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Personal Profile Silhouettes outline sweet moments in time

Organized Giving Designer finds inspiration beneath the clutter

Purls of Wisdom

Knitting volunteers are honored with the Trailblazer Award


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CONTENTS PAGE 22

JAN/FEB ’21 “For every minute spent organizing, an hour is earned.” —Benjamin Franklin

in every issue 4 EDITOR’S LETTER 6 NOTEWORTHY 26 ON THE TOWN 28

TASTEMAKERS

32

LAST GLANCE

departments 1 0 DOING GOOD

Purls of Wisdom Knitting volunteers are honored with the Trailblazer Award.

1 2 ARTS

Personal Profile

Silhouettes outline sweet moments in time.

1 4 BE WELL

Expecting the Unexpected

Physician and author explores the myths around postpartum.

features

Frozen

Local anglers enjoy their fishing … on ice.

22

Organized Giving “By the time you hear there is a hot bite on a lake, it’s probably over.” —Jeff Nuss PAGE 16

2 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

Designer finds inspiration beneath the clutter.

CHRIS EMEOTT, FISH BY EM HANDY

16


ADVERTISEMENT

With Your Help, Maple Grove Pearle Vision Weathers the Storm A caring community and a hard-working team are keeping this family-owned business alive.

A

s 2020 began, Maple Grove Pearle Vision was on track to surpass the number of eye exams performed and sales of glasses and sunglasses in 2019. Then COVID-19 happened and the business had to close for nine weeks. Since then, the Hawley family, who own and operate Maple Grove Pearle Vision, have worked tirelessly to continue providing eye care in a safe environment to their patients and customers. Thanks to a community of caring people, they’ve succeeded. The Hawleys have owned the business since 2011, and before the pandemic, there was a Hawley on site six days a week. As COVID-19 forced restrictions on businesses all over, the Hawleys took the challenge head-on. General manager Brooke Hawley worked without a break for weeks to create a COVID-preparedness plan and to research protocols for reopening. Jim and Donna Hawley secured small business loans to keep the business open and replace crucial equipment. Kea Hawley Bull kept customers informed and encouraged on social media. In addition to the Hawley family working to keep things running, other team members were coming in daily to

answer phones, fix broken glasses and deliver much-needed contact lens orders curbside. The business slowly began reopening in May, with one doctor per day and one patient per hour. Now, three doctors per day see patients seven days a week. Throughout this difficult period, the Maple Grove Pearle Vision owners have remained involved in the community. They have continued to support local high school teams, Cross Food Shelf and the District 279 Foundation. The business owners also participate in the #MyMoneyStaysLocal movement, purchasing their supplies from as many locally owned businesses as possible so more money stays in the community. “We have been overwhelmed by the support of our community,” Donna Hawley says, “and the rave reviews we’ve been receiving about our happy team and our COVID safety level have been heartwarming and very much appreciated.”

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hen I was a child, going to Dayton’s was everything. Remember the Daisy and Anniversary sales? Legendary. We (Mom and four sisters) looked forward to those every year. (I can still hear the television jingle for the anniversary sale!) The beloved department store was our go-to place to shop for seasonal clothes and special gifts. I still have the porcelain egg with handpainted violets that I purchased as a little girl for my Mom’s birthday. She kept it on her dresser … forever. One year, my sisters and I received baby chicks at Eastertime, purchased, naturally, from Dayton’s! Another memory finds a very young me, sitting very still on a chair near a silhouette artist, who Dayton’s had hired for an appearFollow us ! ance. Somewhere in my house is that silhouette See what we’re doing behind the and another one of me from a few years later— scenes and around town! my hair had grown much longer, but my profile maplegrovemag.com was still distinctively captured. Maple Grove Magazine I recall standing near my grandmother’s van@maplegrovemag ity set and looking at the silhouettes of my aunts, @maplegrovemagazine uncles and my mother, her childhood braids and bows given their jaunty due. In a way that photographs can’t, silhouettes provide a timeless glance into a moment of someone’s life. Maple Grove resident Caroline DeKrey is keeping the art alive with her own take as owner of Sweet Silhouette Co. Rather than using a specialty scissors, her work is digitally created. “Silhouette portrait art is currently enjoying a burst of popularity,” DeKrey says. “The simplistic nature of the black and white portraits complements a large number of popular home decor styles right now … In my opinion, there will always be a place for silhouettes in keepsake art and family memorabilia …” Whose silhouette would you like to capture? Read more about DeKrey and her business on page 12. Until next time,

Renée Stewart-Hester, editor maplegrovemag@tigeroak.com

MAPLE GROVE MAGAZINE

@

Contact Sara Johnson

612.927.3008 sara.johnson@tigeroak.com

Personal Profile Silhouettes outline sweet moments in time

Organized Giving Designer finds inspiration beneath the clutter

ON THE COVER Hat by The Knitting Grandmas and Friends page 10 CHRIS EMEOTT

4 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

Purls of Wisdom

Knitting volunteers are honored with the Trailblazer Award

PHOTO BY TATE CARLSON

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N OT E WO RT H Y PICKS

Grow

Utilize ferns to improve your health. to stay moist, requiring a bit more maintenance than other ferns and will show signs of stress very easily. The Crispy Wave or Bird’s Nest and Curly ferns offer neon green foliage color with a solid leaf. Their care is much like the Boston fern, but like the Maidenhair fern, prefers its soil to stay moist, with more forgiveness. The Rabbit-foot fern is also manageable in care and produces spores that are light in color and fuzzy to touch, looking much like a rabbit’s foot, hence the name. —Contributed by Christina Timm, Lynde Greenhouse and Nursery

Bird’s nest fern

Create

Why do we need art? Art in the community is important, as it brings together people from different walks of life to share a common goal of art appreciation—be it through painting, music, words and more. It is all around us, in homes, shopping malls, medical offices, workplaces and more. Even the food on your plate can be considered an art piece. Everything around you was, in fact, designed by someone else. But is art important? I argue that art is important to our health, well-being and education. It can inspire us, push us and lead us toward new skill sets. Have you ever been to an art gallery and really looked at a painting? I mean, really looked, by standing at different distances and angles and taking

