Woodbury October 2020

Page 1

OCTOBER 2020

16 BRIDGEMAN’S ICE CREAM PARLOR OPENS

34 LOCAL ARTIST CREATES HANDMADE SIGNS

Woodbury Magazine FRESH TAKES ON TRADITION // MANTELS AND HEARTHS // STATEMENT SIGNS

Mantels & Hearths

Highlight this architectural focal point to create a warm and welcoming atmosphere

woodburymag.com


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Who You Work With Matters! wade hanson & Associates

luxury broker w w w. Wa d e H a n s o n . c o m

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SERVING FAMILIES OF THE WOODBURY COMMUNITY SINCE 1997 Over 2800 Homes Sold!

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CONTENTS

“You can restyle your mantel each season in order to serve as an ever-changing design feature.” —Brittany Meidinger, Twigg + Lu PAGE 25

PAGE 16

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CASE STUDY: Phillip and Jennifer are making the big move back to Minnesota from Detroit... during a pandemic... NO WORRIES! WE HAVE IMPLEMENTED VIRTUAL SHOWINGS. WE’LL TAKE CARE OF EVERYTHING!

OCT/NOV ’20 October marks a seasonal change, but also a time to redecorate your home—and that’s what we’re showcasing in our special homes edition.

in every issue 6 EDITOR’S LETTER 9 NOTEWORTHY

“Angela helped us find the home of our dreams! She was very responsive and helpful whenever we had questions about any detail with house buying. She is extremely knowledgeable about the current market and helped us make an informed decision. She understood the desires we had for a new home and helped us navigate the sale with ease. She was also proactive with negotiating a great price for us. As a first time house buyer I would definitely recommend her and I will without a doubt use her again in the future!” - Jennifer & Phillip

39 ON THE TOWN 42 GALLERY 44 TASTEMAKERS 48 LAST GLANCE

departments

Angela@SadatSells.com | 651.246.2739 | SadatSells.com

14 SCENE

Leaving a Legacy

Afton vineyard owner branches into winemaking.

16 TASTE

For Old Times Sake Bridgeman’s Ice Cream Parlor is bringing back a classic taste to Woodbury.

18 ENLIGHTEN

TATE CARLSON, COURTESY OF BRIDGEMAN’S ICE CREAM

Money Matters

Schools and council make educational deposit in students’ personal finances.

features 20

Fresh Takes on Tradition

Hudson Flower Shop shares advice for caring for houseplants.

25

Mantels and Hearths

The Holidays are right around the corner. Call now to guarantee the install of YOUR early present.

Highlight this architectural focal point to create a warm and welcoming atmosphere.

34

Statement Signs

Local artist creates handmade signs that spruce up any space.

PREMIUM QUARTZ AND GRANITE COUNTERTOPS 1231 Industrial Street, Ste 100, Hudson WI 54016 info@gallery77stone.com | www.gallery77stone.com Design Center: 715-808-8232 WOODBURYMAG.COM | 5

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Love Woodbury Magazine?

from the ED ITOR

O

ctober officially marks the first full month of autumn, and I typically spend my days out and about exploring the fall foliage or cozied up with a read, making the most of my days until the inevitable cold arrives. So, as I go about my fall reading list, I wanted to share one with you—you may recognize the author, Helen Simonson, as the debut novelist of Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand. Simonson’s The Summer Before the War takes place in pre-World War I England, where the perfect summer is coming to an end. Beatrice Nash, a freethinking Latin teacher, arrives in the idyllic town of Rye and falls in with the Kents, an eccentric local family. As Beatrice settles into Rye, the imminence of war is descending, and the local men are eager to enlist. The blissful summer turns Follow us ! into the killing fields of France and the men of See what we’re doing behind the Beatrice’s life go off to war. scenes and around town! Though the premise may seem a bit jarring, fans woodburymag.com of historical drama, romance and Downton Abbey, Woodbury Magazine are sure to be enthralled. If you’re searching for a @wburymag @woodbury_mag good read this month, Simonson’s novel is it. You may even be tempted to start a virtual book-club, easily done by roping in your high-schooler, friends or coworkers. Meanwhile, you can read this October issue of Woodbury Magazine. This month, we feature the new Bridgeman’s Ice Cream Parlor (page 16), mantel and hearth decorating tips (page 25) and writer Ava Diaz chats with local sign maker Jessica Stegbauer of Rusty7s (page 34). And on page 44, fellow editors, Angela Johnson and Renée StewartHester, and I roundup a few festive bites for October 31st. Happy October, see you next month!

Get Connected & Find Upcoming local events Web exclusive articles Expanded versions of our print stories

Hailey Almsted, editor woodburymag@tigeroak.com

16 BRIDGEMAN’S ICE CREAM PARLOR OPENS

34 LOCAL ARTIST CREATES HANDMADE SIGNS

Woodbury Magazine

ON THE COVER

FRESH TAKES ON TRADITION // MANTELS AND HEARTHS // STATEMENT SIGNS

woodburymag.com

OCTOBER 2020

Visit us online for even more about Woodbury.

Mantle display woodburymag.com

page 25 TATE CARLSON

Mantels & Hearths

Highlight this architectural focal point to create a warm and welcoming atmosphere

PHOTO BY RACHEL NADEAU

PLUS Submit story ideas to Woodbury Magazine

6 | OCTOBER 2020

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[ VOL. 17

NO. 2 ]

woodburymag.com

SUSAN ISAY publisher

editor HAILEY ALMSTED managing editor ANGELA JOHNSON associate editor HAILEY ALMSTED digital editor ANTHONY BETTIN copy editor KELLIE DOHERTY staff writers AVA DIAZ contributing writers editorial interns

MADELINE KOPIECKI DONNA CHICONE RACHAEL PERRON JILL STRAND MARGARET WACHHOLZ NINA RAEMONT VIVIAN SHINALL KATELYN STORCH

FRESH IS

BEST

editorial advisory board PEPE BARTON, South Washington County Schools TANNER IGNASZWESKI, Woodbury High School MIKE LEWIS, 3P Boxing 24/7 LAURIE MORDORKI, Woodbury Lakes STACEY MORGAN, woodburykids.com MICHELLE OKADA, City of Woodbury Public Safety MARGARET WACHHOLZ, Woodbury Heritage Society, Woodbury Community Foundation, Woodbury Senior Living SARAH SORENSON-WAGNER, South Washington County Schools

senior managing art director art director lead staff photographer

7 0 5 0 VA L L E Y C R E E K P L A Z A W O O D B U R Y, M N 5 5 1 2 5 L U N D S A N D B Y E R LY S . C O M 651-999-1200

SARAH DOVOLOS EMILY HANDY TATE CARLSON

c reative services coordinator production director project coordinators

ALEX KOTLAREK

BRITTNI DYE ANGELA BEISSEL DEIDRA ANDERSON senior account executives BROOKE BEISE KATIE FREEMARK CYNTHIA HAMRE SARA JOHNSON

digital marketing manager

credit manager accountants receivable

president and ceo chief operating officer

KRISTIN MASTANTUONO APRIL MCCAULEY JARED LAWSON

R. CRAIG BEDNAR SUSAN ISAY

Woodbury Magazine

ONE TIGER OAK PLAZA 900 SOUTH THIRD STREET // MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55415 612.548.3180 SUBSCRIPTIONS: Woodbury Magazine is published 12 times a year. Rates $18 for 12 issues. Back issues $5.95. ©Tiger Oak Media Inc. 2020. All rights reserved.

