Page 1

CELEBRATING LIFE AROUND THE LAKE

NAMASTE Find your calm at Zen Fitness and Wellness

ENJOY THE UNIQUELY NORTHERN SPORT OF ICE FISHING


MARY NELSON 651-335-7260

GAIL GENDLER 651-210-1699

KATHY & LISA MADORE 651-592-4444 | 651-216-1335

JOHN MONETTE 612-720-0545

HEATHER & RANDY BACCHUS

651-214-2964 | 612-499-5744

AMY DOWNEY 651-324-2543

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THE BACCHUS-ECKLIN GROUP 651-592-8932

JOHN LUDWIGSON 651-285-4939

THE FLYNN TEAM NANETTE & LIZ

LAURA WHITNEY 612-387-3052

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DOUG DONOVAN 651-261-5544

DANA & MARK ASHBY 651-287-4040

LINDA & RICK GUY 651-247-7895

MICHELE KAY 651-808-0983

BRYAN PELTIER 651-353-0388

JASON BROWN 612-834-9229

BEN STEWART 651-271-0877

LINDA POWERS 651-315-4119

JAN NIEMIEC 612-248-4100

TOM BECKER 651-402-1398

DENISE LARSON 651-271-8560

PAT FRUCCI 651-470-7807

TAMMY SODERLUND 612-554-1774

DON JOYCE 651-442-4085

LORRIE KAY PILGRIM 651-247-7686

ERICH YOUNG 612-220-1191

JENNIFER TILLGES 651-442-5662

TRAVIS PELTIER 612-708-2296


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BREAKTHROUGH MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY AVAILABLE IN WHITE BEAR LAKE ADVANCED PAIN RELIEF Unless you or someone you know has struggled with severe injury, chronic pain, or degenerative disease, it’s difficult to understand the impact it can have on life. But if you struggle with chronic pain, you know its debilitating effects. You’ve likely given up hobbies, family activities, and travel in your efforts to control pain and maintain functionality. Unfortunately, until now, the only treatment options for these types of conditions have been surgery or addictive pain killers, which often have unwelcome side effects. But recent developments in medical technology may offer advanced, effective relief. Summus Laser, a state-of-the-art, Class IV laser is a safe and effective FDA cleared therapy. Laser Therapy is the use of specific wavelengths of light (red and near-infrared) to stimulate the body’s natural ability to heal.The effects of laser energy include improved healing time, pain reduction, increased circulation and decreased swelling. IMAGINE A DAY WITH NO PAIN Dustin Carlson D.C, of White Bear Lake, has offered Summus-Laser treatments in his practice since 2016. “I’m thrilled with the outcome of Summus-laser therapy. I’m now able to provide holistic, natural treatments for conditions that previously required invasive treatments or heavy medications with no promise of real relief.” - Dr. Dustin Carlson D.C.

CONDITIONS TREATED WITH K-LASER High power laser therapy can stimulate all cell types, including soft tissue, ligaments, cartilage, and nerves. Some conditions that have been shown to respond well to Summus-Laser include: • Peripheral Neuropathy, Fibromyalgia • Back and Neck Pain • Arthritis pain, Degenerative Discs/ Joints • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome • Knee Problems • Tendinitis, Trigger Fingers • Bunion Pains, Plantar Fasciitis • Sprains/Strains • Bruises, Contusions, Burns • Headaches, TMJ, Sinus Trouble • Athletic Injuries • Work-Related and Auto Injuries • Post-surgical recovery To take advantage of a complimentary first visit, call 651-762-8040 and tell the receptionist that you’d like to come in for the -Laser Consultation.

I was in a car accident and was introduced to the Summus-Laser at Carlson Chiropractic. The car accident left me with a broken toe and whiplash. I have been using the Summus-Laser on both areas and has worked so well. I would highly recommend giving this a try if you have an injury or an underlying condition that may require therapy. - Shelley J After tearing my right meniscus twice, I thought I would have to deal with scar tissue and a lacking range of motion in my right knee for the rest of my life. After completing my laser therapy, my range of motion has increased dramatically and the pain in my right knee has decreased significantly! - Kevin J (personal trainer)

EVEN RESULTS MAY R ONE BE SEEN AFTE TREATMENT!

Clinic hours are Monday-Friday 8am-6pm, and Saturdays 8-11am.

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CONTENTS JAN/FEB ’21 Cozy up with the January/February issue chockfull of ideas that will get you creating, relaxing, helping, fishing, slurping and more!

in every issue 4 EDITOR’S LETTER 7

NOTEWORTHY

25

ON THE TOWN

28

TASTEMAKERS

32

LAST GLANCE

departments 1 0 DOING GOOD

Fore!

BEAR’ly Open celebrates winter for a good cause.

1 2 SHOPS

Community Driven, Community Focused

ReGrow White Bear Lake supports downtown businesses.

1 4 BE WELL

Namaste

features 16

Making It!

Flex your DIY muscles with these fun projects.

20

Frozen PAGE 16

2 | JANUARY/FEBRURY 2021

Enjoy the uniquely northern sport of ice fishing.

PHOTO BY SARAH DOVOLOS

Find your calm at Zen Fitness and Wellness.


Of the many reasons to love Minnesota, at least one can be delivered.

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11 Twin Cities Locations |

W W W. K O W A L S K I S . C O M


from the EDITOR

Listening to your Dreams

Sara Moran Realtor

Follow us !

See what we’re doing behind the scenes and around town!

whitebearlakemag.com White Bear Lake Magazine @whitebearlakemag @whitebearlakemag

ON THE COVER

I’ve always loved doing projects. David and I have built seven houses during our 34-year marriage (yep, we’re crazy) and the idea of a blank slate, of taking those blank walls and empty spaces and making them beautiful, is something we adore. I love the sense of accomplishment that comes with projects, the before and after, the journey of creation. This past summer, while David was building an outdoor wood storage/bar for our firepit area, I decided to work on another project: transforming an old pump organ into a beverage station. The organ, a beautiful piece of craftsmanship, was a holdover from his parents, and we tried selling it, we tried donating it to a few churches, to no avail. So, I got to work. I removed all the insides (the dirtiest job ever!), sanded, primed, painted and distressed the organ. I’m so pleased with how it turned out! (See pics below.) And so, I thought, let’s share some DIY projects that folks can work on during these cold months. I made a chunky knit blanket, which I don’t feel any shame in telling you, took me a LOT longer to figure out than tearing apart that organ. But I finally cracked the code and was able to finish it. Other editors offer up some fun projects, too; you can find the story on page 16. Happy DIY-ing!