8 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

in what the artist was trying to convey? Doing that exercise inspires me to create, either visually or verbally. Listening to music is proven to be beneficial to health. It has been shown to relieve stress, lower blood pressure levels and increase serotonin and endorphin levels in the blood, whilst decreasing cortisone. Studies have shown that listening to music can help students attain higher scores in standardized tests, as it relaxes the brain. So, the answer to my initial question is—yes. Art accessibility is vital to a community’s overall health and wellbeing.—Contributed by Lise Spence-Parsons, president of the Maple Grove Arts Cente

Organize

The decluttering journey begins with a single step. It goes without saying that the best way to begin organizing is to first eliminate clutter, making the process much more manageable and even saving money on organizing supplies. Sources of clutter are everywhere—paperwork, knickknacks, memorabilia, kitchen gadgets and clothing. Starting the decluttering process can be daunting because of the sheer volume of the items in question or the thought that we might eventually use or need the items under review. Remember—reducing clutter isn’t as intimidating as it seems if you just keep it simple. Consider tackling one room at a time, spending only 30 minutes per day working on the process. In the room in which you’re working, have boxes labeled Donate, Sell, Recycle and Trash. Stick with asking yourself, “Keep, or don’t keep?” versus over-analyzing and spending too much time making a decision on an item. Be sure to take the filled boxes to donation sites, consignment stores or recycling centers as soon as they are filled, ideally, keeping as much out of the landfill as possible. The process of letting go will become easier, and you will find yourself working through spaces with more efficiency and decisiveness. Give yourself kudos for taking on the challenge. Now, look forward to the next stage, which is creating an organized space. —Contributed by Kira Vanderlan, Zestful Design, a home and business decluttering, organization and interior design company with a focus on mindfulness. zestfuldesign.com

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Help purify your home’s air with a wide variety of ferns that emit high contents of oxygen, creating cleaner air to breathe. Ferns also have qualities that will naturally mitigate your home’s exposure to toxins, and some studies show that ferns can even improve your sleep. The Boston and Kimberly Queen ferns are two of the most common household ferns that are easy to care for once a watering schedule has been established. For something a bit more exotic try: The Maidenhair fern offers very light, delicate foliage and prefers


Keeping seniors safe. At home.

Read

Library offers travel guidance. Travel sites might offer deals, but can they help with travel decisions? Preparations, precautions and reading beforehand can enhance travel safety. Visit Hennepin County Library’s website (hclib.org) to search magazine and newspaper articles for tips about travel during the pandemic and beyond. The library’s catalog has the top travel guidebooks, including well-known guidebooks like Frommer’s or Fodor’s (Did you know there’s a Frommer’s EasyGuide series?) or specialty guidebooks, like Bradt’s, for the “unusual” destination. The library also has specific travel guidebooks for planning road, air or bike trips. Access Rough Guides, Insight Guides or Blue Guides, or librarians can help find the best guidebook for your trip. —Contributed by Rose Ryan, Hennepin County Library–Maple Grove

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ShopTalk

New tenants offer fresh takes on retail, work and social amenities. The Shoppes at Arbor Lakes is or soon will be home to four new businesses, which represent a varied offering of goods and services. CoHAUS hopes to open early this year next to American Eagle Outfitters. The membership-based space focuses on co-working, meeting/event spaces and social networking. With various levels of membership, CoHAUS offers members 24/7 access, protected WiFi, access to a fully stocked bar, complimentary food and beverage offerings, private storage and more. Cycle Gear was to arrive at the end of the year between Williams-Sonoma and White House|Black Market. It provides motorcyclists with gear, parts and accessories. Team members come from diverse riding backgrounds. cyclegear.com Face Foundrié opened its doors last November across from Leela & Lavender. This membership-driven express spa specializes in micro treatments that give clients a customizable beauty experience. facefoundrié.com Xfinity Store opened last September next Williams-Sonoma and provides customers an opportunity to explore, learn and interact directly with the latest Xfinity products and services. xfinity.com —Contributed by Katie Welch Len

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DOING GOOD

COZY CUTIE

D E PA R T M E N T S

|

Local program helps newborns retain body heat.

Purls of Wisdom Knitting volunteers are honored with the Trailblazer Award.

BY AVA DIAZ PHOTO BY CHRIS EMEOTT

RECOGNIZED FOR ITS DEDICATION and commitment to spreading joy throughout the Maple Grove Hospital, The Knitting Grandmas and Friends program received the Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota annual Trailblazer Award. Since the opening of the hospital in 2009, The Knitting Grandmas and Friends have handcrafted more than 45,000 one-of-a-kind hats for newborns in the facility. Using yarn supplied by the hospital’s volunteer fund, 65 group members work diligently to make

10 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

a minimum of three hats a week each to keep up with the demand. Individually wrapped with a note from the knitter and a description of the program, these hats are truly customized with love. The group is filled with experienced knitters, some of which are blue ribbon winners at the Minnesota State Fair. Sheila Enestvedt, a knitter since she was 5-yearsold and a member since February 2010, says that the members share a common bond. Before the pandemic, the group would meet weekly at


BLUE CROSS AND BLUE SHIELD OF MINNESOTA trailblazer.bluecrossmn.com Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota @BlueCrossMN MAPLE GROVE HOSPITAL 9875 Hospital Drive; 763.581.1000 Maple Grove Hospital @MapleGroveHosp

Maple Grove Community Center to knit and crochet. Now, Knitting Grandmas regularly hosts a drop-off event in the parking lot, where individuals can exchange finished hats for new yarn. “I can’t say enough about how great this group is as human beings and as volunteers to one another,” says Jennifer Nelson, volunteer manager at Maple Grove Hospital. “I know that they will continue to adapt to whatever is put in front of them and continue making an impact in the community.”