The best care for your best friend. Hudson Road Animal Hospital 8154 Hudson Road, Woodbury 651-739-0117 hrahvet.com The Standard of Veterinary Excellence

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NOTEWORTHY W H AT ’ S G O I N G O N I N W O O D B U R Y

A Spooky Read Local writer’s new book is the perfect bone-chilling page-turner for fall.

As the temperature drops and leaves fall, there’s no better time to get your thriller fix. Published earlier this year, Kathryn Schleich’s new novel Salvation Station is perfect for mystery and crime fiction lovers. “As a crime novel, readers can expect murder, mystery and suspense set against the backdrop of a televangelist’s popular program,” Schleich says. As readers follow the interwoven plot lines of three different main characters, they’ll be challenged to think critically about religion in their own lives. The inspiration for this topic came in large part from Schleich’s own life experience during her 20-year marriage to a Catholic deacon. Schleich hopes that readers will take away a key message from the book: “To not blindly accept anything as truth ... I want to encourage readers to ask questions and think for themselves.” —Vivian Shinall

SALVATION STATION

To purchase this novel, and others, visit kathrynshleich.com GRUBER PHOTOGRAPHY

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N OT E WO RT H Y

FOOD

Transport Your Taste Buds Plan a culinary vacation in lieu of a getaway. I love to eat and I love to travel, so it makes sense that one of my favorite aspects of traveling, whether it be to Chicago, Nashville, San Diego or Iceland, is always the food. I plan visits to restaurants the way others plan visits to parks, museums and beaches. Some of my all-time favorite meals took place on vacations in Italy, Maui and New York City (at La Chiusa, Star Noodle and Bar Boulud, respectively). I’ve missed traveling and visiting restaurants as much as I used to. It’s hard to believe I haven’t been or eaten anywhere other than my sister’s lake cottage since March. I have, however, managed a few culinary vacations. I didn’t make it to Laos, Paris or Tokyo this year, but I did learn to make larb, bostock and blistered shishito peppers at home. I taught my son how to handmake pasta the way I learned to make it in the village of Figline Valdarno, in Tuscany. My daughter and I missed out on a longawaited trip to Spain this past June, so we took the opportunity to experience traditional Spanish ingredients and recipes with a party for two on our front porch. (Complete with crema Catalana cava, patatas bravas with smoked paprika aioli and chorizo meatballs with romesco sauce!) I can’t wait until I can revisit the New Scenic Café in Duluth and DanDan in Milwaukee or have my first taste of tapas in Barcelona. In the meantime, you’ll find me in White Bear Lake, whipping up Singapore noodles, potstickers, bucatini Bolognese and whatever else my wandering spirit craves.

RACHAEL PERRON is the culinary &

brand director for Kowalski’s Markets, where she specializes in product development and selection, culinary education and communications.

RASPBERRY BOSTOCK MAKES 12

6 oz. fresh raspberries ¼ cup plus 1 Tbsp. sugar, divided 1 cup almond flour 2 Tbsp. flour ¼ cup Kowalski’s unsalted butter, at room temperature 2 egg yolks ½ tsp. kosher salt ½ tsp. baking powder ½ tsp. Kowalski’s organic pure Madagascar vanilla xtract ¼ tsp. almond extract 1 loaf day-old challah bread (from the Artisan Bread Table) 9 oz. Kowalski’s raspberry jam Sliced almonds, for garnish Confectioner’s sugar, for garnish In a small mixing bowl, sprinkle raspberries with 1 Tbsp. sugar; stir, smashing berries lightly, and set aside. In a medium mixing bowl, combine the ¼ cup sugar with the next eight ingredients (through almond extract); mix until combined and set aside. Slice 6 pieces of challah from the center of the loaf, where the bread is widest; cut slices in half. Reserve remaining bread for another use/day. Spread jam evenly on one side of each bread slice; top evenly with almond mixture. Top evenly with smashed berries; sprinkle with sliced almonds. Bake in a preheated 375 degree oven until almond mixture is dark golden and bread is toasty on the edges; let stand for 5 min. Sprinkle with confectioner’s sugar; serve warm.

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WATCH

They’re heeeere Spooky streaming for your TV.

As quarantine continues, my podcast consumption remains at an all-time low. Meanwhile, my TV intake is on the rise! As with most things, I have a predilection for all things spooky, so here’s some recommended season viewing on popular streaming services. (Show listings are subject to change.) SHOW: Gravity Falls two seasons, Disney+/Hulu

SENIOR LIVING

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Oil and Canvas with Reasoning When my children have difficulty falling sleep they have often tuned into Bob Ross, an icon in American artistry. I tried this one time and was so transfixed on his voice, his words, his presence—I didn’t find this treasure, Bob Ross, a sleep aid for me. I’m cognizant of my children’s demeanor when they talk of Ross. The level of positivity he had is contagious. Growing old gracefully beats the alternative: like Ross, you can foster upbeat thinking by shining the light on the positives at every turn. He experienced noise in the military, vowing to never shout at anyone. Even when he was sick, he still sported his fabulous iconic perm. He did not dwell on his injury, losing part of his index finger as a young man, or his diagnoses of lymphoma. Repeating our sadness gives us temporary relief, but the payoff is shortlived, and we get stuck.

Ross tried at every step to practice optimism using certain steps and he enjoyed the happy consequences. “We don’t make mistakes, just happy little accidents,” he said. That quiet verve he poised and pursued naturally is something the youngest of children to an aging adult can utilize finding power in softness and susceptibility. We are all called to teach and we are strengthened by sharing what we know. The real work of our lives is to figure out our function, our part in the world and share it with our human community. If we are living in a bubble, we can thrive without anxiety, perhaps. When Ross would work on a landscape, he would consider the least of us. “This is where the little mounMARGARET WACHHOLZ

tain goat lives, right up in here. He needs a place to call home, too, just like the rest of us.” Like Ross, many confident people seem to have this sense of calmness. They are already over themselves and needn’t expend energy on costly facades. They don’t try to make people like them, they don’t pass judgment, they aren’t hypocrites and they are not stuck in despair. We want to enjoy our lives and make progress, even amid difficult circumstances. We are all called, and we all have a contribution to make. No greater gift than to honor your calling. Releasing hurt for good gives us the influence, the power to be the best version of ourselves.

is the campus marketing director at Woodbury Senior Living. In her column, she shares observations and wisdom about aging and senior living in our community. woodburyseniorliving.com