CELEBRATING LIFE AROUND THE LAKE

NAMASTE Find your calm at Zen Fitness and Wellness

Nancy Eike, guest editor whitebearlakemag@tigeroak.com ENJOY THE UNIQUELY NORTHERN SPORT OF ICE FISHING

Brittany Tobin page 14 PHOTOS BY TATE CARLSON; COURTESY OF NANCY EIKE

CHRIS EMEOTT

advertise with

WHITE BEAR LAKE MAGAZINE

@

Contact Katie Freemark

612.270.9339 katie.freemark@tigeroak.com BEFORE

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AFTER


[ VOL. 10

NO. 1 ]

whitebearlakemag.com

publisher editor managing editor associate editor digital editor staff writers contributing writer editorial interns

SUSAN ISAY NANCY EIKE ANGELA JOHNSON HAILEY ALMSTED ANTHONY BETTIN AVA DIAZ MADELINE KOPIECKI CLAIRE SWENSON RENÉE STEWART-HESTER SAMANTHA DE LEON ANITA STASSON

editorial advisory board KEN GALLOWAY, Galloway Culinary ASHLEY FILIPP HARNESS, White Bear Area YMCA LAUREN ROBBINS, Wild Tree Psychotherapy ELISHIA ROBSON, Lakeside Floral

senior managing art director art director junior graphic designer lead staff photographer print production director production coordinator digital production director project coordinators senior account executives

SARAH DOVOLOS EMILY HANDY ALLISON NOLDEN CHRIS EMEOTT BRITTNI DYE ALEX KOTLAREK DEIDRA ANDERSON ANGELA BEISSEL

To see all our favorite healthy recipes, visit LundsandByerlys.com/Nourish 4630 CENTERVILLE ROAD, WHITE BEAR LAKE, MN 55110 L U N D S A N D B Y E R LY S . C O M | 6 5 1 . 6 5 3 . 0 0 0 0

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REGISTER FOR PRESCHOOL NOW! Year-round registration available. Spaces are limited. Call nearest center for availability.

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Before

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NOTEWORTHY W H AT ’ S G O I N G O N A R O U N D T H E L A K E

Lend me an ear! A model wears a few of Sam Snyder’s delightfully whimsical designs.

Accessory Queen A young jewelry designer with big goals.

“I’ve always been interested in art that stands out, so I figured why

not incorporate that into my jewelry,” says owner and full-time student, Sam Snyder of Spotted Mushroom Co. Snyder’s Esty shop started out as a quarantine hobby in June, but as time went on, her ideas turned into something bigger than she ever expected. Beginning as quick sketch ideas, her pieces are made in her small at-home studio space. She works with polymer clay and hypoallergenic hardware that is oven-baked and coated with glossy varnish to be durable and wearable. Enrolled as a full-time student at the University of Wisconsin-Stout studying art education and minoring in printmaking, art has not only been a stable outlet for Snyder but says the teaching component will be an added bonus. “Teaching art is more than what many think it is,” says Snyder. “It is a class that allows students to learn about new cultures, issues and information—it also is a space for students to let their creativity flourish and freely express themselves.” Snyder hopes her future students feel valued in her classroom and understand the importance of art. “I’ve always dreamed of being a self-employed/full time artist,” says Snyder, “and this is just a step towards that goal.” —Samantha De Leon

Spotted Mushroom Co. Spotted Mushroom Co. @spottedmushroomco CHRIS EMEOTT

WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 7


N OT E WO RT H Y

ARTS

Together as One

A collective of furniture artisans with one common goal. Taking old furniture pieces and transforming them back into timeless pieces, with lots of care and hard work, is the mission of The Artisans Markets Minnesota collective. Created four-and-a-half years ago by Lori Gravink of LaDeeDa Design and Laura Johnson Hernandez of Vivid Furniture Designs, this successful, online collective is for artisans to come together with a common goal and a commitment to raise market quality for furniture. The 40-plus artisan collective, with more than 20,000 members, uses Facebook as their platform to list their wares. From the page, members can view furniture listings— which change daily—and deal directly with the artisans. Members are promised first grabs at pieces since they won’t list items on any other website for the first seven days. If a piece is purchased, artisans offer personal delivery of the item. “Artisans are all unique and do this for different reasons,” Gravink says. They can structure their production based on their lives; it’s a unified mission. Each artisan has produce as often as they want, and can leave or enter anytime. It’s a flexible, highly motivated group of individuals. And, Gravink says, it’s a “worth-while adventure because it gives me the opportunity to be a part of different generations.” Gravink runs the collective out of a spot in White Bear Makerspace. She also has a second group, The Artisan Markets Minnesota Too, which features home décor, art, jewelry and accessories. —Samantha De Leon Interested in joining? Head to The Artisan Markets Minnesota and The Artisan Markets Minnesota Too on Facebook and request to join. If interested in becoming an artisan, reach out to Gravink or Johnson Hernandez on Facebook about the application process.

8 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ARTISAN MARKETS MINNESOTA

his or her own page and can post anytime,


LENS ON THE LAKE

PICTURE PERFECT 2020 Lens on the Lake winners.

Cue the trumpets and don the regalia … it’s time to reveal the 2020 Lens on the Lake photo contest winners.

Open for Business. Dreaming of Beaches. During challenging times, we’ve remained open to meet your eye care needs. But we’ve also dreamed about walking the hottest beaches, wearing the coolest shades. Whatever your needs, our experienced doctors and stylish eyewear can make it all a reality. Call today to schedule your appointment for a comprehensive eye examination and eyewear styling by appointment only.

