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Challenge The Magazine of Tiffi Tiffin n University Spring / Summer 09

Commencement 2009


Graduate, Vickie Galaska

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EDITOR’S NOTE Dear Alumni and Friends: The pages ahead are filled with stories and photos of what happened on campus since the last issue of Challenge. Commencement 2009 was a huge success and students have now returned to their homes and summer jobs preparing for next year. Graduates are busy looking for jobs or have already begun a new and exciting career, thanks to their education Tiffin University has provided. Challenge is for you, our alumni and friends. As alumni, your ClassScene news is invaluable to Challenge Magazine. Continue to send your news, stories and photos announcing a new member of your family, your marriage, new employment or recent journey. Go to www.tiffin.edu and “Tell Us About Yourself!” If you send me your news, I’ll send you a coupon code for a discount toward a TU online bookstore purchase.

this issue

Challenge SPRING / SUMMER 09 The Magazine of Tiffin University

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SEND NEWS, OLD OR NEW, TO CHALLENGE MAGAZINE.

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Mail: Lisa Williams, 155 Miami Street, Tiffin, Ohio 44883 Call for interview appointment or story idea: 419.448.3444 Email: lwilliam@tiffin.edu Web Site: www.tiffin.edu (Alumni-Tell Us About Yourself)

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Commencement p4

Lisa Williams Editor, Photographer Executive Director of Media Relations & Publications International p17

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CREDITS Photography: Lisa Williams, Callie Dewald, Zeng Lei Contributing Writers: Geoff Schutt, Elaine Ocker Graphic Designer: Mary Ann Stearns

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Note: We have made every effort to provide names and captions for each photo. Please accept our apologies for those that are incomplete.

If this issue of Challenge Magazine is addressed to someone in your household who has moved, please notify the Alumni office by calling 419.448.3323 or email KoehlerS@tiffin.edu. www.tiffin.edu

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what’s happening > Commencement

‘Know Your Passion. Know Your Talents. Give 100 Percent … What You Do Matters.’

Commencement this 2009

“Know your passion. Know your talents. Give 100 percent, and don’t forget to reach back and pull someone else forward.” State Representative Sandra Williams, the keynote speaker for Tiffin University’s 121st Annual Undergraduate Commencement, held on Saturday, May 2, 2009, had succinct advice for the Class of 2009: “What you do matters.” Williams (D – Cleveland), currently serving her second term representing Ohio’s 11th District, remarked that there are two ways in life to get ahead: “luck and preparation.” She recalled her mother, the sole provider for seven children after her father passed away when Williams was in the third grade. “You need to get an education,” her mother told her children. The words weren’t a request, but a directive. Luck might come in handy, but you can’t control luck. You need to make your own luck. During an interview just prior to her speech to the graduates, Williams remarked, “Your life is your life. What you do determines the rest of your life. You can’t make excuses. It’s about what you do, being the best at what you do, focusing on one thing, and then moving forward.”

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‘Preparation’ Preparation. It’s a word that Williams said she knows so well. No stranger to Tiffin University, she was one of the first graduates from the master’s degree program in Criminal Justice Administration, completing her studies at the University’s regional campuses in Dublin and Mentor, Ohio. As she related her own story to the 2009 graduates in a crowded Gillmor Student Center Gymnasium on a beautiful spring afternoon, she commended TU for its equal recognition of and dedication to both traditional and non-traditional students. Williams began her career in public service in the criminal justice field, working for more than a decade in such positions as corrections officer, probation officer, parole officer and mediator. She also served the nation as a member of the U.S. Army Reserve for eight years. And for five years before running in her first race for political office, she worked as a legislative aide in Ohio’s Statehouse to gain experience for what would be her own campaign. The persistence, the dedication, the strong will to survive, and yes – the preparation – paid off. She ran for office in 2006 and won, and was re-elected in 2008. Recently diagnosed with lupus, Williams said her doctor told her to lower her expectations, but she had a quick reply. “What you do under duress helps build who you are,” she said. “You need persistence, dedication, and a strong will to survive.” She currently chairs the Ohio House Economic Development Committee, and is Vice Chair of the Public Utilities Committee. She is a member of the Financial Institutions, Real Estate and Securities Committee, as well as the Veteran’s Affairs Committee. She was also appointed to the State Coverage Initiative Institute on Health Care. As Chair of the Economic Development Committee, Williams has worked on job creation, job retention, and getting Ohioans back to work. She is also committed to revitalizing the State’s economy.

true. Tiffin University has one of the best programs anywhere. Each faculty and staff member treated me one-on-one, as if I were the only person on campus. I’ve never seen anything like this anywhere else. I tell everybody about TU.” One of the key things she learned in her graduate degree program, she commented, was about the thought process that goes into decision-making. She added that this key element has served her well in Ohio politics, as well as in her personal life. “There is a step process to success,” she explained. “You should always grow in your profession, and a good education, at every level, is the key foundation to making this happen.” Williams said she is looking to start a mentoring program for young women, especially in the public school system. “Public schools have always gotten a bad rap,” she said. “Here in Ohio, we need to put more money into our K-12 education, and I’m working to help do that. This said, we also need to give our young people hope, and the knowledge base so they can recognize their own skills and use those skills. I want to be able to show young women that they have the power to run things in the workforce.”

‘Stay in Ohio’ Although Ohio has been among the states hardest hit by the recession, Williams said she sees new types of companies taking the place of old. “We are reinventing ourselves to do what we can not only do to survive, but to prosper,” she explained. “What I tell any young person is this – ‘stay in Ohio.’ We need you. Companies need you. Young, available talent is what they’re looking for as we transition from traditional manufacturing jobs and agriculture to high tech manufacturing and discovering new and innovative ways to do business. Ohio is a great place for this to occur. But we need to realize that we’re competing with other states, so it’s necessary to get people trained for the jobs we have today and for the jobs we’re creating for tomorrow.” Preparation. Education. “Tiffin University is a huge part of making this possible, and again, I commend this university,” she remarked.

She said one of her long-terms goals is to run for governor.

‘Tiffin University Has One of the Best Programs Anywhere’ When Williams was looking for a way to fit the demands of earning an advanced degree into her already busy life, she asked a colleague for suggestions. “It was Tiffin University,” she said. “And what I discovered was 6

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Williams kept her address to the graduating seniors short, acknowledging that most would remember very little of what she said. But if the graduates were to take away one phrase, one sentence, she said she hoped it would be the words she was repeating throughout her speech: “What you do matters.” As a leader by example, Williams has been a model individual for demonstrating this in action.


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Graduate Commencement Ruthann House of Fremont was the graduate of the year for the master’s in business administration program. House, who works for WSOS Community Action Commission, said she had the opportunity to work many of the graduates during the last year and a half, and they are wonderful people. They were a nice mix of younger and older students and a nice mix of cultures and backgrounds, she said. “We each brought our own perspectives,” she said.

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Academic Honors Ceremony Tiffin University hosted the Academic Honors Ceremony in April. The event was attended by students and their families. Honored were 220 students for their academic achievements in five categories: Academic Achievement, Academic Distinction, Excellence in the Field of Study, the F.H. “Cap” Wilkinson Award and the Daisy and Frederick Stone Scholarship. Ninety-seven (97) students were presented certificates for Academic Achievement (students who have completed 54 credit hours and have a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or more). Academic Distinction Certificates and Medals were presented to 123 baccalaureate students scheduled to graduate with a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or more. Fourteen students were presented with Excellence in Field of Study awards. This award is given to graduating students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or more as chosen by the faculty for their academic performance and for their contributions to learning and life on campus. The Excellence in the Field of Psychology award was given in honor of the late Professor R. Scott Distel, who was Tiffin University’s first Chair of the Department of Psychology.

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Dr. Jonathan Appel presenting the Excellence in the Field of Psychology award to Ryan Fausnaugh

Dr. Henry Barker presenting the Excellence in the Field of Finance award to Kit Tiell

Dr. Lillian Boehmer presenting the Excellence in the Field of Organizational Management award to Cheryl Denny

Dr. Sherry Truffin presenting the Excellence in the Field of English award to Jaime Rhoades

Dr. Steven Hurwitz presenting the Excellence in the Field of Forensic Psychology award to Vicki Jones

Professor Kellie McGilvray presenting the Excellence in the Field of Marketing award to Thomas Buxton

Dr. John Millar presenting the Excellence in the Field of Management award to Jennifer Mitsoff

Dr. Elizabeth Athaide-Victor presenting the F. H. “Cap” Wilkinson award to Amy Brown

Professor Timothy Schultz presenting the Excellence in the Field of Accounting award to Kristen Ameling

Dr. Allen Smith presenting the Excellence in the Field of Homeland Security and Terrorism award to Jessica Ramirez

Dr. Jaimie Orr presenting the Excellence in the Field of Government and National Security award to Jessica Pivato

Professor Rebecca Fox presenting the Excellence in the Field of English Education award to Tomithia Underwood

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Faculty update THREE PROMOTED Tiffin University promoted three of its faculty members, effective August 2009, according to President Paul Marion. Dr. Thomas Debbink and Dr. Bonnie Tiell were each promoted to Associate Professor of Management and Dr. Henry Barker was promoted to Professor of Economics and Finance. Dr. Debbink earned a Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati, an M.S. from Kettering University and a B.A. from Albion College. His areas of expertise include acting, history (automotive industry in the U.S.), manufacturing process, organizational decline and theory, sailing and theatre. Dr. Tiell earned a D.S.M. from the United States Sport Academy, an M.A. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a B.S. from Troy State University. Her areas of expertise include events administration, athletic fundraising, sports careers, sports gender, leadership, Olympics, and project management. Dr. Barker earned a D.B.A. from Indiana University, an M.B.A. from the University of Utah, and a B.S. from Ohio University. His areas of expertise include economics and finance. Prior to joining 12

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the TU faculty in 2003, Dr. Barker had a successful 25 year career in business.

