Saint Croix Valley October/November 2020

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10 AN HONEST ACCOUNT FROM JESSIE DIGGINS

30 HOMEMADE HALLOWEEN TREATS

Pretty as a Picture Botanical photographer captures beauty in the natural world


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CONTENTS in every issue 4 EDITOR’S LETTER

OCT/NOV ’20

6 NOTEWORTHY

“I believe the world is incomprehensibly beautiful, an endless prospect of magic and wonder.” -Ansel Adams

27 ON THE TOWN 30 TASTEMAKERS 32 LAST GLANCE

departments 1 0 FACES

Brave Enough

An honest account from Olympian Jessie Diggins.

1 2 FRESH AIR

Not Their First Rodeo

PAGE 10

UW-River Falls rodeo team and club celebrates 56 years.

1 4 DWELL

Get Ahead of the Game

Clean out and cozy up your home for the fall.

features 18

Watch Your Language

Don’t wing it when it comes to Thanksgiving dinner.

20

Pretty as a Picture Fine art and botanical photographer captures beauty in the natural world.

6

MATT WHITCOMB, COURTESY OF YELLOW HOUSE VINEYARD

2 | OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

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from the ED ITOR

A

merican sports fans held our collective breath during the final seconds of the women’s team sprint freestyle race during the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeonghang, South Korea. Local cross-country skier Jesse Diggins managed to summon the strength to pass two of the best skiers in the world and clinch the first ever cross-country skiing gold medal for the United States. The race was thrilling to watch and it’s somehow satisfying to know that such talent was groomed right here in the St. Croix Valley. If you’ve ever wondered what went into the making of this sports champion, Diggins tells readers about her journey to greatness in her inspiring story titled Brave Enough. Diggins told us a little bit about her book and what she hopes readers will take away from it. You can read our interview on page 10. Follow us ! Sports in the St. Croix Valley run the gamut. See what we’re doing behind the So, we were also excited to learn about a comscenes and around town! petitive rodeo club and team at the University stcroixvalleymag.com of Wisconsin-River Falls. We connected with St. Croix Valley Magazine the team’s coaches and a few student athletes to @scvmag @stcroixvalleymag learn more about the sport of rodeo and why it’s a draw for college riders and local enthusiasts alike. Check out the story on page 12. And if all of this talk about sports and physical exertion makes you tired or hungry, then just sit back, relax and rest while reading our recipes for delicious and seasonally inspired snacks on page 30, and be sure to check out our Noteworthy story on page 6 about a new winery making a splash in Afton. We’re here to help celebrate the vitality and inspiration found in the St. Croix Valley where creative aspirations can be found everywhere in our cities and in nature. So be sure to share your local story ideas by emailing me about who or what you think we should spotlight in a future issue of St. Croix Valley Magazine. Happy Fall!

Angela Johnson, editor edinamag@tigeroak.com

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HOMEMADE HALLOWEEN TREATS

ON THE COVER

Cynthia Dickinson photograph 800-341-9911 Insured by NCUA

page 20 CYNTHIA DICKINSON

Pretty as a Picture Botanical photographer captures beauty in the natural world

PHOTO BY LISA BUTH

10 AN HONEST ACCOUNT FROM JESSIE DIGGINS

4 | OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

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stcroixvalleymag.com

publisher SUSAN ISAY editor ANGELA JOHNSON managing editor ANGELA JOHNSON editorial assistant HAILEY ALMSTED digital editor ANTHONY BETTIN copy editor KELLIE DOHERTY staff writers AVA DIAZ MADELINE KOPIECKI contributing writers KELLI KAUFER editorial interns VIVIAN SHINALL KATELYN STORCH NINA RAEMONT

editorial advisory board MEG BROWNSON, Alfresco Casual Living PETE FOSTER, Barkers and San Pedro Cafe JOHN KNUTSON, Catalyst Sports Medicine RUTH MISENKO, Seasons on St. Croix BRENT PETERSON, Washington County Historical Society SARAH QUICKEL, Enchanté HEATHER RUTLEDGE, ArtReach St. Croix ANDREW SACHARIASON, St. Croix Preparatory Academy

senior managing art director art director lead staff photographer c reative services coordinator production director project coordinators

circulation director

SARAH DOVOLOS EMILY HANDY TATE CARLSON

Thomas Pink, CFP®, AAMS® Senior Vice President – Financial Advisor 350 North Main Street, Suite 106 Stillwater, MN 55082