If you want to enjoy some spooky fare with the kids, but they’re not quite ready for Stranger Things or Poltergeist, Gravity Falls is a family-friendly option that mixes adventure and the unknown with bright colors and positive themes. It follows two siblings, who live with their uncle and encounter all sorts of weird happenings in the Pacific Northwest. SHOW: Over the Garden Wall one season; Hulu Another family-friendly animation, this miniseries oozes fall feeling in its colors, themes and soundtrack. It follows two brothers, who fall into a strange world where they’re on the run from a beast in the woods. Along the way, they encounter weird, spooky and friendly characters that remind one to never make a judgement based on first impressions. SHOW: Haunting of Hill House one season; Netflix As a fan of Shirley Jackson’s novel, I wasn’t optimistic about this Netflix-original adaptation. Imagine my surprise when it turned out to be one of my favorite series. Definitely more adult drama/horror than family-friendly, the show follows one family’s struggle with each other and the more supernatural elements in their lives. It’s chilling and atmospheric—and sometimes straight up terrifying—but so full of heart and details that it’s a gift for any fan of ghost stories. SHOW: Twilight Zone five seasons; Netflix/Hulu When all else fails, never question a horror classic! So many plot twists and TV tropes originate in episodes of The Twilight Zone— there’s a reason it’s been able to stand the test of time. Existential questions posed by Rod Sterling in the black and white vignettes still hold plenty of relevance for those watching today. It’s a great way to stir up some spooky feelings and good conversation. —Contributed by Emily Handy, art director

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N OT E WO RT H Y

FITNESS

How Nutrition Boosts Your Immune System Let’s focus on food to boost your immune system. What you eat can greatly improve your chances of successfully battling viruses or another pathogens that dares cross your path. Here’s what the research shows … • A varied diet of healthy, whole foods is the best source of nutrients. No individual food is the key. Key nutrients in plant and animal foods for growth and strength of immune cells are vitamins C and D, zinc, selenium, iron and proteins. • What we eat determines what kinds of microbes live in our intestines. The gut is the center of immune activity and is where antimicrobial proteins are produced. • Half your plate should be veggies and fruit, other half split between lean protein and grains. • Fruits and vegetables: Their nutrients help your immune system battle viruses and bacteria. Frozen vegetables are generally better than canned, but canned

veggies are better than none.

MEDITERRANEAN DIET A WINNER

• Choose fruits and veggies to get a rainbow of colors that provide key vitamins and nutrients. Fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds and legumes are rich in nutrients and antioxidants that fight harmful pathogens. Antioxidants ease inflammation by fighting unstable compounds known as free radicals. (Chronic inflammation is linked to heart disease, certain cancers and Alzheimer’s disease.)

One formula shown to increase immune-boosting cells, like T-cells, is the Mediterranean diet, with 400 International Units (IU) of vitamin D each day. A classic Mediterranean diet is low in saturated fat and high in fiber, made up largely of olive oil, legumes, fruits, vegetables, fish, yogurt, cheese and moderate daily consumption of red wine.

• Fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains load you up with prebiotics. There are many great sources: garlic, onions, spinach, broccoli, bananas, watermelon, oats, quinoa, salmon, eggs, chicken, turkey and more. • Another key is fermented foods like sauerkraut, miso, yogurt and more. They feed good bacteria in your gut. Probiotic supplements can help if you don’t like these foods. • Healthy fats reduce inflammation, helping your immune system fight off diseases. Choose olive oil, salmon, chia seeds or nuts.

A BAD DIET IS A BAD IDEA If you eat unhealthy foods, it impairs production and activity of immune cells and antibodies. If you eat a lot of processed foods, immune function suffers. The classic Western diet, high in sugars and red meat and low in fruits and vegetables, unsettles the balance of healthy intestinal microorganisms. That brings inflammation of the gut and suppressed immunity. Refined sugars and carbs contribute to being overweight or obese, increasing the chances you’ll get sick.

JILL STRAND and CHRIS RADKE are owners and certified trainers at UpLift Guided Fitness in Woodbury. upliftfitness.com // 651.209.6778

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Food can be used for your benefit, and it should be, too.

12 | OCTOBER 2020

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PETS

Bark at Me

Help your new family addition adjust. During this time of isolation, many people have reached out to adopt dogs. Shelters have seen adoptions increase and that is good news for pet parents, and especially for dogs. Adopted dogs often have special needs—most of them come with a level of fear and anxiety. I have adopted a dog who has only been with us for one month, and he still is not totally comfortable with me touching him. Much love and patience are essential. Remember, you are excited, but your dog may be fearful and overwhelmed with the new experience.

PET PARENT QUESTION: DONNA CHICONE is an award-winning author, TEDx

speaker and advocate for dogs. She lives in Woodbury. You might find her engaged in pet-assisted therapy work. superpetparent.com

We have adopted a dog, but house training seems very hard for him to get and he

doesn’t seem to know what to do with toys. What can we do to help him? Some adopted dogs do well when there is already a dog in the home to teach the adopted dog what I like to call “all things dog.” House training is one of those teachable things. The adopted dog will look to and mimic what the other dog does. Learning how to play with toys can also be learned from another dog. If you have no other dog in the home, you can still be successful as a pet parent. Treat your newly adopted dog as though he was a 9-week-old puppy and use positive crate training to house train him. Interact with tug toys and a ball he can learn to fetch. Basic obedience training will be a great help for both of you.

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D E PA R T M E N T S

|

SCENE

Leaving a Legacy Afton vineyard owner branches into winemaking. BY ANGELA JOHNSON

CODY KAYE OF AFTON understands all

too well the phrase “you only live once.” In fact, after nearly losing his life in a rollover utility terrian vehicle (UTV) accident in 2012 when he was just a teenager, Kaye became passionate about planting grapevines, as a business, but also as a legacy, something that would remain long after he is gone. Kaye grew up in a big yellow house in Afton. His love for that home and his hometown are part of the story behind Yellow House Vineyard, a business Kaye launched in 2013. Tucked in its own micro-climate between a tree farm and one of Afton’s three Bissell Mounds made of limestone, is 2.2 acres of solid grapes that Kaye planted on his family’s property, just down from their yellow house. On one side are rows of Frontenac blanc grapevines mirrored by rows of Marquette grapevines, a variety that although is reportedly cold hardy, has been considered more difficult to grow in much of Minnesota after suffering seasons of polar vortex and late frost damage. “It’s a rare grape to find,” says Kaye of the Marquette variety. “I know of seven growers who’ve given up after a decade of trying to grow it. But this is one of the best micro-climates and the top soil is eroded limestone left over from the ice age, which is the most desirable.” Much of Kaye’s grape growing knowledge has accumulated from hard work and learning by doing. But he has some background in agriculture. His father owned the Afton Tree Company and Kaye has fond memories of palling around on the equipment with his dad. Kaye has also studied at the University

Cody Kaye, 25, started Yellow House Vineyard out of passion, but hopes to grow the business into a legacy.

