Lake Minnetonka September 2021

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LAKE MINNETONKA MAGAZINE

M URAL S ON THE WA LL

SEPTEMBER 2021 LAKEMINNETONKAMAG.COM

Wayzata artist personalizes home décor with larger-than-life creations


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CONTENTS

SEPTEMBER 2021

Em ily Bretzel p rov id es an in sid e look of h er fa m ily’s expansive hom e gardening en d ea vors . Ph oto by Chr is Emeott PAG E 5 0

The glory of gardening: hands in the dirt, head in the sun, heart with nature. To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul. ALFRED AUSTIN, ENGLISH POET AND NOVELIST

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SEPTEMBER 2021


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CONTENTS

IN EVERY ISSUE PAG E 2 2

Editor’s Letter 8 Noteworthy 11 On the Town 43 Gallery 48 Tastemakers 50 Last Glance 56 DEPARTMENTS Art and Culture 16

Raise the Curtain Blue Water Theatre sets the stage for upcoming productions. Pets 18

Scaling Back Top Dog offers weight management program. Scene 20

Remembering 9/11 A new memorial is set to be unveiled in Wayzata’s Panoway Park. Faces 22

Your Face Here Smokin’ Henways virtually produce a new album. FEATURES

28

The Touch Crisis Author explores communicating healthy boundaries.

34

Murals on the Wall

PHOTO: CHRIS EMEOTT

Wayzata artist personalizes home décor with largerthan-life creations.

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SEPTEMBER 2021


STUDIOM-INT.COM Plymouth

763.717.8500 Lake Geneva


FROM THE EDITOR Renée Stewart-Hester, lakeminntonkamag@tigeroak.com

F

Never miss an issue of Lake Minnetonka Magazine with free, anytime access to our digital editions. Full screen viewing on your digital device allows easy cover-to-cover reading. You can zoom in on text or images as well as share your favorite Lake Minnetonka Magazine stories with friends and family.

Learn more at lakeminnetonkamag.com

See what we’re doing behind the scenes and around town! LAKEMINNETONKAMAG.COM

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On the Cover Abbey Holden, photo by Chris Emeott

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SEPTEMBER 2021

PHOTO: TATE CARLSON

in digital format!

resh starts. A little tabula rasa does us all good from time-to-time. Looking forward affords us the opportunity to embrace change and accept new challenges. For some, January is a good starting point; for others, September is the launching pad for moving in a new direction. This issue includes some perspectives on moving forward or shaking things up a bit. Take, for example, Dawn Bennett, author of The Touch Crisis: Navigating the Tricky Terrain of Bringing Healthy Touch Back to Our Culture. On page 28, Madeline Kopiecki examines Bennett’s take on the return of more human touch in a post-pandemic world. How do you plan to react to an extended hand or an offered hug? Samantha DeLeon writes on page 22 about musician Craig Schmoller and some fellow artists, who, in lieu of live gigs, decided “Enough is enough. No pandemic is going to get us down. Let’s make some music, properly physically-distanced, of course,” he says. The group, the Smokin’ Henways was born, and the band headed into a recording studio. I had the pleasure of connecting with Charlie Leonard, the artistic director and founder of Wayzata’s Blue Water Theatre Company. On page 16, he describes how the theater company pivoted during and after the pandemic. “Luckily, we remain in strong financial shape due to the generosity of our supporters and the seriousness with which the board and staff take our fiscal responsibilities ... But programming was affected in a big way,” he says. Looking forward shouldn’t prevent us from remembering and honoring the past. Kopiecki also offers a look at a 9/11 memorial in Wayzata. Turn to page 20 for more information, and visit wayzataconservancy.org for up-to-date information. Until next time,


VOL. 17 NO. 4 lakeminnetonkamag.com

publisher SUSAN ISAY

editor RENÉE STEWART-HESTER

managing editor

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ANGELA JOHNSON

associate editor HAILEY ALMSTED

copy editor KELLIE DOHERTY

staff writers AVA DIAZ, MADELINE KOPIECKI, SAMANTHA DELEON

editorial interns MEGHAN BISHOP, LAUREN FOLEY, OLIVIA RIVERA

editorial advisory board Jacqueline Getty, Minnetonka Public Schools Tracy Hvezda-Lehtola, Hennepin County Library-Excelsior Michele Phillips, blogger, writer, photographer Jenny Bodurka, Minnetonka Community Education Natalie Webster, chief creator at Webster Effect Mike Polis, Realtor and YouTuber Things|People|Places

senior managing art director SARAH DOVOLOS

art director ALLISON NOLDEN

lead staff photographer CHRIS EMEOTT

print production director BRITTNI DYE

digital production director DEIDRA ANDERSON

project coordinators ADRIANNA BLACK BULL, LISA STONE

senior account executives BROOKE BEISE, KATIE FREEMARK, CYNTHIA HAMRE, SARA JOHNSON

circulation and marketing KATIE RINGHAND

credit manager APRIL MCCAULEY

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chief operating officer SUSAN ISAY

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Lake Minnetonka Magazine 9877 AIRPORT ROAD N.E. BLAINE, MN 55449 612.548.3180 SUBSCRIPTIONS: Lake Minnetonka Magazine is published 12 times a year. Rates $18 for 12 issues. Back issues $5.95. For subscription and customer service inquiries, please contact customerservice@tigeroak.com or call 1.800.637.0334. ©Tiger Oak Media Inc. 2021. All rights reserved.

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SEPTEMBER 2021


NOTEWORTHY local tips, tidbits & insights

HAVE A BALL Eke out a bit more summer fun with these larger-than-life yard games. BY AVA DIAZ

E L EVATE YOUR BAC KYA R D F U N

with twists on classic games, and largerthan-life activities. Bucket Ball Set up six buckets in the shape of a triangle for each team, and take turns throwing the ball into the opposing bins. The team with no buckets left standing wins. (DIY: Use 12 buckets and a ball that fits inside.)

Giant Jenga Take turns removing the wood blocks from different levels of the tower. (DIY: Cut 54 2x4 sanded wood blocks.)