THE TRAILBLAZER AWARD

Encouraging communities to reach their full potential, Blue Cross works to transform the face of healthcare through three purpose areas: a provider (clinics or health systems), a foundation (education and community-based organizations) and a center for prevention (access to healthcare coverage). As a part of recognizing the varying types of care, the Trailblazer Award sheds light on innovation across the state, ranging from large-scale, multi-year initiatives to specific smaller community needs. Since 2016, Blue Cross has awarded over 34 organizations across Minnesota for their dedication to making a healthy difference in their communities. “This award is a testament to [the awardees] commitment to doing their part to bring about community change and do things that promote mental, physical and social wellbeing,” says Scott Keefer, vice president of public affairs for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota. “These programs and these trailblazers show us what unites us as people and as Minnesotans.” Nominated by people engaged with Blue Cross partners externally, the organization is 2.8 million people strong (all 50 states and on four continents) and is home to more than 3,000 associates, who are geared toward spotting and celebrating innovation, Keefer says. MG

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D E PA R T M E N T S

|

ARTS

Maple Grove's Caroline DeKrey has outlined the perfect business during times of social distancing.

Personal Profile Silhouettes outline sweet moments in time. BY RENÉE STEWARTHESTER

IF IT ONLY TOOK 20-30 MINUTES TO CREATE A MEMORY that

will last a lifetime, would you want it? How about if it captured gentle loops of your toddler’s hair, the carefree jaunt of your teen’s baseball hat or the stoic pose of your beloved dog? Caroline DeKrey owns Sweet Silhouette Co., which she opened in March 2020. After she was unable to find a silhouette artist who met her expectations, DeKrey, a speech-language pathologist, took matters into her own hands—literally. “I could not find anyone local or online that featured all the specific elements of the art I envisioned, so I resolved to learn the trade myself,” she says. “I enjoyed illustrating my own children’s' portraits so much I decided to open my online Etsy shop.” For too many businesses, opening during the pandemic was not the perfect plan, but DeKrey’s timing might have been on target. “Silhouette portrait art is currently enjoying a burst of popularity,” the Maple Grove resident says. “The simplistic nature of the black and white portraits complements a large number of popular home decor styles right now, including modern farmhouse, transitional, minimalist and shabby chic. In my opinion, there will always be a place for silhouettes in keepsake art and family memorabilia; silhouettes display a person's profile features in a unique way not typically captured in photos.” Ideally suited for social distancing, transactions are handled virtually. “Customers electronically submit photos of the person or pet and specify any customizations or personalization they would ART BY CAROLINE DEKREY

12 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021


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like,” DeKrey says. “I [digitally] illustrate the silhouette portrait and then send the completed silhouette art as a digital JPEG file. Customers are able to print their digital files at home, a print shop or photo center. It is the perfect no-contact business in the era of social distancing.” Also a sign of the times, DeKrey’s materials don’t include specialty scissors and cardstock paper, as were and are used in a more traditional version of silhouette art. “My silhouette illustration is completed digitally using Photoshop,” she says, noting this allows her to capture more detail, such as individual strands of hair. “Other advantages of digital silhouette art include the opportunity to easily do revisions on the art if requested, quick delivery of the files to customers, unlimited printing and reproduction by the customer and the ability to easily transform the silhouette art files into other products, such as savethe-dates or thank you notes,” she says. DeKrey describes her style as “realistic with a touch of whimsy. I want to honor the true profile of the subject, but I do exaggerate the subject's eyelashes and take some liberties when illustrating the hair,” she says. “I like to fix any distracting elements, such as stray hairs, strange head tilts or double chins related to unnatural posture, as I know firsthand how difficult it can be to get a young child to cooperate for the submission photo.” Children are her most popular subject. “My specialty, and I believe what sets me apart from other silhouette artists, is the layered sibling silhouette portraits,” DeKrey says. “My second bestseller is silhouette portraits featuring personalized accessories, such as hair bows and glasses.” She’s also completed silhouettes of dogs, couples holding hands, parents holding children or people walking with pets and transforming the photo subjects into full-body silhouette portraits. $19.99 per person/$14.99 per pet/custom orders accepted MG

ETSY.COM/SHOP/SWEETSILHOUETTECO @sweet.silhouette.co Sweet Silhouette Co.

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D E PA R T M E N T S

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BE WELL Education and awareness are key to managing postpartum issues.

Expecting the Unexpected

BY RENÉE STEWARTHESTER

THE TRAP IS EASY TO FALL INTO—images of beautiful babies swaddled in bunting, birth mothers sporting post-birth figures that have immediately snapped back into pre-pregnancy place, mother and child in a blissful breastfeeding scene, fathers embracing skin-to-skin contact with their newborns and on it goes. While some of those images speak a truth, there’s more to the postpartum story than typically meets the public or social media eyes. The definitions of family and the experiences with welcoming a baby into a home are varied, and, often, those versions don’t make it into many adaptations of the storybook. Erin Stevens, MD, added to the narrative with her first book, Unexpected: A Postpartum Survival Guide (Wise Ink Creative Publishing, 2020). “I originally was planning to create a short handout that reviewed expectations for the postpartum period to provide to patients in my office as it seems that many people are unprepared for the realities of that time,” the OB/Gyn says. “People don't generally talk about their postpartum experiences publicly … and there's sort of this societal assumption that people are just supposed to be happy to have a baby.” But not everyone goes home from the hospital with a

14 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

baby. Consider stillbirths, surrogacy, NICU babies, for example. For those who do go home with their child, there can be a host of other postpartum issues, including bleeding, cramping, hemorrhoids, issues with sex, difficulties with lactation, mood issues, poor sleep and on it can go. “When issues do arise then, they're not sure what's normal, how to manage it and when they should be reaching out to a healthcare professional,” Dr. Stevens says. “This allows serious complications of many kinds to worsen without appropriate management.” Stevens, who has worked at Maple Grove’s Clinic Sofia since 2017, strives to make the book accessible and relevant to everyone, who can experience pregnancy, including transgender and non-binary individuals, gestational carriers, people who experience a stillbirth and their partners. “This meant not carrying assumptions that there's a baby present postpartum; avoiding words like woman, mother and parent; and acknowledging without judgment that each individual's experience may be different than that of the next,” she says. Each chapter is driven by medical information and anecdotes and most conclude with symptom information, key products and questions to ask a healthcare

ISTOCK.COM/RYANJLANE

Physician and author explores the myths around postpartum.