651-429-3379 • whitebeareye.net

Look for some of these photos in upcoming issues of the magazine. Congratulations to all! —Nancy Eike Activities and Events

4750 Washington Square • White Bear Lake, MN 55110

1. Day at the Beach (Memorial Beach in Winter) by Lauren Meyer 2. Paddling through Gold—White Bear Lake by Ed Boggess 3. Row by Stephanie Herington City Landmarks 1. A Frosty Morning Near Manitou Island by Ron Hawkins 2. Lake Ave. Spring Snow by Terry Ward 3. Autumn at the Rotary Nature Preserve Pavilion by Ron Hawkins People and Families 1. Boys of Summer by Jean Auger 2. Exploring the Woods by Michael Lovett 3. Donna’s New Kayak by Jean Auger Pets 1. Crumpet Tea on the Lake Snack Time by Beckett Babiash 2. Hi Friends by Michael Lovett Wildlife 1. Circling the Sailboat by Jean Auger 2. Dawn Patrol—Canada Geese Over White Bear Lake by Ed Boggess 3. Grasshopper by Ron Hawkins

WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 9


D E PA R T M E N T S

|

DOING GOOD

Fore!

BEAR’ly Open celebrates winter for a good cause. PUTTING THE FUN IN FUNDRAISING, White Bear

Lake’s BEAR’ly Open event does so in true Minnesota fashion as an official Winter Carnival event. Celebrating its 14th year, BEAR’ly Open invites hundreds of local residents to Ramsey County Beach on the frozen White Bear Lake to enjoy rounds of golf on ice. Established in 2008 by members of the Rotary Club of White Bear Lake and White Bear Events, BEAR’ly Open was created as a way to celebrate the community and support the White Bear Area Food Shelf (WBAFS). Typically equipped with two nine-hole courses, a variety of delicious food, a hospitality tent, music and a Community Dance, there is no shortage of entertainment during this jam-packed weekend. But due to the pandemic, this year's event will look a little different. "There will be no sponsor tents or congregating of any kind," said Ken Galloway, founder and current chair of BEAR'ly Open. "Instead, we will have the course open on Friday and Saturday, February 5th and 6th. We will sell tee times in groups of four and spaced out 10 minutes apart; golfers will register and pay for their tee time in advance on our website." The event will also include a virtual Gala on Friday night, February 5th, as well as an online auction that will run for four days up until Friday. And, as always, it's about giving back; all of the proceeds of this event go toward the WBAFS. Providing support to the area since 1977, the food shelf is a critical resource for local families striving to live a healthy, nourished lifestyle. Through their partnerships with various nonprofits and local businesses, the

10 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

PHOTOS COURTESY OF KEN GALLOWAY

BY AVA DIAZ


The Neighborhood Electrican

651-528-4975 food shelf is able to multiply and increase the value of the donations. “For every dollar you would spend at a grocery store, we would be able to buy eight dollars’ worth of food through our connections,” says Perry Petersen, executive director of WBAFS. To date, the BEAR’ly Open event has raised over $200,000, which equates to more than $1.6 million in food for community members in need. With a lofty goal of reaching $2 million this year, Galloway says this event “has really made quite the impact,” and that he would love to see BEAR’ly Open continue to expand and reach more people.

- Panel Replacements & Upgrades - New Lighting - Electric Car Chargers -Hot Tub Wiring

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EVENT INFORMATION: Please visit bearlyopen.org for up-tothe-minute updates on how to reserve your tee time, the virtual Gala and the online auction.

GALLOWAY CULINARY In addition to his work as a Rotary club member and an organizer of this event, Galloway also started Galloway Culinary in an effort to combine his experience in management with his passion for food. With an emphasis on healthful cooking, he creates gourmet, multi-course meals for customers—and teaches private cooking classes. Look for a full Tastemakers story, devoted to Galloway and his culinary talents, in the March/April issue of White Bear Lake Magazine.

w her e qua lit y

finds a home

WHITE BEAR AREA FOOD SHELF 1884 Whitaker St.; 651.407.5310; whitebearfoodshelf.org White Bear Area Food Shelf @WBLfoodshelf BEAR’LY OPEN 651.983.5202; bearlyopen.org BEAR’ly Open

18 651-429-8032 • PrattHomes.com WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 11


D E PA R T M E N T S

|

SHOPS

Community Driven, Community Focused ReGrow White Bear Lake supports downtown businesses. WHEN DOWNTOWN WHITE BEAR LAKE FACED THE BRUNT OF THE PANDEMIC IN EARLY SPRING, ReGrow White Bear Lake stepped up to the

BY SAMANTHA DE LEON PHOTOS BY LISA BEECROFT

plate to help the many shops, eateries and businesses that help make the area such a great place to live, work and play. The campaign is a community-wide partnership of several groups, including the city of White Bear Lake, White Bear Area Chamber of Commerce, Main Street Organization, Explore White Bear and White Bear Lake Economic Development Corporation. They came together to help find a way for business owners to survive and reopen; within several weeks, ReGrow invited several local business owners to join. They use events, such as WBL Bear Hunt, Plant Party and Picnic in the Park, to help bring folks to the area to

12 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

dine and shop; they’re also working on building resources to promote smaller businesses and safe dine-in and takeout options for restaurants. In fact, several restaurants are collaborating on a pledge to commit to safety for their business and their customers. “We’re changing how we do things, smaller and more intimate, but in a way to celebrate community,” says Lisa Beecroft who is a ReGrow White Bear Lake committee member and volunteers at Explore White Bear. Beecroft says the collaborative effort is also resulting in a webinar series to assist businesses, technologically, such as online ordering. Generosity from local business owners and volunteers have helped make those events, Plant Party and Picnic in the Park and others, possible.


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Left to right: Social distance sign on Lake Ave., Plant Party pretties, Bear Hunt sign at Mixx Salon

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See all that your community has to offer.

Check out our Community Directory! All of the best resources at your fingertips. whitebearlakemag.com

ReGrow White Bear Lake encourages folks to get involved by dining and shopping local, using #ReGrowWBL when posting those outings to social media, supporting local nonprofits and checking the ReGrow White Bear Lake website for upcoming events, contests and updates.

