Plymouth April/May 2021

Page 1

Little Big Things

Snowflakes create a flurry of love and business


BEFORE

M A JOR R E NOVAT IONS | K I T CH E N & BAT H R E MODE L S | 2 N D ST ORY A DDI T IONS

Our award winning team has the knowledge and experience to help you with any renovation or new addition you may be considering. Call Andy Johnsrud 612.703.2253 U N C O M P R O M I S I N G Q U A L I T Y . U N E Q U A L L E D C R A F T S M A N S H I P. U N M AT C H E D V A L U E .

952 .94 4 .9499 | L EC Y BRO S.C OM We feature qualit y Andersen ® products. “Andersen” and the AW logo are registered trademarks of Andersen Corporation.

#BC325555


ADVERTISEMENT

Caption

Making the Possible, Possible

Crown Bank Helps Clients Succeed and Thrive Even in Challenging Times

T

o the experienced professionals at Crown Bank, banking is all about relationships. It’s about honest handshakes, answering the phone when you call, and always being there to help meet the demands of your everchanging business banking needs. “The relationships we have with our customers are key,” said Jeff Wessels, President and COO of Crown Bank. “We take the time to really get to know our customers and their businesses. And because we are a community bank, we are the ones making the decisions, which allows us to think outside the box to get a deal done quickly for our customer.” This “making the possible, possible” approach has helped Crown Bank grow significantly over the past year—even amidst a pandemic. They’ve expanded their real estate banking options by financing complete projects, and brought on many new customers. Whether a “mom-and-pop” shop or a multi-million dollar business, Crown Bank has your back—especially in these trying times. When the statewide shutdown shuttered First Avenue, one of the most recognized music establishments in the

country, Crown Bank was there to fill the void. “Crown Bank has always been a long-time and trusted partner of First Avenue, and during a time like this, the bank truly stepped up when we needed it most. Not only did they help us navigate PPP and the other COVID-related government programs, but they also deferred our existing loans without penalty and were willing to extend access to more credit. While businesses such as ours were the first to close and will be the last to re-open, our relationship with Crown has provided peace of mind and helped make survival possible during the pandemic,” said Mike Killeen, CFO First Avenue and the 7th Street Entry. How can Crown Bank help you make the possible, possible?

CROWN BANK

6600 France Ave. S. Suite 125, Edina 952.282.5800 • crown-bank.com


CONTENTS

A P R I L / M AY 2 0 2 1 Shawn Kelly was accepted last year into the MN Nice professional development program at the Northern Clay Center. “It’s great to have access to educational resources, mentorship opportunities and community support.”

PAGE 14

PAGE 10 2

APRIL/MAY 2021

PAGE 30


A DIFFERENT KIND OF FIRM, A DIFFERENT KIND OF WEALTH MANAGEMENT

in every issue Editor’s Letter 4 Noteworthy 6 On the Town 25 Gallery 28 Tastemakers 30 Last Glance 32

Client Focused: Our family is the largest client of the firm Experience: Josh has been a money manager in the Twin Cities for over 40 years. Judd spent almost 20 years on Wall Street at 3 of the largest hedge funds in the industry

departments STY L E 10

Pushing Boundaries The Foursome expands its closet to reintroduce womenswear. TAST E 12

Get Luce

Performance: Since 2016, our proprietary client portfolio has generated net returns of +230.4% compared to 80.6% for the S&P 500 1

Plymouth’s first brewery proudly serves craft beers along popular trail. A RTS A N D C U LT URE 14

Throw Down

“Pottery is definitely a lifelong challenge.”

features 16

Little Big Things

Snowflakes create a flurry of love and business.

We offer a free, 48-minute no cost, no obligation consultation on your investment portfolio. We regularly meet with clients in our Edina Office.

PHOTOS BY CHRIS EMEOTT, SARAH DOVOLOS

20

Go Play Outside

Experts offer tips to keep pets safe at home and the park.

JOSH ARNOLD INVESTMENT CONSULTANT 6750 France Avenue South, #325, Edina 952.925.5608 1

Past performance is no guarantee of future success. For information purposes only. Investing contains risk, including risk of loss. Returns represent an actual client portfolio with an average risk tolerance. For further information, including a detailed disclaimer, please contact our office.

PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

3


FROM THE EDITOR Renée Stewart-Hester, plymouthmag@tigeroak.com

T Never miss an issue of Plymouth Magazine with free, anytime access to our digital editions. Full screen viewing on your digital device allows easy cover-to-cover reading. You can zoom in on text or images as well as share your favorite Plymouth Magazine stories with friends and family.

Learn more at plymouthmag.com

See what we’re doing behind the scenes and around town! PLYMOUTHMAG.COM @PLYMOUTHMAG

PLYMOUTH MAGAZINE @PLYMOUTH_MAG

On the Cover Big Little Things, photo by Marta Marek

4

APRIL/MAY 2021

PHOTO BY TATE CARLSON

in digital format!

hrow open the windows of your spirit; April is here! Hopefully, each passing month brings us to another level of appreciation for what we have endured and held onto and hope for what we can achieve and celebrate in a world that has repeatedly and, in some cases unmercifully so, challenged us. Resurrection is on the horizon, be it spiritually, emotionally, physically or even in terms of businesses, which have been hit hard over the last year and forced to pivot as the pandemic ebbed and flowed its way through many people’s families and livelihoods. It’s time for us to till the soil and replant with the promise of fruitful and glorious lives—starting now! I hope this issue helps you along your way. Planning to embrace the local outdoors? We’ll show where to find some great “adventure” clothing and a spot to stop for a brew along a local trail. Are you as eager as I am to dig in and plant fresh flowers and some container gardens for yourself or friends and family? Check out some beautiful pottery containers that will elevate your plantings to a fresh creative level. Need a feel-good story? We’ve got one that features a family, separated by continents and COVID, that found a way to bring purpose and a smile to their mother. We didn’t forget about your pets, who’ve been tried and true all these months. Check out the piece about pet-friendly landscaping and public play areas. Can we agree that our pets deserve extra special playtime after all they’ve done to love us throughout this past year? Until next time,


Gentle & effective care...so you can enjoy life…and live well!