AWARENESS MATTERS According to Erin Stevens, MD, postpartum mood disorders occur more often than believed, and underreporting remains a significant issue when gathering data. “The biggest misconception is that it indicates the person suffering with it is a bad person or bad parent,” she says. “That is absolutely not the case, but this perception prevents many people from talking about their symptoms and makes the situation worse.” "[They] may be experienced by the person who gave birth, their partner(s) or adoptive parents," she says. Visit maplegrovemag. com for symptom information.

professional. Topics include vaginal tearing , Cesarean section issues, bleeding, cramping, urinary issues, constipation, hemorrhoids, exercise, body changes, sex, birth control, breast- and chest feeding, formula feeding, postpartum mood disorders, bonding, sleep, emergencies and more. “… now more than ever, people are in need of additional guidance,” Stevens says. “Many are finding they don't have the same access to a routine prenatal care schedule, childbirth education, lactation support, hospital tours, etc. that they would have had before the pandemic. It's a scary time with a lot of unknowns. Information and support is so crucial. It's also incredibly important to normalize asking for help—from friends, family and healthcare professionals— when needed.” MG

Unexpected: A Postpartum Survival Guide is available for ordering online at Magers & Quinn and Moon Palace Books in Minneapolis and Red Balloon Bookshop in St. Paul. More information is available at erinstevensmd.com/unexpected. @unexpected_apsg

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MAPLEGROVEMAG.COM | 15


story by Nancy Eike and Renée Stewart-Hester

illustrations by Em Handy 16 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021


LO C A L A N G L E R S E N J OY T H E I R F I S H I N G … ON ICE. Land of 10,000 Lakes—well, we all know just how important those glistening bodies of water are to us in the Bold North, especially in the warmer months. For many of us, they serve as the welcoming center of our outdoor sporting lives. And, when the time comes, we don’t let Old Man Winter with his decidedly-icy-and-sometimes-irritatingly-long-grip deter us from hitting the water in its icy state, especially to cast our luck at ice fishing. In fact, we relish it. We bundle up, head to the frozen lake, drill a hole and hope for the best. Ice fishing, of course, has been going on for at least two millennia as a way for folks to eat when the weather cooled and other protein sources became scarce. But now, in addition to providing fresh shore meals, ice fishing in Minnesota is a competitive sport. Many communities hold well-attended ice fishing contests; the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) notes it issues nearly 400 permits for ice fishing contests and tournaments statewide each year. Add those participants to the anglers, who are out on the ice independent of a contest, and that equates to a lot of sportsmen/women. DNR conservation officers are

MAPLEGROVEMAG.COM | 17


charged with making sure people are safe and adhering to local and state policies. “When I am out checking ice fishermen, I am first checking to make sure anyone 16 and older has a valid Minnesota fishing license. This license either needs to be on their person physically in paper form or in electronic form,” says Brent Grewe, DNR conservation officer and Maple Grove resident. “I am also checking to make sure their ice house or shelter is marked and licensed properly and that there isn’t litter around

18 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

their fishing shelter.” He’s also on the lookout for those using more than two lines per person, and ensuring the fish hauls are within the limits. “For the most part, anglers are pretty respectful of our lakes,” he says. Grewe reminds that understanding ice conditions and guidelines are paramount to a successful turn on the lake. “Check the DNR’s website for guidelines and tips. [There’s] lots of very useful information there pertaining to ice safety and fishing guidelines,” he says.

When he’s not on duty, Grewe and his family enjoy their own angling endeavors, hitting Medicine Lake and Lake Minnetonka for pan fish and Lake Mille Lacs for walleyes. Bait? “When fishing pan fish, I prefer a small teardrop type lure, tipped with a waxworm or spikes,” Grewe says. “Lots of factors determine different colors to use, so it’s best to have a variety and experiment with them and see how the pan fish respond. A very important tool in catching pan fish is a flasher. Vexilar,

PHOTOS COURTESY OF KRISTEN OPHAUG

Kristen Ophaug, who lives with her young family on Lake Minnetonka’s Jenning’s Bay, shares photos of “smallbut-still-fun-tocatch-northerns my husband and I caught last winter in Carson’s Bay … I surprised my husband with an electric auger for Christmas, and we borrowed our friend Jesse’s pop-up fish house. We were using tip-ups—fun to see the flags ‘tip-up!’”


Where Love Grows

saintvdp.org

Catholic Church & School The DNR’s website (dnr.state.mn.us) is chockfull of information about ice fishing, ice thickness safety, specific lake details (regulations, maps, fish species, stocking reports, etc.), where to find fishing groups and a whole lot more.

Located at the blessed juncture of Brooklyn Park, Osseo and Maple Grove

WHAT YOU’LL NEED: Ice fishing rod: typically, 24”-36,” which is smaller than your warm weather fishing rod, as you need the leverage because of the confined space Ice fishing reel: more compact than a typical reel Ice fishing line: created to withstand frigid temperatures and jagged ice Lures and bait: dependent upon what fish are the target Tackle box: yep, a way to keep all your small items secure and organized

*

Ice auger or drill: a must; no hole = no fish A spot to sit: a 5-gallon bucket or inside an icehouse Warm clothing: layers, layers, layers

* Dr. Corey Jensen*, Dr. Jennifer Bertrand, Dr. Brett Moore**

Hummingbird and Marcum are very popular flashers, and if you don’t know how to use them, YouTube can be very helpful.” There’s likely two ice fishing camps— ice house vs. no shelter. “We prefer fishing out of a shelter, keeping my family comfortable out ice fishing,” Grewe says. “If you are looking for a portable shelter, the flip over style and pop up tent are very popular. These portable shelters are very easy to use, and you can now buy them with insulated canvas, which makes them much warmer. You can also

**

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WHAT TO CATCH It’s probably no surprise that the favorite fish to catch in Minnesota, the most beloved, is—you guessed it—the walleye. It doesn’t hurt that it’s the official state fish and, well, just think of the best plate of grilled walleye you’ve ever eaten—with that subtle sweetness and delicate, flaky texture—and you’ll understand why Minnesotans adore this fish species, which is part of the perch family and is named for its distinguishable pearlescent eyes.

Did you know the bluegill, named for its large “gills,” is the most commonly caught fish in Minnesota?

We have two species of crappies in Minnesota, black and white, and they tend to hang out—not near the surface or the bottom of a lake— but, according to the DNR’s website, “somewhere in between.”