Learn about the value of a Hill-Murray education and our commitment to our students. Discover the Hill-Murray Academic Experience, including personal attention, small class sizes, and many others.

Join our Virtual Open House – Featuring a Live Zoom Feed!

Thursday, January 7th, 2021 – Join the live launch at 6:00pm

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RSVP by December 29th at Hill-Murray.org/OH and recieve a special gift, mailed to your home. HILL-MURRAY PIONEERS

Limited to the first 100 sign-ups!

WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 13


D E PA R T M E N T S

|

BE WELL

Namaste Find your calm at Zen Fitness and Wellness. BY WHITE BEAR LAKE MADELINE RESIDENT BRITTANY KOPIECKI

TOBIN happened upon yoga at a particularly pivotal time in her life. “I actually found yoga when I was pregnant with my son, about seven years ago; I did prenatal yoga. It helped with my back pain, everything, and I’ve been falling in love with it since then.” Tobin kept at it, taking more classes herself, and introducing the practice to her friends and family through yogain-the-park lessons. After becoming a certified instructor, Tobin’s next step was to open her own studio, Zen Fitness and Wellness. “I think the biggest shock was how surreal it was at first,” says Tobin. “Now I have people who love to come to the studio—which feels great—and I just love hearing their stories.” The people who attend Tobin’s classes come from all walks of life, with students as young as 12, and others getting started on their yoga practice in their 60s. Tobin says that no matter your age or prior experience, it’s never too late to learn. “When people tell me that they don’t think yoga is for them, I’ll either get, ‘I’m not flexible at all,’ or ‘I have horrible balance,’ or ‘I like an intense workout.’ But yoga isn’t about flexibility,” Tobin notes. “It’s about stretching. It’s stretching the muscles in ways you aren’t used to, which has so many benefits. Inside the body, there’s blood flow and circulation. And with all of us on more screen time, especially now, it helps with the neck strain and calming your mind.” To help her clients, Tobin also offers a complimentary wellness profile with any class purchase. “I do a full body scan, PHOTOS BY CHRIS EMEOTT

14 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021


The Joy Erickson Real Estate Team it’s a to serve you!

Are you interested in starting a new fitness routine but don’t know where to begin? Check out zenfitnessandwellness.com for a full class schedule, including classes like HIIT FIT, Bootcamp, and Cardio Drumming (Pilates and Zumba classes coming soon!), in addition to yoga classes for all experience levels.

I scan their water weight, muscle weight and BMI,” she says. “A lot of people, when they look at a regular scale, say, ‘I’m not losing weight.’ But they’ve actually gained six pounds of muscle because they’ve been working out.” Tobin says yoga also helps to ease anxieties. “I have a lady who comes in, and she says, ‘I’m so stressed, and my body’s so stiff. I take your class and after the final pose I feel like a whole new person. I can breathe, I can move my body more.’ And I just love to hear that.” Note: Due to the ever-changing pandemic situation, please head to zenfitnessandwellness.com for the most up-to-date studio information.

ZEN FITNESS AND WELLNESS 1350 Highway 96 E. Suite 9; 651.341.4694 zenfitnessandwellness.com Zen Fitness and Wellness @zen_fitness_and_wellness

JoyErickson.com 612.802.7150 JoyTeam@EdinaRealty.com

in digital format! Never miss an issue of White Bear Lake Magazine with free, anytime access to our digital editions. Full screen viewing on your digital device allows easy cover-to-cover reading. You can zoom in on text or images as well as share your favorite White Bear Lake Magazine stories with friends and family.

Learn more at whitebearlakemag.com

WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 15


MAKING IT!

FLEX YOUR DIY MUSCLES WITH THESE FUN PROJECTS. Written by Editorial Staff

16 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

Photos by Sarah Dovolos


We’re relegated to staying home a lot more these days, so why not put that extra time indoors to good use? You know there are lots of projects you’ve been meaning to do and oodles of Pinterest board ideas and Instagram posts you’ve been meaning to try but have always just been too darn busy. Well, now’s your chance. Our editorial staff compiled a list of four delightful projects you can create—a chunky knit throw, bookmarks, door décor and faux pottery—to help get your wheels a-spinnin’ and your creativity a-flowin’.

BLANKET BLISS

We all love cozy blankets and throws to help keep the chill away during these cold

winter days. When you make said cozy blankets and throws with your own two hands, well, they just feel a whole lot snugglier. So, grab some yarn, find a flat surface on which to work (preferably a table or kitchen island), and let’s get hand-knitting—no knitting needles required! (Contributed by Nancy Eike)

Materials:

• 4–6 skeins of 7 mm yarn (I used Yarn Bee’s Chunky Knit Yarn in ivory.) • Tape measure

Method:

Create a 4-inch loop using a slip knot. Leave approximately 12 inches at the end (this is called the “tail”; the rest of the skein is called the “working yarn.”) Reach your hand through the loop, grab the yarn and pull it through to make another 4-inch loop.

Continue creating the loops until you’ve made 20, which will resemble a chain stitch. (This will make a throw of approximately 50 inches by 60 inches.) Turn the 20th loop up (this becomes your first stitch of the new row) and put your finger underneath the top “hill” of each loop thereafter, and pull the yarn through to create another loop. Continue going back and forth until you’ve reached your desired length. To finish the blanket, put the first two loops in the last row together, reach your hand through both loops, grab the yarn and pull it through to create a new loop. Use the new loop and next loop in the row until you get to the end of the row. Cut the yarn leaving a 12-inch tail, and tie a knot in the last loop. Weave remaining tail through the blanket.

DIY BOOKMARKS

I am typically not a “crafty” person, but I am an avid reader, and these DIY bookmarks seem like a wonderful way to repurpose old books. And, it looks easy! That’s an important project component to non-crafters like me. That is, if I can get past the idea of deconstructing something as venerable as a book. You may have old books on your shelves to use. If not, check thrift stores and garage and estate sales. (Contributed by Angela Johnson; inspired by familyhandyman.com)

Materials:

• Old hardcover books • Razor knife • Grommet maker, hole punch or drill • Assorted ribbon or leather strips

WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 17


Method:

Simply use a razor knife to slice the covers from old books, and cut out the spines. Drill a hole (or use a grommet maker) in the top of the book spine. Thread a strip of leather or ribbon through the hole to accent these unique bookmarks that could make fun gift items for the bookworms in your life.