FAMILY THERAPY & CRIMINAL JUSTICE Dr. Jonathan Appel, Associate Professor of Psychology and Criminal Justice, gave two presentations at the annual meeting of The American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Annual Conference, “Ethical and Legal Challenges in Contemporary Family Therapy.” AAMFT represents the professional interests of more than 24,000 marriage and family therapists throughout the United States, Canada and abroad, and their annual conference is attended by more than 1500 students, therapists, and educators from around the world. Dr. Appel’s presentations were based on recent trends and connections between the fields of family therapy and criminal justice. Original research was used, in part, to highlight emerging knowledge that could benefit mental health therapists, criminal justice professionals, as well as families served by both fields.

HOW COLLEGE STUDENTS COPE WITH STRESS & WELL-BEING Tiffin University Professor Dr. Fang-Mei Law presented papers at two national conferences. The first paper, An Orientation Course for First Year International College Students and its Impact in Their Ways of Coping with Stress and Psychological Well-Being, was presented in February during the 28th Annual Conference on the First-Year Experience of the National Resource Center for the First-Year Experiences.

In March, Dr. Law presented The Study of Correlation between Ways of Coping with Stress and Psychological Well-Being of Students with a Criminal Justice Major at the Academy of Criminal Justice Science Annual Meeting in Boston. This spring, Dr. Law published a book entitled Overcoming Depression: Counseling Strategies for Depression.

WILLIAM BLAKE’S UNIQUE PRINT TECHNOLOGY TU Professor James Rovira presented his paper, “Blake: A Publishing Outsider,” during the 19th annual conference of the Society for the Interdisciplinary Study of Social Imagery in March. The conference theme was The Image of Technology in Literature, Media, and Society. Dr. Rovira says his paper “investigates the relationship between the unique print technology Blake employed in the production of his illuminated books and London’s commercial publishing industry of the 1790s – demonstrating how Blake’s print technology embodied both his religious consciousness and his critique of Britain’s church/state complex.”

SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER Dr. Phyllis Watts recently attended the annual meeting of the North Central Sociological Association. The theme of the conference was, “The Sociological Way of Looking at the World: Research, Teaching and Application.” Watts was the discussant for a three-paper panel presentation dealing with sociology of gender. The focus of the discussions included challenges to the dominant notions of patriarchal attitudes toward religion, Islam and gender egalitarianism, and domestic violence and gender related asylum claims.


MICROFINANCE

GUN CULTURE

Dr. Vinnie Gajjala, Associate Professor of Economics & Finance at Tiffin University, presented a paper on microfinance at the First European Research Conference in Microfinance in Brussels, Belgium, in June. The paper was titled From Microfinance to Online Socio-Business-Networking: Microfinance in the age of Social networking and E-Commerce. Dr. Gajjala has taught at TU’s School of Business and in TU’S MBA program in Romania since 2002.

Dr. Jim Taylor, Adjunct Professor in Tiffin University’s Master of Science in Criminal Justice program, has one book scheduled for publication this summer. LFB Scholarly Publishing will release American Gun Culture: Collectors, Shows and The Story of the Gun in August. Taylor says this new book will appeal to readers interested in collecting guns, gender studies on the topic, and the U.S. gun culture in general. The book will be available for purchase through Barnes and Noble, Amazon, and directly from LFB Scholarly Publishing (http:// www.lfbscholarly.com/).

PROFESSOR HONORED Michael Herdlick, Instructor of Mathematics at Tiffin University, was honored at the Ohio Water Environment Association’s Annual Meeting with the Crystal Crucible (C2) Award for outstanding performance, professionalism, and significant contributions to the water/wastewater quality analysis profession. This award is given to those professionals who have been active in teaching, education, or research in the water and/or wastewater fields. The Ohio Water Environment Association is an organization that works with wastewater treatment facilities in hopes to curb pollution and help industries regulate waste. Over the last seventeen years, Herdlick has presented over fifty papers at various state, national, and international conferences in the areas of laboratory analysis, automation, quality assurance, and quality control. He has also been a trainer and moderator for various conferences around the country for the environmental laboratory industry.

Staff Highlight TU VICE PRESIDENT NAMED OUTSTANDING ALUMNUS The Saint Ignatius-Loyola Alumni Association (Cleveland, Ohio) presented James White with the Rev. Gerald B. Garvey, S.J. Award. White is Vice President for Finance and Administration at Tiffin University. The Garvey Award is the highest award given by the Alumni Association to one of its members. Each year, a recipient is recognized for outstanding service to the school through the Alumni Association.

Dancing Dragon Visits Opportunity Center A dragon with a large head and snaking tail slithered through the gymnasium at Seneca County Opportunity Center on a morning in January. As music played, adults and children watched as the creature moved with help from Tiffin Middle School and Tiffin University students. “It is Chinese Spring Festival, which we call the Chinese New Year,” said Joe Moore, director of the International Cultural Center at the middle school. He said one of the impor-

tant things in Chinese culture is the dragon, and last spring, he talked to people in the Opportunity Center’s creative arts studio adult division to see whether people could help make a dragon head. Moore said he gave them a few photographs he found on the Internet, and three or four months later, they presented him with a beautiful dragon head. Tiffin Middle School students helped make the tail. Other activities included two students singing while Opportunity Center students swayed their arms and clapped along. Students also shared information about their culture, including Chinese food, the importance of wearing the color red, and performed a lion dance. Moore said a wish during the Chinese New Year is that people will make a lot of money. He told students if they said “hong bao” to the TU students, the college students would give them a paper envelope containing Chinese money. Andrew Bickelhaupt, a 20-year-old Opportunity Center student, said his favorite part of the presentation was when students talked in Chinese. “I liked when they told us not to spend this money in Tiffin,” he said. This Article Appeared, in part, in The AdvertiserTribune in January. www.tiffin.edu

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Student activities THREE MEDALS WON AT WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS Tiffin University student Jonathan Burkin, who was a top competitor on NBC’s television program “America’s Got Talent” in 2008 for his baton twirling skills, continues to impress judges on the international stage. Jonathan won two gold

FROM THE HEART Members of Tiffin University’s football team lent a hand to the community during From the Heart campaign at First Presbyterian Chuch in February. A food shortage in Tiffin’s Salvation Army and FISH Food Pantry was temporarily filled because

A TEAM GONE GREEN Tiffin University’s football team celebrated Earth Day 2009 by participating with an Ottawa, Sandusky, and Seneca County Joint Solid Waste Management District (OSS) initiative to clean-up the community.

Dragon Football team Members and Mayor Boroff.

of the success of the From The Heart campaign. Mayor Jim Boroff said he set up the Mayor’s Task Force on Community Assistance after being notified that these agencies had little resources and increasing demand.

medals and one bronze medal at the World Twirling Championships, held in April in Belgium. Jonathan earned his entry into the 2009 World Championships as part of Team USA with his efforts in the freestyle, two baton and solo divisions, and plans to share his expertise and teach at baton clinics at a variety of locations across the United States. “I also hope to raise awareness of baton twirling as a sport by speaking at schools and encouraging young people to become involved,” he says.

TU CREW Tiffin University’s dance team, TU Crew, performed at the Day of Dance in February on the Owens Community College campus in Findlay, Ohio. TU Crew has been in existence for three years, performing at Tiffin University events. Day of Dance is a national day to celebrate women’s heart health. The day included numerous performances by dance troupes, dance lessons and demonstrations, free health screenings, free samples, a fashion show, and a variety of health and beauty information.

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Dragon Football Clean Up Community. Photo by Jill Gosche.

INTERNATIONAL HOSPITALITY WEEK

“It is not often that I get to lead adults on a litter pick-up. Usually, I am working with small children who are cleaning up their school yards. I’m excited to be working with TU’s football team and I am anticipating that we will cover a large portion of the campus with the many volunteers. It just shows how much pride they have for their campus and the surrounding community,” explained Andria Marquis, OSS Seneca County Education Specialist.

International Hospitality Week, including the International Restaurant Show, Hotel World Expo and Conference, and the Nightclub and Bar Convention, was held in March at the Las Vegas Convention Center. The 21 TU students who attended the conference were able to share ideas and insights with more than 28,000 hospitality professionals. The students attended networking events and the tradeshow.

SPORTS MANAGEMENT MAJORS LAND INTERNSHIPS Two Tiffin University students majoring in Sports and Recreation Management have landed prestigious six-month internships, according to Dr. Bonnie Tiell, Associate Professor of Management. Shantriya James and Tom Waugaman were selected to serve respective six-month internships with the Women’s Sports Foundation in New York City and the Boston Red Sox Class A affiliate team in Salem, Virginia. Tiffin University’s Sports and Recreation Management major is one of the largest on campus. Undergraduate students may choose to concentrate in sport marketing, athletic administration, and/ or recreation and tourism. Tiffin University also offers a sport management concentration in the MBA Program. For more information on these programs, visit www.tiffin.edu/sportsmanagement.

Teresa Miller, Assistant Professor of Hospitality and Tourism Management, coordinated the trip with the assistance of Cory Snyder, Hospitality Club President. According to Professor Miller, “Hospitality industry professionals look to this tradeshow as a place to stay relevant as well as an industry educational center to learn new strate-


gies to move their business forward. Therefore, I feel this is an invaluable opportunity for our students to be able to attend such a large-scale event that showcases the global hospitality industry.”