HOUSE PHOTO COURTESY OF YELLOW HOUSE VINEYARD

PHOTOS BY TATE CARLSON

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Orthopaedic Specialists of Minnesota (UMN) and worked with Drew Horton, an enology specialist who researches wine making with hybridized cold-climate wine grapes developed by the UMN Grape Breeding program, as well as with Annie Klodd, a UMN viticulture researcher. Kaye has also been learning the business side of things. In the beginning, friends were curious and volunteered to help harvest grapes. Last year, a 14-person crew hand-picked Kaye’s grapes in what he estimates took 324 hours. “I got 23 pounds from a single vine last year, when many growers typically get 6–8 pounds,” says Kaye. This year, with more vines producing, he estimates he’ll have 40 percent more grapes to harvest in what could take up to 500 hours to hand pick. Instead, Kaye hired a commercial harvester and says it’ll be done in three to five hours. “I’m learning the commercial method,” Kaye says, noting the huge cost savings per acre. “It’s the knowledge you gain after a few years of experience.” Up to now, Kaye has only grown and harvested his grapes while outsourcing any winemaking. But Kaye has plans to begin producing his own wine next year and hopes to host on-site events at his beautifully secluded vineyard. He’s partnered with three other vineyard owners to establish the Afton Vineyard Association and has dreams of purchasing more property, to grow his business. Kaye is only 25 years old. He has come a long way since that UTV crash in 2012. He says, “I remember being in the ambulance on a back brace and thinking, ‘What am I going to do with my life?’ I couldn’t move. It was pretty traumatic … no more contact sports … I was on bedrest for over five months … I didn’t know if I was going to be able to do this … but I knew the vines would be here a lot longer than I was, it’s a sentimental kind of thing,” kind of like the big yellow house.

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D E PA R T M E N T S

|

TA S T E

For Old Times Sake

Bridgeman’s Ice Cream brings back childhood memories with iconic scoops and parlor feel. SERVING UP SCOOPS OF PREMIUM GOURMET ICE CREAM for over 80 years, Bridgeman’s Ice Cream

BY AVA DIAZ PHOTO BY TATE CARLSON

Parlor has become a sweet staple in the land of 10,000 lakes. Although the parlor now sells primarily wholesale through local family-owned markets and grocers, Bridgeman’s was once a brick-and-mortar ice cream dynasty with over 100 storefronts across the state. In addition to their original flagship shop in Duluth and as an ode to those good ole days, Bridgeman’s is

bringing back the iconic ice cream parlor feel to the Woodbury community. With glass sundae boats and tin cups, house-made soda pop and fresh dipped cream, customers will experience a blast from the past. “It is a new way of being old,” owner Crystal Bakker says. Straying away from the trendy, unique flavors, Bakker says that at Bridgeman’s tries to stick with their traditional 31 flavors like strawberry, peppermint bon bon

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Greg Foote Jewelers BY THE NUMBERS

• 80,000: gallons of ice cream are sold each year.

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• 10,000: gallons of milk used each year. • 500: gallons in each batch of ice cream.

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• 167: gallons of milk used for each batch of ice cream. BRIDGEMAN’S ICE CREAM PARLOR

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and butter brittle, and the parlor offers 25 flavors in-store at any time. “People who grew up on Bridgeman’s … know and remember a classic flavor palette,” Bakker says. “Everyone has a flavor that they love.” Through sweet treats and active community engagement, Bakker says that Bridgeman’s is committed to implementing change locally and globally. “We have dedicated ourselves to be a social-impact business meaning that we want to create a positive influence on our community,” she says. “We want to make it a better place. We want to be there for families and children.” In order to achieve this goal, Bridgeman’s has partnered with local schools and Common Hope, a nonprofit that supports education for children and families in Guatemala, through the Common Hope Coffee Sundae. In addition to their work within the community, all four of the franchise owners reside in the Woodbury community, making it easy for the local entrepreneurs to connect with their neighborhood. With the hopes of expanding to other local communities, Bakker says that Bridgeman’s will continue to be a place where people can come together to share experiences through the love for ice cream. “Everyone that we meet has a Bridgeman’s story,” Bakker says. “There is a heart piece to it—the experiences— and [we] are looking to recreate that.”

"A perfect five star review underrates Hyounsoo Lathrop. From start to finish, she has been Out-Of-This-World AMAZING!"

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HYOUNSOO LATHROP, REALTOR Cell: 651.233.8527 HLathrop@CBRealty.com www.HyounsooLathrop.com

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ENLIGHTEN

| D E PA R T M E N T S

Money Matters BY RENÉE STEWARTHESTER

IF MONEY TALKS, what’s it saying to teenagers? Once they graduate from high school, are they able to handle their personal finances on their own or with limited assistance from parents? Do they have enough financial building blocks to grow into future financial situations? The Minnesota Council on Economic Education (MCEE) strives to equip Minnesotans with economic and personal financial understanding. Programs

include Economics Challenge, Global Food Challenge and Personal Finance Decathlon competitions with students from around the state. Since 2016, teams have come from (but not limited to) Edina, Minnetonka, Wayzata and Woodbury high schools and Parnassus Preparatory School. The Economics Challenge and the Personal Finance Decathlon are now online platforms. (In June, the state

PHOTO BY ISTOCK.COM/GECE33

Schools and council make educational deposit in students’ personal finances.

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MCEE.UMN.EDU Minnesota Council on Economic Education @mceetweets

In-Center

OR

Online Instruction!

Personal Finance Decathlon champions, a St. Thomas Academy team, won third place in the national decathlon, and an Edina High School team has advanced to the national Economics Challenge.) “Financial literacy education is vital to the health of our economy and can help prepare students and young adults for their future roles as employees, entrepreneurs, consumers, borrowers, savers, investors and voters,” according to information provided by Julie Bunn, Ph.D., MCEE executive director. Closer to home, South Washington County Schools offers a personal financial management course in face-to-face, online and concurrent enrollment formats. The elective is open to students in grades 9–12 and is designed to equip students to discuss money issues and plan for their financial future. Younger district students also receive instruction on the topic. "Personal and financial goals or skills, such as budgeting, saving, investing, trading, insuring and spending, is a particular focus in sixth grade, choices and opportunity costs are a focus in seventh, and a more global comparison of the market economy is examined in eighth grade," says Kelly Jansen, director of teaching and learning in South Washington County Schools. Moreover, the very basics of finance and economics are embedded into learning beginning in elementary school. Nancy Krenner, a fifth-grade teacher at Red Rock Elementary School and an MCEE master teacher, incorporates economic standards in all subject matters. Krenner uses simulations and creative lessons to signify the importance of economics. One simulation, "Creative Toy Production," has students design and price a prototype, write and perform an advertisement, calculate their profits, if their classmates decide to purchase the toy, and deduct their cost of production. "Our youth are our future," Krenner says. "And the economic health of our nation and the world is in their hands. It is imperative that we give them the tools to help them make informed and responsible [financial] decisions."