Here to serve you in 2021: Safely and Effectively! VOL. 18 NO. 1 plymouthmag.com

publisher

SUSAN ISAY

editor RENÉE STEWART-HESTER managing editor ANGELA JOHNSON associate editor HAILEY ALMSTED

staff writers

AVA DIAZ

MADELINE KOPIECKI CLAIRE SWENSON

editorial interns

Chiropractic

Massage Therapy

Acupuncture

MEGHAN BISHOP

LAUREN FOLEY OLIVIA RIVERA

editorial advisory board ELIZABETH COHEN, Studio M ANN MARIE GROCHOLSK, AMG Photography DEB SAKRY LANDE, Interfaith Outreach EMILIE KASTNER, City of Plymouth AMY PARNELL, Wayzata Public Schools

763-420-8595

LUANN SVENDSEN, Plymouth Reads member and community volunteer

senior managing art director SARAH DOVOLOS art directors ALLISON NOLDEN EMILY HANDY lead staff photographer CHRIS EMEOTT

print production director production coordinator digital production director project coordinators

senior account executives

20

7237 Forestview Lane N. • Maple Grove, MN 55369

www.bromanchiro.com

BRITTNI DYE ALEX KOTLAREK DEIDRA ANDERSON ANGELA BEISSEL BROOKE BEISE

KATIE FREEMARK CYNTHIA HAMRE

Providing MEMORY CARE with a LOVING KINDNESS

that respects the dignity of each resident.

SARA JOHNSON

circulation and marketing

KATIE RINGHAND

credit manager

APRIL MCCAULEY

chief operating officer chief financial officer

SUSAN ISAY BILL NELSON

Plymouth Magazine ONE TIGER OAK PLAZA 900 SOUTH THIRD STREET MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55415 612.548.3180 SUBSCRIPTIONS: Plymouth Magazine is published 6 times a year. Rates $12 for 6 issues. Back issues $5.95. For subscription and customer service inquiries, please contact customerservice@tigeroak.com or call 1.800.637.0334. ©Tiger Oak Media Inc. 2021. All rights reserved.

Memory care that celebrates each moment.

Minnetonka & Plymouth www.GIANNAHOMES.org

Serving individuals with memory loss including Alzheimer’s Disease, Lewy body dementia, FTD, and Traumatic Brain Injury Contact Cari at

952.443.6113

or cari@giannahomes.org

Mind. Body. Spirit. At Gianna Homes we lovingly care for them all. PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

5


NOTEWORTHY local tips, tidbits & insights

Need to up your martini game? We have the perfect recipe on page 8.

SHAKE, STIR, RATTLE AND ROLL Bar carts give a nod to Old Hollywood glamour. BY HAILEY ALMSTED

6

APRIL/MAY 2021

PHOTO BY CHRIS EMEOTT


W

ho else is eager to host the first garden party or backyard barbecue of the year? April might still be hosting a snow pile or two, but, May should give the green light. Roll out a bar cart to add a little old school charm. While they up the snazzy factor, bar carts also help guests feel at ease, pouring their own mixes, and give hosts a reprieve from tending bar. There are plenty styles available at local and online retailers. Vintage shops seem to have one or two tucked in the midst of other retro goodies. Get creative, and make your own. A splash of metallic paint on a utility cart transforms it into a unique bar cart, ready for its first pour. Appoint the cart with vodka, gin, rum, tequila, whiskey and scotch. Bonus points: include orange liqueur, vermouth and Campari. For guests who skirt unescorted whiskey, include juices, sodas, tonic water, simple syrups and bitters. Have sparkling and still nonalcoholic beverages on hand, too. Accoutrements should include a Boston shaker to shake the ice amongst the cocktail ingredients. A jigger is an essential tool, and this little number measures perfectly to create a tastier drink. Use a muddler to muddle or mash fruits, herbs and spices to release flavor for a mojito, mint julep, old fashioned and the like. Used to chill whiskey and other spirits, a whiskey stone—a natural, clean cut soapstone—chills a drink without diluting the concoction. Get more mileage out of your bar cart. For brunch, serve the warm menu items from the kitchen or outdoor buffet table, and use the bar cart to hold fruit dishes, sweet breads, viennoiserie pastry, syrups, jam varieties, juices, tea and coffee, along with cream and sugar. For dinner, transform the bar cart into a dessert cart, featuring individual-serving sweets, tea and coffee, mints and a selection of digestifs. Roll up to your next bonfire (if it’s surrounded by pavers, of course) with a sweet array ingredients to show off your s’moreology game.

YO U R D REAM S O UR E X P E RTIS E YO U R H O M E

P/ 763.544.5950 3620 WINNETKA AVE. N / CRYSTAL, MN 55427

crystalkitchen.com

LIC# BC007200

PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

7


N OT E WO RT H Y »

SI P

SAY, CHEERS, TO MORNING MARTINIS. We stand at the precipice of brunch season, and, frankly, we’re ready to take the leap. Swing open the windows to the fresh start of a new season, make (or order) your best breakfast loves and toast new beginnings with the frothy sass of a blood orange martini. Cheers.

Blood Orange Martini littlesugarsnaps.com

Rosemary Syrup »» 1 oz. fresh rosemary »» 4 ½ oz. sugar »» 4 oz. water

Martini »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

2 blood oranges 2 ½ oz. plus 1 tsp. gin 4 tsp. rosemary syrup 1 tsp. Campari 1 egg white Handful of ice Spring of fresh rosemary for garnish

Put all of the ingredients, except the ice, into a cocktail shaker; shake vigorously for about a minute. Add the ice, and shake for a minute. Strain the liquid and egg white foam into two coupe glasses, and garnish with rosemary sprigs. Serve. —Renée Stewart-Hester