PHOTO BY CHRIS EMEOTT

Kan Jam This intertwines disc golf with horseshoe. (DIY: Use large plastic bins and cut a 3x12 slit for the win.) $39.99; Dick’s Sporting Goods, 11260 Wayzata Blvd., Minnetonka; 952.525.0200; dickssportinggoods.com

the opposing three-step ladder. Each step is worth points, and the remaining bolas on the ladder are added to the total. $34.99; Frattalone’s Ace Hardware, 5016 County Road 101, Minnetonka; 952.474.5461; acehardware.com

Lawn Dice Play a larger-than-life version of the classic board game Yahtzee or Yarkle, the yard game version of the Facebook game Farkle! $29.99; Available to purchase at Cabela’s, 8400 Hudson Road.

Spikeball Teams gather around an ankle-level hoop. The first player serves the ball into the net toward the opponents. With up to three hits to return the ball, the volley will continue until one team fails to return the ball. $59.99; Dick’s Sporting Goods, 11260 Wayzata Blvd., Minnetonka; 952.525.0200; dickssportinggoods.com

Ladder Toss Opponents toss three bolas toward

LAKEMINNETONKAMAG.COM

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N OT E WO RT H Y »

TAST E

Mostly Made hits local markets. Readers might recall reading about Mostly Made in previous issues of Lake Minnetonka Magazine. The company, owned by Deephaven’s Jillian McGary (Head of Hot Dish), specializes in premade enchilada filling, shepherd’s pie mix and skillet lasagna mix. But there’s more news to share—Mostly Made is now available in the deli section of Super Target. “It’s really neat to see some traction after all that blood, sweat and tears,” McGary says, noting she’s been busy demonstrating and promoting the product. To gain speed during the pandemic is impressive. “People got tired of cooking during [the pandemic],” McGary says. “They wanted that restaurant-quality food.” A little help in the kitchen for home cooks is always welcome, and the premade items serve well for cabin cooking; older folks, who need assistance; and even college students or young adults, who are short on time and kitchen skills. “It’s cheaper than going out to eat at restaurants and healthier,” McGary says. The website features recipes for using the mixes, so home cooks have multiple ways of using the products. Think: burrito bowls, nachos and tortilla soup; calzone, minestrone and stuffed spaghetti squash; and scalloped potato shepherd’s pie, tater tot hot dish and more. The business partners with the Ronald McDonald House–Upper Midwest, sharing its fillings with it residents. It’s a fitting tribute since the business was borne out of McGary providing meals for a family member, who was diagnosed with breast cancer, and her family. Mostly Made products can be found in Minnesota, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota and Wisconsin. Find Mostly Made in the freezer section at Kowalski’s Market, 400 Water St., Excelsior; Lakewinds Co-op, 17501 Minnetonka Blvd., Minnetonka; Coburn’s Superstore, 1400 Babcock Blvd., Delano; Jubilee Foods, 2131 Commerce Blvd., Mound; and Super Target (deli), 4848 County Road 101, Minnetonka. Read more about Mostly Made by visiting mostly-made.com and lakeminnetonkamag.com. —RENÉE STEWART-HESTER

SIP

This cocktail is very easy to prepare and non-committal, too, as these ingredients are often available in smaller format bottles, so give it a try.

»» 2 oz. dry vermouth »» 1 oz. Benedictine (a liqueur flavored with 27 flowers, herbs, roots and spices) »» 3 dashes of absinthe

Put ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake, strain and serve. Garnish with an orange twist!

Kevin Castellano, general manager at Wayzata Wine and Spirits, is a lake area wine and liquor expert. wayzatawineandspirits.com

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SEPTEMBER 2021

PHOTO: EMILY J. DAVIS

It’s time to try something new!


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EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

N OT E WO RT H Y »

READ

Debut novel makes an impact.

Brit Bennett was only in her mid-20s when The Mothers, her debut novel, was released. She took the publishing world by storm with this book, which seemed as if someone with many more years of experience had written it, and was a finalist for multiple prestigious book awards. It’s an excellent choice for a book club in search of a title with lots of discussion-worthy scenarios and character choices. It centers on Nadia Turner and her complicated relationships with Aubrey and Luke, which begin when all three are teenagers, and follows them into their adulthood. The main themes of the story focus on, unsurprisingly, mothers and the impact they have on their children’s lives, whether they are present or not. The most unique feature of this book is the eponymous “mothers,” whose narration of the story from a distance brings to mind a Greek chorus and adds another layer of perspective as events unfold.

Raela Schoenherr is an editor at a Minnesota publishing company. Find her on Twitter at @raelaschoenherr.


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D E PA R T M E N T S » A R T A N D C U LT U R E

Raise the Curtain Blue Water Theatre sets the stage for upcoming productions.

IT’S BEEN A MINUTE (OK, since 2015) that we last visited with Charlie Leonard, founder, executive director and artistic director of Blue Water Theatre Company (BWTC). We wanted to find out what’s been happening in recent years and how the theatre handled the pandemic. What’s new? Our biggest and most notable change in the last six years was our purchase of the Unitarian Church building in downtown Wayzata and the conversion of that space into a 145-seat theater. Not only has this allowed us to nearly double the number of shows we produce each year [10-12], but it’s become the perfect “home” for our community of actors and has really defined who we are. How did the pandemic impact the theatre? Luckily, we remain in strong financial shape due to the generosity of our supporters and the seriousness with which the board and staff take our fiscal responsibilities ... But programming was affected in a big way. The entire essence of what we do involves getting as many kids as possible into a room together and putting on big shows, and we just haven’t been able to do that in any sort of “normal” way for over a year now … [Summer 2020 , BWTC held smallgroup theatre and dance classes. During the 2020-2021 school year, it produced a couple of small-cast plays, performed fully-masked to a very limited audience.] … At our core, we are a musical theatre organization, and to go a year without doing musicals has felt like a piece of our hearts has been missing. What’s on deck? The plan is to do a

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PHOTO: SARAH KURTZ

RENÉE STEWART-HESTER


Did you know? The theatre’s moniker, Blue Water, is roughly the translation of the word Minnesota, based on the Dakota word Mnisota, which means sky-colored water, cloudy water or blue water, according to Leonard.

big middle/elementary school musical in November and a big high school musical in December. Auditions for both shows will take place in early this month. Has the theatre had “graduates” perform in any regional or national venues? [An alumnus] made his Broadway debut in the winter of 2019-2020 in A Christmas Carol, and then opened in Harry Potter and the Cursed Child in March of 2020 right before the pandemic hit. We have other alumni, who have performed in regional/dinner theatres throughout the United States. But we are still a young enough organization that most of our alumni, who are planning to pursue theatre as a career, are still in college. Ask me this question again in about five years, and I’m pretty confident and excited that we are going to have a lot of kids to brag about! What has theatre meant to you? It’s funny. I really accidentally fell into this career. I was a middle school English teacher, who volunteered to direct a school play because I had “seen a lot of shows.” Fast-forward 17 years, and this is where I am today. Creating BWTC and seeing how important it is to so many kids has been the most rewarding way I could possibly have thought to spend my life.