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Does your child have the skills and confidence they need to succeed in school? We make it happen. Our expert instructors teach each child individually, using customized learning plans to help students thrive in the classroom and in everything they do! Contact us today to get started. Mathnasium of Woodbury 651-409-MATH (6284) mathnasium.com/woodbury

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OWNER/RETIREMENT PLANNING SPECIALIST* (651) 888 - 4848 | mark@woodburywm.com 2165 Woodlane Drive, #104, Woodbury, MN 55125 www.woodburywealthmanagement.com *Retirement Planning Specialist title owned and awarded exclusively by AXA Advisors, based upon receipt of a Certificate in Retirement Planning from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. Securities offered through AXA Advisors, LLC (NY, NY 212-3144600), member FINRA, SIPC. Investment advisory products/services offered through AXA Advisors, LLC, an SEC-registered investment advisor. Life insurance and annuities offered through AXA Network, LLC. AXA Advisors, LLC and AXA Network, LLC do not provide tax or legal advice. Woodbury Wealth Management is not a registered investment advisor and is not owned or operated by AXA Advisors or AXA Network. CFP® and CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ are certification marks owned by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. and awarded to individuals who successfully complete the CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. PPG-123976(03/17)(exp.03/19)

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Fresh Takes on

TRADITION Hudson Flower Shop shares advice for your “big day” and everyday.

T

he wedding date is set and everything is starting to come together. The two of you have stopped flip-flopping over color scheme and the venue’s been booked. But some of those tricky details for your big day may have escaped your attention in the whirlwind of planning, especially one that’s key to the procession itself: the bridal bouquet. Shelli Erck, owner of Hudson Flower Shop, actually advises couples to hold off on ordering flowers too early. She recommends details like color scheme and clothing get confirmed first. “You want to make sure you get the big picture lined up before you start doing the decoration. Otherwise it’s easy to go back and forth on ideas and, frankly, the chance of wasting money is higher when you’re changing your mind so much,” Erck says. So, what’s fresh this season? “What I’m seeing mostly is fresh-picked, garden style bouquets,” says Erck. “Generally large bouquets with a variety of greenery and

textures, accented with a little bit of color.” “I’ve been surprised to see this brings a little more tradition to it,” Erck says. “A lot of the [brides] are doing the graygreens with white flowers, or a little bit of blush coloring if they add color at all. Of course, roses still hold strong in wedding bouquets, but also other garden favorites like stock flowers or ranunculus, tulips, lilies, hydrangeas.” Increasingly popular with younger generations are standard chrysanthemums including Fuji and cremon varieties. “For that big, round look in their bouquets, they really enjoy those. Especially because the prices are reasonable,” Erck says. The shop suggests putting together an inspiration board, where you can look at the size, shape and type of bouquet you like. Pay attention to how the bride in the photos carries the bouquet, Erck adds, as this can also affect the type of flowers you choose.

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written by MADELINE KOPIECKI photos by TATE CARLSON

LEARN YOUR WAY AROUND THE BOUQUET Biedermeier: These bouquets are formed using concentric circles of different types of flowers. Cascade: As the name implies, these bouquets spill down like a waterfall of blossoms. Composite: These tightly assembled arrangements combine many petals to a single “stem” for an oversized single-flower effect. Hand-tied: Also described as “garden style,” these loosely arranged blooms look freshly picked from the garden. Nosegay: A small, tightly wrapped arrangement generally using a single dominant flower cut to a uniform length. Pageant: A long-stemmed bouquet carried in the crook of a bride’s arm, à la Miss America.

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HUDSON FLOWER SHOP 222 Locust St., Hudson 715.386.2663 hudsonflowershop.com Monday–Friday: 8:30 a.m.–6 p.m. Saturday: 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m. Sunday: Noon–4 p.m. Hudson Flower Shop @hudsonflowershop @hudsonflower info@hudsonflowershop.com

CANCER’S NOT CANCELED. Give today.

HEALTHY HOUSEPLANTS Looking for something long-lasting but not quite ready for marriage? With the wide variety of houseplants available at Hudson Flower Shop, Erck offers some plant-care advice. Watering: “My biggest tip for houseplants care and maintenance is most people over water,” Erck says, and recommends letting plants dry out between watering. “The best way to check that information is to stick your finger into the soil and see what’s happening beneath the surface. Is the soil cool and moist or does the soil feel dry? Generally, when you feel the soil is dry you want to give your plants a good soaking.” Lighting: Keep plants in a bright area but out of direct sunlight. “Most of the houseplants you see around here don’t need a hot sun. They don’t tolerate south facing windows as well as they do when they’re backed out of it,” she says. Repotting: “Plants are like people,” says Erck. “If you move into a house with too much room, you become stressed rather than if you move into a place with the right amount of room. Most plants like to be comfortable in their pot or tight before moving.” She adds not to be overly alarmed if the top of the plant goes into shock. It’s most likely redirecting resources to rebuilding a strong root system before turning its attention back to leaves. A Good Golden Rule: “A big tip on plants is if you have a yellow leaf, that tells you there’s a watering issue. If you have brown leaves, that tends to tell you there’s a light issue,” she says.

The pandemic is changing everything. But it’s not stopping the fight against cancer. When you give to the Cancer Kids Fund at Children’s Minnesota, you help local families keep fighting. Your gift supports everything from unique therapies to life-saving research to mortgage and rent relief during a time when more families need your help. Your gift today is more important than ever.

Thank you to the 30+ businesses that partnered with Children’s Minnesota in September to raise funds for our cancer and blood disorders program. childrensMN.org/shinebrightforkids

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A Commitment To Being The Best! These Brands Prove It! Mulvey Gulch Ranch BouldeR, Montana 100% Grass Fed Black Angus Beef

7760 HARGIS PARKWAY | WOODBURY, MN 55129 www.jerrysfoods.com | www.mulveygulchranch.com

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COURTESY OF TWIGG + LU

Highlight this architectural focal point to create a warm and welcoming atmosphere.

AND

WRITTEN BY HAILEY ALMSTED

|

P H O T O S B Y TAT E C A R L S O N

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I

INCORPORATE THE HEARTH

“We actually love this look,” Meidinger says. “If you have a fireplace with no mantel there are many things you can do around the bottom of the fireplace to cozy it up.” Adding a set of baskets for blankets, pouf ottomans, large lanterns or candle holders, a storage bin for birch logs, plants or a dog bed are just a few of the options that Meidinger recommends. While decorating the hearth, keep safety in mind. Ensure that the décor pieces aren’t combustible, or there’s nothing that little hands (or paws!) will break.

like to think of the fireplace as the focus of the home—a place to share stories, laugh with one another and reminisce on old photographs. It’s a space that should be filled and surrounded with memories and happiness and decorated as such. However, it’s oftentimes a large undertaking in preparing your home for the upcoming holidays, and it can feel overwhelming trying to figure out how to pair decorations together in an inspiring manner. We frequently find that updating the mantel or redoing the hearth at the top of our dreaded to-do list but adding a touch of cheerfulness and that at-home feeling doesn’t have to be such a challenge. We sat down with experts Brittany Meidinger and Shannon Knutson of Twigg + Lu Design Co. to gather their tips on accentuating this focal point and creating that cozy feeling we all adore.