Pink Wealth Management Group

(651) 430-5550 | thomas.pink@rbc.com www.pinkwmg.com Investment and insurance products: • Not insured by the FDIC or any other federal government agency • Not a deposit of, or guaranteed by, the bank or an affiliate of the bank • May lose value ©2020 RBC Wealth Management, a division of RBC Capital Markets, LLC, Member NYSE/FINRA/SIPC. All rights reserved. 20-WQ-02924 (08/20)

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senior account executives BROOKE BEISE KATIE FREEMARK CYNTHIA HAMRE SARA JOHNSON digital marketing manager

credit manager accountants payable accountants receivable director of HR

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KRISTIN MASTANTUONO APRIL MCCAULEY CHRIS ADAMIETZ JARED LAWSON ASTRID ADAMIETZ

R. CRAIG BEDNAR SUSAN ISAY

St. Croix Valley Magazine ONE TIGER OAK PLAZA 900 SOUTH THIRD STREET MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55415 612.548.3180

SUBSCRIPTIONS: St. Croix Valley Magazine is published 6 times a year. Rates $12 for 6 issues. Back issues $5.95. ©Tiger Oak Media Inc. 2020. All rights reserved.

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NOTEWORTHY W H A T ’ S G O I N G O N I N T H E VA L L E Y

YELLOW HOUSE VINEYARD

We visited owner Cody Kaye about his passion project.

6 | OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

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Thanks for Your ThE winning CoNfIdENCE Care." I hAvE INSIdE

Celebrating WITh MY NEW

Leaving a Legacy

40 YEARS SMILE IS

of Smiles! AMAzINg.” - Jessie Diggins, – Judi S., patient of Dr. Musser

Olympic 2018 Gold Medalist

Afton vineyard owner branches into winemaking.

PHOTOS BY TATE CARLSON, COURTESY OF YELLOW HOUSE VINEYARD

C

ody Kaye of Afton understands all too well the phrase “you only live once.” In fact, after nearly losing his life in a rollover utility terrain vehicle (UTV) accident in 2012 when he was just a teenager, Kaye became passionate about planting grapevines, as a business, but also as a legacy, something that would remain long after he is gone. Kaye grew up in a big yellow house in Afton. His love for that home and his hometown are part of the story behind Yellow House Vineyard, a business Kaye has been working on since 2013. Tucked in its own micro-climate between a tree farm and one of Afton’s three Bissell Mounds made of limestone, is 2.2 acres of solid grapes that Kaye planted on his family’s property, just down a slope from their yellow house. On one side are rows of Frontenac blanc grapevines mirrored by rows of Marquette grapevines, a variety that although is reportedly cold hardy, has been considered more difficult to grow in much of Minnesota after suffering seasons of polar vortex and late frost damage. “It’s a rare grape to find,” says Kaye of the Marquette variety. “I know of seven growers who’ve given up after a decade of trying to grow it. But this is one of the best micro climates and the top soil is eroded limestone left over from the ice age, which is the most desirable.” —Angela Johnson

TO CONTINUE READING, GO TO STCROIXVALLEYMAG.COM Yellow House Vineyard @yellowhousevineyard

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N OT E WO RT H Y

RECIPE

SALTED NUT ROLL SHOT

(Pinterest) For guests who’d rather have a sip than a bite, offer this easy-to-mix nod to a classic Minnesota candy bar. 3/4 part RumChata liqueur 1/4 part Butterscotch schnapps Salt Dip the top of a shot glass with salt or sprinkle some in the glass, and add in the liqueur and schnapps. See page 30 for more Halloween recipes!

PHOTO CONTEST

SUMMER HAS SET SAIL BUT WE STILL HAVE FOND MEMORIES VIA YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY ... ABOVE: Thanks to Patrick O’Donnell for submitting this photo titled “St. Croix Sailing Club” to our 2019 Lens on St. Croix Valley photo contest. LEFT: Seeing hot air baloons in the Valley never gets old. Thanks to JR Hunter for sending us this photo titled “Balloons and Sails.”