BLUE WATER THEATRE COMPANY 605 E. Rice St., Wayzata; 952.855.9147; bluewatertheatre.com @bluewatertheatre Blue Water Theatre Company @bluewatertheatr

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D E PA R T M E N T S » P E T S

Scaling Back Top Dog offers weight management program.

CONSIDER THIS: 56 percent of pet dogs in the U.S. are overweight, with 30 percent of those being obese, according to a 2018 survey by the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention. Those statistics increase the likelihoods of pets being diagnosed with diabetes, heart disease, cancer and arthritis, resulting in shorter and reduced quality of life. “We see so many dogs that are overweight and in some cases obese, and I am concerned for their health, happi-

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SEPTEMBER 2021

ness and longevity,” says Jean SteltenBeuning, owner of Top Dog Country Club in New Germany. Enter Top Dog’s Canine Weight Camp. “I developed the program details, and my operations manager, Stephanie [Nitzschke], came up with the idea,” Stelten-Beuning says. “It is something that we have unofficially done at Top Dog for years.” Previously, many clients, she says, have commented that their dogs return home from Top Dog with an

increased fitness level, thanks to receiving five to six hours of daily group play in large outdoor play yards. “Often, my clients utilize a Top Dog vacation to help their dog lose those extra pounds, knowing that they are on a routine here with lots of exercise and knowing we don’t cave every time we get those begging eyes and noses nudging for extra treats,” Stelten-Beuning says. But the Weight Camp takes things a step further. “The program is completely customized based upon the dog and [his/

PHOTO: TOP DOG COUNTRY CLUB

BY RENÉE STEWART-HESTER


“Pets and their needs for fresh air, exercise and mental stimulation always add to their humans’ benefit—getting us out for extra walks and exercise.” Jean Stelten-Beuning, owner of Top Dog Country Club

her] medical situation,” she says. “We work with the dog’s current veterinarian, as they know the dog’s history. Exercise can include swim therapy, walks, flexibility exercises [and more].” The program involves a kick-start getaway to Top Dog with a veterinariandirected diet and exercise, followed by a customized plan and a maintenance program, including diet recommendations and a continued exercise regime. Applicable costs include the standard boarding/daycare fee, which includes five to six hours of group play, plus a $100 administrative fee. Additional walks, swim therapy and flexibility exercises and vet transport would be in addition. Maintaining a pet’s healthy weight once a goal is achieved doesn’t equate with denying him/her an item or two from the table. “I am not against a treat from the table now and then,” Stelten-Beuning says. “My own dogs always get a bite of my beef tenderloin when I treat myself or a bite of broccoli. However, I am very careful to never give them sweets or grains, which serve no useful purpose in a dog’s diet.” She recommends apple slices and vegetables, which are good low calorie treats for dogs. “A quality dog food, free from fillers, grains and other carbohydrates, is complete and balanced for dogs and should be their primary source of nutrition,” Stelten-Beuning says.

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D E PA R T M E N T S » S C E N E

Remembering 9/11 A new memorial is set to be unveiled in Wayzata’s Panoway Park.

EVERY ALPHABETICAL LIST of the nearly 3,000 victims from the 9/11 attacks starts with the name Gordon Aamoth, Jr. Now, the family of Wayzata local Gordy Aamoth—along with the rest of the Wayzata community—will have a place to honor the lives lost and reflect on the courageous actions of first responders in the wake of that tragedy. “We didn’t want the memorial to just be dedicated to Gordy,” says Erik Aamoth, Aamoth’s brother. “We understand, as a Wayzata resident, he’s going to be mentioned, but we wanted it to be dedicated to all the victims [and] the first responders and for it to be a community memorial.” Aamoth worked at Sandler O’Neill + Partners and was on the 104th floor when the World Trade Center’s south tower collapsed. But while his loss was felt most acutely by his family and loved ones, Erik says the loss was felt by everyone. “My experience over the past 20 years is that the communities are impacted; everybody’s impacted,” he says. “And so that was really important to us—that we have it be focused on the community and all the different people, who were impacted by the attack.” The Aamoth family donated some of the artifacts it had received from Ground Zero to the City of Wayzata. At the time, the city had yet to form any concrete plans for a 9/11 memorial, but, in 2020, construction on the new Panoway Park off of Lake Street rekindled conversation about the project. Andrew Mullin, the executive director of the Wayzata Conservancy, says this new park sparked the design process for the memorial. “It is two large pieces of granite—they’re one nine-

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PHOTO AND RENDERING: CIVITAS

BY MADELINE KOPIECKI


hundredths the size of each fallen tower from the World Trade Center—set in a birch grove of nine trees, symbolizing nine and 11,” Mullin says. These two granite plinths will lay on their sides, offering visitors a quiet space for contemplation and remembrance. One of the plinths will have a piece of iron, a piece of steel and a piece of stone from Ground Zero, donated by the Aamoth family. The other plinth will feature a series of flags, which will be flown in remembrance every September 11 from sunrise to sunset. Money for the memorial was raised by the Wayzata Conservancy. “Many, many community members stepped forward to donate money,” Mullin says. The conservancy was also mindful to include the Aamoth family on the design process, and multiple family members contributed and collaborated on the memorial’s design. Peter Aamoth, Aamoth’s younger brother, is an architect with the Minneapolis firm James Dayton Design and collaborated on the technical aspects of the memorial, while Aamoth’s mother, Mary Aamoth, focused on the aesthetics of the memorial. “When we first heard about [plans for the memorial], we were really pretty humbled about it,” Erik says. “To have the city put the effort in that they’re putting in, not only on behalf of Gordy but the other victims, we were pretty pleased that they were thinking about it, and we appreciated them involving us in this process.” The memorial will be unveiled tentatively on the 20th anniversary of 9/11 at the Panoway on Wayzata, 681 Lake St. S.E., Wayzata. Up-to-date information is available at wayzataconservancy.org.