Go for geometry

Just as you may blend patterns and colors throughout the home, you also want to mix and match different shapes and objects when it comes to mantel décor. Layering artwork, mixing textures and having contrasting shapes, sizes and colors is just the beginning. “Examples of objects to incorporate into your design could be books, candlesticks, vases, greenery and photo frames,” Meidinger says. “Depending on the look you are trying to achieve, you may want a more collected and asymmetrical design, which will provide a relaxed feel, or something more symmetrical … [like] having a matching set of vases on either end to provide a more formal feel.” Shapes and textures are your friends, so pair the objects together—a large circle (a basket or clock), rectangle (photo frames or books) and straight lines (taper candles or vases) create a modern, elegant look. Elevate the mantel even further with fresh flowers and plants for an

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Emphasize the horizontal

organic element. To raise the length of the mantel and help accentuate the ceiling height, add in taller pieces, such as a leaning mirror— oftentimes used as an anchor—or branch and greenery arrangements. Balance out the display with pieces that bring your eye down, such as candlesticks, and include horizontal décor at the base. “Overlap picture frames, put skinny candlesticks in front of larger objects and display a plant on top of a stack of books to help create height and visual interest,” Meidinger says. “[Also] respect the negative space, too much on your mantel will make it feel congested and overwhelming. You can layer objects, but remember to give your pieces a little breathing room.”

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Go green

Don’t forget the greenery Adding organic materials and plants create life in the space and easily freshens the mantel. “Flowers and greenery can add life and movement to your mantel,” Meidinger says. “We suggest picking out one type of stem and use different styles of vases to put them in. Garlands are a timeless choice … [and] become more popular in the fall and winter months.” Autumnal hues—think leaves, berries, even gourds and pumpkins—add a colorful and cozy touch. Eucalyptus, ivy, sheaves of wheat or dried allium create more neutral tones and may work well through multiple seasons. Try highlighting organic elements through silhouettes. Frame colorful red, orange and yellow leaves in floating frames or hang the leaves with ribbon. Meidinger says, “If you have a green

thumb, real greenery and plants look great, but there are also many realistic faux options out there too.”

Something old, something new

Although shopping for new décor is a great way to spend a Sunday afternoon, try reusing the pieces that are already around your home. Swap out pieces from another room—such as the bedroom, dining room or living room—to create a fresh feeling. Baskets, candles, books, canvases and frames are all pieces that are easily interchangeable, and an older piece may just be that personal touch for the mantel. If all else fails, ask your friends or family for décor pieces that they’re no longer using, or swing by the local thrift store. After all, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. “Check out your

6

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Demand higher FOR WOODBURY HOMES HAS NEVER BEEN

If you feel it might be your time to make a move, let’s explore this together. At the Chuck Eckberg Group, we...

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Twigg + Lu Design Co. 731 Bielenberg Drive Suite 203 651.217.8096 twiggandlu.com Twigg + Lu Design Co. @twiggandlu_designco

Decor staging by Twigg + Lu Design Co. Mantle and home designed by Ispiri. Special thanks to Ispiri for providing the backdrop for this photoshoot.

INSTALL A FAUX MANTEL Of course, a home with a fireplace is a score. But not all homes are equipped with the space for one. Installing a faux mantel is one of the easiest ways to create a focal point in the room. “We would take a more unique approach to this idea and suggest installing a mantel

above the headboard in a bedroom,” Meidinger says. “It’s the perfect spot to display layered artwork, greenery and décor.” Faux mantels may also work well in the living room and even the dining room. Here’s a few installation tips: • Sizing the mantel: Use painters tape to mark

out the length and height of the mantel. • Securing the mantel: Mantels are oftentimes attached to a backer that supports the material. If purchasing materials form a lumberyard, ask questions about proper installation—or consult a construction company or fireplace installer.

local vintage shops to mix in old with new pieces,” Meidinger says. “But keep in mind the size of your mantel and the material it’s made out of, [as] those will be the factors that play into the types of objects that you choose to display.” Contrasting textures create movement around the fireplace and draws the eye around the space, so search for colored glass pieces (different vases, trays and abstract items), metal pieces (mirrors, candlesticks or book ends) or baskets for a vintage touch. Glass creates a dimensional affect, while metal reflects the light and contradicts the masonry or wood of a fireplace. Utilitarian elements, such as baskets, create a useful, yet attractive space around the mantel and hearth. “You can restyle your mantel each season in order to function as an everchanging design feature,” Meidinger says. “Don’t be afraid to mix it up with pieces you wouldn’t typically do in order to add interest and be bold.”

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Regionally Renowned Infertility Services in Your Neighborhood Reproductive Medicine & Infertility Associates adds a new physician to an already accomplished group

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any individuals and couples travel hundreds of miles for comprehensive, compassionate infertility services. For Woodbury residents, one of the region’s most well-respected practices is located right in your city.

For over two decades, Reproductive Medicine & Infertility Associates has been dedicated to helping patients successfully grow their families. With a focus on in vitro fertilization (IVF), they are committed to guiding you to a successful pregnancy via high-quality, individualized and educational care. “Compassion and empathy are big values of the practice,” says Dr. Jani Jensen, whose professional interests include LGBTQ+ family building and fertility preservation. Their labs and surgery centers are state-of-the-art, and the entire practice fosters a supportive environment in which you’ll receive the care you need. “We’re very committed to family building,” says Dr. Phoebe Leonard. “We make sure that all patients get what they need and feel like they’re in a safe place.” The clinic’s accessibility goes beyond its location. New telehealth options offer consultations from the comfort of your home. Innovative IVF warranty programs relieve some of the

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financial burden of fertility treatments by offering patients a refundable amount if they do not achieve a live birth. The group recently welcomed a fourth partner, Dr. Tana Kim, an award-winning physician who completed her OBGYN residency and reproductive endocrinology fellowship training at the University of Minnesota and Mayo Clinic, respectively. Dr. Kim joins Doctors Leonard, Jensen and founding partner Dr. Jacques Stassart. Infertility is a challenging journey under the best of circumstances. Having empathetic, effective care close to home helps alleviate the struggle. Luckily, RMIA is right in your neighborhood. “We’re helping people build the families of their dreams,” Dr. Jensen says.

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9/1/2020 12:08:07 PM


Statement Signs Local artist creates handmade signs that spruce up any space.

A

s a stay-at-home mom for nearly 15 years, Jessica Stegbauer, owner and creator behind Rusty7s , was looking for a way to get in touch with her artistic side. Not knowing exactly what she wanted to do, she eventually transformed her fun hobby of creating fun-spirited, humorous and quirky signs into a full-time job. “I have always been a very creative-mind per-

written by AVA

DIAZ

son,” she says. “[Art] is endless and there is so much you can do.” Stegbauer began creating these pieces in an open farmhouse space that was worn down and tattered. Drawing inspiration from her surroundings and as a part of a seven-member family, the name Rusty7s was born. From cutting and painting the wood, to applying and peeling back vinyl lettering, and sealing

photos by JESSICA

STEGBAUER

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“With spaces and lifestyles constantly changing, the signs can be changed with it too. As a decorator and a creative, you are always looking to change something.” Jessica Stegbauer

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the design and framing, she does everything by hand in the comfort of her own home. From design conception to completion, Stegbauer says she can create a new sign within a matter of a few hours. Through a collection of light-hearted messages, Stegbauer says that her pieces have the ability to transform any space through the variety of interchangeable sizes, text styles and seasonal sayings available. “With spaces and lifestyles constantly changing, the signs can be changed with it too,” she says. “As a decorator and a creative, you are always looking to change something.” Although Stegbauer primarily sells her pieces through her Instagram, @rusty_7s, where her following is more than 30,000 strong, she also sells through her Etsy page, Rusty7s, and at Dwell Furniture & Home Décor in Afton, Minn. As for the future of Rusty7s, Stegbauer hopes to expand her customer base and eventually have a separate work shed on a larger property to operate from yearround. Continuing her love for her craft, she will remain specializing in sign making for years to come . “I did not know what I wanted to do when I grew up and I’ve always had a creative mind,” Stegbauer says. “This has really given me such an outlet to do that. It’s turned my dream into a reality.”

