • dippers, your choice: berries (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries), bananas, pretzels, brownie bites, pound cake, caramels,

• 1 tsp. cornstarch

cookies (shortbread, Madeleine, meringue),

• ½ cup sweet white wine, divided

doughnuts, biscotti, marshmallows, banana bread,

• 1 lb. crumbled creamy blue cheese

candied fruits, etc.

In a small mixing dish, stir together cornstarch and

Place the cream in a medium saucepan; bring to a sim-

1 Tbsp. wine; set aside. In a medium saucepan over

mer over medium heat. Reduce heat to low; add choc-

medium heat, heat remaining wine; bring to a sim-

olate and whisk until smooth—do not rush this part.

mer. Reduce heat to low; add cornstarch mixture and

Remove from heat; whisk in butter until smooth. Whisk

cheese to the saucepan, stirring constantly until cheese

in liqueur until incorporated and smooth. Transfer to a

is melted and smooth. Transfer to a small slow cooker

fondue pot; serve with desired dippers.

or fondue pot for serving; serve immediately.

Liqueur flavors: The flavor can reflect your occasion and/or favorite dipping options. Some flavored liqueur options include orange, coffee, chocolate, hazelnut, almond, raspberry, vanilla, crème de menthe and Irish cream.

Kowalski’s Market 8505 Valley Creek Road; kowalskis.com Lunds & Byerlys 7050 Valley Creek Plaza; lundsandbyerlys.com

46 | DECEMBER 2020


CHOCOLATE FONDUE

HELPFUL HINTS Submitted by Heidi Rathbun • Slow and steady wins the race. Never rush fondue with higher than recipe-specified temperatures. Although some recipes can be a bit more forgiving and made in a saucepan. A bain Marie (double boiler) can also be used. Some fondue pots have a cook setting, be sure to follow manufacturer’s instructions. • Use quality ingredients. Good ingredients = great taste. • Know your crowd. Is the occasion casual or formal? Does anyone have a food allergy (nuts, gluten, dairy, etc.)? Should alcohol be left out of the recipe? • Make sure your fondue is “Fun-Do!” Read through your recipe and prepare all ingredients first. Have your dippers ready before beginning fondue. In other words, prep for success.

WOODBURYMAG.COM | 47


LAST GLANCE HONORABLE MENTION Activities & Events

Snow Aglow Manjinder Kaur captures everyday winter splendor in this late-night shot. BY VIVIAN SHINALL | PHOTO BY MANJINDER KAUR

EVERY MINNESOTAN KNOWS THE FEELING. You’re all cozy by the fire, perhaps enjoying a good book and getting ready to bring your evening to a close, when your peace is broken by a sudden blizzard. For those who like to get ahead of the game and cut down their workload for the next morning, it’s boots on and hustle out to plow the snow. Manjinder Kaur’s husband is captured here in one such situation. “My husband was clearing our driveway of snow … I noticed that the light from our street lamp made the snow look like it was glowing,” says Kaur. This photo was awarded an honorable mention in the 2019 Focus on Woodbury Photo Contest in the Activities & Events category, which is no surprise given the everyday majesty it captures. “I love the way the light looks through the snow, it’s a truly magical effect that we don’t see often,” Kaur says. Although Kaur is not a photographer by trade, it’s her passion, and she finds herself picking up her camera, a Nikon D810 for this photo, whenever she gets the chance.

48 | DECEMBER 2020


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Holiday Season!

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6 1 2 - 9 8 7 - 6 8 3 5 • K I M @ K I M Z I TO N . C O M W W W. K I M Z I TO N . C O M