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D E PA R T M E N T S » FAC E S

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Voted Best Fine Dining in Minnesota by StarTribune Readers

Your Face Here Smokin’ Henways virtually produce new album. BY SAMANTHA DE LEON PHOTOS BY CHRIS EMEOTT

BY DROPPING THE CURTAIN on live entertainment, the pandemic took a toll on the music scene. But this wasn’t necessarily the case for Craig Schmoller of Carver and Joe Sherohman of Maple Grove, who created and produced an album this year, virtually, without ever meting face-to-face. Pre-pandemic, Sherohman says he met Schmoller, who for 25 years had lived in the Minnetonka/ Wayzata area, while performing together on a sidewalk outside of a Dunn Brothers Coffee in Maple Grove. He says it was a throwtogether jam for a one-shot gig with Sherohman on bass and Schmoller on guitar. After going their separate ways, they crossed paths again 10 years later during a men’s group rib fest. That second encounter set the course for their initial band, Waylen Blue and the Sub Fives. But, Sherohman says that all fell apart when the pandemic hit. When everything shut down, he and Schmoller tried playing music together online with Jamulus, a music performance software that enables live rehearsing from anywhere on the Internet. Despite their best efforts, it didn’t work for them. Sherohman says Schmoller

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FAC E S » C O N T I N U E D

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Your Face Here is available on Apple Music, Spotify and YouTube.

Donate $20 to Hammer and walk away with a mystery bottle of wine valued from $20-$70! All proceeds go to Hammer Residences, a Wayzata based nonprofit providing adults with developmental disabilities the opportunity to experience life to the fullest. Thursday September 30 | 5-7 PM | Cash Only

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decided to create an album, and that’s when Smokin’ Henways was born. It’s an instrumental jazz/ rock/fusion/Texas-styled blues band. Sherohman says the name of the band originates from a 1930s Marx Brothers joke. “It’s just for fun and for those who remember those guys,” Schmoller says. Creating the album, Your Face Here, was a short leap for both musicians, who have studios in their homes, and transferring their music to each other wasn’t much of an issue either, Schmoller says. “I tried to do a tune in about a week, and [Sherohman would] shoot those tracks right back to me, and we did this volley back and forth. By February, it was all mixed, mastered and we distributed it,” he says. Granted, the pandemic brought missed opportunities for working together, but Schmoller says it afforded them good exercises and inventive avenues for making music. “There was an upside to it, even if we can’t play out,” he says. But as the world began reopening, the duo has received multiple inquiries about performing live. “We’re looking forward to doing live music because that’s really, to me, what it’s all about,” Schmoller says.

LAKEMINNETONKAMAG.COM

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CALEY PAVILLARD, MODEL FOR GUESS AND VICTORIA’S SECRET —Smile Design by Dr. Holger Meiser

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Thank you to Lake Minnetonka residents and Lake Minnetonka Magazine readers who voted us Lake Minnetonka’s Best Builder for 2021. We appreciate this great honor!

Custom Homes and Renovations

952-935-9100 • www.JKandSons.com


WrittenbyMadelineKopiecki

TH E T O UCH CR I S I S

How we heal through healthy touch. 28

SEPTEMBER 2021


“ ... everyone has different needs and preferences for touch and how to appropriately ask what their level of comfort is. Especially after this last year, I learned how to ask people what kind of greeting they prefer.”

PHOTOS: ISTOCK.COM/SIBERIANBEAUTY; DAWN BENNETT

CATHI WILLIAMS, WAYZATA

In the wake of COVID-19, Dawn Bennett says many people have experienced a collective trauma, especially when it comes to resuming consensual touch, but she offers a remedy. “My goal is: Let’s recover from this as efficiently and as well as we can,” she says. “And that’s going to take communication. That’s going to take, ‘Do you want touch? Is it okay for me to touch you?’” Instead of swearing off touch because we’re afraid of getting sick or because we’re afraid of offending someone, Bennett says we need to have clear communication, so that even if it’s not physical contact, we can touch other people with compassion, with, “I see you.” Bennett, a massage therapist and founder of Red Wing-based Touch Remedies, hosts speaking engagements across the Metro, including the Lake Minnetonka area, and was inspired to write The Touch Crisis: Navigating the Tricky Terrain of Bringing Healthy Touch Back to Our Culture after a touch crisis of her own. “My [previous] business had won the service business of the year award with the Chamber of Commerce,” Bennett says. “So, I went up on stage, and on the way back to my seat, I hugged a bunch of people because I knew a lot of people there.” A few weeks later, a woman approached Bennett on the street. “She shamed me, basically, and said, ‘The way that you were hugging in a business event was completely inappropriate. This is no place for doing that,’” she says. While Bennett acknowledges that there was probably a reason that this woman’s reaction was so emotionally charged, the conversation nevertheless challenged Bennett to think about how she was interacting with touch. “I thought I had really clear communication, and it kind of set me back where I

started exploring, you know, where are my boundaries lacking or where perhaps could I communicate more clearly,” she says. Bennett began exploring how people give and receive consensual touch, as well as methods for creating boundaries for those who don’t want to be touched. The results of her explorations are included in her book, which provides tools and methods for people to communicate their wants, needs and boundaries. “The phrase I use a lot in my book is, ‘Would you like,’” Bennett says. “Not, ‘Let me have a hug,’ or ‘Can I have a hug?,’ but ‘Would you like a hug?’ because that allows the other person to make the decisions. You offer up what’s on the table for you, and ask the person what they would like.” “Reading The Touch Crisis has really helped me understand that everyone has different needs and preferences for touch and how to appropriately ask what their level of comfort is,” says Cathi Williams of Wayzata. “Especially after this last year, I learned

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“My goal is: Let’s recover from this as efficiently and as well as we can,” she says. “And that’s going to take communication.”

how to ask people what kind of greeting they prefer. Some people prefer a wave or an elbow bump while others are eagerly waiting for a hug. Without this awareness in the past, I would either hold back in fear of upsetting someone or had the potential of invading someone’s space.” Understanding people’s preferences has helped Williams on another level. “It allows me not to take it personally,” she says of when people prefer to avoid touch-based greetings. She recommends Bennett’s book for those who are interested in gaining insight on how to navigate touch in the post-pandemic world.