8

APRIL/MAY 2021

O RG AN IZE

Before you play go fetch, tidy up. Pets bring endless joy, comfort and love. I have two rescued greyhounds that are 11 years old and retired from racing. Taking my furry friends on daily walks keeps me active. Petting them is calming, and seeing their wagging tales puts a smile on my face. While many of us have experienced the upshots of home organization, it can be similarly good for pets, too. Let’s start with food. Whether you have a cat or a Great Dane, food takes up quite a bit of space, and bags can be unsightly. Why not find a decorative container to hold the kibble? Large baskets with lids or appealing trash bins are favorable options. Tip: Use collapsible scoops to save space. Walking pets several times a day requires that leashes and waste bags be readily accessible. Consider installing decorative hooks near a door,

or, if you prefer not to have the items visible, attach hooks inside a closet door or add a decorative chest of drawers to hold the supplies. Tip: I have a bench with drawers near my front door, where I place my pet supplies and can easily put my shoes on for our walk. Pet playtime is always a highlight of the day. There are so many cute options for storing pet toys and stuffed animals. Tip: Keeping the bins small and low to the ground allow for easy access. Remember, when it comes to home organization, it is easy to add decorative and functional options for our beloved pets. Kira Vanderlan operates Zestful Design, a home and business decluttering, organization and interior design company with a focus on mindfulness. zestfuldesign.com

ISTOCK.COM/FOLLOWTHEFLOW

Put the sugar and water into a small saucepan, and allow the sugar to dissolve over a medium heat. Add the rosemary sprigs, bring up to boiling, and remove from the heat. Cool completely, and strain to remove the rosemary. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to one month.


LIVE SAFE AND CONFIDENT CALL US TODAY!

DIS COVE R

PHOTO COURTESY OF PLYMOUTH HISTORICAL SOCIETY

SCHOOL BUILDING HAS GRADUATED INTO SEVERAL INCARNATIONS.

Situated along busy Highway 55, just south of the Luce Line Trail, sits one of the city’s first schools. The building, nearly unrecognizable in its current form, was home to the District 95 School. The school’s origins began in the mid1850s, when a no-longer-extant log cabin served as the primary place for learning for new Plymouth residents. By 1872, the cabin was replaced with a wood-framed, singlestory structure. By the 1930s, the population in Plymouth was growing, and ideals in education were shifting as schools moved from a singleroom model to buildings with dedicated spaces. The District 95 building, renamed Beacon Heights Elementary, reflected these changes. Constructed in 1939-1940, the new school reflected a modest PWA Moderne style, popularized during and after the Great Depression through many government-sponsored work projects. This is reflected in the building’s simplicity of form, symmetrical rows of windows and geometrical decoration surrounding the school’s entrance. Students were separated by age into two classrooms and had use of an auditorium for assembling. A kitchen was also included so students’ meals could be prepared on site. As Plymouth expanded, so did the building, with further additions in 1955 that today obscure the building’s original decorative entrance. Beacon Heights closed as a public school due to district consolidations in the 1980s, and the building has since seen various commercial uses. Today, it continues in use as a private early childhood education center. Contributed by Rebekah Coffman, Plymouth Historical Society

763-550-0333 • cornerstoneal.org 3750 Lawndale Lane North, Plymouth MN

“Without Crown Bank, the growth we’ve experienced would not have been possible.” jr anderson ASI: Acousitical surfaces, inc.

When you’re in the business of acoustics, quiet is good. But when ASI’s JR Anderson needed money to make some noise in a pitch for a piece of a national chain’s business, he turned to his partner at Crown Bank. Crown delivered, totally funding their pitch - which helped ASI win the entire contract. Watch the whole story at crown-bank.com. What can we make possible for your business? MEMBER FDIC

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

9


D E PA R T M E N T S » S T Y L E

Pushing Boundaries The Foursome expands its closet. BY MADELINE KOPIECKI

WHILE THE FOURSOME FINE APPAREL AND SHOES is well known as a local go-to spot for fine

menswear, the store hasn’t always focused exclusively on men’s clothing. “We actually used to carry women’s clothing,” says Nicole Chose, an owner and marketing director at The Foursome. “There was a time that we were The Foursome Family Clothing and Shoes.”

10

APRIL/MAY 2021

PHOTO BY SARAH DOVOLOS

Now, The Foursome is expanding its scope to include womenswear alongside menswear with a new athleisure and outdoor activewear store, Boundary Clothing. The idea, Chose says, was born out of the pandemic and how it has affected the community’s sense of style. The increasingly popular work-from-home model amplified the opportunity to introduce a more casual


MARK GEIER R E A L T O R

THE FOURSOME 3570 Vicksburg Lane N.; 763.473.4667; @shopthefoursome thefoursome.com The Foursome Fine Apparel and Shoes @ShopTheFoursome

Spotlight On Results Plymouth’s #1 Homeseller

763-670-8100 | mark@markgeier.com www.markgeier.com

style into people’s workweek looks. The pandemic has also moved some people to forego the gym or workout clubs in favor of outdoor activities, including biking, camping, hiking and walking. “It’s been really fun how excited people, especially the women, are about the brands that we have over here (prAna, Toad and Company, Vuori and Mountain Hardwear, to name a few),” Chose says. “So many people come in, and they know these brands, and they’re so excited to find them here ...”

TAKE BOUNDARY CLOTHING OUT ON THE TOWN Activewear should never be short on versatility. A casual look can carry throughout the day, depending on how it’s styled. Chose culled outfits that dovetail with a couple’s busy day out and about. Him: Greyson Montauk pant: built for function and performance but designed as a dress pant with eight-way stretch performance fabric sourced in Italy KÜHL shirt: features comfort in a buttondown style shirt made of organic cotton tasc Performance vest: breathable, wicks moisture, has four-way stretch and is made of organic cotton and bamboo OluKai sneakers: boasts breathable mesh with leather accents and elastic laces Her: Vuori performance jogger: slim but relaxed fit and designed with soft, premium stretch fabric tasc NOLA quarter-zip: versatile, durable piece for spring wardrobes, sustainably made from organic cotton and bamboo

Chalaine Morrow Barbara Arend Callyssa Cronick Eileen Mesa Crystal Warming

DVM DVM DVM DVM DVM

Top rated veterinary practice in the Plymouth area for over 30 years! Dental Care • Emergency and Critical Care Immunization and Wellness Care • Microchipping Nutritional Counseling • Pain Management • Surgery Ultrasound • A Lifetime of Care

Arc'teryx hoody: clean, casual technical styling with a versatile wool sweater look On Cloud Hi shoe: cushioning technology with a higher profile for urban adventure and travel Models are wearing Maui Jim sunglasses.