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ON THE TOWN

PHOTO COURTESY OF WOODBURY PARKS & REC

W H AT ’ S G O I N G O N I N W O O D B U R Y

Ghouls Galore

Woodbury Parks & Recreation to host annual Halloween Hoopla.

J

oin the Woodbury Parks & Recreation department for the second annual Halloween Hoopla. Get ready for all types of family-friendly festivities in this celebration that’s so fun it’s scary. Attendees will enjoy “trunk or treating,” carnival games, pumpkin picking, pumpkin decorating, crafts and treats. “We love seeing families participate in this event together,” says recreation specialist Elizabeth Owens. Don’t forget to dress in your most unique

Halloween costume to compete in the muchanticipated costume contest, which will be decided by a secret judge. The event will take place on a Saturday afternoon, so make sure to dress for the possibility of chilly weather. “It’s exciting to see all family members searching for the best pumpkin, posing with the photo props and dressing up in their own unique costumes,” Owens says. —Vivian Shinall

HALLOWEEN HOOPLA Recommended for ages 3–12. $8 per child. Saturday, Oct. 24, 3–5 p.m. Ojibway Park, 2695 Ojibway Drive; woodburymn.gov Woodbury Parks & Recreation

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O N T H E TOW N

Halloween Workshop OCTOBER 24 Kidcreate Studio 1785 Radio Drive 651.773.0880 kidcreate.com

IN-PERSON EVENTS

2 First Fridays at Creators Space

Get creative and crafty this fall while enjoying good food and good company—so get together with other artsy folks and enjoy music, fresh food and letting your imagination run free. All ages. Free. 5–9 p.m. Creators Space, 218 Seventh St. E., St. Paul; 651.340.6736; creatorsspace.com

6 Our Home: Native Minnesota

For teachers, it can be tough to understand how to thoughtfully and ethically teach students about Native American history. This seminar, put on by the Minnesota Historical Society, teaches educators how to incorporate Ojibwe and Dakota primary sources into curriculum. Teachers and educators encouraged to attend. Ticket prices vary. 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Minnesota History Center, 345 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul; mnhs.org

ONLINE EVENTS

3, 10, 17, 24, 31 Lets Meditate Minneapolis

On days when it’s too cold to go outside, take some time to reflect inside. These Sahaja mediation courses require no prior experience. You can join the Zoom session 30 minutes early to get some tips to set yourself up for a great experience as well. All ages. Free. 8:45–10 p.m. Zoom meeting ID: 870 6142 9822; Password: 123123; freemeditation.com

24 Sixth Annual Bloom Event: A Virtual Event

Expecting mothers face many new challenges and often have questions about the road ahead. Bloom provides Twin Cities new and expecting mothers with support and education. Presented by Twin Cities Mom Collective, Breck School, Park Nicollet, HealthPartners and City Mom Collective, this year’s event will be fully online to ensure everyone’s safety and well-being. Moms of all ages. $24–100, see website for details. 10–11:30 a.m. amanda@twicitiesmom.com; twincitiesmom.com

Support the St. Paul Festival and Heritage Foundation while enjoying local food, drink and live music at Sip & Savor: Best of Twin Cities. Hosted at the Landmark Center, attendees will be able to bid on over 100+ items in a live and a silent auction. All ages. $35. 5:30–8:30 p.m. Landmark Center, 75 W. Fifth St., St. Paul; wintercarnival.com

10 Home Improvement & Design Expo

The Home Improvement & Design Expo has hourly seminars and free interior design and color consultations, so you’ll receive the best tips from industry

ISTOCK.COM/SEVENTYFOUR

7 Sip & Savor: Best of Twin Cities

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COMPILED BY NINA RAEMONT, VIVIAN SHINALL AND KATELYN STORCH

experts. Follow wherever your inspiration takes you with over 150 companies specializing in kitchen, landscape, bathrooms, decks and much more. All ages. Free. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Veterans Memorial Community Center, 8055 Barbara Ave., Inver Grove Heights; 952.238.1700; mediamaxevents.com

23 The Nightmare Before Christmas with the Minnesota Orchestra

What better a way to gear up for the season of scare than by listening to your favorite Halloween soundtrack at the Minnesota Orchestra? This classic Halloween soundtrack will haunt you with bone-chilling live music and frighteningly beautiful melodies. All ages. Prices vary. Orchestra Hall, 1111 Nicollet Mall, Mpls.; minnesotaorchestra.org

29 Women in the Arts: Voices and Visions

Are you looking to be inspired by women within the greater Twin Cities community? This networking and panel discussion event seeks to connect creative women in the arts and entertainment industry. The event will be supplemented with complementary drinks and appetizers, and feature three women-directed films for screening. All ages. $40. 5:30-8:45 p.m. Showplace Icon Theater, 1625 West End Blvd., Mpls.; teamwomen.org

Due to the fluidity being experienced in the current environment, please note that some events/dates and even some business operations may have changed since these pages went to print. Please visit woodburymag.com for updates.

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GALLERY

JULIE PRIOR-MILLER

Leap into the Legacy

On February 29, SoWashCoCARES held its first fundraiser, Leap into the Legacy, at Prestick Golf Course. The funds raised at the event supplied food packs and basic needs to students, beginning this past summer, as well as funds for the Skoolie Bus project.

South Washington County Community Action Reaching Ever Student (SoWashCoCARES) serves the Woodbury community, alongside the eastern suburbs of St. Paul, Minn. The goal is to support these communities through the SoWashCoCARES Facebook page, where items can be requested and fulfilled. Items such as food, clothing, toiletries and gas cards are often requested, and can be dropped off at schools throughout the district. To view more pictures from these events, as well as others, visit woodburymag.com. To have your event considered send date, time, location and contact information to woodburymag@tigeroak.com.

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WOODBURY CARES PROGRAM

WILLIAMS DIVORCE & FAMILY LAW CARES ABOUT WOODBURY After almost 30 years as residents, attorney Gerald Williams and wife Winnie are proud to live and work in Woodbury. "We love Woodbury for its strong sense of community, its wonderful system of trails and parks that we frequently walk, and for the choral and theatre arts community, " says Gerald, who opened Williams Divorce & Family Law in Woodbury in 2008. "While Covid-19 means that performances are currently on hiatus, we have found family in organizations like the Spirit Song Choir and the Open Door Community Theatre."