HAT’S OFF Who doesn’t love a craft project that repurposes some of what we already have on hand? With some greenery

18 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

rescued from December and January’s wreaths, outdoor pots or home arrangements, a little floral foam, seasonal fillers and—an adorable winter hat—we have ourselves a cozy, cute door hanging. (Contributed by Renée Stewart-Hester; inspired by craftsbyamanda.com)

Materials:

• A sturdy knit winter hat with ties • Container, to fit into the hat • Floral foam • Hot glue gun and clear glue sticks • Greenery, dried or faux • Seasonal fillers, ideas

include mini bird houses or faux pine trees, pinecones, pompoms, seasonal ornaments, etc. (Switch these up to highlight Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day, a birthday, an anniversary, etc.) • Decorative picks (or bamboo skewers covered in floral tape) • Large safety pin and sturdy elastic band

Method:

Cover bamboo sticks with floral tape, and glue decorative, theme-appropriate items to one end. Using hot glue, secure the floral foam in the

base of the container. Add larger greenery elements to the container, making sure both sides are balanced. Fill in the arrangement with remaining items. Carefully, place the container into the hat with the ties facing forward and backward. Secure the ends of the hat ties with the safety pin, looping in the elastic band, which will be used to hang the arrangement on the door.

TRASH TO TERRACOTTA Let’s face it. Everyone has


The family that crafts together …

old glass vases and jars lying around, stored in old boxes or the back of shelves. Instead of collecting dust, upcycle old glass and ceramic pieces with house or acrylic paint and baking soda to make faux pottery. (Contributed by Hailey Almsted)

Materials:

• Glass or ceramic vessels, vases, jars, etc. • House, acrylic or chalk paint (just about any paint will do!) or liquid terracotta • Baking powder • A small container • Spoon or small stick • Large bristle paint brush

Method:

Put ¼ part baking powder and ¾ part paint in a small container and mix using a spoon until a thick, textured paint is formed. (Add in additional baking powder, 1 tsp. at a time, for a more textured look.) Laying out newspaper and using a clean paint brush, began to paint the mixture onto the vessel in large, sweeping strokes. To create a pottery-like feel, paint in horizontal strokes around the pieces instead. Let fully dry, and paint 1–2 more coats, depending on coverage. Textured or colored vessels may need more coats.

If your family is itching to get into the DIY zone, check out CreARTivity kits, which are available through Minnetonka Community Education. The wood projects are assembled-to-order and can be pre-ordered, picked up curbside (no contact) and completed at home. The family-friendly kits feature supplies and materials, paints, brushes, sponges and written instructions. (Some kits may include video instructions.) If the CreARTivity kits, a collaboration between Minnetonka Community Education and White Bear Makerspace (supporting local crafters and artisans), are a win in your household, keep at it, as new kits are released every 1-2 weeks.

To view all the available kits and place an order, visit Minnetonka.ce.eleyo.com.

WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 19


Written by Nancy Eike

20 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

Illustrations by Em Handy


ENJOY THE UNIQUELY NORTHERN SPORT OF ICE FISHING. With a motto that aptly states, “Land of 10,000 Lakes,” well, we all know just how important those glistening and gleaming bodies of water are to us in the bold north. We swim in them, we boat on them, we picnic around them, we catch fish in them. And we don’t let Old Man Winter with his decidedly-icy-and-sometimes-irritatinglylong-grip to deter us from dropping a line and catching a big one—nope! In fact, we relish it. We bundle up. We head to the frozen lake. We drill a hole. We bait a hook and drop a line. And we hope for a hungry or inquisitive fish to find that bait just so dang irresistible that it takes a nibble and, voila, a fish is on the line. This process of catching fish on a frozen body of water, of course, has been going on for at least two millennia as a way for folks to eat when the weather cooled, and food became scarce. But now, ice fishing is mostly done as a hobby, a way to spend time relaxing alone or with friends or family, or for sport. Many Minnesota cities and towns hold well-attended ice fishing

contests; the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) notes they issue nearly 400 permits for ice fishing contests and tournaments statewide each year. FOR THE LOVE OF ICE Austin Holmes remembers as a young boy bundling up and heading out to the icy lake with his dad on cold winter Saturdays. Perched atop one of those overturned fivegallon buckets and with fishing pole in hand, he’d wait, as patiently as a small tyke can, for a fish to bite. “Those Saturdays were always a really big highlight of my week,” Holmes says. Those memories of father and son, of fish and fisherman, intrigued him—set the hook, one could say—to a life of water and ice, of fishing, and of relishing the still, quiet moments when the hustle and bustle of an overscheduled world seems far away. Ice fishing with buddies while in college in northern Wisconsin only shored up his passion for the sport. A self-professed “cold weather freak,” who says temperatures above 55 degrees are “just too hot,” Holmes,

WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 21


after time in the U.S. Coast Guard in Alaska, and Hawaii, where he met his wife Chelsea, settled in White Bear Lake and began to study White Bear and Bald Eagle lakes and the fish that inhabit them. “I started really learning the different contours of the lake, where the fish move based on the temperature of the water,” says Holmes. “There’s a lot that goes into it that people don’t realize; obviously, there’s luck involved, but there’s a lot more.” And, just as his father introduced him to ice fishing, so, too, has Austin shared his love of the sport with Chelsea, and their two dogs, Cobalt and Timber. They recently purchased an icehouse/camper from Ice Castle USA in Forest Lake and, when the lake is frozen enough to hold the camper, head out on the weekends to make some ice fishing memories. Let’s just say it’s a little nicer than an overturned plastic bucket. “Chelsea loves it because she gets to go out fishing with me and have the heater on,” Holmes says. “And wake up in the morning, make cinnamon rolls—and still catch fish. It really has become a family affair for us; we love it.” AUSTIN’S TIPS • When it comes to bait, have a lot of options. “I tend to fish walleyes more than anything else and they’re finicky biters,” says Holmes. “What works one day might not work another, so just bring lots of bait and jigs.” • Invest in an electric auger. “That is a game-changer,” says Holmes. “You don’t have to worry about fumes or having the windows open ...” • Use an electronic fish finder with GPS. “They’re really neat because you can walk around and you can tell within a pretty short distance how deep you are, the contours of the lake,” says Holmes. “You may stumble across a little shelf that nobody else knows is there and you may find a nice school of perch ...” • For walleyes, Holmes recommends fishing at dawn and dusk. “But for perch, sunfish and the like, any time goes.”