CLEVELAND SPORTS COMMISSION Meredith Scerba, Vice President of Event Management for the Greater Cleveland Sports Commission (GCSC), made a special visit to campus in February. The visit is part of the Sports and Recreation Management Program’s speaker series. Scerba highlighted the numerous events coordinated by the GCSC including the recent US Figure Skating Championships and upcoming dates for Division I National Hockey Championships, the Senior PGA Championship, the Dew Action Sports Tour, and the Patriot Bowl. Her message was one that encourages students to seek a variety of opportunities to showcase their interest and talent.

Spring Festival Tiffin University’s annual Spring Fest was held in April. Several campus organizations hosted entertaining activities such as an inflatable obstacle course, a jousting pit, and photo opportunities on the Big Red Chair. Other events included Gamma Chi Alpha’s Pie A Gamma fundraiser, Alpha Iota’s Bingo Night, Hall Council’s Battle of the Dorms, Circle K’s Powder Puff Football Game, and TU Builder’s Ice Cream Social.

Scerba was accompanied by Tiffin University alum, Melissa Kinkopf, who is an intern for Meredith Scerba

the Sports Commission. Kinkopf graduated in December TU Alum Melissa Kinkopf with a degree in Hospitality and Tourism Management. Both Scerba and Kinkopf addressed opportunities and access for students who wish to gain experience in their major field of study. The Greater Cleveland Sports Commission offers opportunities for students in a variety of majors beyond sports and recreation.

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what’s happening > CampusScene CHRISTI THOMAS MEMORIAL EASTER EGG HUNT

International INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SPRING FESTIVAL Tiffin University’s World Student Association (WSA) and its counterpart at Heidelberg University sponsored a collaborative International Student Spring Festival in January. The event coincided with the celebration of the Chinese New Year. The festival featured a wide variety of entertainment, along with traditional Chinese holiday foods prepared by the international students.

Tiffin University’s Student Government held its annual Community Easter Egg Hunt in April. The hunt has been a popular offering for many years and, through a generous donation by the Thomas family, it has now been renamed to honor their daughter, Christi, who succumbed to neuroblastoma in 2006. All Tiffin-area children were invited to bring family and friends to watch the hunt for brightly colored surprise-filled eggs.

STUDENTS TAKE UNIQUE FINAL EXAM The 77 students enrolled in Tiffin University’s introductory Sports and Recreation Management classes had a unique final exam. In April, they were required to participate in a “Question & Answer with The Ohio State Buckeyes,” featuring Miechelle Willis, Senior Associate Athletic Director for The Ohio State University.

“The Spring Festival is the most important of the traditional Chinese holidays and many Asian countries surrounding China,” according to Ryan Miller, Tiffin University’s Director of International Student Services. “It is also known as the Lunar New Year during which family and friends get together to celebrate a beginning of a year in the lunar calendar. During the Spring Festival, people wish one another a year with fortune, peace and happiness,” Miller adds.

TU SCHOLARS PRESENT FINDINGS Two visiting scholars from Beijing Normal University shared their findings from research projects about Chinese currency and the airline industry with members of the Tiffin University community. Lin Li and Fang Ma, in the second year of their graduate studies, presented research projects in TU’s Main Classroom Building. Perry Haan, dean of TU’s School of Business and associate professor of marketing, said this marks the third year the university has participated in the visiting scholars program. Li and Ma are graduate students from Beijing Normal University who are at the end of their master’s program and the university pairs them with faculty members in the discipline in which they’re working. “They spend the school year here working on that project,” he said.

“The program was primarily a question-and-answer session,” explained Dr. Bonnie Tiell, Associate Professor of Management. “Part of each student’s final exam was to submit questions ahead of time that demonstrate critical thinking.”

Lin Li and Fang Ma

Li compared Chinese and American airline industries and explained co-opetition, which combines cooperation and competition. Her statistics showed the U.S. has 25 airlines, compared to 20 within the Chinese mainland. Li said Chinese and American airline industries are facing a different competition pattern. Their policies about the airline industries are different, and their companies have a great disparity in strength, she said. “For the competing airlines, it’s a dog-eat-dog world, and the battle for control of the skies has only just begun,” she said. Offering flight services together and purchasing things, such as insurance and spare parts are ways airlines can apply the alliance theory. Ma explored the causes, influence and counter-measure of renminbi, or Chinese currency, compared to U.S. dollar appreciation. She said July 21, 2005, the Chinese exchange rate system was adjusted. Some of the factors that led to appreciation of renminbi are internal economic growth, balance of payments, foreign exchange reserve and inflation, she said. Some of the outside pressures on renminbi are international political pressure, depreciation of the U.S. dollar and international “hot money,” or money flowing from one investment to another quickly in order to gain more profit, flowing to China, she said. “Hot money, maybe it’s mostly used in China,” she said. This Article Appeared, in part, in The Advertiser-Tribune in April

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Dance of the Dragon

International Dinner The annual International Dinner was held in March. The event featured food, fashion, and entertainment from around the world. Some of the twenty countries represented at this year’s dinner included Nepal, the United Kingdom, China, Romania, Vietnam, and Canada. Entertainment included dancing, piano and song, the TU Choir, martial arts, and a fashion show. “The International Dinner has become a popular tradition,” remarks Ryan Miller, Director of International Student Services. “It provides a unique opportunity for International and American students to share their heritage through food and entertainment.”

Left: International Dinner Fashion Show; Center: Kitchen Duty; Right: International Dinner Buffet www.tiffin.edu

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President’s Club Dinner Tiffin University celebrated its annual President’s Club dinner in April. President’s Club members donate $1,000 or more to Tiffin University’s Annual Fund.

Hazel Franks and Diana Kirk

John and Sandy Schultz

Charles and Patty Cole

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Dick Frick


Gene and Betty Schalk

Dan and Laura Mays

Sue and Mike Lange

New Members Rob and Jeanne Ashworth

New Members Yaw and Francesse Mamphey

President’s Club Entertainment by Up in the Air

President’s Club Entertainment by Up in the Air www.tiffin.edu

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Academics HEALTHCARE ADMINISTRATION Tiffin University added a concentration in Healthcare Administration within the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree. “The new concentration in Healthcare Administration is yet another example of Tiffin University’s MBA program offering students the relevant education they are asking for. The eminent change in the healthcare system in the United States that the new administration is proposing will lead to new types of jobs in the healthcare field. Tiffin’s MBA program will be a leader in providing programs that fit those trends,” says Dr. Perry Haan, Associate Professor of Marketing and Dean of the School of Business. According to Haan, the MBA Healthcare Administration concentration is a program designed to enhance the management skills necessary for effectively operating within a wide spectrum of healthcare organizations. Students will explore patient management systems, decision-making tools, new technologies, financial management, the management of information systems, supply chain management, marketing of professional services, referral systems, and current issues in health law and ethics. For more information, contact Kristi Krintzline, Executive Director of Graduate Admissions and Student Services, 419.448.3445.

CYBER-DEFENSE AND INFORMATION SECURITY

Tiffin University is partnering with the Advanced Technical Intelligence Center for Human Capital Development (ATIC) to offer an innovative Cyber-Defense and Information Security degree program. The new major will be housed in the Tiffin University School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences. The program is a specialized variation of TU’s Homeland Security and Terrorism curriculum, focusing on the specific threat of cyber-terrorism and cyber-based crimes. In partnering with the ATIC, Tiffin University will support and augment the center’s mission to develop the advanced technical intelligence workforce of the future. The ATIC has identified a need to fill a shrinking workforce in this area for both the government and the private sector. According to Dr. Timothy Shaw, Dean of the School of Criminal Justice and Social Sciences, the major is designed to provide a strong foundation in the technical aspects of computer systems and cyberdefense. “With the dynamic and ever-changing threat to our nation’s cyber systems and our critical infrastructure, Tiffin University is providing the necessary tools and training through this new degree to help combat these threats,” Shaw remarks. “Our Cyber-Defense and Information Security program will provide qualified students to defend our national security from a cyber terrorism attack and also to protect our nation’s critical infrastructure.” For more information, contact Dr. Shaw, 419.448.3305. 20

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FBI Evidence Response Team Members of the FBI’s Evidence Response Team (ERT) gave Tiffin University criminal justice students an inside, hands-on look at its operations during a visit to campus in April. The ERT’s primary focus is on federal crimes, although agents also support local law enforcement agencies. Formed in 1984 for the Los Angeles Summer Olympics, the success of the ERT soon spread to other FBI field offices. Among high profile cases the ERT has been involved with include the Columbine High School shootings, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building bombing in Oklahoma City in 1995, and the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

The ERT has a 12-step process of processing a crime scene, including preparation, approaching a scene, securing and protecting the scene, initiating a preliminary survey, evaluating physical evidence possibilities, preparing a narrative description of the scene, recording and collecting of physical evidence, and depicting the scene photographically as well as preparing a diagram or sketch of the scene for potential juries to consider.


MODEL NATO CONFERENCE Seven Tiffin University students attended the 24th Annual National Model NATO Conference in February, and were hosted by Dan Cloyd, Assistant Director of the Counterintelligence Division at FBI Headquarters. Assistant Director Cloyd then made a special visit to the TU campus in February.

Krintzline, Executive Director of Graduate Admissions and Student Services, participants of the Open House were provided information on the following programs: Master of Business Administration with concentrations in General Management, Healthcare Administration, Leadership, and Sports Management; Master of Education; Master of Humanities; Master of Science in Criminal Justice with concentrations in Crime Analysis, Criminal Behavior, Forensic Psychology, Homeland Security Administration, and Justice Administration.

A VICTIM’S VOICE

FBI Assistant Director Dan Cloyd enjoys lunch with CJ Students.