3900 Vinewood Lane Suite 16 | Plymouth, MN 55441 rrahospital.com | 763.559.7554 PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

11


D E PA R T M E N T S » TA S T E

Get Luce Plymouth’s first brewery proudly serves craft beers along popular trail. BY AVA DIAZ PHOTOS BY TODD ZALLAPS

AS PLYMOUTH’S FIRST AND ONLY BREWERY, cofounded by Kate Coward

and Tim Naumann, Luce Line Brewing pours up a variety of bold-flavored craft brews from the 2,000-barrel facility. Located next to Trailhead Cycling and along the Luce Line State Trail, this is a hot spot for walkers, cyclists and cross country skiers to take a break and toss back a refreshing cold one. Coward says that the brewery was a dream of hers that combined her love for cycling, good camaraderie, tasty treats and beer. As one who's traveled to Europe and Japan, Coward says that she developed an appreciation for brewing and the diversity that it holds. Trying a new brew in each location she visited, Coward found that beer, “Universally connected people with one another.” Serving up to 16 different brews, each one is unique in flavor and named after other cycling, hiking and walking trails located in Minnesota. Constantly rotating varieties, Coward says that they do so in a way that aligns with customers’ preferences through sales. “We like to experiment and keep things fresh, so people have a reason to come and try new things,” she says. To accompany its beverages, Luce Line dishes up fan favorites, including handcrafted pizza, soft pretzels, charcuterie boards, hummus and guacamole. It also offers non-alcoholic options, such as hop tea, kombucha, craft sodas and coconut water.

WON’T GET LUCE As a dog-friendly company, Luce Line teamed up with Stunt Puppy, a Minneapolis-based designer and manufacturer of gear for dogs. As companies that both focus on living an active lifestyle, it was a perfect match for a collaboration. Creating a line of dog leashes, collars and

12

APRIL/MAY 2021


runners (hands-free leashes), Luce Line ensures that pets “Won’t Get Luce.” “Working with local companies that are doing the same thing we are is a super satisfying way to connect,” says Ken Goldman, president of Stunt Puppy. “And when dogs are the center of it all, it makes everyone pretty happy.” In addition to the walkable trails near the brewery, Luce Line also has a dogfriendly patio, enabling pets to join in on the fun, and Coward hopes to add a line of dog treats and incorporate dogfriendly events.

WHAT’S ON TAP (FLAGSHIP ITEMS): • Hard seltzers: Mango, Cherry and Clara (unflavored) • Foggy Bottom Hazy IPA • Sault Line Stout • Heartland Hefeweizen • Mesabi Iron Range Lager • Big Rivers Pale Ale Visit the website’s What’s Pouring section for a complete list of available beverages.

LUCE LINE BREWING 12901 16th Ave. N.; 763.324.8114, Luce Line Brewing lucelinebrewing.com @lucelinebrewing @LuceLineBrewing TRAILHEAD CYCLING 12901 16th Ave. N.; 763.712.0312; Trailhead Cycling trailheadcycling.com @trailheadbike @Trailhead55316 STUNT PUPPY 1621 East Hennepin Ave. Suite 150, Mpls.; stuntpuppy.com Stunt Puppy @stunt_puppy @stuntpuppy

PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

13


D E P A R T M E N T S » A R T S A N D C U LT U R E

Throw Down "Pottery is definitely a lifelong challenge." BY RENÉE STEWART-HESTER

PHOTOS BY CHRIS EMEOTT

SHAWN KELLY SIGNS OFF FROM EMAILS with, “Spark smiles and connect.” Why? “Smiles and connection are the icing on the cake, the cherry on top,” says the owner of Lime Knot Pottery. “I get to make pots—something I love to do—and it has the added benefit of, hopefully, bringing people joy and connection.” Since 2018, the online store has featured bowls, business card and candle holders, coasters, mugs, olive oil bottles, planters, spoon rests and vases, all made with Minnesota clay from Minnesota Clay Co., the primary supplier. Gardens are not only right at home in traditional beds, but they cozy up nicely in gardening pots on patios, decks and other outdoor spaces, and Kelly creates planters that are ideal for any spot. Created with built-in drainage trays, pots come in 4-, 6-, 8- and 12-inch sizes, featuring 16 color options. Popular choices include frothy ocean, evergreen dusk, evergreen day and blue twilight. “That said, I love to do custom orders,” he says. “Recently, someone asked me for a planter that said, ‘Don’t die,’ written on the side of it. Apparently, the recipient didn’t have a green thumb.” Other custom

14

APRIL/MAY 2021

items have included luminaries; nesting bowls (These were signed by children and given to their mom, so they can cook together.); personalized mugs, dog dishes and treat jars; serving platters; shot glasses; and a ceremonial wedding planter inscribed with the bride and groom’s initials, and the couple planted a tree in the planter as the vows were said. (Cue the hankies.) Though he’s been in business for about three years, Kelly’s interest in pottery making came alive when he was in high school and saw his teacher throw on the potter wheel. He was mesmerized. “The act of creating something out of nothing—wow,” he says. “Actually, it’s better than creating something from nothing. You get to play with mud and create … whatever you want. The possibilities are endless.” “… Before [I began working with] ceramics, white hot was just an expression,” Kelly says. “Now, white hot means peering into a 2,000 plus-degree kiln through a peep hole, hoping your pots turn out like you envisioned. And waiting for the kiln to cool so you can see the result—it’s like Christmas morning!” Kelly clearly enjoys the artistic process even when it presents a hurdle or two. “For folks that know me, they


We are devoted to the physical and psychological wellfare of every patient. Using low-stress handling techniques, we provide your pet with the best medical care in a fearfree setting.

$25.00 First Exam*

Stress-Free Grooming

*New Clients only. Coupon good for up to two pets per household seen at the same time. Not to be combined with other offers.