crappie

The biggest fish … Chelsea caught a 32” northern pike on Bald Eagle. Austin caught a 22” walleye on White Bear and a 32” pike on Bald Eagle.


walleye northern pike

The DNR website (dnr.state.mn.us) is chockfull of information, facts and regulations about ice fishing (and a whole lot of other stuff, too, but we’ll focus on ice fishing) in the approximately 4,500 fishing lakes in our neck of the woods. We’ve culled a few of those fish-inspired nuggets to inspire you to don your mukluks and your warmest winter gear, grab your fishing supplies and an auger, and, whether you plop yourself down on an overturned bucket or inside an elaborate icehouse, create a fish tale of your own. WHAT YOU’LL NEED • Ice fishing rod: Typically, 24”–36,” which is smaller than your warm weather fishing rod, as you need the leverage because of the confined space. • Ice fishing reel: More compact than a typical reel. • Ice fishing line: This line is created to withstand frigid temperatures and jagged ice. • Lures and bait: Research the type of fish you want to catch and adjust lures and bait accordingly.

• Tackle box: Yep, a way to keep all your small items secure and organized. • Ice auger or drill: A must; no hole = no fish. • A spot to sit: On a 5-gallon bucket or inside an icehouse. • Warm clothing: Make sure to dress in layers. WHAT TO CATCH (a few of the many species we can catch ice fishing): It’s probably no surprise that the favorite fish to catch in Minnesota, the most beloved, is—you guessed it—the walleye. It doesn’t hurt that it’s the official state fish and, well, just think of the best plate of grilled walleye you’ve ever eaten—with that subtle sweetness and delicate, flaky texture—and you’ll understand why we Minnesotans adore this fish species, which is part of the perch family and is named for its distinguishable pearlescent eyes. Did you know bluegill, named for its large “gills,” is the most commonly caught fish in Minnesota? We have two species of crappies here

in Minnesota, black and white, and they tend to hang out not near the surface or the bottom, but, instead, according to the DNR’s website, “somewhere in between.” When you’re hankering to catch a big fish, one of those fish you can tell your grandkids about, Northern Pike may just be the one. He’ll give you a run for your money, as they’re known to put up a fight as you bring them in. The state record is 45 pounds, 11 ounces, so you’ve got your work cut out for you. DID YOU KNOW? If you are 16 or older, you need a license to ice fish in Minnesota lakes; you don’t need a license if you’re fishing in state parks. FOR MORE INFORMATION Head to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources website (dnr.state. mn.us) for complete ice fishing information, ice thickness safety, specific lake information (regulations, lake maps, fish species, stocking reports, etc.), where to find fishing groups and a whole lot more.

WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 23


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Love White Bear Lake Magazine? Get Connected & Find Upcoming local events • Web exclusive articles Editors’ and writers’ blogs • Submit story ideas to White Bear Lake Magazine

Visit us online for even more about White Bear Lake. whitebearlakemag.com

24 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021


ON THE TOWN W H AT ’ S G O I N G O N A R O U N D T H E L A K E

Casa Couture

Mainstream Boutique lets you shop from the convenience of your own home.

W

Natalie and Kelly

hen business had to shut down due to COVID-19 last March, Mainstream Boutique acclimated to the times and found a way to bring its customers’ in-store shopping experience to a weekly online fashion show via Facebook Live. “The [online fashion shows] became a light in a dull time for women,” says shop owner, Kelly Arcand. For women, who were homebound and busy with work and/or kids, the shows became an outlet of entertainment. Now that the store is open again, Arcand says their clients still want to watch their online shows. Every Tuesday at 6 p.m., 15 to 20 outfits are showcased live; the videos are then posted to the Mainstream Boutique of White Bear Lake Facebook page. With the help of her daughter, Natalie, she puts together the outfits, each piece with a number, and explains on-camera content, color and fabric of the item. Women can comment in real-time and ask questions or purchase an item. Both Kelly and Natalie say the videos help clients see a snippet of what they have and, in-turn, brings in the foot traffic. And the experience has strengthened Kelly and Natalie’s relationships with their clients. —Samantha De Leon

Mainstream Boutique 4729 Highway 61 N.; 651.209.6790 mainstreamboutique.com Mainstream Boutique of White Bear Lake @mainstreamboutiquewbl COURTESY OF MAINSTREAM BOUTIQUE

WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 25


Compiled by Samantha De Leon and Anita Stasson

O N T H E TOW N

White Bear Lake Winter Farmers Market 12 Home at Last Tour

Learn more about Solid Ground, which helps families build the strong foundation for a brighter future and works to prevent and end homelessness in the community, for a one-hour tour, held virtually, every second Tuesday. All ages. RSVP. 5:30–6:30 p.m. Solid Ground, 3521 Century Ave. N.; 651.773.8401; solidgroundmn.org

30 Polar Plunge

Participate in the biggest fundraiser for Special Olympics Minnesota! All funds raised help over 8,100 athletes across the state. This year, there are two Plunge options: in-person or virtual. All ages. Register online. Fundraising required to participate. Begins at 1 p.m. (subject to change). Ramsey Beach, 5050 Lake Ave.; plunge@somn.org

AREA EVENTS

Eat, shop and support local at the White Bear Lake Farmers’ Market! This year, shopping can be done online with quick pick up at vendors’ booths, or onsite with food trucks and more! All ages. Free. 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Tamarack Nature Center, 5287 Otter Lake Road, White Bear Township; 651.407.5350; tamaracknaturecenter.org