“This is the first year TU was invited to participate in the Model NATO Conference,” says Dr. James Orr, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Security Studies. The TU students were upperclassmen and members of the Global Affairs Organization (GAO). At the conference, they represented the nation of Estonia. “The students participated over a three-and-a-half-day period – in various committee meetings, negotiations, and strategy sessions in the context of serving on several aspects of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization,” Professor Orr says. “This also included meetings at the Estonian Embassy.” During his visit to the TU campus, Assistant Director Cloyd spoke to students about career opportunities at the FBI. He also presented a session on the FBI’s counter-intelligence mission and a briefing on the Robert Hanssen case, which was the basis for the hit movie “Breach.”

GRADUATE ADMISSIONS OPEN HOUSE Tiffin University’s Office of Graduate Admissions and Student Services hosted an Open House event to promote the graduate programs offered at Tiffin University. According to Kristi

People have the right to ask for forgiveness, and victims have the right to grant it or not, a corrections official said. Karin Ho, administrator of the Office of Victim Services through the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction, presented “A Victim’s Voice” at Tiffin University in April and spoke about the Victim Offender Dialogue program.

Karin Ho, Director of the Office of Victim’s Services.

“You’re preparing both groups to come together,” she said. The program brings together offenders and their victims for meetings. Ho said officials have conducted more than 100 dialogues in Ohio’s prison system, and several have been on death row. Officials work as facilitators, working with the sides to be able to find a common ground and ensure there are no surprises when they sit down together, she said. The dialogue program started after a Cleveland woman’s daughter was murdered in 1993. Ho said the woman told her she would meet with the murderer on the anniversary of her daughter’s death. Screaming, the woman said she had to do it. Ho, who served as a victim advocate, said 50,000 victims are registered with the Office of Victim Services.

dresses certain victim concerns; provides information about inmate or parolee status; provides victim notification; provides notification and support for surviving family members throughout the execution process; offers community education; and makes referrals to other state and local services. This article appeared, in part, in the Advertiser-Tribune in April.

STUDENTS SURVEY COMMUNITY PERCEPTION A survey released earlier this year by Tiffin University students revealed the community perception of the Tiffin Police Department as

positive. According to a release from the Tiffin Police Department, TU Professor Steve Hurwitz was contacted by the police department about conducting a survey to gauge community perceptions of Tiffin police. The survey was administered by criminal justice majors to more than 250 Tiffin residents. Completion of the survey allowed the police department to comply with an additional, optional accreditation standard, Tiffin Police Chief Dave LaGrange said, and provided the department with comprehensive results of the community’s perception in several different areas. According to the survey, which included two sets of questions about global impressions of the department and specific aspects of police performance and behavior, survey respondents had a positive view of the department. The survey showed the general impression of Tiffin police as “good, strong, active, useful, professional, respectful and fair.” This article appeared, in part, in the Advertiser-Tribune in April.

According to a brochure she provided, the office provides crisis intervention and advocacy; adwww.tiffin.edu

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Career Services VIRTUAL JOB FAIR TU students were given the opportunity to take part in the 2009 Collegiate Employ Net Virtual Job Fair, held in February. According to Carol McDannell, TU’s Director of Career Development, the job fair included full-time, part-time and seasonal employment, along with internship possibilities. “Students were able to connect with employers who were seeking qualified students for a wide variety of employment opportunities,” McDannell remarks. Employers posted jobs and viewed resumes online, making it easy for students to match their expertise and career goals to find the “right fit” with companies and organizations. Students were able to register an account and upload their resumes through www.collegiateemploynet. com.

TU/BERG CAREER FAIR

Criminal Justice at Tiffin University and President of OCCJE. “Last year, we had an impressive assortment of criminal justice agencies and this year, we have expanded. In addition to the law enforcement and corrections fields, there were organizations representing the areas of homeland security, mental health and social services. This was a great opportunity for everyone ranging from college students and recent graduates looking for entry level positions to criminal justice professionals who are seeking new opportunities for advancement in the field to gather information and network with a wide array of professionals under one roof.”

ences. Students were able to learn the universal principles of building effective relationships and ideas on skills needed to build these important relationships in the world of work. Students also gained insight into diversity issues at work to become a more marketable and successful job candidate in the process.

AROUND THE TOWN

Gatton said understanding diversity Dr. Debra Gatton helps people communicate better with others and helps with workplace interaction. She listed skills she said would help people in any situation but are particularly important in those involving diversity. She encouraged interpersonal skills, flexible thinking skills, adaptability, teamwork skills, cultural awareness and understanding, self evaluation and emotional intelligence. “Employers do recognize students who have diversity awareness,” she said.

The 6th Annual “Around the Town” event with area employers and organizations was held in September. The event was co-sponsored by the Tiffin Area Chamber of Commerce and Tiffin University. Local area employers and organizations had an opportunity to showcase products and services. The event also provided potential employment opportunities and information about Tiffin and surrounding communities.

The Hospitality Club and Career Development Office co-hosted the Business Etiquette Seminar in April. Students enjoyed an entertaining evening at the Schriner House, which is the TU President’s residence. Mrs. Susan Marion provided a presentation of dining etiquette and professional interview skills.

BUSINESS ETIQUETTE SEMINAR

INTELLIGENCE CENTER VISIT

Tiffin University and Heidelberg University offered this event in April for students and alumni to learn about full-time, part-time, summer, and internship employment opportunities available and to network with recruiting professionals.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE EDUCATION CAREER FAIR The OCCJE career fair was hosted at Tiffin University in November. Employers accepted resumes and conducted brief interviews. Employment opportunities consisted of full-time, part-time, and internship positions. “We were very excited to host the OCCJE Career Fair for the second consecutive year,” said Dr. Steven Hurwitz, Professor of Psychology and

TU students visited the U.S. Air Force Base (Wright-Patterson AFB): National Air and Space Intelligence Center in November. NASIC is the Air Force and Department of Defense Center of Excellence for all-source air and space intelligence. NASIC supports USAF and Joint operational, acquisition, and policymaking customers at the national Intelligence Community level.

DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE Held in November, this workshop was hosted by Dr. Debra Gatton, Professor of Management at Tiffin University. The Diversity in the Workplace workshop was an informative event with a focus on building work relationships across differ-

Susan Marion conducts etiquette seminar. www.tiffin.edu

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Art Exhibitions The public is cordially invited to view all art exhibitions and speak to the artists about their work during opening receptions. Regular Diane Kidd Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Thursday, or by appointment by contacting Celinda Scherger at Tiffin University at 419. 448.3313. Group tours of the gallery’s shows are also available. Exhibition Series can be obtained by contacting Gallery Director Marsha Pippenger at marsha.pippenger@gmail.com.

POTATO CHIPS INSPIRE WORK OF PUBLIC ART Potato chips and art may not seem a likely combination, but for 17 Tiffin University students, making the connection between the arts and the community turned into something permanent for one local business institution. The students in Professor Lee Fearnside’s “Special Topics: Public Art” class created a cascading mural stretching down one of the stairwells at the Ballreich Bros. factory in Tiffin.

‘STILL LIVES AND OTHER MEMORIES’ BY PAULA WILLMOT KRAUS Tiffin University’s Diane Kidd Gallery featured the works of photographer/artist Paula Willmot Kraus in January. For “Still Lives and Other Memories,” Kraus created several series of photographs, which experimented with light, focus and the framing. “Still-life photography evolved into its own genre after emerging from its artist/painter roots,” says Kraus. “The work I have produced in this genre can be divided according to subject matter, although my approach in each case is essentially the same. I select small objects and work with the camera in close proxPaula Wilmot Kraus imity to the subject, usually only inches away. This ‘close work’ emphasizes the importance of the subject while minimizing the space around them.” Each of the series of photographs has its own story.

Cascading mural

Based in Dayton, Ohio, Kraus currently teaches at the Ohio Institute of Photography & Technology. She has also taught photography at William Marsh Rice University. She earned degrees from The Art Institute of Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania State University, and has also completed studies at Rice University, the University of Houston, and Antioch University McGregor. Student paints cascading mural at Ballreich’s in Tiffin.

APPLES AND ORANGES In March, The Diane Kidd Gallery featured Apples and Oranges, an exhibition of drawings, paintings and prints by artist Patrick Mauk. Apples and Oranges featured recent mixed media works, a selection of self-portraits in various media including intaglio, charcoal and graphite, and model studies done in the printmaking mode of monotype, according to Pippenger. Mauk earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Wright State University, and a master’s degree from the University of Cincinnati. His prints, paintings, drawings and mixed media works have been exhibited in numerous venues. In addition, he has been curator for a number of artists’ exhibitions both in the Dayton area and beyond. 24

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Fearnside, Assistant Professor of Art, says this was the first time Tiffin University has offered such a class. “Our goal was to find a way for the students to see art as a part of people’s everyday lives,” she says. “And what better part of the everyday life than the potato chip?” The students spent time both during class hours and outside of class to produce the finished mural, which is based on Ballreich’s famous onepound potato chip bag design. “The ideal was to demystify the artistic process,” she says. “The students learned there is a rational basis for art, and that art is work. For me as