We also provide a full line of low stress handling pet grooming care! Call today to schedule with one of our three talented groomers.

7000 E. Fish Lake Rd • vcamaplegrove.com • 763.420.7958

also know that there’s nothing I like better than a challenge,” he says. “Pottery is definitely a lifelong challenge.” Lime Knot Pottery can be found online and at Heidi’s GrowHaus & Lifestyle Gardens and Lynde Greenhouse & Nursery in Plymouth; Candlelight Floral & Gifts in Wayzata; Love That Olive in Maple Grove; Olive on Tap and the General Store in Minnetonka; and Art 2 Heart in Hamel. “I really enjoy selling locally,” Kelly says. “I like to feel connected to the people that support me by purchasing my pots.”

Pain relief without addictive drugs!

18

limeknot.com Lime Knot Pottery @limeknotpottery @LimeKnotPottery

20

1421 East Wayzata Blvd. Wayzata, MN 55391 Shawn Sailer D.C., Caroline Brost-Sailer D.C., Ryan Elton D.C., Barbro Brost D.C., Aaron Schulte D.C., Tyler Knutson D.C.

952.473.9637 • TheBrostClinic.com PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

15


Written by Renée Stewart-Hester Photos by Marta Marek

16

APRIL/MAY 2021

@MARTAMAREK_FOTOGRAFIA

Snowflakes create a flurry of love and business.


Aleksandra and I often talk about how [magical] this experience has been. Little Big Things helped us turn around a negative situation into something truly positive and heartwarming. –Aneta Mendoza

SNOWFLAKE PHOTO BY MONIKA DE MYER,

@MONIKADEMYER

Little Big Things The recent pandemic has seeped, invaded, wormed—or use whatever egregious verb you choose—into so many facets of our lives—physical wellbeing, mental health, relationships and businesses. How it has impacted each person is different, and the ways in which people have dealt with the fallout are equally as distinctive. For one woman and her family, handling the emotional aspects of the pandemic reached across familial and international lines. Aneta Mendoza, who lives in Plymouth with her husband Angel and sons, Nathaniel and Benjamin, and her sister Aleksandra Brzoza, of New Jersey, decided to give their mother a birthday gift that she’ll not soon forget. Mendoza grew up in Jastrzębie-Zdrój, Poland, a small coal mining town in the southern part of the country and where her parents remain. “Every year, for the last 10 years or so, my parents (Roman and Krystyna Brzoza) would come visit and stay with us for the summer,” Mendoza says. “Nathaniel and Benjamin do not remember a summer without babi and dziadek (grandma and grandpa).” Enter the pandemic and travel restrictions put a halt to the annual family reunions. To add insult to the proverbial injury, Brzoza faced a cancer diagnosis and subsequent surgery without her daughters by her side. “Luckily, her surgery went well, and she is cancer free today, which we are very grateful for,” Mendoza says. “She is a real super

woman, and I cannot imagine my life without her. She is the type that just wants to cook for everyone, take care of everyone and make others happy. It has been crazy difficult for my sister and I to support her from so far away. As you can imagine, healthcare there is not that great, and not even being able to hold her hand during hard times was impossible.” Not even connecting through phone calls could quell Mendoza’s overwhelming concern for her mother. “Suddenly, we were talking to mom, who was very different from how we knew her all our lives. She changed from happy, loud and energetic to sad, quiet and hopeless.” Mendoza and her sister wanted to find a way to boost their mother’s spirits. Since Brzoza loves to knit and crochet, they opened an Etsy shop for her as a birthday gift. “This whole idea was a total team effort,” Mendoza says. Family and friends participated in a friendly contest to name the shop, a cousin (Gaby Apostel Strempel, who lives in Germany), made the logo, and friend and photographer Monika DeMyer, in New Jersey, took product photos for the site. With winter and the holidays on the horizon, they decided have Brzoza fill her online shop with snowflake ornaments, which she’d ship to Mendoza, who would fulfill the online orders. “We knew that each of the snowflakes would be made with a lot of love, patience and a goal in mind to make others smile,” Mendoza says. “And her craftsmanship

Krystyna Brzoza

PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

17


is truly impressive. It took years of experience and true passion, but her work is really remarkable.” In less than two months, close to 100 sets (600 snowflakes) were sold, and snowflake garlands later entered the blizzard of success. “To be honest, neither my sister nor I ever expected that Little Big Things would actually work out the way it did,” Mendoza says. “We thought we would sell a few crocheted snowflake sets, and the plan was that we would buy the rest to keep mom happy.” With that early success comes news that they are working on a spring collection, featuring crocheted and knitted bunny-themed blankets, hats, socks and toys. “Mom wanted something that would remind people of spring, and bunnies would do that,” Mendoza says. “… And given how crazy our family is about dogs, I think a dog collection may be just what we need for the fall of 2021!” Given the interest in the products, Brzoza’s friend Jadzia Gajda is also creating inventory. “I would love to see this expand to be able to have more women in the town join Little Big Things,” Mendoza says. “Bear in mind, we are talking about a different place, where this generation of women would stay home to take care of kids and rarely had the opportunity to do anything else.” “Little Big Things has been a blessing for all of us,” Mendoza says. “Mom is so excited that she cannot stop talking about it. She is so proud of herself, probably more than she has ever been in her life. She is pretty humble, so the idea of people paying for her crocheted creations is difficult for her to swallow, but listening to me translate customer reviews that they write on Etsy has been her favorite pastime lately.” Find products on Etsy at LittleBigThings2020. @LittleBigThings2020 littlebigthings2020

18

APRIL/MAY 2021


THE BEST YEARS OF YOUR LIFE

In Their Words Customers are delighted with their Big Little Things purchases and have expressed as such on its Etsy site. “These snowflakes are absolutely GORGEOUS! They came so beautifully gift wrapped that I actually waited until the day that I decorated the tree before I unwrapped them ... and then I decided that I didn’t want anything but snowflakes on my tree this year!! Handmade items always give off such a warm and cozy energy, so I like to use them everywhere I can. I spray these with vanilla-mint to decorate around the house to send them in holiday cards, to attach to gifts. I even have one hanging in my car.”