A NEW PATH

Bennett began her career path centered on healthy touch through a series of healing touch courses. After a peer in her Tai Chi class told her about a group of nurses, who practiced healing touch, Bennett decided to explore it. “I started going to this healing touch group practice on Wednesdays, and I learned about how even off-the-body intentional presence and present touch can move energy through the body and create healing,” Bennett says. Following this interest, she left college at 19 to attend massage school. After initially specializing in injury work and deep tissue massage, Bennett had a revelation that changed the course of her career. “What I realized is that so much of our emotions are trapped in tissue, as well. So it’s not just releasing the tissue in

the body, it’s how do you to touch with intention to allow those emotions to release?” This question led her to train in craniosacral and visceral massage, two forms of massage therapy that help release scar tissue along the brain, spinal cord, nervous system and abdominal organs. Even after completing training, more emotions kept coming up for Bennett, leading her down yet another path. “I went to school to become a homeopath to work with emotions,” Bennett says. “I started doing emotional freedom techniques because I really wanted to empower people. I wanted to teach people some of what I was doing with them, so, that way, they could release their own emotions.” Touch Remedies followed a similar path, with an initial focus on massage therapy giving way to an emphasis on body healing, which led to an emphasis that encompassed the mind, as well. “Touch is so much more than just tactile stuff,” Bennett says, continuing, “Yes, when I’m talking about my book, it’s very tactile, but it’s also ‘How do I emotionally impact another human being in a really positive way? How do I give support? How do I communicate? How do I have healthy boundaries in a way that when I’m present, they feel safe, they feel nurtured [and] they feel connected to something larger,’ right?” The Touch Crisis: Navigating the Tricky Terrain of Bringing Healthy Touch Back to Our Culture is available through amazon.com.

Touch Remedies; 651.401.6131; touchremedies.com

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SEPTEMBER 2021

Touch Remedies

@TouchRemedies

PHOTO: DAWN BENNETT

Dawn Bennett


Our local connection is extremely important when it comes to bringing you unique, exclusive, top-quality products, including the freshest produce in town. We work with both large local growers and small local farmers in our stores’ neighborhoods because local isn’t just good for our economy and the environment, local produce also retains more nutrients and just tastes better.


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Wayzata artist personalizes home décor with larger-than-life creations.

murals on the wall

Placing an imprint on our homes can take a host of forms—among them: Architectural designs, furniture elements, décor themes and color stories have their own ways of communicating homeowners’ styles. After living much of our lives on mute due to the pandemic, are we ready to make bigger, bolder statements in our homes? Fine artist Abbey Holden of Wayzata is mostly known for her landscape painting and textile designs, but she’s also adept at large-scale pieces, including murals. “I love painting murals because they sort of envelop you in a giant painting,” she

says. “The actual act of painting murals really fulfills me; it is something about the large-scale nature of them.” She’s witnessed an uptick in clients requesting murals and says, “I think it has to do with people being home a lot more now.” Commonly used as a focal point, murals can also serve as the exclamation point for a space. “I love being the player in the team that brings a home together,” Holden says. Using different brush techniques, as well as line forms, Holden is able to create pieces to enhance each rooms’ purpose and intended feel.

Written by Ava Diaz

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SEPTEMBER 2021


PHOTO: SPACECRAFTING PHOTOGRAPHY


PHOTOS: CHRIS EMEOTT


She says clients are using murals in most spaces, particularly in nurseries and bathrooms. While wallpaper can have a similar effect on spaces, it’s doesn’t have that personalized touch that many homeowners are seeking when creating their design story. “There’s something about having it unique and knowing no one else has this on their walls,” Holden says. Using a unique blend of oil paints, the purest paint form made from non-toxic and natural materials, like stones and elements, Holden creates rich and textured pieces that combine playful energy with organic shapes. From soft, neutral hillside landscapes to vibrant, colorful floral patterns, she uses the room as her canvas to accentuate its physical features and heighten its interior design elements, such as

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PHOTOS: ABBEY HOLDEN; SPACECRAFTING PHOTOGRAPHY


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furniture, accessories, upholstery and even appliances. Her background in textiles lends itself to mural work, where she focuses on patterns and florals. “I get to translate that pretty smoothly into murals,” she says. While neutral tones and soft palettes certainly have a place, Holden says bolder colors are certainly coming to the fore. “Murals are a statement piece, and people are willing to make it colorful,” she says. “At its core, a mural is already a statement. It’s a fun surprise for people.” Regardless of color choice, “The end result provides a great statement room, a story and something that adds personality to an otherwise blank wall,” Holden says. Falling in love with color and design at a young age, Holden became intrigued by the work of her artistic grandmother and attended additional art classes and afterschool programs to enhance her skill set. Through her exposure to different mediums, Holden realized her career path including painting. “I know it’s my calling and how I’m wired, so there’s really no ignoring it,” she

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Abbey Holden Studio abbeyholden.com @abbeyholdenstudio Abbey Holden Studio

PHOTO: CHRIS EMEOTT

Otten Bros. GARDEN CENTER – Everything you need for fall says. “Another career wasn’t ever really an option for me.” Studying studio art, art history and design management in Denver, Florence, Italy, and the Parsons School of Design in New York City, Holden gained extensive perspectives. Upon graduating, she moved to Philadelphia, where she joined the textile designer team at Lilly Pulitzer. Following her experience there, Holden went on work with Brooke & Lou, The Hutton House, Love Your Melon and Mahi Gold, to name a few. However, Holden always longed to start her own business. Upon returning to the Midwest to live lakeside in Wayzata, she established Abbey Holden Studio, offering custom pieces for clients, and a small selection of her work is featured at Gray Home + Lifestyle in Excelsior.