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DESIGN

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D E PA R T M E N T S

|

FAC E S

Brave Enough

An honest account from Jessie Diggins about success on snow and in life. BY DANA BEDINGFIELD

JESSIE DIGGINS GREW UP IN AFTON, MINN. and graduated

from Stillwater Area High School. Growing up in the Saint Croix Valley, it isn’t surprising that she began skiing as a little girl. But skiing was more than a pastime for Diggins and her passion for it wasn’t something she outgrew. In fact, at the 2018 Winter Olympics, Diggins and teammate Kikkan Randall could have won a gold medal in the category of women’s team sprint. What they did win, was the United States' first ever cross-country skiing gold medal. From learning to ski at age 4 to winning a gold medal in her mid-twenties Diggins has worked incredibly hard, dealt with physical and emotional pain, dealt with an eating disorder and learned to accept herself—win or lose. That’s the story she tells in her book Brave Enough. The book, which was co-written with veteran sportswriter, Todd Smith, is more than a sports book, Diggins says. “I hope readers see something of themselves in my story,” she says. “It’s an ordinary story played out on a less ordinary stage.” Top: Jessie Diggins (photo by Julia Kern); Bottom left: Diggins' little sister Mackenzie inherits the family backpack while Diggins tries out her own skis. (photo Courtesy of the author.) Bottom right: Diggins' support team at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Back row, left to right: Aunt Holly Murdoch, Wade Poplawski, Uncle Blair Murdoch, Clay Diggins. Front row, left to right: me, Grandma Betty Santa, Deb Diggins, Mackenzie Diggins. (photo Courtesy of the author.)

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Jessie Diggins JessieDiggins @jessdiggs

Diggins says that she wanted the book to tell more than just the story of how she won … she wanted to tell the story of all the times she didn’t. She was willing to be completely honest about all of her story because she hopes that it will help to change the conversation about what it means to be successful. “I try to invest in the process,” she says. “You can’t tie your self-worth to winning. You may have the best race of your life and not win. You have to be able to celebrate your success.” Brave Enough has been described by Olympic gold medalist Jackie JoynerKersee as “a raw, heart-wrenching, nothing-held-back look at the struggles [Diggins] went through to succeed." Diggins has continued to ski professionally—she races the World Cup circuit every year from November to March. She lives in Stratton, Vt. where she’s a member of the Stratton Mountain Team. She is also active off the ski trail. She is an ambassador for the non-profit Fast and Female which says its mission is to “keep girls healthy and active in sports because it sets them up to succeed and lead in life beyond sports.” She also works with Protect Our Winters, an organization that works on climate change issues through the point of view of the outdoor sports community.

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FRESH AIR

| The University of Wisconsin River Falls Rodeo team and club celebrates 56 years.

BY AVA DIAZ

ESTABLISHED IN 1963 by faculty member David Stafford, the University of Wisconsin-River Falls competitive rodeo team and club combines the love for horses and the sport of rodeo with community outreach to preserve Western heritage. Competing against 12 other schools in the Great Plains region (Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North

Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin) throughout the year, athletes showcase their skills at an individual level for the benefit of the whole team. At the end of the season, the top three in each region (11 total regions) qualify for college nationals in June in Casper, Wyo. With lofty goals, comes the need for proper training and facilities to achieve them. Home to an indoor and

PHOTOS BBY ELIZABETH KUJALA (TOP) AND GAYLE BERGSTROM

D E PA R T M E N T S

River Falls Rodeo

12 | OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

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outdoor facility (equipped with stalls and stables) on campus, coaches Matt and Lacy Dunsmore say that it is their duty to continue to provide these athletes with proper equipment to ensure good, safe practice to set them up for success come competition. What sets this sport apart from others is the degree of responsibility held by each athlete for themselves and for the health and stability of their animals. “My favorite part of the sport is the family, the camaraderie but also the kinship that you get from competing with an animal,” Matt says. “That horse is like your world; it is yours and it is your partner. You take the best possible care of them, you exercise them. They are their own athlete.” Only practicing as a team once a week (and meeting twice a month as a club), some athletes have to dedicate extra time to perfect their individual events and improve their physical fitness. For team members like senior Hannah Bergstrom, the schedule as a student athlete who also balances an internship and work can be tough. However, she says it all comes down to the experiences you gain, and the relationships created with the people and horses you care about most. “If it is something that you want to do, you just make time for it,” Bergstrom says. Despite the unconventional 2020 season, Lacy says that the team still accomplished a lot of their goals and even had one of their athletes, Eric Wuthrich, qualify for nationals in bareback riding. As for the future, Matt and Lacy hope the program continues to excel at a competitive level all while maintaining the teams’ positive reputation in the community.

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DWELL

| D E PA R T M E N T S

CLEANING TOOL KIT Investing in all the right cleaning supplies can be challenging. Be sure you have everything on hand before cleaning day because even the smallest things can put a damper on productivity. Here are a few outside-the-box options: • Baking soda • Hydrogen peroxide • White vinegar • Essential oils (eucalyptus, lemongrass, lavender and tea tree are great for cleaning!) • Microfiber cloths • “Eraser” sponges • Latex gloves • Stiff/bristle brush

BY HAILEY ALMSTED PHOTOS BY TATE CARLSON

Get Ahead of the Game Clean out and cozy up your home for the fall.