Added Value: The Diane Kidd Gallery By Marsha M. Pippenger, Gallery Director media – oil painting, wood sculpture, fibers, intaglio printmaking, metals and others – and to view many different artistic styles or ways of working. Viewers can experience art from a variety of geographic or cultural traditions; they may be introduced to centuries old production methods. The art From Diane Kidd’s initial vision, shown in the university gallery Tiffin University’s art gallery has can call attention to current grown to become the spacious events, pressing social issues, and light-filled Diane Kidd Gal- Marsha M. Pippenger or psychological themes. It can lery in the Hayes Center for the simply be beautiful, and by its Arts. It is one of the finest exhibeauty infuse us with hope or gratitude. Art bition spaces in the area, a drawing card for art becomes a catalyst for discussion across the lovers in Ohio and beyond. curriculum – history, language arts, and psychology – and sheds light on individuals and Some people may ask however: what is the societies. true value of a university art gallery, especially on the campus of a non-liberal arts university? Art does enrich lives. It has the ability to proFor an artist the answer is obvious: a university voke strong emotions. Imagine your surroundgallery provides a space for an artist to show ings as four blank white walls. Try “living” in new work, stage a retrospective, or collaborate that space in your mind. Now, envision yourself with other artists. A university gallery introducwalking through a public building that is totally es new or known artists to the campus comdevoid of three-dimensional objects, architecmunity as well as to the community at large. It tural detail, or wall art of any kind. Let yourself can be a stepping stone to greater recognition mentally walk through this space. These empty for the artist who shows work in a university spaces are the sterile environments of a world gallery. These are all benefits to the artist. What without art. Now “hang” those four white walls are the benefits to the viewer? with beautiful pictures. Populate that empty building with sculpture, wall hangings, paintThe current mission statement of The Diane ings, brickwork, columns and architectural Kidd Gallery of Art at Tiffin University is this: details. You are now living and working in an to educate, enrich lives, and enlarge the world enriched space. One such enriched space is of students, staff, and the larger community the university art gallery. by providing a dedicated venue in which to present quality arts exhibitions and programs by talented professional, amateur, and student artists. In 1994, due to the vision and efforts of former TU first lady Diane Kidd, the original Tiffin University art gallery opened in Franks Hall. Fittingly, the inaugural show included watercolor paintings by Kidd, herself a talented painter.

As part of its mission to educate, our university gallery provides an opportunity for viewers to see and experience different kinds of artistic

The world becomes both smaller and larger with an accessible campus art gallery. Looking at art brings us closer to our fellow human beings, revealing our similarities, making the world around us smaller and more intimate. At the same time it enlarges our world as we are able to participate in human experience worldwide, through the visual arts. Art is a conversation between artist and viewer, and while that conversation can take on many forms, it would not happen without the benefit of a university gallery. Because our university gallery shows work by both professional and student artists, Tiffin students have the opportunity to create and exhibit their work. Their world grows just by putting their work out for others to see. Lastly, our university gallery stands as an example of Tiffin University’s commitment to excellence in education across all subject areas. It is part of building a well-rounded Tiffin graduate, one who has knowledge of the humanities as well as business acumen. The Diane Kidd Gallery is an asset not only to Tiffin University, but to the surrounding community as well. As the conversation grows, so will its reputation as a destination place for thought-provoking visual art. If you would like to become a Friend of the Diane Kidd Gallery at Tiffin University, please contact: Celinda M. Scherger, Director of Alumni Relations, Tiffin University, 155 Miami Street, Tiffin, Ohio 44883; 419-448-3313. As a Gallery Friend you will receive invitations to all Gallery openings and special events. Your tax-deductible contribution is greatly appreciated.

It is one of the finest exhibition spaces in the area, a drawing card for art lovers in Ohio and beyond. www.tiffin.edu

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a professor, this class was about engaging students in the process of meeting and achieving a goal, which can be translated into so many other areas of life.” As sophomore Kaitlin Kalb remarks, “I felt like I learned teamwork and precision. I learned that everyone needs to work together or otherwise the project will not turn out as planned. I also feel like I learned to be more precise, as you need to concentrate and slow down when you are doing touch up. The biggest thing we learned overall was how to communicate.”

visitors to the factory to what Ballreich’s is all about,” she explains. The finished mural features an “Ohio Proud” logo at the top of the stairs and the centerpiece onepound potato chip bag, with blue stripes that frame the cascading potato chips down the wall of the stairwell. Each of the students participating in the project signed the work. Several students took great pride in signing their names close to the areas where they worked most, Fearnside says. Junior Nelly Arnett comments, “After being a part of this project, this experience was not only just for a grade, but it also showed me how to be open and receiving of other’s ideas. Together, all of the ideas formed a historical piece that we can be proud of. This leaves me with a sense of completion and accomplishment.” Ben Rudolph, a senior, says, “What I found most interesting though was the business side of the project. When you are creating a piece of your own art, you have the freedom to do basically anything you desire. When you have been asked to create art for someone else, it gets a bit trickier, so the business side of this course is really what interested me.”

Students paint cascading mural at Ballreich’s in Tiffin.

Fearnside says, “From preparing budgets to describing the location, purpose and process of making the work, the class followed as closely as possible the process of how public art is selected in the ‘real world.’” She adds that she tried to make the class as student-driven as possible, from class research into other works of public art across the country to the discussion of a local project that could have meaning in people’s lives. Once the students decided on creating a mural at Ballreich’s, and received approval from the company, they had an opportunity to tour the factory – even enjoying potato chips hot off the line. Following this, they prepared detailed proposals of potential designs and voted on which design they ultimately liked best, followed by a sketch of how they envisioned the completed work. Because most of the students in the class had little or no formal art training, Fearnside says she was intent on breaking down the end result into simple parts that would lead to the coherent whole. “With this mural, we wanted to introduce 26

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Fearnside observes that “from problem-solving to engaging in the necessary group dynamic to get the mural completed, I was impressed by the class, and I also think the students impressed themselves with the finished work.” The TU professor says she hopes the “Special Topics: Public Art” class will be offered again, though perhaps during the Fall, so students would be able to work on an outdoors project.

In The News ‘ART-ITUDE’ Colorful posters designed by Tiffin University student Angela Betterley appeared around Tiffin to promote something called ART-itude, an arts

festival that took place in April at the Tiffin Mall. In addition to displays of visual arts and fashions, attendees were able to watch demonstrations or receive instruction in dance, drama, music and art.

The event was a class project presented by the Managing the Arts class at TU. Their instructor, Michael Strong, said the students wanted to have a free public event that would showcase various art forms. The main goal was to attract local musicians, actors and artists to demonstrate and display their work. The Ritz Teen Thespian Guild, Ritz Players and the TU theater department offered theater workshops. TrideaDance, the resident modern dance ensemble from the Ritz Theatre, was on hand all day to give workshops in choreography and movement to interested people, young and old. TU Crew, a student dance team of 18 women, also performed. One area was devoted to live music all day. Members of the Kappa Kappa Psi music fraternity offered to help children make instruments out of household items, such as milk jugs and paper tubes. TU Assistant Professor Lee Fearnside had her students in her public art class construct miniature golf holes as a special installation. The Tiffin Art Guild provided materials and instructors to give art workshops throughout the day. This article and photos appeared, in part, in The Advertiser-Tribune in March.

TU STUDENT ART EXHIBITION Viewers enjoyed a variety of subject matter and media at the annual Tiffin University Student Art Exhibition held in April. “Such fine work speaks to the creativity of both students and teachers, and emphasizes the importance of the arts to our quality of life,” said Lee Fearnside, Assistant Professor of Art. All of the student artists studied and created their pieces under the direction of art department professors Fearnside, Bob Johnston, Monica Cameron and Louise Wineland.


Arts and Angles All Arts & Angles programs are free and open to the public, and no advance reservations are necessary. There is always time for questions following the presentations. For more information, contact Dean Miriam Fankhauser, 419.448.3426. THE MOUNDBUILDERS Professor Miriam Fankhauser presented a revealing look at the artwork created by different eras of “The Moundbuilders” during the Arts & Angles program in January. During her program, Fankhauser, Dean of the School of Arts and Science and Associate Professor of English and Humanities, explored works created by the Poverty Point Culture (ca 1500-700 B.C., Late Archaic period) and the Adena Culture (ca 500 B.C. - 1 A.D., Early Woodlands period). Part of the information for her program, especially pertaining to the Poverty Point Culture, was gleaned from a “Moundbuilders” trip she participated in several years ago.

Jamie Rhoades

Jessica Pivato

Sara Durkee and Greg Dunn

STUDYING ABROAD TU’s February Arts & Angles Program focused on the Adventures of Studying Abroad, which featured four TU students who spent fall semester 2008 working on their degrees in England and Switzerland. The students gave brief presentations about their study abroad experiences and shared photos of their respective adventures. Jamie Rhoades and Jessica Pivato studied at Oxford, England, and Sara Durkee and Greg Dunn spent their semester in Geneva, Switzerland. More information about the program can be obtained by contacting Professor Bruce Bowlus, Associate Professor of History, at 419.448.3294, or via email at bbowlus@tiffin.edu.

TELLING STORIES Professor Lee Fearnside offered an inside look at archaeology – its processes and the politics of telling history – during the March Arts & Angles program. “Telling Stories: A Documentary on the Process Politics of Archaeology” featured a 30-minute documentary by Fearnside that aired on Rhode Island Public Broadcasting in 2008. Fearnside, an Assistant Professor of Art for Tiffin University, followed a dig by the Greene Farm Archaeology Project at a plantation that has been continually owned by a famous Rhode Island family since the 18th century.

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Congratulations

class of 2009

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Google? A questionable value!

Using Google to search the Internet is like using a shovel to treasure hunt in a landfill. Like the landfill, the Internet is vast, containing much of questionable value.

The dramatic illustration is posited by Dr. Jan Samoriski, Professor of Communication and Dean of Graduate Studies at Tiffin University. Samoriski is an expert in emerging electronic media and author of the book “Issues in Cyberspace: Communication, Technology, Law and Society on the Internet Frontier,” published by Allyn and Bacon in 2002.

In a recent academic paper, Samoriski explains his caution about World Wide Web searches. For starters, he says, the Web is far from comprehensive. Search engines access only a small percentage of what’s online and index far less. In fact, the professor’s research suggests that search results offer one page per 5,000 available pages. “What we don’t search is much larger than what we search,” he notes. And, then, Google decides what’s being searched. Samoriski says, “For various reasons search engines choose not to index certain content. Most of those reasons are known only to insiders.”