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Otten Bros. carries over 12,000 different and inspiring garden products. Visit our 12-acre garden and landscape supply center to enjoy one of the largest selections of plant material, landscaping supplies, gardening tools and gifts, birding supplies, pottery, and more in the Midwest. LAKEMINNETONKAMAG.COM

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The Cedar Roof Man KUHLS CONTRACTING: 1515 SOUTH 5TH STREET, HOPKINS, MN • 952.935.9469

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STRAIGHT TALK FROM STEVE KUHL

Five signs your cedar roof may need some TLC 1

Let’s face it. Cedar roofs look great but owning one is a little scary. “Has it been damaged by hail?” “Will it blow off in a storm?” “I hear something chewing up there!” But despite what you may hear, your cedar roof is still one of the most beautiful and long-lasting products on the market. The only catch is you have take care of it.

Owner, Dad, Wood Roof Geek

That’s where I come in. My free, written estimate includes a thorough analysis of your roof. Bringing over 25 years of experience to the table, I will evaluate its’ condition to determine whether or not maintenance, repairs or replacement is the best option for you. Worst case scenario you get a free inspection from a true expert. Best case, we work our magic on your roof and add years to its lifespan.

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In fact, Kuhl’s Contracting is looked to for the evaluation and restoration of cedar roofs by more insurance companies, home inspectors, realtors and architects than any other company in Minnesota. Not to brag, but we are pretty awesome. Don’t take my word for it. Check out our talents at www.kuhlscontracting.com. Or ask around. We have probably done work for someone you know. I started this company in 1987. Since that time we have worked on thousands of homes around the Twin Cities. My approach to business has never wavered. Be honest, be reliable and do great work. As a result our list of happy clients grows daily.

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ON THE TOWN things to see and do around Lake Minnetonka

WEEKEND ON THE TOWN James J. Hill Days returns to Wayzata. PHOTOS: DYNAMIC PHOTOWERKS

BY LAUREN FOLEY

STRETCHI N G D OW N L A KE ST R EET from Broadway Avenue to Ferndale Road, James J. Hill Days is set for September 10–12 with festivities kicking off Friday evening from 5–10 p.m. and continuing Saturday from 10 a.m.–10 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Entry is free, and local food trucks with snacks, meals and beverages will be located throughout the event spaces. Although the event may be smaller than previous years, guests can still expect a fun, safe community

environment centered around Wayzata’s best assets. Weekend-long highlights include live music and entertainment from a Lake Street stage; a street market with vendor booths, offering local products; and a carnival with a variety of games and activities for all ages. For a full list of events, visit jamesjhilldays.com. James J. Hill Days @jamesjhilldays @JamesJHillDays

LAKEMINNETONKAMAG.COM

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Compiled by John Deignan, Hilary Kaufman and Kira Schukar

SEPTEMBER 10–11

9AM–3PM

Kids Corner, and a beer and wine garden. All ages. Free. Times vary.

Water Street, Excelsior; 952.474.6461; excelsior-lakeminnetonkachamber.com

19 Run for Beer Jog through Long Lake, and enjoy a pint of locally brewed beer at Birch’s on the Lake. Hosted by the Minnesota Brewery Running Series, Run for Beer is an annual fundraiser for local Minnesota nonprofits, including People for Parks, Brewing a Better Forest and the Red Shoe Society. All ages. $30–

$100. 11 a.m. Birch’s on the Lake Brewhouse & Supperclub, 1310 Wayzata Blvd., Long Lake; morgan@breweryrunningseries.com; breweryrunningseries.com/minnesota

A R E A E V E N TS

1–6 A Beautiful Collection: Prince’s Custom Shoes

Join the Land-O’-Lakes Antique and Classic Boat Club for its 45th annual Real Runabouts Rendezvous. Land-O’-Lakes members and boat enthusiasts will gather on Lake Minnetonka to show off their antique watercrafts on Friday and Saturday. Spectators are welcome to join the boaters on Saturday for the second day of festivities, including an awards show at 2:30 p.m. All ages. Spectators enter for free.

All ages. Guided tours of Paisley Park, including exhibit access, $45–$160. Paisley Park, 7810 Audubon Road, Chanhassen; 952.495.6750; paisleypark.com

Lord Fletcher’s Old Lake Lodge, 3746 Sunset Drive, Spring Park; acbs-bslol.com

LO CAL EVEN TS

2 Live Summer Music Series Experience the soul jazz sound of East Side Quartet on the CoV patio in Wayzata. Formed in 2008, the group has released several albums, including the Nuevo Tangoinfluenced Astoria. All Ages. Free.

5:30–8:30 p.m. CoV Wayzata, 700 East Lake St.; 952.473.5253; covwayzata.com

10 James J. Hill Days Celebrate James J. Hill Days by strolling through its unique Night

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SEPTEMBER 2021

Market. To kick off the weekendlong street market, 60 local vendors will open their booths under the stars for one night only. Enjoy live music and food truck fare as you browse the merchandise. All ages.

Free. 5–9 p.m. Lake Street, Wayzata; 952.473.9595; wayzatachamber.com

18 Art & Apples on the Lake For the first time, Excelsior is combining its annual Art on the Lake festival with the historic Apple Day! This two-day event will feature over 140 artists and their work, live music, apple pie contests, a Happy Apple

Excelsior Art & Apples on the Lake

PHOTOS: EMILY J. DAVIS; EXCELSIOR-LAKE MINNETONKA CHAMBER

Runabouts Rendezvous

Paisley Park is displaying more than 300 pairs of the Prince’s custom shoes, including heeled boots, roller skates and platform sneakers. The exhibit celebrates Prince’s innovative style and impact on modern fashion.


LAKEMINNETONKAMAG.COM

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O N T H E TOW N »

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952.473.9637 • TheBrostClinic.com 1–5 Pottery Festival The American Pottery Festival catalog for this year will focus on the power of making and its role in healing, storytelling and community building through collaboration. Northern Clay

Center, 2424 E. Franklin Ave., Mpls.; 612.339.8007; northernclaycenter.org

7 Shoreview Farmers Market With a commitment to encouraging community in Shoreview and offering a range of produce and shopping opportunities, the weekly event hosts over 30 vendors. All

ages. Free. 3–6 p.m. Shoreview Farmers Market, 4580 Victoria St. N., Shoreview; 651.490.4750; shoreviewmn.gov

9–12 Glass Pumpkin Patch

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SEPTEMBER 2021

View gorgeous works of eight awardwinning glass artists at the Arboretum Auxiliary’s Glass Pumpkin Patch! The professional artists will present 2,000 glass pumpkins, demonstrate glass blowing and teach small glass work classes. All ages. Free for members

and children under 15, $15 for nonmembers. Times vary. Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Drive, Chaska; 612.624.2200; arb.umn.edu


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12 Pickup Truck Opera Join the cast of Mixed Precipitation’s Pickup Truck Opera for a familyfriendly performance. The show is a country carnival spin on Homer’s classic epic, The Odyssey, complete with Dolly Parton tunes and selections from Monteverdi’s 1639 opera. All ages. $10–

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$25/person. 3 p.m. JD Rivers’ Children’s Garden, 2900 Glenwood Ave. N., Mpls.; 612.619.2112; mixedprecipitation.org

To have your event considered: email lakeminnetonkamag@tigeroak.com by the 10th of the month three months prior to publication. Due to the fluidity being experienced in the current environment, please note that some events/dates and even some business operations may have changed since these pages went to print. Please visit affiliated websites for updates.