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FALL CAN BE BUSY. First, back-toschool, then Halloween and Thanksgiving. It seems fall is the busiest time of the year for some—prepping for how you will approach new schedules, the holidays and daily life in between. To make your environment more conducive to calmness, don’t wait until spring to freshen your home, start now.

FOCUS ON SAVING (AND CLEANING) SPACE

Storage space can be a make-or-break when it comes to organizing, so ensure that you have all the room you need. First, start by getting rid of clothing, shoes and accessories that aren’t needed, or simply things you never wear. Sort through your closets, including coat closets and the kids’ closets to clear out old or unworn items. To maximize space—and save time!— only store in-season items in your closets. Store out-of-season goods in labeled bins, and pack them away until the next season rolls around. Bring out your sweaters, scarves, jackets and boots, focusing on vertical space to store larger items. Cascading hangers, folding methods and drawer dividers are additional space savers. Saving kitchen space is every chef’s dream come true. Now is the time to sort through your pantry, cleaning supplies, food storage containers and more. Toss out expired foods, including spices, baking goods and canned or boxed items. Label containers of pasta, cereal, snack foods and canned goods. Sort through food storage containers, making sure each has a matching lid. If you have more than you need, toss or donate these items. Prepare for the cold weather by cleaning out and organizing the garage—after all, you’ll need space for all the labeled bins, outdoor furniture and your car once the snow falls.

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DWELL

|

CONTINUED

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APPLES. APPLES. APPLES.

Apples for everybody! Apples in pies, doughnuts, rollovers, muffins, bread and cider. FUN for the whole family with pick-your-own pumpkins.

EDITOR’S TIPS AND TRICKS • To steam clean your microwave: Fill a microwavesafe bowl with one cup water, 2 Tbsp. white vinegar and a few drops of your favorite essential oil (or squeeze juice from lemon, lime or orange slices). Heat in the microwave (on high power) for five minutes, then let it sit inside for an additional five minutes before wiping the inside clean. • To clean tile grout: Mix 3/4 cup chlorine bleach with 1-gallon water. Wear rubber gloves and use a stiff brush to apply the solution. Let sit for several minutes before scrubbing and rinsing. Be careful to not splatter. For a bleach-free cleaner, mix equal parts baking soda and hydrogen peroxide to form a paste. Apply to grout, let sit for several minutes, scrub and rinse.

GET AHEAD OF THE HOLIDAYS

It never hurts to get ahead of holiday stress. Begin sorting through holiday decorations, clearing out overused or broken décor, and move decorations to an accessible spot so there’s no scrambling to get everything up and out. Resist the urge to overspend on gifts and meals, and start looking ahead to holiday budgets and written goals. Begin sorting through children’s books and toys to make room for new ones. If guest rooms are used as storage space, clear out any unnecessary items as early as possible. Not only will this be a lifesaver the weekend before your guests arrive, but you’ll be able to focus on pressing matters, such as setting out fresh linens, dusting and vacuuming. After clearing the clutter, ensure that all light bulbs (and night lights!) are in working order, make bathroom supplies (i.e. toilet paper) easy to find and make your spare room comfortable for guests.

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Watch Your Language Don’t wing it when it comes to Thanksgiving dinner. There are a few Thanksgiving camps, including the Tried and Trues and the Let’s Do Something News. (There’s no shame in sampling from both plates.) For those interested in traveling the culinary road not taken, we’ve collected some cooking vocabulary that can help clear the path to Destination Yum. —by Renée Stewart-Hester

BRINE = a salt solution, typically featuring fresh herbs and fruit, used to marinate turkey, for example, to provide for moist, flavor infused-meat. (Trust us; it’s worth doing to give your turkey an extra trot to the table.)

CRIMPING = the technique of pleating or adding a ruffled edge to pie dough, along the upper edge of the pie plate. (It’s all the presentation, so mastering this is half the battle of making homemade crust.) DUCHESS BAKED POTATOES = fancypants mashed potatoes, which are prepared, piped into decorative, individual swirls and browned. (Impress the motherin-law with these numbers!)