When you’re hankering to catch a big fish, one that fills the bill for a great fish tale, Northern pike may just be the one. They’ll give you a run for your money, as they’re known to put up a fight as you bring them in. The state record is 45 pounds, 11 ounces, so you’ve got your work cut out for you.


invest in a wheelhouse, which is like a camper on the lake. Wheelhouses are very popular, as well, and you can find them with all the amenities for a weekend on the ice.” Maple Grove’s Jeff Nuss falls into the other camp. “The reason we don’t use ice houses (if we do, it’s a small portable that is easy to set up and take down) is we drill many holes in a given area, drop a [fish finder] down the hole and fish it for only a few minutes,” he says. “If no fish appear on the electronics or bite, we move to the next hole. On some given days, we may drill 40-150 holes per person. We like to cover ground and move until we find active fish, and finding active fish may be easy, or hard, you just have to go out and try.” Growing up fishing Bloomington lakes, Nuss enjoys fishing for pan fish in northwestern Wisconsin at his family’s cabin, in the Dakotas (perch and walleyes) and around the Metro. He recommends doing your research before dropping a line. “Work with a close group of fishermen to help each other out,” he says. “By the time you hear there is a hot bite on a lake, it’s probably over.” With all the effort and braving the elements, bad days on the ice are part of the deal. “We’ve all had them,” Nuss says. “Being skunked, breaking equipment in the process (broken rods, fish finders, heaters, etc.).” But it’s the good days that keep anglers coming back for more. “Boy, there have been some pretty good ones,” he says. “I guess the one that sticks out in my mind was from about 4-5 years ago in South Dakota perch fishing. It was a long day, lots of drilling of holes, and honestly, wasn’t a good day until about the last [part] the day …. The group finally found a good school of perch …” MG

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Organized Giving Designer finds inspiration beneath the clutter. written by

photos by

Madeline Kopiecki

Chris Emeott

ira Vanderlan’s passion for design has been a constant throughout her life. Even before she started her organization and interior design business, Zestful Design, Vanderlan helped declutter and reorganize the homes of friends and family. “As I was doing this with friends and family, I started seeing patterns in the process that really helped form the idea of Zestful Design,” Maple Grove’s Vanderlan says. “It’s a unique business; most people either do design or organization, but what I found with it was that when people start decluttering and start seeing the space, they realize the room could use updating or want to try a new design in the space.” Especially while people are sticking closer to home during the pandemic, they’re taking stock of all the necessary and not-soneeded items they’ve accumulated over the years. After an initial burst of DIY mentality, Vanderlan says many people realize they’ve bitten off more than they can chew and are looking for professional advice. Reorganizing is often a daunting task, and client Sue S. of Minneapolis knew she didn’t want to do it alone. “I needed a fresh set of eyes,” she says. “Kira came in and helped me with my basement. Being a teacher, I have so much curriculum that I hang on to. [Additionally], my kids are older, so there’s just things we aren’t using anymore that need to be passed along to someone else, and

22 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

NOTEWORTHY IDEAS We could all use some decluttering know-how, and Vanderlan’s expertise will be available in a new monthly column, Organize, appearing in Maple Grove Magazine. Vanderlan looks forward to her bimonthly contributions to the magazine and plans to kick it off with the basics. “I’m going to start with the most popular rooms to reorganize, so pantries, closets,” she says, along with offering advice about organizing products

and discussing organizing for kids. The act of decluttering is mirrored by a correlating mental decluttering. It’s easier to feel productive in a space that is well organized, an experience that Vanderlan is also excited to share with our readers. “It’s amazing what happens to people when you declutter, when you put things where they belong and when you create a beautiful surrounding. That’s what I love about this job,” she says.


MAPLEGROVEMAG.COM | 23


DONATE WITH A PURPOSE Decluttering a home shouldn’t come at the cost of overloading local landfills. Vanderlan’s sourced a long list of great local donation centers to help keep as much as possible out of the landfills. “One of my favorite places around is Bridging, which helps people transition into their first home,” she says. “A lot of my clients have household goods that would benefit [the organization].” Other organizations that welcome used (but in good repair) items include Habitat for Humanity and Interfaith Outreach in Plymouth. “I think a lot of people don’t know [Habitat for Humanity] takes more than just tools,” Vanderlan says. “And one thing that’s neat about [Interfaith Outreach] is you can donate food, too.”

Kira knows where to take things. I’m trying to keep them out of landfills.” After tackling the basement together, the duo turned its attention to the upcoming school year and an outdated office space in Sue’s home. “I needed a space to work productively—a place to be productive,” Sue says, noting she also needed a spot that was visually pleasant, not cluttered, for when she’s on virtual platforms teaching her students. To liven up the room, Vanderlan’s first step was to cover up the dated, dark wood

24 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

paneling with an on-trend coat of white paint. Next came the unexpected project of tearing out the old carpeting and going with bold new blue flooring. “Painting the walls totally changed the room and getting the carpeting out,” Sue says. “The sunlight is just amazing now, and Kira had that vision.” Once they finished getting the room prepared, a new problem arose. “Then came the hard part— finding a desk during COVID, when everyone’s at home and working from home,” Vanderlan

Another recycling superstar in the local scene is Tech Dump, a one-stop drop-off for all things electronic. “A lot of my clients have tons of cords, things where they don’t know where it came from or what it goes to,” Vanderlan says. It’s also a great place to drop off out-of-date phones and laptops, as data security is a top priority with the folks at Tech Dump.