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GALLERY PHOTOS BY JIM DOUGLAS

To have your event considered: send date, time, location, photos and contact information, and a brief description of the event to lakeminnetonkamag@tigeroak.com.

48

SEPTEMBER 2021


MOST T RUST ED HOME WATCH COMPAN Y IN MINNESOTA At Elite Home Professional, we;

FANFARE FOR THE COMMONS A free concert event was held to celebrate a new pavilion in Excelsior Commons and honor the 168-year legacy of the beloved and refurbished park space. The celebration continued with music featuring the Minnesota Orchestra. Curated boxed dinners from Kowalski’s Market, Joey Nova’s Pizzeria, Olive’s Fresh Pizza and 318 Cafe were available for purchase at the community celebration.

• Schedule and monitor maintenance services while you’re away • Provide you with detailed home updates weekly • Protect your housing investment

Absentee homeowners partner with Elite Home Professional to help prevent problems that could arise during unoccupancy. Elite Home Professional is a licensed, bonded, insured and accredited member of the National Home Watch Association (NHWA).

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of everything we do and the cornerstone of our 65 years in business. We’re proud to be partnered with the Minnesota Lakes Bank team that shares that same passion for delivering exceptional service.” Jay Soule, Owner, Al and Alma’s Supper Club and Charter Cruises

This triathlon has been held in Excelsior for 15 years (cancelled last year due to COVID-19), but this year’s event was sold out with 500 competitors participating. The swimming portion was 1/2 mile, the running segment was 15K, and the biking leg was 15 miles in the immediate Excelsior area. This local triathlon has become a charitable event with donations being made to Interfaith Outreach and Community for the Commons.

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Home Grown “… WE ALL NEED TO GET OUTSIDE AND DIG IN THE DIRT A LITTLE MORE.” BY RENÉE STEWART-HESTER

50 SEPTEMBER 2021

PHOTOS BY CHRIS EMEOTT


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“If you had told me 10 years ago that I would become a chicken lady with a 3,000-square-foot garden, I would have told you [that] you were crazy,” Emily Bretzel says. “When we bought our house, we were simply looking for a beautiful outdoor space. But, once we realized the potential for hobbies, we went for as many things as we could.” Bees. Chickens. Cutting flowers. Fruit trees. Herbs. Maple trees (syrup). Vegetables. Bretzel and her husband, Ryan, are part of a growing crop of garden-to-table homeowners. “Gardening and backyard chickens are just hobbies for us that we jumped into and are learning as we go,” she says. If her name seems familiar, for more than six years, Bretzel served as the senior managing art director for our magazine family. Today finds her family, including children Archer, 10; Laine, 7; and Vienna, 3, living on 6.5 acres in the “suburbrural” burg of Grant, just outside Stillwater. It’s not unusual to find the children in the hen house, collecting daily eggs. “We started out with four hens and have added over the years,” Bretzel says. The current flock includes nine hens and one (surprise) rooster. “Some of my favorite breeds are buff orpingtons, speckled sussex and buff polish. We love the Easter eggers, too, for their beautiful blue/green eggs,” she says. The garden ably serves its dual roles— reliable producer and variable testing site. About half of the space is devoted to pumpkins, which are given away to friends and family in the fall. They also grow beans, carrots, corn, herbs, peppers and tomatoes. “You name it, we have grown it,” she says. Each year yields a slightly different garden plan. “We change what and how much we grow based on our eating preferences and what grows well in our soil/ microclimate,” Bretzel says. While editing out produce makes sense (“We just can’t seem to grow broccoli.”), so does adding in some new items (“Because what’s the fun of just growing the same old?”). In the past, they’ve tried amarynth, borage, glass gem corn and purple Vienna kohlrabi. This year? Luffa gourds. “We are planning to add an orchard of similar size this year with fruit trees and bushes,” Bretzel says. “We also have a small children’s garden

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next to the playhouse, where we put plants with different textures and colors for the kids to explore.” Cutting flowers can be especially satisfying for their obvious beauty and ability to attract pollinators. “I’ve been adding more and more flowers and herbs to the garden because I love how much they attract pollinators and caterpillars, and I love looking at and cutting fresh flowers,” Bretzel says. “Zinnias and marigolds are my favorite easy-to-grow flowers for cutting. This year, I’m adding dahlias, bachelor buttons and others to the mix.”

52 SEPTEMBER 2021

As long as we’re talking about pollinators, the Bretzels host up to three honey hives with different types of bees. “Bee colonies are complex and taking care of them requires lots of special equipment and consistent follow-up and education,” Bretzel says. “Our first year, we did not get any honey as we were growing our colonies. In other years, we’ve gotten 60 to 80 pounds of honey.” Planning and planting are literally just the start. During growing season, the day begins with setting up the sprinkler or checking the plants. “My husband and I

both work full-time and have three young kids, so we spend any time we can to make sure the garden is successful. And, to be honest, we are not as hands-on as we probably should be, but things grow never-the-less,” Bretzel says. “A lot of the time is spent pulling weeds. The harvest season is definitely a busy time. We have to make sure we have the time to not only harvest our vegetables, but to either prepare or preserve them. We get our kids involved in picking beans and tomatoes.” The garden (and hive!)-to-table benefits of gardening are obvious, but there