GALETTE = a flat, round pastry or bread that holds a sweet or savory filling GIBLETS = liver, heart, gizzard (part of the stomach) and neck of fowl (used to flavor gravy, stuffing and soup) GREMOLATA = made with chopped parsley, garlic and lemon zest (accompanies a protein)

HASSELBACK POTATOES = arrived thanks to the Hasselbacken Hotel’s restaurant in Sweden, spuds are sliced (not all the way through the potato) into thin slices (Presentation grade: A+) KABOCHA SQUASH = winter squash, also known as a Japanese pumpkin MINCED MEAT = a finely chopped mixture of boiled meat, suet and apples with spices and raisins. (Calm yourselves; not all versions include meat.)

ROUX = typically equal parts fat (we like butter!) and flour for start sauces or gravy SORGHUM = used by cooks as a sweetener (Ask your Southern friends about it.) and can be ground into flour and used as substitute for wheat flour TIAN = finely chopped vegetables that are cooked in olive oil then baked au gratin (see above for definition) ISTOCK.COM

BRAISING = uses wet and dry heat with food sautéed or seared and finished in a covered pot in low temperature with a liquid

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THIS

VS

T H AT AU GRATIN VS GRATIN DAUPHINOISE = au gratin includes slices of precooked potatoes cooked in cream and topped with cheese; Dauphinoise includes slices of uncooked potatoes cooked in cream. (Don’t go the boxed route for au gratin potatoes; fresh is best, especially for the holidays.) COMPOTE VS CHUTNEY VS COULIS = compote features fresh or dried fruit slowly cooked in a sugar syrup; chutney is a combination of fruit, vinegar, sugar and spices; and coulis is simply a fruit (or veggie) puree CRUMBLE VS BUCKLE VS BETTY = crumbles are typically stewed fruit and a topping mixture of butter, flour and sugar; buckle is fruit and cake baked with a streusel topping); and betty includes fruit layered between or on top of bread crumbs or cubes SPATCHCOCKED VS BUTTERFLY = Same thing! You just sound more “chefy” is you refer to splitting a chicken by removing the backbone to flatten it for better cooking as spatchcocking. SPOON BREAD (typically a soft cornbread served with—a spoon!) vs BREAD PUDDING (slices of bread baked with dried fruit, sugar, spices and eggs) STOCK (made from bones) vs BROTH (made from meat or veggies) So if you want to feed your skin, nails and hair, stick to stock—it’s full of collagen STUFFING VS DRESSING = Here’s where the dinner table arguments begin. The ingredients for stuffing and dressing are basically the same. What’s different is how they’re cooked. Stuffing goes IN the bird; dressing hangs out in a casserole dish in the oven or a pot on the stove. YAM VS SWEET POTATO = We’re betting 90 percent of us have been calling these Thanksgiving staples the wrong name. Often, an item labeled “yam” is actually a soft sweet potato (copper skin and orange flesh); items labeled “sweet potato” are firm sweet potatoes with golden skin and light flesh. Will the real yams please stand up? Real yams have black/brown skin and white, purple or reddish flesh. When in doubt, does it really matter?

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as a picture

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PHOTO CREDIT

Minnesota photographer captures beauty in the natural world. Fine art and botanical photographer Cynthia Dickinson grew up in northern rural Minnesota on the Mesabe Iron Range. She has many fond memories of summers spent making maple syrup and staying with her grandparents on a mile of lakeshore in Lutsen, and her botanical photography has likely been heavily influenced by her upbringing. She laughs as she recalls how her grandmother would wait every year for the lady slippers to bloom. “It was like the Queen of England came to our cabin,” she says. Dickinson’s father was a forester and in a way his work led her to an artist in residency at the St. Croix Watershed Research Station for the summer of 2021. “In 1954 my dad started reclaiming mine land in northern Minnesota, Tailings Ponds in particular,” she says. “I grew up with this dad who was an environmental

guy, so I really wanted to do a project at the Watershed.” That fusion of art and science is evident in Dickinson’s work and in her plans for what she hopes to accomplish during her residency at the Watershed. “I decided I wanted to do this project where I work with six scientists and ask each of them what they think beauty is, and what they think beauty is on their job,” she says. She retells the story about how her grandfather’s life was saved by an Ojibwe guide when an ax cut his leg during a land survey. This led to her grandparents having a strong respect for the Native American community, their cabin filled with Navajo rugs. “To get me to go to sleep, my grandmother would tell me to find the break in the Navajo rugs, because that’s where the