“What amazes me is, that as a society, we uncritically accept Internet search,” Samoriski says. “We are using search engines without knowing what is being searched, what has been excluded, how the results are being arrived at.”

And, most search engine users don’t know results start with those who’ve paid to be there. This “pay to play” has attracted attention from the Federal Trade Commission.

Relying on one search engine is like basing reality on a single television network. Both have limits.

Samoriski notes, “The FTC continues to warn Internet search engine users that search terms typed into a search engine don’t necessarily produce the most relevant results. Users need to be aware that … some websites or URLs may be ranked higher because they have paid for sponsorship.”

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The professor chose Google as his most relevant example because the search engine has a 59 percent market share, followed by Yahoo, 15 percent, and Microsoft, 6 percent. Any media that controls the information Americans access– Google, in this case -- has a profound influence on society, says Samoriski. Unlike traditional media, search engines lack editors and accuracy filters, and thus, he says “lead to a decline in intellectualism.” That decline can be halted if people question their reliance on technology; and evaluate the credibility of their search engine, its results and the corresponding web pages. If information limitations aren’t enough, Google has personal privacy implications that concern Samoriski. Few users know that Google records and stores their inquiries, and then, can analyze these over a multiyear period.

“What we don’t search is much larger than what we search.” “By recording and analyzing what people search for,” says Samoriski, “Google has developed the unique ability to discover what’s on people’s minds, which raises serious questions that pertain to freedom, privacy and democracy, three cornerstones of American society.” In summary, Google is watching you. He says, “The wisdom of placing so much trust, knowledge and information in the hands of a corporate, for-profit entity accountable only to its stockholders … is highly dubious and raises serious questions about the course of democracy in free societies.” A leader in his field, Samoriski is examining and influencing how electronic media will change our culture. This fall, he’ll explore these ideas and more in a course entitled “Cybercultures and Issues in Cyberspace.” He’s currently working on his second book entitled “Foundations of Internet Law.”

Caution: Facebook and Twitter At a recent conference of military leaders, Professor Jan Samoriski praised their use of social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter, while urging caution about social and legal implications of doing so. Samoriski was speaking to a select gathering of participants at a United States Joint Forces Command (USJFC) Joint Public Affairs Wo r k i n g G ro up ( J PAW G ) conference on Social Media. Samoriski was one of two academic representatives to be invited to the conference. He was invited to attend on a recommendation by a student in his online course, Cybercultures and Issues in Cyberspace, who works for the Department of Defense and a student in the Master of Humanities program at Tiffin University. “I was honored to represent Tiffin University during my briefing to the group on user and legal aspects and national security implication of social media,” Samoriski said. During his briefing to public affairs representatives from different branches of the Department of Defense, Samoriski praised the work that’s being done by the military in communicating their messages through social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter, but also warned about the social and legal implications of doing so.

Samoriski urged caution in how much information is put on social networking sites and the implications for national security. He also emphasized the nature of technological innovation and how volatile the Internet is as a new technology. “We’ve been here before, with the invention of the telephone, radio, television, cable television, and the Internet, but we have to be really careful how perceptions about new technologies create reality,” explained Samoriski. “We’re dealing with a new generation that can’t imagine life without the Internet and a cell phone. Is it a fad or here to stay?” asked Samoriski. Samoriski went on to explain, “All innovations evolve, and social networking may go boom or bust; depending on if there’s a business model behind it. Currently, there’s no business model behind social networking and once there is, the environment will change.” “We’re inundated with communications technology. At some point we’re going to reach a saturation point,” Samoriski said. “We have to put social networking in perspective.”

“There are many benefits to social networking, but we’re just now starting to see the drawbacks,” Samoriski said. “What we do online in an open environment can have serious consequences.”

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what’s happening > CampusScene RED SUN RISING BAND

Music TU TOURING ENSEMBLES FEATURED AT RITZ

Tiffin University’s touring musical ensembles, Up in the Air, Front Street and Higher Ground, were featured at the Ritz Theatre in February. The band, Front Street, performs an eclectic mix of all original rock, blues, funk, and jazz arrangements in concerts on campus, in the community, and on tour to high schools throughout the region. The band features a five-piece horn section, lead singer, and guitardriven rhythm section. The group is directed by Christian Secrist.

VOCAL FESTIVAL FEATURES GOSPEL, POP AND JAZZ

The a cappella group Up in the Air performs an eclectic mix of a cappella jazz, r&b, pop, and world music. The group performs extensively, having appeared before hundreds of audiences throughout the nation and in Europe, including a 2008 concert tour to the Czech Republic. Up in the Air has performed with a variety of professional artists, including American Idol’s Rudy Cardenas and Nicole Tranquillo, Grammy-winner Dee Dee Bridgewater, the New York Voices and Rockapella’s Sean Altman, who calls the group, “one of the best collegiate groups around!” The group has recorded four CDs, and has performed and recorded a variety of original compositions and arrangements by its members and director Brad Rees.

Higher Ground performs an eclectic repertoire of vocal harmony in popular styles, with emphasis on all-original blues and soul arrangements. This nine-member vocal ensemble presents public performances each year both off campus and around the community, and is directed by Ali Rees. 32

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Tiffin University welcomed rock band, Red Sun Rising, for a performance in February. The aggressive straight-forward rock band has captivated audiences with its high energy, charismatic stage presence, and thoughtful melodic harmony.

High school pop and jazz vocal groups from around Ohio and Indiana came together with gospel and jazz artists from Nashville, Washington DC, and Switzerland for Tif fin Universit y’s thirteenth annual Ohio Vladimir Tajsic Vocal Summit in April at the Ritz Theatre. This event is the largest such festival in the region, with free performances and educational sessions held all day. The day concluded with an evening concert by the gospel

Afro Blue

recording artist VLADA, joined by Tiffin University’s a cappella group Up in the Air and Howard University’s vocal jazz ensemble Afro Blue. Daytime activities featured performances by 22 high school vocal groups.


JAZZ FESTIVAL High school jazz bands from around Northern Ohio came together for Tiffin University’s eleventh annual Ohio Jazz Summit in April at the Ritz Theatre. The event featured free

Theatre THE DIXIE SWIM CLUB The Tiffin University Dragon’s Den Players presented The Dixie Swim Club in February. The two-act comedy, written by Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope and Jamie Wooten, was appropriate for all age groups, according to Dr. Mary V. Grennen, Assistant Professor of English and Director of Theatre Arts.

performances and educational sessions held all day and concluded with a concert by the Cleveland-based soul band WINSLOW, joined by Tiffin University’s acclaimed rock/funk band FRONT STREET.

LEGACY COURTYARD ROCK Tiffin University’s Concert Production Team hosted several rock bands from around the area to perform at the ROCK SHOCK in April. A cookout also took place during the event, and the concerts were free and open to the general public. For more information about Tiffin University’s Concert Production Team, call the Tiffin University Music Department at 419.448.3583 or email Greg Wilson at wilsongd@ tiffin.edu

The comedy followed the story of five unforgettable Southern women and their lasting friendships. The women, who became friends years before on their college swim team, now set aside a long weekend every August. They met at the same beach cottage on North Carolina’s Outer Banks as they recharged their friendships, laughed, and meddled in each other’s lives. The play focused on four of these weekends, spanning a period of 33 years. As their lives unfolded and the years passed, these women relied on one another through advice and raucous repartee, and to get through the challenges (which ranged from men, sex, marriage, parenting, divorce, aging) that life handed them.

STUDENTS WRITE, PRODUCE & DIRECT FILM Tiffin University students Samantha Turner and Devin Weaver presented the world premiere of their film “Hour 23” in April. The zombie film stars students and faculty and was funded by TU, with Dr. Mary Grennen serving as advisor on the project. In “Hour 23,” concert attendees at a small town college find themselves overrun by zombies. Kaden must find a way to stay alive. After saving preppy Grace from an untimely death, Kaden stumbles on a group of students hiding in a classroom. They risk their lives to make it to a fraternity house off campus. There they discover unhinged Dominic hiding out in the house. “The group not only battles zombies but also each other in this desperate attempt to stay alive – when the unthinkable becomes reality,” Turner remarks.

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Campus news

Student apartments

Tiffin University is near completion of the first two buildings of its Living-Learning Community located on land adjacent to the campus that once was a scrap yard.

The

apartment buildings are located on slightly more than 4 acres on the south side of Miami Street and will also include a parking lot. When completed, the Living-Learning community is to have four buildings of student apartments. Each apartment includes five bedrooms, two bathrooms, a living room area, full kitchen and pantry. They are designed for juniors, seniors and graduate students.

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Living-Learning Community Student Apartments

Typical Five-Bedroom Apartment www.tiffin.edu

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TU – A leader in Online Education

According to the 2009 rankings published by Online Education Database, Tiffin University ranks 15th of 44 colleges and universities that offer courses and programs online. Tiffin University’s placement among the rankings demonstrates its commitment to transparency and academic excellence. Tiffin University offers courses on a state-of-the-art learning platform in partnership with eCollege, a leader

TERRY COLLINS ELECTED TO BOARD OF TRUSTEES Tiffin University elected business executive & restaurateur Terry Collins to its Board of Trustees. According to Tiffin University President Paul Marion, “Terry Collins is a wonderful addition to our Board of Trustees. He has achieved great success in the business world and his interest in Tiffin University is very helpful as we continue to strengthen the educational experience of our students.” Mr. Collins is Chair of the Board of Pappa Murphy’s International, Inc. Papa Murphy’s is the fifth largest pizza chain in the United States, with more than 1,000 locations in 30 states. It also has multiple locations in Canada. The chain is the world’s largest “take-and-bake” pizza company. In 2003, Papa Murphy’s was voted “Best Pizza Chain in America” by Restaurants and Institutions Magazine, and has won the honor every year since. In 2006, it won the Platinum Award for Consumer’s First Choice in Pizza Chains. According to the Papa Murphy’s website, “The pizza chain empowers its patrons--not only do they decide which fresh, high-quality ingredients top their pizza, but customers have the pleasure of baking it right in their own ovens for a piping hot, delicious meal whenever they want.”

in online education. The eCollege platform is known for its reliability, and TU is known for its personal involvement in making the online experience successful. In addition to the convenience of online

Terry Collins and his wife Rose live in Petaluma, California. They have four children and 11 grandchildren.

learning, TU has the capability to put each online student in touch with faculty members in real time through Class Live Pro, a synchronous learning tool that is embedded in all of its online courses.