Global Pointe offers the vibrant lifestyle and personalized services you deserve. With an exceptional care staff and the highest safety protocols in place, rest assured you’ll have everything you need to enjoy life just a little bit more.

Call Mary at 763.278.8000 and ask about our MOVING SPECIAL!* INDEPENDENT LIVING | ASSISTED LIVING | MEMORY CARE 5200 Wayzata Blvd. Golden Valley, MN 55416 MANAGED BY

763.235.3468 GlobalPointeSeniorLiving.com *Limited offers available. Terms and conditions apply.

Your Full Service

Garden and Landscape Resource Center

“These snowflakes are beautiful. They remind me of things my grandma used to crochet!” “I love these! Very high quality and made with care. The attention to detail right down to the packaging is amazing.”

Garden Center & Landscaping

2350 West Wayzata Blvd., Long Lake, MN 55356 952-473-5425 www.ottenbros.com PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

19


written by Claire Swenson

E x p e r t s o f f e r t i p s t o ke e p p e

W

ith many Minnesotans sticking closer to home during the pandemic, folks have been looking for inspired ways to use their newfound time and engage in sociallydistanced endeavors. For some, that meant welcoming pets into their homes—some for the first time. Rachel Mairose, executive director of Secondhand Hounds in Minnetonka, says the shelter witnessed an uptick in interest for pet adoptions and fostering. “Our large dog coordinator had a 75 percent increase in the number of lives saved over the summer,” Mairose says. “Over the summer and into fall, we rarely have dogs stay [available for adoption] on the website more than a couple hours.”

20

APRIL/MAY 2021

t s s a fe a

t home and the par

“[Pet adoptions] is the silver lining of this whole pandemic for us,” Mairose says. “The amount of lives not only Secondhand Hounds has been able to save, but every rescue across the country, is amazing.” With so many first-time pet owners bringing animals into their homes and exploring the sociallydistanced outdoors, it brings to question thoughts about how to properly care for the animals. Spending time outdoors is healthy for owners and their pets, so where are good areas to take pets for a walk? At home, is there anything owners can do to make sure landscaping elements are pet friendly? We turned to some experts for answers. There are plenty dog parks dotted throughout the Metro, but did you

k.

know that there’s one nestled in the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum? The Arboretum Dog Commons is “a place where members [with a dog-added membership]and their leashed dogs can enjoy the beauty of the arboretum together,” says Jean Larson, PhD, manager of the arboretum’s Nature-Based Therapeutic Services and assistant professor at the Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality and Healing at the University of Minnesota. When you’re out and about, Larson says that it’s essential to let dogs follow their instincts while staying on marked paths. While humans are used to moving at their own speed, it’s important to allow dogs to have a say in the pace. “When you are on a walk with your


PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

21

PHOTO BY EMILY J. DAVIS


dog, let your dog sniff.” Larson says. “Sniffing on a walk is extremely important for a dog’s wellbeing, and it allows us humans to slow down and enjoy the walk, too.” Heading out for some exercise and socialization is important for pets, but, let’s face it, they spend a vast majority of their time in their own backyard. Larson gives pet owners a few tips for pet-safe yard care at home. “Invest in a quality fence for your yard,” Larson says. “Physical fencing allows your dog to roam freely and stay safe.” She also says that careful supervision and recognizing your dog’s habits can be a great way to create a space he/she will enjoy. Is he a digger? Provide a sand pit for digging. Is she a sniffer? Feature areas of heavier cover where your dog can happily sniff. Does your dog like to sunbathe? Find a sunny spot where your dog can warm his belly.

22

APRIL/MAY 2021

Larson also recommends using dogsafe materials in your home landscaping and warns against using cocoa bean mulch and commercial weed killers. Kristi Flynn, DVM, assistant professor, Primary Care, University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine, says that often, fertilizers with bone meal can also be dangerous. “[They] prove to be irresistible for some dogs and can make a dog sick if they eat too much,” Flynn says. At-home horticulturists should be strategic about what plants are in their gardens, as many can be harmful to cats and dogs if ingested. Yews, castor bean, holly and lilies are a few that can quickly become dangerous. “The best prevention for keeping your dog healthy is to research plants that work in your zone and are safe for your dogs,” Larson says. She suggests books

like Dog Friendly Gardens by Cheryl Smith. Pet owners can also visit the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’ online library of poisonous plants. While owners can’t always know if a dog has ingested a dangerous plant, there are a few signs that are important to note. “Some plants can cause drooling or mild [gastrointestinal] signs right away, while others can have more serious adverse effects delayed after ingestion,” Flynn says. If you are worried that your pet has eaten something he/she shouldn’t, Flynn recommends contacting a veterinarian or a pet poison center, including the Pet Poison Helpline at 855.764.7661. If you have questions about your pet’s health, don’t risk it. Contact your veterinarian.


BORN TO RUN

We turn your house into the home of your dreams!

In addition to local parkland (Find out cities’ regulations regarding on- and off-leash pet areas, including permits.), here’s a shortlist of some area dog parks. 4 Paws Dog Park at Plymouth Playfield, 9755 36th Ave. N., Plymouth Brookdale Park, 7650 June Ave. N., Brooklyn Park Environmental Nature Area, 10201 West River Road, Brooklyn Park Cedar Knoll Park, 2541 Nevada Ave. S., St. Louis Park

J Brothers Design l Build l Remodel 763.732.8731 • JBrothersRemodel.com • MN LIC #BC326186

20

Crow-Hassan Park Reserve, 12595 Park Drive, Hanover Dakota Park, 2643 Dakota Ave. S., St. Louis Park Elm Creek Reserve Dog Park, 12400 James Deane Parkway, Maple Grove Fish Lake Regional Park Dog Park, 14900 Bass Lake Road, Maple Grove

PHOTOS BY EMILY J. DAVIS, TATE CARLSON

Happy Tails Dog Park at Oakwood Playfield in the hockey rink, 1700 County Road 101, Plymouth Iron Horse Dog Park, 5180 Kentucky Ave. N., Crystal Lake Minnewashta Regional Park, 6900 Hazeltine Blvd., Excelsior Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Drive, Chaska Plymouth Dog Park, 17005 County Road 47, Plymouth Susan E. Lurton Park, 3580 Wayzata Blvd., Long Lake