written by KATELYN STORCH photos by CYNTHIA DICKINSON

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&

CYNTHIA DICKINSON PHOTOGRAPHY

Portfolio: cynthiadickinson.zenfolio.com Shop: cynthia-dickinson.com

spirit of the rug moved in and out,” says Dickinson. “I grew up thinking that art had to have a spirit, and it had to have a break in the symmetry for the spirit to move in and out of the piece.” She began to take pictures around eight years old and always has had a camera with her since then. But when she stepped foot in an art museum for the first time at 14, she recalls the first piece she saw was a still life of fruit. “I kept staring at this painting because I couldn’t figure out where the pattern was and where the break in the pattern was, because the spirit had to have some place to get in and out,” says Dickinson. “I really believe that my job as a photographer is to find the spirit of something.” “A lot of the work that I’m doing comes after the fact,” says Dickinson when referring to the photographic

editing process. “I like to see what’s not there, and I want to see what I can make out of that.” She explains that for her, the camera is just a tool that produces a visual “recording” and her main task is to manipulate that “recording” to create art. Her technique includes digital hand painting and layering in Adobe Photoshop. “I really believe my job is to see beyond just the recording of something,” says Dickinson. Throughout the summer, Dickinson photographed gardens in Minneapolis and Edina to keep herself busy. She says it was difficult to photograph at her typical spots like the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum because they kept people on a one-way path and limited time due to COVID-19. However, she has been able to use this past summer to experiment much more.

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CANCER’S NOT CANCELED. Give today.

Despite certain limitations, Dickinson has had a successful year. She was able to show her work internationally at a gallery in Italy (online due to COVID-19). Her work also recieved honorable mention for a Julia Margaret Cameron award. “This year has been really good to me,” she says. The Julia Margaret Cameron award is primarily for women photographers. This year, 6010 images were submitted by around 900 women representing 67 countries. The award features multiple categories with one winner in each category as well as a handful of honorable mentions, one of which was awarded to Dickinson in the non-professional section nature category. Like many Minnesotans, Dickinson is preparing to shoot our much-anticipated fall foliage. She recommends shooting

The pandemic is changing everything. But it’s not stopping the fight against cancer. When you give to the Cancer Kids Fund at Children’s Minnesota, you help local families keep fighting. Your gift supports everything from unique therapies to life-saving research to mortgage and rent relief during a time when more families need your help. Your gift today is more important than ever.

Thank you to the 30+ businesses that partnered with Children’s Minnesota in September to raise funds for our cancer and blood disorders program. childrensMN.org/shinebrightforkids

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“I really believe my job is to see beyond just the recording of something.” Cynthia Dickinson

the fall colors in your own backyard to stay safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to appreciate the beauty in your own neighborhood. Her advice is to stay local and go out during the week when there aren’t a lot of people around. Dickinson is looking forward to an upcoming February solo show at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, where she will host two photography classes and give a gallery talk. She is also now represented by Burnet Fine Art and Advisory in Wayzata. She mentions that she would love to eventually shoot botanicals at the headwaters of the Mississippi River all the way down to its mouth. Her goal would be to document how those landscapes are changing, like capturing endangered and invasive species, and focus on how photography assists in that ecological work. For readers who are interested in purchasing her work, Dickinson’s limited edition 11x17 prints are between $130-150. “I always make sure I have something that people can afford. It’s still limited, it’s still signed, and it’ll still go up in value,” says Dickinson.

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ON THE TOWN W H A T ’ S G O I N G O N I N T H E VA L L E Y

LUMBERJACK TOUR Ends at a local bar where you can throw axes.

Take a Tour of Rivertown New walking tour company offers outdoor entertainment options.

T

his past summer, three entrepreneurial women Angela Fletcher, Christie Wanderer and Sara Letourneau opened a walking tour business in downtown Stillwater. The three have known each other for several years and have enjoyed participating together in fitness classes offered at Pioneer Park as well as challenging themselves on the Stillwater stairs. It was during a stair climb workout that Fletcher mused about how she’d enjoy working for a local walking tour company. That’s all it took to inspire the trio to launch Rivertown Tours Letourneau laughs about how the three are not Stillwater natives. She’s from New York, Fletcher is from Michigan and Wanderer is from California. But, she says, “The three of us love Stillwater and we want to show off our town, its businesses and its history.” They spent last year researching the background of historic

houses and local architecture through engagement with Discover Stillwater and the Historical Society. “Then, covid-19 hit, and everything was put on ice,” Letourneau says. “But, as things began to open up in June, people were looking for things to do outside, so we got going. We weren’t 100 percent ready, but we figured it out.” They started by offering two different tours twice a day on Saturdays and Sundays. One was a Main Street tour that took participants along the river and through a few alleys. The other was a south hill tour near the historic courthouse and through the neighborhood. They later added a lumberjack tour about logging, ending with guests throwing axes at Stillwater’s Lumberjack axthrowing bar. Check out what tours are available this fall at rivertowntours.com —Angela Johnson