Online education is the fastest growing ssegment of Tiffin University’s enrollment.

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TU GREEN COMMITTEE Tiffin University is part of The American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment. This has resulted in the recent formation of TU’s Impact on Climate Change Committee, made up of faculty and staff members at Tiffin University – it is called the “Green Committee” for short. The American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment is a national effort to make campuses more sustainable and address global warming by garnering institutional commit-


ments to reduce and ultimately neutralize greenhouse gas emissions on campus and to accelerate the research and educational efforts of higher education to equip society to re-stabilize the earth’s climate. Building on the growing momentum for leadership and action on climate change, the Presidents Climate Commitment provides a

framework and support for America’s colleges and universities to go climate neutral. The Commitment recognizes the unique responsibility that institutions of higher education have as role models for their communities and in training the people who will develop the social, economic and technological solutions to reverse global warming.

Good Morning World REMEMBERING A BETTER ANGEL: ABRAHAM LINCOLN In March, Edwin Bearss presented Remembering a Better Angel: Abraham Lincoln, at TU’s Good Morning World breakfast lecture series. Mr. Bearss has been the recipient of a number of awards in the field of history and preservation. In addition, he has authored many books of a historic nature. In 1990, he was featured as a commentator on the PBS Program, The Civil War. Recently, he appeared on the Arts & Entertainment, Civil War Journal.

THE WINNER’S EDGE: LIFE IN BALANCE In April, Dell Robinson, GLIAC Commissioner, presented The Winner’s Edge: Life in Balance, at TU’s Good Morning World Breakfast lecture series. Robinson is the sixth commissioner in the 37-year history of the GLIAC, and the first ethnic minority to be named commissioner of a non-Historically Black College or University conference in the NCAA’s Division II.

COOPER TIRE—TODAY AND TOMORROW FRIEDMAN VILLAGE The Sisters of St. Francis acquired Friedman Village from Tiffin University in March. The property is located on St. Francis Avenue, across the street from the St. Francis Community.

In May, Roy Armes, Chairman, CEO and President of Cooper Tire & Rubber Co., presented Cooper Tire—Today and Tomorrow at TU’s Good Morning World Breakfast lecture series. Prior to joining the company in 2007, Mr. Armes concluded an extensive career at Whirlpool Corporation where he gained broad experience in engineering, manufacturing, procurement and international operations and demonstrated success in developing customer relationships and consumer-oriented products. He spoke on the background of Cooper Tire, their global footprint, products and Cooper’s people. He also included a look at the industry trends, along with a snapshot of Cooper’s strategic direction.

The purchase included all land and buildings, including the independent living units, the assisted living residence, the private residence that faces Melmore Street, and the community building. Tiffin University has owned this senior living community since 1995 and provided independent and assisted living under the management of AdCare Health Systems. The community was developed on property that was donated to Tiffin University by Robert and Eugenie Friedman. The property is now called Friedman Village at St. Francis.

Tell Us About Yourself • www.tiffin.edu New Jobs / Promotions • Award or Recognitions • Marriages and Births Vacations • Hobbies • Change of Address • Search for a lost Classmate www.tiffin.edu

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what’s happening > CampusScene

Cole Dining Hall Goes Trayless Something familiar disappeared in Tiffin University’s dining hall beginning spring semester-trays. Tiffin University can now report food waste declines of up to 50% in addition to thousands of dollars in energy savings. “As a result of the reduction of food waste and energy costs (water and electricity usage to wash the trays), Tiffin University students will benefit in the future,” according to James White, Vice President for Finance and Administration. “Trayless dining is a bottom-line initiative with environmental, financial, and social benefits. Students may think twice about over-eating and interact with each other more. Most importantly, it will promote greater awareness of waste and conservation overall. Going trayless is a far-reaching initiative across the U.S.,” said White. “Although financial incentives are important, it is the ‘green’ attribute and less waste that is critical at this time.”

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The Old Fort Banking Company Supports TU Campaign

Community RELAY FOR LIFE Tiffin University participated in a series of fundraising efforts for the American Cancer Society, including Casual Day, Lunch in the Courtyard, a Bake Sale, and the Relay for Life. The events were organized by Lori Hall, Director of Human Resources, and Lynn Keegan, Administrative Assistant for Academic Affairs. All efforts were in memory of the late Professor Scott Distel, who lost his battle with cancer last year. Professor Distel actively participated in the Relay for Life prior to his death. Casual Day was part of the fundraiser that allowed TU employees to wear jeans to work if they donated to the cause.

The luminaries were displayed on the night of the relay. At the Relay for Life event, Darby Roggow, Men’s Golf Coach, provided the teams with the canopies used for golf outings. Mark Ingalls, Yaw Mamphey, Coordinator of Degree Completion Admissions Operations, and Gene Crutsinger, Associate Professor of English & ELAC Director, set up the encampment for the relay teams. During the afternoon, there was face painting, a clothing rummage sale, DJ, a student vendor table selling t-shirts, food and drink vendors, speakers, awards, a ceremony honoring survivors, a memorial luminary service, and a late-night pizza party.

Lynn Keegan explained, “As a cancer survivor, I Other donation oppor- Relay for Life Bake Sale–Linda Gray and Lynn had a personal interest tunities included the Keegan in participating in this sale of hot dogs and event and was so proud of our Tiffin University root beer floats during Lunch in the Courtyard. family when they stepped forward to make The Human Resources Department and Profesthis relay a reality. Those that were not able sor Lee Fearnside, Assistant Professor of Art, to participate the day of the relay were eager volunteered their services in running the event. and willing to help with all of our fundraising Bud Kinn, Director of Facilities, roasted all of the activities and prep work that had to be done hot dogs sold that day and TU donated all of prior to the day of the relay. Our teams may the food (100% of the proceeds went to the have been physically on the track on the day Relay fund). of the relay, but it was the support of the entire campus that allowed us the opportunity to The Bake Sale was organized by Linda Gray, participate in the relay. Everyone involved did Administrative Assistant for Graduate Studies, an awesome job.” and Jeanie Fisher, Assistant to the Vice President of Academic Affairs. More than 20 people donated baked goods. Ruth Gosche, Director of Adult Student Services, made a TU Dragon cake and the bookstore donated a large basket of items which were raffled. Luminaries were sold as a way for TU students, faculty, staff, and supporters to honor or remember loved ones who have battled cancer.

The American Cancer Society suggested that the TU Relay Teams set its goal at raising $1,000. That goal was almost doubled–they raised $1,944.88. The money was donated to the Seneca County American Cancer Society in memory of Professor Scott Distel.

The Old Fort Banking Company considers community involvement a core value and a significant factor in community banking. Old Fort Bank believes that they have a responsibility to make a difference in the communities that they serve…the $250,000 donation to the Tiffin University is just one example of their commitment.

“Old Fort Bank realizes the importance of a quality university in our area. We welcome the opportunity to contribute to the Tiffin University capital campaign for their continued success in offering an excellent curriculum and campus experience,” stated Michael C. Spragg, CEO/President of Old Fort Bank. Old Fort Bank, as well as the Paul M. & Lucy Gillmor Foundation, have pledged a combined total of $375,000 to the University. Tiffin University is the location of the Gillmor Student Center named after its benefactors and located in the center of the campus along with The Old Fort Banking Company Basketball Court and the PM Gillmor Tennis Courts located near the athletic complex. President Spragg serves on the Tiffin University Board of Trustees along with the bank’s Chairman of the Board, Dianne Krumsee. “The Old Fort Banking Company has always seen Tiffin University as a great asset to Northwest Ohio and to the city of Tiffin in particular. TU offers excellent academic programs and provides students in our community with the opportunity to improve their lives through education. It has been my privilege to follow my father, P.M. Gillmor, as a Trustee of TU. Like him, I am committed to supporting TU’s continuing growth and success. The Old Fort Bank also values the opportunity to support this fine institution and the Tiffin community.” Dianne Krumsee remarked. www.tiffin.edu

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what’s happening > CampusScene UNIQUE LESSON FOR ELEMENTARY STUDENTS Fifty-nine fifth graders from Krout Elementary School had a unique lesson at Tiffin University in April. Mrs. Susan Marion hosted the students’ visit on campus and worked through table etiquette tips as the students enjoyed a family-style meal. This collaborative effort began with Mrs. Karen Klepper and Mrs. Kim Orwig sharing a concern that children need to be accepting of others who are different than they are. The social barriers that hinder them from being able to fully participate in their educational experience need to be removed. The students were seated in groups of seven with a “Table Mom” volunteer at the head of each table. Student survey responses indicated that they learned much more than how to cut their meat and use a cloth napkin correctly! The students got to know each other better, which allowed them to see their classmates in a new and more compassionate manner.