are other upshots, too. “We talk with our kids about growing and what they like to eat, and they love that they can snack on any of the healthy foods that come directly from our garden,” Bretzel says. “The kids are fascinated with the process of growing plants. I think it’s really cool for them to have an appreciation and pride for growing their own food. It encourages us all to eat healthy foods and we get satisfaction from knowing that we grew it ourselves.” “The glory of gardening: hands in the dirt, head in the sun, heart with nature. To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul,” writes Alfred Austin (1835-1913), English poet and novelist. Gardeners have long supported the physical and spiritual benefits of placing their “hands in the dirt,” and a growing chorus is singing about the benefits of grounding or earthing, which can involve activities that “ground” or electrically reconnect one to the Earth. Does this strike a chord with Bretzel in terms of encouraging her family to participate in Earth-related activities, such as gardening? “I definitely think we all need to get outside and dig in the dirt a little more ... Simply being outside and taking moments to disconnect from our phones and electronics is good for our mental health and helps us appreciate nature,” she says. For those who are ready to dig in with their own garden, Bretzel advises, “Start small. You don’t need a lot of space to grow most plants. Find the sunniest place in your outdoor space, and start your garden there. It can be in a planter or container if you don’t have yard space. Don’t be discouraged if you have failures. Part of the fun is trying and failing and then trying again.”

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Given the size of their garden, the Bretzels are bound to have “leftovers,” but very little goes to waste. While some items are consumed shortly after picking, and friends and family receive their fair shares of garden goodies, they turn to other ways to extend the usage. Bretzel’s sister Carrie Anderson in Roseville is also bitten by the gardening bug. “Basically, her whole yard is a gar-

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den and chickens/ducks,” Bretzel says. Anderson is the designated family canner, which helps Bretzel preserve some of her vegetables. There are other methods, too. Come fall and winter, take a peek inside Bretzel’s freezer, and you’re likely to find a bountiful harvest of frozen garden vegetables. “Freezing is by far the easiest way to preserve produce,” she says. As for onions, well, they like a bit of privacy. Take a lookyloo in one of Bretzel’s closets, and you might find strands of braided onions. TIP: I definitely recommend blanching beans and carrots before freezing. TIP: Spread veggies out on a cookie tray; freeze for an hour or two before sealing them in a bag, so they don’t freeze together. TIP: [Place basil] into a food processor with olive oil, and freeze [it] into cubes. Then, anytime I need basil for a recipe, I just grab a cube, and toss it in. You can make and freeze pesto and tomato sauces, too. I also puree pumpkins and squash, and freeze those for future use. TIP: Freeze [cherry tomatoes] whole on a baking sheet; keep them in a large baggie. TIP: If you have glass canning jars, you can freeze tomato sauce directly in jars. Just make sure to let the jars cool in the fridge first because glass could shatter.

OVEN ROASTED HEIRLOOM TOMATOES Thickly slice tomatoes, and lay them on paper towels to absorb some moisture. Spread slices out on a foil-lined pan, and brush or drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle generously with salt. Add other herbs and/or spices as desired (garlic and basil are good choices). Bake at 400° for about 30 minutes. TIP: Eat as a side dish, on a sandwich or as meat topping or for savory pies. Freeze roasted tomatoes for later use. TIP: Slice tomatoes into halves or chunks. Toss with roughly-chopped onions and olive oil. Add salt, garlic and/or herbs. Bake on a pan. TIP: Green zebra tomatoes are Minnesota hardy and taste great roasted.

54 SEPTEMBER 2021


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55


LAST GLANCE

FIRST PLACE People & Families

A Boy and His Dog “… this photo captures a shared moment of pure contentment …” BY RENÉE STEWART-HESTER

L AKE MINNE TONKA SU NS ET WIT H M Y B E ST FRIEND, taken by Wayzata’s

Katie Rajchert, placed first in the People and Families category of our annual Lens on Lake Minnetonka photo contest. “The photo was taken on the front of our boat last summer, heading back from Carson’s

56

SEPTEMBER 2021

PHOTO BY KATIE RAJCHERT

Bay to our slip in Wayzata Bay on a slow sunset cruise,” she says. “The far background is along the shore of Ferndale and Harrington [roads].” Taken with an iPhone 11 Max Pro, the photo features Rajchert’s son Joshua, who was 8 years old at the time of the photo, and the family goldendoodle, Zoey, who

was 2 years old at the time. “Zoey is a sweet, affectionate dog, who loves boat rides with our family,” Rajchert says. “I love how this photo captures a shared moment of pure contentment and love between these two great buddies—a boy and his dog—on a sunset cruise after an evening of anchoring and swimming.”


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CANDI & SCOTT STABECK YOUR LAKE MINNETONKA AREA SPECIALISTS SINCE 1987. Contact us for a complimentary, no obligation market analysis of your home. It might just be worth more than you think.

Some of our 2020-21 Lake Area Sales •18405 Minnetonka Blvd., Deephaven | $1,775,000 •2322 Huntington Point Road W., Minnetonka Beach | $2,795,000 •5890 Hardscrabble Road, Minnetrista | $2,890,000 •398 Margaret Circle, Wayzata | $1,426,054 •16912 Cottage Grove Ave., Minnetonka | $1,450,000 •28065 Boulder Bridge Drive, Shorewood | $1,269,000 •110 Gleahaven Road, Wayzata | $1,225,000 •2515 Lafayette Road, Minnetonka Beach | $1,050,000 •4732 Chantrey Place, Minnetonka | $860,000 •16924 Cottage Grove Ave., Minnetonka | $600,000 •5880 Minnetonka Drive, Shorewood | $765,000

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CANDI STABECK candistabeck@edinarealty.com | 612.987.4801 SCOTT STABECK scottstabeck@edinarealty.com | 612.747.5863 SUE RODELIUS Client Services Manager 952.475.4906

Make “the perfect new home for us” happen Michael Sluis Home Mortgage Consultant 612-667-3743 michael.a.sluis@wellsfargo.com michaelsluis.com NMLSR ID 400516

New neighborhood. Bigger house. Closer commute. Whatever your reason for buying your first or next home, we’re here to help you every step of the way. You’ll have personal support, low down payment options, and online resources to help you find the right loan — and enjoy your new home for years to come.

Information is accurate as of date of printing and is subject to change without notice. Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. © 2019 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. NMLSR ID 399801. AS5201179 Expires 09/2021 IHA-6835306


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