LOCAL EVENTS

2–31 Shamanic Reiki

Undergo the unique sessions that blend techniques of Reiki and Shamanic healing, enabling you to rid blockages that have built up of oppressed emotions and negative thought patterns; every Saturday. Ages 18 and up. $35 for 30 minutes; $65 for 1 hour. Noon–6 p.m. Enchanted Boutique, 4074 White Bear Ave. N.; 651.600.3769; enchantedboutiquemn.com

8 Friday Night Yoga and Wine Samples

Candlelight yoga and wine samples— talk about a fun time! Grab a wine sample before or after class, or sip throughout while you learn about “healthy” wine. To secure spot, send payment to ZenFit via Venmo. Ages 21 and up. $20. 6–9 p.m. Zen Fitness and Wellness, 1350 Highway 96 Suite 9; 651.341.4694; zenfitnessandwellness.com

2 Gingerbread Wonderland

Norway House presents Gingerbread Wonderland in all its cinnamon splendor. Explore the gingerbread village of familiar buildings and landmarks from the Twin Cities, created by friends and neighbors. All ages. $10 general admission, $5 members, seniors (65+) and kids (5–12), free for kids 4 and under. Virtual access is available and free. 10 a.m.– 6 p.m. Norway House, 913 E. Franklin Ave., Mpls.; 612.871.2211; norwayhouse.org

3 Twin Cities Bridal Show

The Twin Cities Bridal Show is your go-to spot for the perfect wedding day! Meet area vendors, discover wedding ideas and find your fairytale dress. Masks are required to attend this event. All ages. $15 general admission option or upgrade. Noon–5 p.m. Saint Paul RiverCentre, 175 Kellogg Blvd. W., Saint Paul; twincitiesbridalshow.com

Due to the fluidity being experienced in the current environment, please note that some events/dates, and even some business operations, may have changed since these pages went to print. Please visit applicable websites for updates. To have your event considered: email whitebearlakemag@tigeroak.com by the 10th of the month three months prior to publication.

26 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

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cookiecart.org WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 27


TA S T E M A K E R S

Soup’s On!

FILL YOUR BOWLS WITH A HEALTHY DOSE OF WARMTH AND COMFORT. BY EDITORIAL STAFF

PHOTOS BY CHRIS EMEOTT

By now, even the most fervent cooks have grown a bit weary as the holidays and heavy-food season begin to fade into the distance. As with nature, cooking has its own seasons—enter the time for comfort cooking. Soup tops the list, providing warmth against winter’s chill and soothing what ails us—one glorious spoonful at a time. Our editors from across the Twin Cities celebrate soup’s restorative qualities by sharing some of their favorite recipes.

• 3 cups whole milk • 12 oz. smoked trout fillets, skin removed

WHITE CHICKEN CHILI

Nancy Eike, editor of White Bear Lake Magazine

• Smoked paprika for garnish • Optional: Chopped dill leaves, parsley or chopped chilies for garnish

This is my go-to soup recipe. With the precooked chicken and minced garlic, it’s about as easy-peasy as it gets. You

Melt butter in a large saucepan over

can also serve it with a stack of warm

medium heat, and add bacon. Cook

tortillas to sop up some of that glorious

until light brown, about five min-

just-the-right-amount-of-heat chicken

utes. Remove bacon with a slotted

chili broth.

spoon, and set aside. Reduce heat to medium-low, and add the onion and celery. Cook them for five minutes or

• 1 pound of precooked rotisserie chicken, shredded (or 4 breasts)

until onion is softened. Add flour to

• 1-2 Tbsp. olive oil

the saucepan, and stir to make a roux,

• 3 Tbsp. minced garlic

about two minutes. Add chicken stock

• 1 medium onion

and milk, and bring to a boil while

• 4 cups low sodium chicken broth

whisking constantly. Add potatoes and

• 1 15 oz. can white beans, drained

A good friend from Hibbing, Minn.,

thyme, and simmer, stirring occasion-

• 1 4 oz. can diced green chilis,

introduced me to the delicious flavor

ally for 12 to 15 minutes or until pota-

of smoked fish, an Iron Range hall-

toes are tender. Break the trout flesh

• 1 tsp. oregano

mark. Often available at local farmer’s

into bite-sized pieces, and add them

• ½ tsp. chili powder

markets, smoked fish is terrific on

to the pan along with the reserved

• 1 tsp. cumin

crackers, but I’ve always wanted to try

bacon; cook until heated through.

• 1 tsp. salt

Sara Moulton’s recipe for Smoky Fish

Serve soup sprinkled with paprika

• 1 tsp. ground black pepper

Chowder. Here’s the recipe. It’s creamy

and chopped herbs or chilies.

• Fresh cilantro, chopped

and flavorful, the perfect winter soup.

—saramoulton.co

• 4 Tbsp. unsalted butter

Notes: Trout is closely related to

Add olive oil to stockpot; warm. Place

• 8 oz. Canadian bacon, chopped

salmon and can be a good alterna-

onions and garlic in heated oil; cook

• 1 medium onion, finely chopped

tive to often-overfished salmon. It’s

until onions become translucent. Add

• 2 medium celery sticks, finely chopped

a great source of protein and can

chicken broth, beans, chicken, green

• 1 lb. potatoes, 1/3-inch cubes

encourage healthy bones, muscle

chilis, oregano, chili powder, cumin,

• 2/3 tsp. dried thyme

development and boost energy levels

salt, pepper and cilantro. Simmer on

• 3 Tbsp. flour

with B-vitamins, including niacin, an

low for at least 30 minutes. Serve with

• 2 ½ cups homemade chicken

essential mineral for a healthy nervous

tortilla strips, Mexican cheese and

system and brain function.

freshly sliced avocado.

SMOKY FISH CHOWDER

Angela Johnson, editor of Edina and St. Croix Valley magazines

stock or canned broth

28 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

with liquid

(I use a LOT of cilantro.)