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"As a family and as a local business, we believe strongly in giving back to the community in which we live with both our time and financial resources," he adds. Williams Divorce & Family Law has supported the Christian Cupboard Emergency Food Shelf financially for many years. "My family donates many hours each month to support their work feeding hungry people in our community; a need that has grown exponentially in recent months, " says Gerald. "We are also pleased to partner with the Woodbury Community Foundation in continuing to care for our community."

"We believe strongly in giving back to the community in which we live with both our time and financial resources."

GERALD O. WILLIAMS 652 BIELENBERG DRIVE, SUITE 202 | WOODBURY DIVORCELAWYERMN.COM 651.332.7650

9/1/2020 12:08:28 PM


TA S T E M A K E R S

House-to-House Hospitality LET’S GET PROGRESSIVE ON HALLOWEEN. BY EDITORIAL STAFF

PHOTOS BY TATE CARLSON

MONSTER CUPCAKES

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As the sun and the moon trade spots in the sky on Halloween, many streets and neighborhoods teem with adorably-costumed, candy-seeking kids; teens eager for sweets (but less inclined to don a costume); and parents, many of whom relish escorting their kids on the annual candy rounds. If you don’t have trick or treating-age kids, don’t worry. Head on out! For adults, Halloween is turning into a progressive party of sorts—the last chance for house-to-house visits before snow and cold separates neighbors until the spring thaw. If you’re feeling Halloween hospitality vibes, our goody-loving editorial team pulled together some sweet treats and beverages for you to offer your neighbors. Set up an outdoor food and beverage table, fire up a portable fire pit (safely, of course), and take a seat on your driveway or yard for a front row view of Halloween 2020.

MONSTER CUPCAKES

(Contributed by Beth Hill of Woodbury and adapted from Ghoulish Goodies: Creature Feature Cupcakes, Monster Eyeballs, Bat Wings, Funny Bones, Witches’ Knuckles, and Much More! by Sharon Bowers) CUPCAKES: 1 1/2 cups flour 1 tsp. baking powder ¼ tsp. salt 2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice ½ cup butter 1/2 cup sugar ½ cup canned pumpkin puree ½ cup buttermilk 1 tsp. vanilla extract INGREDIENTS FOR ASSEMBLY: 1 container cream cheese frosting, colored with green paste food coloring 18 large marshmallows

1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips 18 pretzel sticks chocolate sprinkles or other candy for faces

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line 18 muffin pan cups with paper liners. Sift flour, baking powder, salt and pumpkin pie spice into a medium bowl, and set aside. Beat butter and sugar in a large bowl with an electric mixer until smooth. Beat in the eggs one at a time. Blend in pumpkin puree, buttermilk and vanilla. With mixer on low speed, add the flour mixture and blend until combined. Spoon the batter into liners. Bake for approximately 18–20 minutes or until a cake tester, inserted into the center of the cupcakes, comes out clean. Cool and assemble.

BOO CUPS

(Contributed by Beth Hill of Woodbury) 3 ¼ cups cold milk 2 packages (4 serving size each) Jell-O chocolate flavor instant pudding 8 oz. Cool Whip whipped topping, thawed and divided 20 Oreo cookies, crushed and divided 30 miniature semi-sweet chocolate chips

Pour milk into a large bowl, and add dry pudding mixes. Beat with a whisk for 2 minutes or until well blended. Gently stir in half each of the whipped topping and cookie crumbs. Spoon 1 Tbsp. of remaining cookie crumbs into each of 15 (6 oz.) paper or plastic cups. Cover evenly with layers of pudding mixture and remaining cookie crumbs. Drop remaining whipped topping by spoonsful onto desserts to resemble ghosts. Add chocolate chips for eyes. Serve immediately, or refrigerate until ready to serve.

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TA S T E M A K E R S

ZOMBTINI

(Contributed by Cindy Erickson of Woodbury) 1 oz. white rum 2 oz. melon liqueur 1 oz. 100 percent pineapple juice ½ oz. Sprite Grenadine Ice Plastic eyeball for garnish

Combine ice, rum, melon liqueur and juice in a martini shaker, and shake well. Pour into a martini glass (2/3 full), and add Sprite. Drizzle grenadine over the top with a spoon. Add (but don’t eat!) the eyeball.

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CARAMEL APPLE BITES

CARAMEL APPLE BITES (Kowalski’s Markets)

Knudsen’s hand-wrapped caramels, sliced into fourths 2 apples, cored and cubed

Skewer several apple cubes with a piece of caramel on four-inch bamboo skewers or party picks. Serve immediately.

SALTED NUT ROLLS

er. Melt the caramel ingredients together, and dip the frozen balls/logs into the caramel. Roll them in salted, blanched peanuts. Place on waxed paper to set.

SALTED NUT ROLL SHOT

(Pinterest) For guests who’d rather have a sip than a bite, offer this easy-to-mix nod to a classic Minnesota candy bar.

(Contributed by Renée StewartHester)

3/4 part RumChata liqueur 1/4 part butterscotch schnapps Salt

CENTER 2 lbs. powdered sugar 2/3 cup corn syrup 2/3 cup butter, melted 2 tsp. salt 2 tsp. vanilla

Dip the top of a shot glass with salt or sprinkle some in the glass, and add in the liqueur and schnapps.

CARAMEL 12 oz. peanut butter chips 2/3 cup corn syrup 1 tsp. vanilla ¼ cup butter Coating Peanuts, blanched and salted

Mix center ingredients, and kneed well. Roll into balls or small logs, and place in the freez-

SPOOKY SPIKED HALLOWEEN PUNCH (conservamome.com)

1 cup orange soda 1/3 cup pinot grigio 1 scoop vanilla bean ice cream

Combine the wine and ice cream in a glass. Add orange soda, and stir together.

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LAST GLANCE HONORABLE MENTION City Landmarks by Julie Ohs

Bountiful Flurries Julie Ohs captures a snow-dusted scene at the farmers market.

BY VIVIAN SHINALL PHOTO BY JULIE OHS

“THE STORY BEHIND THE IMAGE is how quickly the weather in Minnesota can change,” says Julie Ohs, the photographer behind Fall Bounty, submitted to Focus on Woodbury in 2019. Any Minnesotan can attest that they’ve left the house prepared for one type of weather, only to be surprised with something completely different shortly after leaving. For Ohs, what began as a morning of blue skies and sunshine at the farmers market was suddenly interrupted by a flurry of snow. “It was a beautiful sunny morning and all of a sudden within roughly 10 minutes all the flowers and produce at the market were covered in fluffy snow,” Ohs says. Ohs took out her iPhone to capture the vivid col-

ors of the produce dusted with an unexpected layer of snow. “My favorite thing about the image is all the fresh beautiful produce and how amazing it looked covered in snow,” says Ohs. For Ohs, the photo serves as a testament to her love for the farmers market. “The market is my happy place; all the fresh food, flowers, variety, colors and people,” Ohs says.

CONGRATULATIONS! Focus on Woodbury 2020 photo contest winners are announced! Go to woodburymag.com to see the winning photos.

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