“Understanding Your Needs, Protecting Your Rights”

Individuals & Families Estate Planning Probate Elder Law Family Law • Custody Conservatorships Litigation & Dispute Resolution Business & Corporate Law Real Estate Nonprofit Law Employment Law

Businesses & Non-Profit 763.560.5700 | hennsnoxlaw.com 6900 Wedgwood Road, Suite 200, Maple Grove PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

23


A Sense of Belonging School Day 9:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Virtual School Tour

Thursday, May 13, 2021 at 6:30 p.m. Email info@beaconacademy.com to RSVP A Zoom link will be sent to you before the event

COM M U NI T Y

• K-8, Tuition-Free Public Charter School • Character Education • Daily Spanish

RIG OR

CHARACTER

• Rigorous Curriculum • Middle School Honors Program • Student Uniforms

3415 Louisiana Ave N, Crystal, MN 55427 | 763-546-9999 |

• Healthy Lunch Program • Free Busing • Smaller Grade Sizes

WWW.BEACONACADEMY.COM

40 LUXURY LOTS PLYMOUTH

Old Rockford Road & Holly Lane

• Phase One Now Open • Woods, Wetlands & Walking Trails • HOA for Snow & Lawn Care

WO SE T

PHA

• House & Lot Packages Starting in the $500’s

20 612-388-1030 | bergeronhomes.com B U I LD E R LIC E N S E # B C 70 6 4 37

24

APRIL/MAY 2021


ON THE TOWN things to see and do in and around Plymouth

ART APPRECIATION

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE PRIMAVERA ARTS COUNCIL

Annual art show returns for another year. Primavera, Plymouth’s annual spring art exhibition, offers the public the opportunity to celebrate fine art from adults and students alike. The juried event, held in partnership by the Plymouth Arts Council and the City of Plymouth, is set for April 15–18 at the Plymouth Creek Center, 14800 34th Ave. N. Elements for this year’s programming will be available virtually and in person in a limited capacity. Additional information is available at plymouthmn.gov and plymouthartscouncil.org.

Images from previous Primavera exhibitions

PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

25


O N T H E TOW N »

APRIL 7

8–10PM

LO C A L E V E N TS

APRIL:

14

Virtual Open House

Plymouth Historical Society’s spring open house series offers museum updates and space to discuss Plymouth history and local themes—now completely virtual and available from home. Register online to join the community discussion. All ages. Free. 4–5 p.m. plymouthmnhistoricalsociety.org

26

Bodacious Brunch Buffet

From decadent scones and French toast to rich crab cakes and eggs Benedict, this evening cooking course will make you the star of your next brunch get-together. Pre-register online. Ages 18 and up. $39 residents, $49 non-residents. 6–9 p.m. Plymouth Creek Activity Center, 14800 34th Ave. N.; 763.509.5200; plymouthmn.gov

MAY:

17

Artistic Moments

Embrace your creative side by using cut glass, rocks, glass pebbles and other decor to design a garden stone. Finished products can be left outdoors or kept inside. Pre-register online. Ages 18 and up. $31 residents, $37 non-residents. 7:15–9:15 p.m. Plymouth Creek Activity Center, 14800 34th Ave. N.; 763.509.5200; plymouthmn.gov

Bring your family to a night under the stars. The star watch includes an indoor orientation, followed by time outside to learn about and observe the constellations. Pre-register online. All ages. Individual: $10 residents, $12 non-residents. Family pricing (three or more): $20 residents, $24 non-residents. Hilde Performance Center, 3500 Plymouth Blvd.; 763.509.5200; plymouthmn.gov

Kids Garage Sale

Teach youth about entrepreneurship. Not only is this a chance to clear out old toys, games, books and clothes, but it’s also an opportunity for kids to make some money this spring. While this event is run by and for kids, all ages are welcome to shop. Ages 6–13 vendors, all ages

To have your event considered: email plymouthmag@tigeroak.com by the 10th of the month three months prior to publication. Due to the fluidity being experienced in the current environment, please note that some events/dates and even some business operations may have changed since these pages went to print. Please visit affiliated websites for updates.

26

APRIL/MAY 2021

ISTOCK.COM/PIXELPARTICLE

Minnesota Star Watch Party

22


advertise with

Compiled by Meghan Bishop, Lauren Foley and Olivia Rivera

PLYMOUTH MAGAZINE

@

entry. $15 resident vendors, $20 nonresident vendors, free shopping entry. Noon–2:30 p.m. Plymouth Creek Activity Center, 14800 34th Ave. N.; 763.509.5200; plymouthmn.gov

Contact Katie Freemark

612.270.9339 katie.freemark@tigeroak.com

AREA EVENTS / A P R I L

3

Egg Hunt at the Castle

Come celebrate Easter at this family friendly event at the American Swedish Institute with an egg hunt in the castle gardens, storytime with the Easter Witch (påskkäring) and Swedish-style crafts. Registration required. Recommended for 10 and under with their special adults. $10 members, $15 non-members. 9–10:30 a.m. or 1–2:30 p.m. American Swedish Institute, 2600 Park Ave., Mpls.; 612.871.4907; asimn.org

8

Virtual Nature Journal

Connect with nature at home with your children by registering for the Arboretum’s Nature Journal Academy: Looking for Lichen. This online class will be a great way to get your children excited about the bloom of spring. Ages 5–12 with their special adult. $20/family. 10–11 a.m. 612.301.1210; arboretum.umn.edu

9

Arts & Crafts Affair

Huffman Productions, Inc. returns with a family-friendly spring arts festival, featuring over 500 artists and crafters from 30 states. All ages. $10 adults, $9 seniors, children under 10 free. 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Canterbury Park, 1100 Canterbury Road, Shakopee; 402.331.2889; hpifestivals.com

17

*

* Dr. Corey Jensen*, Dr. Jennifer Bertrand, Dr. Brett Moore**

**

5K Bee Run/Walk

This Earth Day, help save the bees at this dog and family friendly event at Boom Island Park. Enjoy the beautiful historic views on the Mississippi River all while doing something meaningful for nature. All ages. 8 a.m.–noon. Great River Coalition, 724 Sibley Street NE, Mpls.; greatrivercoalition.com

Built on a Foundation of Excellence, Artistry and Comfort.