“It’s such a welcoming, bright, warm space. When I’ve got a lot of work to do and a lot of work online, it helps ease the stress and burden when I work in that room. It lightens the load, and it’s a pleasant place to be.” —Sue, homeowner

says. While her normal business philosophy points her to sourcing furniture from local businesses, this time around she was lucky to snatch up a desk from Wayfair before it went back out of stock. Even with the setback of acquiring furniture, Sue couldn’t wait to move into the space. “I’ve already started going in the room and spreading my work out, even though we’re still in the process of finishing it,” Sue says. “It’s such a welcoming, bright, warm space. When I’ve got a lot of work to do and

a lot of work online, it helps ease the stress and burden when I work in that room. It lightens the load, and it’s a pleasant place to be.” Through the experience, Sue garnered some words of wisdom for others considering taking a similar home design step. Be kind to yourself, she notes, and understand it’s a process—a process that may seem to get worse before it gets better. “You deserve a beautiful space,” she says. “That’s what I’ve learned from Kira.” MG

ZESTFUL DESIGN 612.392.1707 // zestfuldesign.com Zestful Design @ZestfulDesign @zestful_design

Bridging; Bloomington Warehouse 201 W. 87th St., Bloomington 952.888.1105 // bridging.org Bridging MN @BridgingMN @bridgingmn

Interfaith Outreach & Community Partners 1605 County Road 101 N., Plymouth 763.489.7500 // iocp.org Interfaith Outreach & Community Partners @iocpinterfaith

Tech Dump 825 Boone Ave. N., #100, Golden Valley 763.432.3117 // techdump.com Tech Dump @TechDumpMN

MAPLEGROVEMAG.COM | 25


O N T H E TOW N

LOCAL EVENTS

6, 13, 20, 27 Playtime

Osseo Early Childhood and Family Education brings you opportunities to connect with other families with young children while participating in parent and child activities. Ages 0–5. $3 per child, max of $8 per family, children 0–12 months are free. 10–11:30 a.m. Arbor View Early Childhood Center, 9401 Fernbrook Lane N.; 763.391.8777; district279.org

hat started as a Facebook and Zoom-driven response to gym closures due to COVID-19 has turned into a new brick and mortar venue, Movement Studio in Plymouth, which opened late last year while adhering to pandemic restrictions. When gyms closed last year due to the pandemic, Monica Moreland started a private Facebook group to lead workouts at the requests of gym attendees, who she met will working as a fitness instructor. Numbers quickly rose—reaching over 1,000 members after one week—and Moreland saw an opportunity. With 15 years of experience as a fitness instructor, she began the journey of opening her own studio while continuing the virtual workouts. Now, with a Facebook group of nearly 7,000 members and a newly-opened physical location, Moreland, who attended middle school in Maple Grove and Osseo Senior High, has created a positive, fun environment for people locally and worldwide (via the Facebook group), who want to feel good during uncertain times. With the start of the new year, Movement Studio is offering the FIT

challenge, a monthly assessment of physical performance. Aimed toward making progress rather than reaching daunting goals, the FIT challenge allows members to work out at their own pace with encouragement from Moreland and the community. Participants test in during the first week of the month and participate in a range of daily exercises. At the end of January, they’ll test out and celebrate progress with the Movement Studio community. Each month will present a new challenge. Participants can join Movement Studio with virtual memberships ($29 per month) or a studio and virtual membership ($45 per month). Virtual classes are accessed through Facebook and Zoom. Individuals can drop in for single classes by going online to movementstudio.live and reserving a spot. —Anita Stasson

Movement Studio 4445 Nathan Lane N., Plymouth 763.339.3674 // Movementstudio.live @movementstudio_fitness Monica’s Workouts and Movement Studio

The Northwest Metro Toastmasters club invites you to join its bimonthly meetings to improve speech-writing skills and gain a competitive edge in the workplace. All ages. Free. 6–7:15 p.m. toastmasters.org

AREA EVENTS

3 Twin Cities Bridal Show

The Twin Cities Bridal Show is your go-to for everything needed for the perfect wedding day! Meet area vendors, discover wedding ideas and find your fairytale dress. Masks are required to attend this event. All ages. $15 general admission option or upgrade. Noon–5 p.m. St. Paul RiverCentre, 175 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul; twincitiesbridalshow.com

8­– 10 Land O’Lakes Kennel Club Dog Show

For you dog lovers out there, this is the right tree to bark up! Enjoy events like the Unleashed Dog Expo, Partners in Performance, Meet the Breeds and more. More information will be available closer to the event. All ages. 8 a.m.–6 p.m. St. Paul RiverCentre, 175 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul; landolakeskennelclub.org

9 Winter Farmers Market

Mill City Farmer’s Market is providing a safe and reliable year-round marketplace

Due to the fluidity being experienced in the current environment, please note that some events/dates and even some business operations may have changed since these pages went to print. Please visit applicable websites for updates.

26 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021

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11, 25 Toastmasters Club Meeting Virtual


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16, 30 Farmers Market

Litigation & Dispute Resolution Business & Corporate Law Real Estate Nonprofit Law Employment Law

Eichtens Artisan Cheese and Specialty Foods hosts the St. Paul Farmer’s Market, bringing you locally-grown produce in this chilly season. Dress warm, and shop the weekly specials. All ages. Free. 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Bachmans, 6010 Lyndale Ave. S., Mpls.; 651.257.4752; eichtenscheese.com

22 Virtual Floral Event

Learn how to make a beautiful dried arrangement with unique dried flowers and textures to add pizzazz in your home. All ages. Sign up online. 6–9 p.m. Ergo Floral; erfofloral.com

Businesses & Non-Profit 763.560.5700 | hennsnoxlaw.com 6900 Wedgwood Road, Suite 200, Maple Grove

25 Meditation and Music

Take a break from the busyness of life for an hour of guided meditation and live music at Orchestra Hall. This event is in collaboration with the University of Minnesota’s Earl E. Bakken Center for Spirituality & Healing. All ages. $26. 11 a.m.–1 p.m. Minnesota Orchestra, 1111 Nicolett Mall, Mpls.; 612.371.5600; minne sotaorchestra.org

28–31 16th Annual U.S. Pond Hockey Championships

If you’re a fan of the old “biscuit” and love the sport of hockey, join the nation’s premier outdoor pond hockey tournament this season. Sign up online to play, referee or volunteer. Free. All ages. 4:30– 5 p.m. U.S. Pond Hockey Championships, Lake Nokomis, Mpls.; uspondhockey.com

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Coupon must be presented at time of order. Offer valid for those 18 or under. Excludes certain frame brands including Maui Jim and Oakley. Not valid on readers or non-Rx sunglasses. See store associate for details. Valid only at Pearle Vision Maple Grove. Exp. 4/30/21. Coupon code: MGRMAG-0121