Smoky Fish Chowder WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 29


TA S T E M A K E R S

Roasted Carrot and Ginger Soup

Notes: Did you know that, according to

For soup:

vegetable stock (reserve 1 c. broth).

some health experts, cilantro is not only

• 2 lbs. carrots

Screen mix through mesh into a medi-

delicious, but good for you—it’s an anti-

• 1 Tbsp. roasted ginger

um-sized stock pot, heating up the soup

oxidant, helps diminish sodium intake, lowers blood sugar levels and more? Don’t

(more or less to taste) • 32 oz. vegetable stock

like cilantro? Blame your genes! There is a

to desired temperature. Add in remaining broth (if needed), along with salt and pepper to taste. Add all gremolata

genetic variant in some people that makes

For gremolata:

ingredients to a bowl, and mix; sprinkle

cilantro taste like soap.

• ¼ c. carrot tops, finely chopped

on top of the soup.

• 1 Tbsp. lemon zest, finely chopped

ROASTED CARROT AND GINGER SOUP

Hailey Almsted, editor of Woodbury Magazine, and Patrick Miehle, Woodbury resident

• 1 Tbsp. raw ginger, finely chopped

Notes: Ginger, a flowering plant originat-

• 2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts, chopped

ing from China, has powerful medicinal

• 2 Tbsp. olive oil

properties and is closely related to tur-

• Pinch of salt, to taste

meric, cardamom and galangal. It’s used to calm digestion, reduce nausea and help

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Peel

to fight common colds—amongst many

and cut carrots to evenly-sized pieces;

others ailments.

This is the ideal hearty, winter soup—and

lightly coat them in olive oil, and spread

a family favorite! It’s vegan (perfect for my

out evenly over a baking sheet. Bake

sister!), low-fat and pairs perfectly with a

for a total of 45 minutes—20 minutes

toasted sandwich. The topped gremolata

in, flip the carrots, and add chunks of

adds contrasting bitterness, brightness

peeled ginger; cook for remaining 25

and spice, creating a tasty soup recipe

minutes. Add carrots and 1 Tbsp. of

you’ll be sure to write down for later.

roasted ginger to a blender, slowly add

30 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

TORTELLINI AND SPINACH SOUP

Renée Stewart-Hester, editor of Lake Minnetonka, Maple Grove and Plymouth magazines


White Chicken Chili

Tortellini and Spinach Soup

This recipe is my go-to when I don’t

the tortellini, and cook for 6 minutes.

features seafood or vegetables but is

have the time or inclination to pull

Add tomatoes and spinach, and cook

typically chunky and made with cream,

together a healthy, warm meal. The

for 2 minutes or until the spinach is wilt-

milk or a roux.

wine brightens up the flavor profile, and

ed. Add butter, and cook until it melts.

there’s plenty left in the bottle to serve

Serve immediately.

Bouillon or Consommé: Bouillon is usually a seasoned broth made

along with the soup. If you’re not a huge fan of spinach but appreciate its health

Notes: Spinach, related to beets and

by straining water in which beef, chicken

benefits, this soup’s for you—the spin-

quinoa, offers loads of nutrients and

or other proteins have been cooked.

ach flavor is muted.

antioxidants, including Vitamin C, which

Consommé is a clear version of bouillon

promotes immune function. It also bene-

as it uses egg whites to collect the excess

• 1 Tbsp. olive oil

fits eye health, reduces oxidative stress,

fat and sediment from the broth.

• 5 garlic cloves, thinly sliced

helps prevent cancer and aids in reduc-

• ½ cup dry white wine

ing blood pressure.

• 18 oz. cheese tortellini • 1 ¼ cup tomatoes, chopped • 6 oz. baby spinach • 1 Tbsp. butter

Stock or Broth: Stock is made from chicken or beef bones

• 3 – 15.75 oz. chicken broth

WHAT’S IN YOUR BOWL? Bisque or Chowder:

and creates a thicker liquid. Broth is made mostly from meat or vegetables and tends to be thinner and more flavorful.

Bisque is a smooth French-style soup

Velouté-based Soup or Pureed Soup:

Over medium heat, heat olive oil in a

made from crustaceans (lobster, crab,

Cream veloute-based soups are thick-

soup pot. Add garlic, and stir for 30

shrimp and crayfish). The shells are used

ened with a roux, while puree soups

seconds. Add the broth and wine, and

to make stock, and the meat is incor-

rely on a puree of the main ingredient

bring to a boil. Cook for 2 minutes. Add

porated into the finished dish. Chowder

for thickening.

WHITEBEARLAKEMAG.COM | 31


LAST GLANCE

A Bridge to Beauty Unique frost makes for a picturesque scene on Manitou Island.

BY NANCY EIKE

NATURE, IN ALL HER UNBRIDLED BEAUTY, frequently

puts on a dazzling display for all to see. Such is the case when Ron Hawkins awoke on a chilly Monday morning last February and noticed the hoarfrost on the trees—he knew the tiny crystals of frozen water vapor coating the landscape would make for beautiful photos. “I went straight to the area of Matoska Park and the Manitou Island Bridge,” says Hawkins. “After hopping out of the car, this was the first PHOTO BY FRON HAWKINS

32 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

view that caught my eye—and it was the very first picture I took that morning.” And Hawkins, an avid photographer, perfectly articulates the feeling his photo, A Frosty Morning on Manitou Island, evokes. “What I like most about the photo is that it simply gives me a sense of peacefulness and hometown pride. White Bear Lake has so many beautiful gems around town and this area certainly is one of them,” says Hawkins. “That morning, and when I look at the photo again, I feel a sense of calmness.”

A Frosty Morning on Manitou Island garnered first place in the City Landmarks category of our 2020 Lens on the Lake photo contest.


White Bear Lake Area Schools

Leading minds to learning, hearts to compassion, and lives to community service. Serving the communities of Birchwood, Gem Lake, Hugo, Lino Lakes, Little Canada, Maplewood, North Oaks, Vadnais Heights, White Bear Lake, and White Bear Township.

our Mission The mission of the White Bear Lake Area School District, the community at the forefront of educational excellence, honoring our legacy and courageously building the future, is to ensure each student realizes their unique talents and abilities, and makes meaningful contributions with local and global impact through a vital system distinguished by: • Students who design and create their own future • A culture that respects diverse people and ideas • Safe, nurturing, and inspiring experiences • Exceptional staff and families committed to student success • Abundant and engaged community partners

www.isd624.org

651-407-7500

/isd624