*

3475 Plymouth Boulevard, Ste 100, Plymouth, MN 55447 763.537.1238 | smiledesigndentistry.com Convenient appointments: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm and Saturdays

PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

27


GALLERY

WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S PHOTOS COURTESY OF TRILLIUM WOODS

About 50 residents and staff participated in the Walk to End Alzheimer’s gathering at Trillium Woods. The Trillium Woods team raised more than $6,500 for the Alzheimer’s Association this year. The chalk art was done by Club YES of Wayzata High School and the musicians that performed at the event included Seth Goodlaxson, Rick Widen and Trevor Holien. The Twin Cities Alzheimer’s Association hosted virtual walks with small teams due to the cancellation of its annual in-person event due to the pandemic.

To have your event considered: send date, time, location and contact information to plymouthmag@tigeroak.com.

28

APRIL/MAY 2021


Love Plymouth Magazine? Get Connected & Find Upcoming local events • Web exclusive articles Editors’ and writers’ blogs • Submit story ideas to Plymouth Magazine Visit us online for even more about Plymouth. plymouthmag.com

PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

29


TA S T E M A K E R S »

Pie–she’s often the underappreciated sister in the dessert family. Cake gets all the glory—candlelit entrances at birthdays and tiered seating at weddings, and all eyes are on her first slice at a host of gender reveal parties. But, have you ever heard of a savory cake? I think not! Pie can flex her ingredient muscles into sweet and savory recipes. More bakers and cooks are appreciating the nuances of pie by elevating traditional slab pie recipes. Made in (mostly) a 9x13-inch rimmed pan or larger jelly roll pan, these lovelies are great for serving a crowd or adding to a buffet lineup. Diners can cut the entrée or dessert any way they like, including into squares, or they can just grab a serving spoon and dig right in. For a delicious take on sweet and savory slab pies, we turned to Taylor Ellingson of greens & chocolate— “where” the website notes, “healthy cooking meets sinful indulgence.” Plymouth Magazine: On what occasion does it make sense to serve slab pie? Taylor Ellingson: I think slab pies are perfect for serving to a larger crowd. While a pie will serve around eight people, a slab pie makes around 16 servings. For savory slab pies, such as my ham and cheese slab pie, I love making it for a family brunch or dinner at home and having leftovers.

Pie Squared SWEET AND SAVORY RECIPES TAKE ON A NEW SHAPE. BY RENÉE STEWART-HESTER

30 APRIL/MAY 2021

PHOTO BY CHRIS EMEOTT

How do standard pie recipes need to be retrofitted? Slab pies are, generally, not as thick/ deep as circular pies, which will affect cooking time. The thinner filling will require less baking time than a deeper circular pie. To adjust to the decreased baking time due to the shorter height of filling, when you are baking a slab pie with a liquid or custard filling, you will have best results if you par-bake the crust prior to adding the filling. Since slab pies are traditionally baked in a jelly roll pan [check your recipes for


Stay Connected & Celebrate Plymouth FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM

where we daily showcase local people and places @PLYMOUTHMAG pan size], … approximately double the amount of pie needed to accommodate the large size. Tips? … If you’ve never made a homemade pie crust, there’s no shame in using storebought. I have used store-bought refrigerated pie crust many times and find it yields great results. If you have a favorite go-to pie crust recipe, I would double the recipe for a slab pie. For the filling, avoid the temptation to overfill the pie crust to avoid spilling on the transfer to the oven and while baking.

Outdoor Living Made Easy! Professional Landscape Design & Installation

Let’s talk about the perfect crust-to-filling ratio. The perfect crust-to-filling ratio is all personal preference. Slab pies have a high crust-to-filling ratio, meaning the filling is much thinner, and, for people who love crust, that is definitely a good thing. For people who love filling, I would suggest making a slab pie recipe with a fruit or no-bake filling, which can be piled a little bit higher than custard fillings. What about go-to ingredient brands? … For butter, Land O’Lakes is my go-to butter for all baking. My pie crust recipe is an all-butter recipe, so the quality of butter definitely makes a difference. Try some of Taylor Ellingson’s slab pie and pie crust recipes by visiting our website plymouthmag.com, where you’ll find tips for baking Ham, Egg and Cheese Slab Pie, Apple Slab Pie with Crumb Topping and her Go-To Pie Crust. Enjoy!

Reserve your spot on our calendar today!

lyndegreenhouse.com/landscape-services | 763-310-3341

Garden Center:

Grand reopening Monday, March 22 Growing Since 1896

greensnchocolate.com @greenschocolate @greensnchocolate greens & chocolate Greens and Chocolate

763-420-4400 lyndegreenhouse.com 9293 Pineview Lane North 55369 PLYMOUTHMAG.COM

31


LAST GLANCE THIRD PLACE Wildlife and Nature

Beautiful Bunting Camelot wins the heart of local birder. BY RENÉE STEWART-HESTER

POP OF COLOR placed third in the Wildlife and Nature

category of our annual photo contest. Deb Ranney was at Lake Camelot when she took the picture. “I was birding [and] had spotted the bunting high in a tree,” the Plymouth resident says. “I stood still watching him, hoping he would come closer, and, after about five minutes, he did fly down to the field I was standing near.”

32

APRIL/MAY 2021

PHOTO BY DEB RANNEY

“I like the beautiful color of the bunting and the corrosion of the grass he landed on. The lighting was perfect. There is hardly any editing on this photo,” Ranney says. While her favorite spot for birding in Plymouth is Lake Camelot, Ranney also enjoys checking out the wildlife at Three Ponds Park. “We are fortunate to have these resources in Plymouth as I have seen so many species of birds at these two parks,” she says.


901 Nicollet

Minneapolis jbhudson.com

612-338-5950