Coupon must be presented at time of order. Excludes certain frame brands including Maui Jim and Oakley. Not valid on readers or non-Rxsunglasses. See store associate for details. Valid only at Pearle Vision Maple Grove. Exp. 4/30/21. Coupon code: MGRMAG-0121

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for small farmers, makers and shoppers. There will be groceries, unique gifts and food for holiday meals. All ages. Free. 10 a.m–noon. Mill City Farmer’s Market, 704 S. Second St., Mpls.; 651.341.7580; millci tyfarmersmarket.org

MAPLEGROVEMAG.COM | 27


TA S T E M A K E R S

Smoky Fish Chowder

28 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021


Soup’s On

FILL YOUR BOWLS WITH A HEALTHY DOSE OF WARMTH AND COMFORT. BY EDITORIAL STAFF

PHOTOS BY CHRIS EMEOTT

By now, even the most fervent cooks have grown a bit weary as the holidays and high entertaining season begin to fade into the distance. As with nature, cooking has its own seasons— enter the time for comfort cooking. Soup tops the list, providing warmth against winter’s chill and soothing what ails us—one glorious spoonful at a time. Our editors from across the Twin Cities celebrate soup’s restorative qualities by sharing some of their favorite recipes.

SMOKY FISH CHOWDER

Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat, and add bacon. Cook until light brown, about five minutes. Remove bacon with a slotted spoon, and set aside. Reduce heat to medium-low, and add the onion and celery. Cook them for five minutes or until onion is softened. Add flour to the saucepan, and stir to make a roux, about two minutes. Add chicken stock and milk, and bring to a boil while whisking constantly. Add potatoes and thyme, and simmer, stirring occasionally for 12 to 15 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Break the trout flesh into bite-sized pieces, and add them to the pan along with the reserved bacon; cook until heated through.

Angela Johnson, editor of Edina and St. Croix

Serve soup sprinkled with paprika and chopped

Valley magazines

herbs or chilies. —saramoulton.com

A good friend from Hibbing, Minn., introduced me

Notes: Trout is closely related to salmon and can be

to the delicious flavor of smoked fish, an Iron Range

a good alternative to often-overfished salmon. It’s a

hallmark. Often available at local farmers markets,

great source of protein and can encourage healthy

smoked fish is terrific on crackers, but I’ve always

bones, muscle development and boost energy levels

wanted to try Sara Moulton’s recipe for Smoky Fish

with B-vitamins, including niacin, an essential min-

Chowder. Here’s the recipe. It’s creamy and flavorful,

eral for a healthy nervous system and brain function.

the perfect winter soup. • 4 Tbsp. unsalted butter

WHITE CHICKEN CHILI Nancy Eike, editor of White Bear Lake Magazine

• 8 oz. Canadian bacon, chopped • 1 medium onion, finely chopped

This is my go-to soup recipe. With the precooked

• 2 medium celery sticks, finely chopped

chicken and minced garlic, it’s about as easy-peasy

• 1 lb. potatoes, 1/3-inch cubes

as it gets. You can also serve it with a stack of warm

• 2/3 tsp. dried thyme

tortillas to sop up some of that glorious just-the-

• 3 Tbsp. flour

right-amount-of-heat chicken chili broth.

• 2 ½ cups homemade chicken stock or canned broth • 3 cups whole milk

• 1 pound of precooked rotisserie chicken, shredded (or 4 breasts)

• 12 oz. smoked trout fillets, skin removed

• 1-2 Tbsp. olive oil

• Smoked paprika for garnish

• 3 Tbsp. minced garlic

• Optional: Chopped dill leaves, parsley or chopped

• 1 medium onion, chopped

chilies for garnish

• 4 cups low sodium chicken broth • 1 15 oz. can white beans, drained

MAPLEGROVEMAG.COM | 29


TA S T E M A K E R S

WHAT’S IN YOUR BOWL? Bisque or Chowder:

Bisque is a smooth Frenchstyle soup made from crustaceans (lobster, crab, shrimp and crayfish). The shells are used to make stock, and the meat is incorporated into the finished dish. Chowder features seafood or vegetables but is typically chunky and made with cream, milk or a roux.

Gazpacho or Vichyssoise:

Both are traditionally served cold. Gazpacho is a Spanish-style soup with tomatoes and other vegetables and spices. Vichyssoise is thicker and made using boiled and pureed leeks, onions, potatoes, cream and chicken stock.

Bouillon or Consommé:

Bouillon is usually a seasoned broth made by straining water in which beef, chicken or other proteins have been cooked. (Some of us are more familiar with the version of dissolving bouillon cubes in hot water.) Consommé is a clear version of bouillon as it uses egg whites to collect the excess fat and sediment from the broth.

Stew or Callos: Stew is

a combination of solid ingredients that have been cooked in liquid and served in the resultant gravy, while callos, common in Spanish cooking, contains beef tripe and chickpeas, blood sausage and bell peppers (and other vegetables) and, sometimes, chorizo sausage. It can be slow-cooked in a paprikainfused tomato sauce.

Velouté-based Soup or Pureed Soup: Cream

veloute-based soups are thickened with a roux, while puree soups rely on a puree of the main ingredient for thickening.

Tortellini and Spinach Soup

• 1 tsp. oregano

TORTELLINI AND SPINACH SOUP

• ½ tsp. chili powder

Renée Stewart-Hester, editor of Lake Minnetonka,

• 1 tsp. cumin

Maple Grove and Plymouth magazines

• 1 4 oz. can diced green chilis, with liquid

• 1 tsp. salt • 1 tsp. ground black pepper

This recipe is my go-to when I don’t have the

• Fresh cilantro, chopped (I use a LOT of cilantro.)

time or inclination to pull together a healthy, warm meal. The wine brightens up the flavor

Add olive oil to stockpot; warm. Place onions

profile, and there’s plenty left in the bottle to

and garlic in heated oil; cook until onions

serve along with the soup. If you’re not a fan of

become translucent. Add chicken broth, beans,

spinach but appreciate its health benefits, this

chicken, green chilis, oregano, chili powder,

soup’s for you—the spinach flavor is muted.

cumin, salt, pepper and cilantro. Simmer on low for at least 30 minutes. Serve with tortilla strips,

• 1 Tbsp. olive oil

Mexican cheese and freshly sliced avocado.