TATE CARLSON

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O N T H E TOW N

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Take some time to reflect. These Sahaja mediation courses require no prior experience and are focused on bringing you the benefits of meditation in the comfort of your own home. You can join the Zoom session 30 minutes early to get some tips to set yourself up for a great experience as well. All ages. Free. 8:45–10 p.m. Zoom meeting ID: 870 6142 9822; Password: 123123; freemeditation.com

20 LGBT Career Fair

Looking for a job at an inclusive business? Connect with companies in the Twin Cities area that value all identities and celebrate a diverse workplace. The list of businesses and community organizers participating in this event will be released two weeks prior to the event. All ages. Free. 5–7 p.m. chris@chaleurcreative.com; chaleurcreative.com

24 Sixth Annual Bloom Event: A Virtual Event

Bloom caters to new and expecting mothers with support and education. Presented by Twin Cities Mom Collective, Breck School, Park Nicollet, HealthPartners and City Mom Collective, this year’s event will be fully online to ensure everyone’s safety and wellbeing. Moms of all ages. $24–100, see website for details. 10–11:30 a.m. amanda@twincitiesmom.com; twincitiesmom.com

IN-PERSON EVENTS

6 Our Home: Native Minnesota – Teacher Workshop

It can be tough to understand how to thoughtfully and ethically teach students about Native American history. This seminar, put on by the Minnesota Historical Society, teaches educators how to incorporate Ojibwe and Dakota primary sources into curriculum, giving them insight through the “Our Home” exhibit in the Minnesota History Center. Teachers and educators encouraged to attend. Ticket prices vary. 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Minnesota History Center, 345 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul; mnhs.org

COMPILED BY NINA RAEMONT, VIVIAN SHINALL AND KATELYN STORCH

7 Sip & Savor: Best of Twin Cities

Support the St. Paul Festival and Heritage Foundation while enjoying local food, drink and live music at Sip & Savor: Best of Twin Cities. Hosted at the gorgeous Landmark Center in downtown St. Paul, attendees will be able to bid on over 100+ items in a live and a silent auction. Whether you’re taking home a silent auction prize or a stomach full of local provisions, Sip and Savor is destined to be an enjoyable time. All ages. Tickets: $35. 5:30–8:30 p.m. Landmark Center, 75 W. Fifth St., St. Paul; wintercarnival.com

8-11 Star Wars in Concert: Return of the Jedi with the Minnesota Orchestra

Enjoy the final film in the original trilogy of the action packed galactic classic Star Wars: Return of the Jedi with accompaniment by the Minnesota Orchestra. This film is brough to life with a live performance of the Oscar nominated movie score. Experience the film on a whole new level, whether it be your first time watching it or your dozenth time. All ages. Ticket prices vary. Thursday– Saturday 7:30 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. Orchestra Hall, 1111 Nicollet Mall, Mpls.; 612.371.5600; minnesotaorchestra.org

24 Glow-In-The-Dark Halloween Scene Workshop

Get your child ready to have some spectacular spooky fun with this art class. Students will receive a canvas board to create their masterpiece on and a lesson to paint a starry glow-in-the-dark night sky. The kids are also encouraged to wear their Halloween costume to the class. Ages 4–9. $25.20 for members, $28 for non-members. 10:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m. Kidcreate Studio, 1785 Radio Dr., Woodbury; 651.735.0880; kidcreate.com

Due to the fluidity being experienced in the current environment, please note that some events/dates and even some business operations may have changed since these pages went to print. Please visit stcroixvalleymag.com for updates.

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TA S T E M A K E R S

House-to-House Hospitality

HOMEMADE HALLOWEEN TREATS FOR FRIENDS AND FAMILY. BY EDITORIAL STAFF

PHOTOS BY TATE CARLSON

If you’re feeling Halloween hospitality vibes, our goody-loving editorial team pulled together some sweet treats and beverages for you to offer your neighbors. Set up an outdoor food and beverage table, fire up a portable fire pit (safely, of course), and take a seat on your driveway or yard for a front row view of Halloween 2020.

ZOMBTINI

(Contributed by Cindy Erickson of Woodbury) 1 oz. White rum 2 oz. Melon liqueur 1 oz. 100 percent pineapple juice ½ oz. Sprite Grenadine Ice Plastic eyeball for garnish

Zombtini

Combine ice, rum, melon liqueur and juice in a martini shaker, and shake well. Pour into a martini glass (2/3 full), and add Sprite. Drizzle grenadine over the top with a spoon. Add (but don’t eat!) the eyeball.