• 5 garlic cloves, thinly sliced • ½ cup dry white wine

Notes: Did you know that, according to some

• 3 – 15.75 oz. cans of chicken broth

health experts, cilantro is not only delicious, but

• 18 oz. cheese tortellini

good for you—it’s an antioxidant, helps dimin-

• 1 ¼ cup tomatoes, chopped

ish sodium intake, lowers blood sugar levels and

• 6 oz. baby spinach

more? Don’t like cilantro? Blame your genes!

• 1 Tbsp. butter

There is a genetic variant in some people that makes cilantro taste like soap.

Over medium heat, heat olive oil in a soup pot. Add garlic, and stir for 30 seconds. Add the

30 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021


broth and wine, and bring to a boil. Cook for two minutes. Add tortellini, and cook for six minutes. Add tomatoes and spinach. Cook for two minutes, wilting the spinach. Add butter, and cook until it melts. Serve.

We turn your house into the home of your dreams!

Notes: Spinach, related to beets and quinoa, offers loads of nutrients and antioxidants, including Vitamin C, which promotes immune function. It also benefits eye health, reduces oxidative stress, helps prevent cancer and aids in reducing blood pressure.

ROASTED CARROT AND GINGER SOUP Hailey Almsted, editor of Woodbury Magazine, and Patrick Miehle of Woodbury This is the ideal hearty, winter soup—and a family favorite! It’s vegan, low-fat and pairs perfectly with a toasted sandwich. The topped gremolata adds contrasting bitterness, brightness and spice, creating a tasty soup recipe you’ll want again and again.

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For soup: • 2 lbs. carrots

20

• 1 Tbsp. roasted ginger (or to taste) • 32 oz. vegetable stock For gremolata: • ¼ c. carrot tops, finely chopped • 1 Tbsp. lemon zest, finely chopped • 1 Tbsp. raw ginger, finely chopped • 2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts, chopped • 2 Tbsp. olive oil • Pinch of salt (or to taste) Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Peel and cut carrots to evenly-sized pieces; lightly coat them in olive oil, and spread out evenly over a baking sheet. Roast for a total of 45 minutes—20 minutes in, flip the carrots, and add chunks of peeled ginger; cook for remaining 25 minutes. Add carrots and 1 Tbsp. of roasted ginger to a blender, slowly add vegetable stock (reserve 1 c. broth). Screen mix through mesh into a mediumsized stock pot, heating up the soup. Add remaining broth (if needed) and salt and pepper to taste. Add gremolata ingredients to a bowl; mix. Sprinkle on top of the soup. Notes: Ginger, a flowering plant originating from China, has powerful medicinal properties and is closely related to turmeric, cardamom and galangal. It’s used to calm digestion, reduce nausea and help to fight common colds—amongst many others ailments.

MG

Compassionate Expertise and Advocacy in Family Matters So You Can Focus on What Matters Most - Family Call us at (763) 575-7930 www.mundahllaw.com | www.fromtheashescast.com MAPLEGROVEMAG.COM | 31


LAST GLANCE SECOND PLACE Wildlife & Nature

Whoo is this? Eagle Lake is home to a watchful raptor.

BY RENÉE STEWARTHESTER PHOTO BY ROD SMOLIAK

WE’RE PLEASED TO GREET 2021 with a fresh round of photos from our annual Focus on Maple Grove photo contest, which was held in August. To start off, Rod Smoliak’s Eagle Lake Great Horned Owl, placed second in our Wildlife and Nature category. “As a wildlife photographer, owls of all types are some of my favorite things to spot, which is why I specifically go out searching for them,” Smoliak says. “Occasionally, I get lucky enough to see an owl fly and land in a viewable position, or crows harassing something is another good indication an owl might be in the area. Most of the time, it’s up to me to spot a stationary owl in a tree, which is a special feeling because they blend in so well.” This photo was taken in the woods along the west side Eagle Lake. “Like most birds, owls will fly away if a per-

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son gets too close, which is why it’s always important to give them and all wildlife space,” Smoliak says. “For this photo, I was using a large telephoto lens, 600mm, on a Sony a7r4 camera.” Speaking of great horned owls, did you know there’s a reason to be … … surprised by them?: Apart from crows and raccoons stealing their eggs and nestlings and fellow great horned owls, they have very few predators. … grateful for them?: They eat more than 4,000 mice a year. (Voles are on the menu, too.) … impressed by them?: The owls have adapted to the presence of humans and may have become more common than they were in pre-settlement times. … jealous of them?: They have long eyelashes! MG


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A Place to Feel Safe Put your trust in Grove Health Dental.

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reventing the spread of COVID-19 is on everyone’s mind right now, but even a pandemic can’t put your other health care needs on pause. To ensure Maple Grove residents are getting the oral health care they need, Grove Health Dental is taking precautions to make each visit as safe as possible. “I truly feel safer at the office than I would be going to the grocery store,” says founder Dr. Ryan Francis. That sense of security is thanks to new protocols and a staff that takes safety seriously. Patients are screened extensively before their appointment – temperature checks and contact tracing are standard. Staff wear N95 masks and a new air purification system has been installed. Even patient communication and check-ins have been made safer. “The things that we’ve been doing have been working really well,” Francis says. Their efforts have clearly paid off, because Grove Health Dental is gaining new patients and garnering strong reviews. In August, the clinic had a record number of new patients, and more are joining each week. “More than anything, I attribute our success and perseverance to our amazing dental team,” Francis says. “I feel so lucky to be a part of this dedicated, caring team.” Patients feel like they can trust the doctors and staff at Grove Health. That trust begins with Dr. Francis. He’s not just the local dentist— he lives just two miles from the clinic and is heavily involved in the community. He coaches multiple local sports teams and has three kids in local schools. “I really enjoy being a part of the social and professional community,” Francis says. “My goal is people continue to trust that our team has their health and well-being at heart.” Grove Health Dental’s experienced team uses state-of-the-art technology to offer services that go well beyond your average clinic. You can schedule your first appointment now knowing you’re safe in their hands.

GROVE HEALTH DENTAL 9907 Maple Grove Parkway, Maple Grove • 763.416.0011 • www.grovehealthdental.com