BOO CUPS

(Contributed by Beth Hill of Woodbury) 3 ¼ cups cold milk 2 packages (4 serving size each) JELL-O chocolate flavor instant pudding 8 oz. Cool Whip whipped topping, thawed and divided 20 Oreo cookies, crushed and divided 30 Miniature semi-sweet chocolate chips

Pour milk into a large bowl, and add dry pudding mixes. Beat with a whisk for two minutes or until well blended. Gently stir in half each of the whipped topping and cookie crumbs. Spoon 1 Tbsp. of remaining cookie crumbs into each of 15 (6 oz.) paper or plastic cups. Cover evenly with layers of pudding mixture and remaining cookie crumbs. Drop remaining whipped topping by

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Monster Cupcakes

spoonsful onto desserts to resemble ghosts. Add chocolate chips for eyes. Serve immediately, or refrigerate until ready to serve.

MONSTER CUPCAKES

(Contributed by Beth Hill of Woodbury and adapted from Ghoulish Goodies: Creature Feature Cupcakes, Monster Eyeballs, Bat Wings, Funny Bones, Witches’ Knuckles, and Much More! by Sharon Bowers) CUPCAKES: 1 1/2 cups flour 1 tsp. baking powder ¼ tsp. salt 2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice ½ cup butter 3/4 cup sugar ½ cup canned pumpkin puree ½ cup buttermilk 1 tsp. vanilla extract INGREDIENTS FOR ASSEMBLY: 1 container cream cheese frosting, colored with green paste food coloring 18 large marshmallows 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips 18 pretzel sticks Chocolate sprinkles or other candy for faces

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line 18 muffin pan cups with paper liners. Sift flour, baking powder, salt and pumpkin pie spice into a medium bowl, and set aside. Beat butter and sugar in a large bowl with an electric mixer until smooth. Beat in the eggs on at a time. Blend in pumpkin puree, buttermilk and vanilla. With mixer on low speed, add the flour mixture, and blend until combined. Spoon the batter into liners. Bake for approximately 18-20 minutes or until a cake tester inserted into the center of the cupcakes comes out clean. Cool and assemble.

SALTED NUT ROLLS (Contributed by Renée Stewart-Hester) CENTER 2 lbs. powdered sugar 2/3 cup corn syrup 2/3 cup butter, melted 2 tsp. salt 2 tsp. vanilla CARAMEL 12 oz. peanut butter chips 2/3 cup corn syrup 1 tsp. vanilla ¼ cup butter

Coating Peanuts, blanched and salted

Mix center ingredients, and kneed well. Roll into balls or small logs, and place in the freezer. Melt the caramel ingredients together, and dip the frozen balls/logs into the caramel. Roll them in salted, blanched peanuts. Place on waxed paper to set.

CARAMEL APPLE BITES (Kowalski’s Markets)

Knudsen’s Hand-wrapped caramels, sliced into fourths 2 apples, cored and cubed

Skewer several apple cubes with a piece of caramel on four-inch bamboo skewers or party picks. Serve immediately.

SPOOKY SPIKED HALLOWEEN PUNCH (Conservamome.com)

1 cup orange soda 1/3 cup Pinot Grigio 1 scoop vanilla bean ice cream

Combine the wine and ice cream in a glass. Add orange soda, and stir together.

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LAST GLANCE “Warm Fall Day in Stillwater”

Fall from New Heights Drone photographer captures lovely autumnal scene. WE REGULARLY FEATURE PHOTO SUBMISSIONS

from our Lens on St. Croix Valley photo contest in the pages of St. Croix Valley Magazine and online. This month, we asked Michael Huber to tell us about his 2019 submission titled “Warm Fall Day in Stillwater.” WHERE WAS THE PHOTO TAKEN?

The photo was taken from about 300 feet in the air on the Wisconsin side of the historic Stillwater Bridge looking towards the city. PHOTO BY MICHAEL HUBER

WHAT INSPIRED THE SHOT?

It was a beautiful morning and warm for October 30th.

The air was calm and I thought there would be a good opportunity to see the bridge being restored with the city in the background. WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT THIS IMAGE?

I particularly like the morning light hitting the city with the high wispy clouds reflecting on the St Croix River. WHAT KIND OF CAMERA DO YOU USE?

I am an FAA Certified UAV pilot and used the DJI Mavi 2 Pro quadcopter for this photograph. It is a 6-shot panorama.

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