TAI CHI Dr. James Orr, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Security Studies, says he hopes that students who learn tai chi (an aspect of martial arts) gain skills that remain with them for their entire lives. He said he hopes they learn the value of slowing down, learning to listen and redirecting rather than opposing. Dr. Orr taught tai chi classes at Tiffin Middle School for about a month this year. Orr said his working with the school matches TU’s goal of trying to help develop the community as a whole. His lessons were through the International Cultural Center, which is focusing on China this year. He said tai chi is about balance and relaxation and has slow and gracefullooking movements. By slowing down and relaxing, a person is able to be more aware of his or her body alignment and what is going on in his or her body, so the person is less likely to injure himself or herself, he said.

BASIC TRAINING Krout School elementary students at etiquette seminar.

FOOTBALL PLAYERS COACH CHILDREN TU football players are setting a good example. Local children get some oneon-one academic coaching from collegiate athletes. The players volunteered to spend time with children in Tiffin City School’s resource rooms, and they read or play games with children as part of a community service initiative. Karen Daniel, special education teacher at Noble Elementary School, said one child read to a football player, and in another circumstance, a football player read to students. She said her class has students at different levels, but the players work with them well and adapt. 40

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In May, Tiffin and Seneca County law enforcement officers participated in Basic and Intermediate Excel Training offered as a community service by Tiffin University and Laura Ketter, Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Technology. Many of the departments represented by these officers do not have a budget that will allow them to enroll in commercial training and they do not have the flexibility or schedule to enroll in a semester-long class.


Congratulations to tiffin university GOLD Employees p y of ten or more years! y

Alice M. Nichols

41 Years

Kelly A. Daniel

14 Years

John J. Millar

27 Years

Michael A. Grandillo

14 Years

Timothy E. Schultz

27 Years

Bradley A. Rees

14 Years

Lisa W. Williams

27 Years

Deborah A. Phillips

13 Years

Miriam K. Fankhauser

26 Years

Charles R. Ardner

12 Years

Frances A. Fleet

26 Years

Keith N. Haley

12 Years

Jeffry J. Stockner

24 Years

Nancy J. Miller

12 Years

Graham W. Ryan

23 Years

Celinda M. Scherger

12 Years

Judith A. Gardner

21 Years

Teresa E. Shafer

12 Years

Cynt Cy nthi hiaa S. LLit ittltlee Cynthia Little

21 Years Year Ye arss 21

Robe Ro bert rt G G.. Wa Wats tson on Robert Watson

YYea ears rs 12 Years

Bonnie S. Tiell

21 Years

Gerald E. Adams

11 Years

Elizabeth Athaide-Victor

20 Years

Jean M. Fisher

11 Years

Carol A. McDannell

19 Years

Debra S. Gatton

11 Years

Lonny L. Allen

18 Years

Linda L. Horning

11 Years

Rebecca J. Fox

18 Years

Laura A. Ketter

11 Years

Gabriel A. Jaskolka

18 Years

Teresa R. Miller

11 Years

Harold J. (Bud) Kinn

18 Years

Martha J. Pennycuff

11 Years

Charles B. Lutz

18 Years

Leonard J. Reaves

11 Years

Annette R. Staunton

18 Years

Nancy J. Sullivan

11 Years

Terry D. Sullivan

18 Years

Dan K. Bell

10 Years

Susan L. Treece

18 Years

Lillian B. Boehmer

10 Years

Debra A. Daughenbaugh

17 Years

Rudy M. Brownell

10 Years

Percilla A. Nye

17 Years

Linda L. Gray

10 Years

Lisa M. Kirchner

16 Years

Larry A. Haferd

10 Years

Shane K. O’Donnell

16 Years

Laura L. Lamalie

10 Years

Phyllis A. Watts

16 Years

Laura A. Mays

10 Years

W. Bruce Bowlus

15 Years

Kathleen T. Moomaw

10 Years

Nancy A. Gilbert

15 Years

Darby M. Roggow

10 Years

Ruth A. Gosche

15 Years

Margaret. M Schak

10 years

Steven D. Hurwitz

15 Years

Thomas K. Wahl

10 Years

Cameron S. Cruickshank

14 Years

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update > AlumniScene

Upcoming event

Cedar Point Day ~ Friday, July 24 Special TU admission price: $30.00 (Regular price: $43.99) Park hours: 10:00 A.M. – 10:00 P.M. TU Booth will be open from 9:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M. Soak City tickets are also available for the special price of $18 (regular $29.99) Soak City tickets must be purchased in advance

Point.click. Give. With our secure server, investing in Tiffin University has never been easier. Just point and click, and your gift – whatever its size – helps TU provide access and opportunity for individuals, and facilitates their preparation for successful careers and for productive and satisfying lives. We invite our friends and supporters to join us at www.tiffin.edu where Real Connections yield Real Results.

SHARE your pride How many of you have your diploma hanging in your office? Do you wear Tiffin University apparel when you are traveling or on vacation? Do you have a TU license place on your car? Does a TU Alumni license plate holder display your license plate? Participating in small activities like these helps promote your alma mater. Who knows when the next prospective student (or parent) will notice that you graduated from Tiffin University?

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update > AlumniScene

Event recaps MEXICAN RIVIERA CRUISE

FOOTBALL ALUMNI REUNION

Tiffin University hosted a 7-Day Mexican Riviera Cruise in February. Alumni and friends enjoyed a week of pure relaxation and exciting adventure as they discovered the unique Mexican ports of Mazatlan, Puerto Vallarta, and Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.

In conjunction with the spring game in April, TU football alumni and friends gathered for a reception at Camden Falls Conference Center. The new coaching staff was introduced along with several new Dragon recruits. Thanks to all alumni players and supportive fans that have helped build the foundation of our football program and make it what it is today!

CLASS OF 1959 CELEBRATES AT COMMENCEMENT To celebrate the 50th anniversary of their graduation from TU, the Class of 1959 was invited to the commencement luncheon and to join the graduation procession with the Class of 2009. Affectionately referred to as our “Golden Grads,” Virgil Cotner, Victor Frantz, Larry Hoover, Jimmie Thomas and Joan Tracht, represented the Class of 1959 at the commencement ceremonies.

Back row: Mike Klepper, Claire Johansen, Mick Pfefferle, John Schultz Second row: Karen Klepper, Martha Marion, President Paul Marion, Susan Marion, Sandy Schultz, Elise Pfefferle Seated: Evelyn Marker, William Reineke, Sr.

TU DAY WITH THE CLEVELAND CAVALIERS In March, TU Alumni & Development Office hosted TU Day at Quicken Loans Arena where TU alumni and friends gathered to watch LeBron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers battle the Atlanta Hawks. Guests were treated to a private luncheon in the lounge of the Executive Offices and enjoyed a Q&A session with Joe Tait, the Voice of the Cavaliers.

TU On The Road If you are an Ohio resident, you can show pride in Tiffin University through the Collegiate License Plate Program sponsored by the State of Ohio. The cost to participate in the program (in addition to any normal renewal fees) is $35 annually. Of this $35 fee, $25 is directed to Tiffin University in the form of a charitable donation to the General Scholarship Fund in your name. Due to a change in the Drivers Privacy Protection Act, Ohio Revised Code 4501.27, the releasee of personal information will not be provided without written consent by the individual. Therefore, you must provide proof of your participation in the collegiate license plate program in order for Tiffin University to recognize your contribution to the TU General Scholarship Fund. If you have questions regarding the Collegiate Plate Program, please contact TU’s Alumni Relations Office at 419-448-3282 or your local Bureau of Motor Vehicles. 44

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Savethe date Homecoming Weekend 2009

October 9-11

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tell us about yourself > ClassScene

1940’s Nila Hodle Swank, Class of 1947, Galion, Ohio, retired from The Galion Community Center YMCA after 14 years as bookkeeper. “From there, I went on to be treasurer of the First Presbyterian Church and retired from there in 2008. I keep busy now volunteering at the Galion Community Hospital.”

Victoria Miroshnik, MBA 1998, Glasgow, United Kingdom, is a Ph.D. Candidate for Glasgow University’s Department of Management. Her husband, Dipak, is a Professor for Nagasaki University. She writes, “After leaving Tiffin, I spent time in Japan and Australia. Then, my daughter was born in Moscow in 2001. I was employed as a Senior Executive for a major Russian company. I have fond memories of Professor Teresa Burkett.” Jeff Beard, Class of 1999, Columbus, Ohio, and his wife, Melissa, welcomed a son, Kegan Jeffery, born in March.

1970’s Jack Ulrich, Class of 1971, Marion, Ohio, is employed by Fahey Banking Company as Assistant Vice President, Commercial Lending Officer. He resides in Marion with his wife Liz. Ulrich is a member of the Marion Elks and Knights of Columbus.

1980’s Jeffery McClain, Class of 1984, Columbus, Ohio, was elected to the Ohio House of Representative in November. He represents the 82nd District, which includes all of Wyandot and Crawford counties and a portion of Marion County. Since 1984, McClain was auditor of Wyandot County-the youngest elected official in the state at that time.

Nancy Ward Stapp, Class of 1986, CPA, CMA, Tipp City, Ohio, is the daughter of Kenneth Ward, Class of 1951, and Peg Ward, Tiffin, Ohio. Nancy is Vice President of Finance for Goodrich Aircraft Wheels and Brakes in Troy. Throughout her tenure with Goodrich, she has taken on positions of increasing responsibility, including accounting manager, assistant controller, director of finance, and SAP project manager. Nancy, her husband, Steve, and their two sons, reside in Tipp City.

1990’s Willie Stewart, Class of 1991, Lithonia, Georgia, is the Publisher/CEO of Trendsetters Magazine. Jenny Blair, Class of 1995, Columbus, Ohio, married Kevin Miller in October. She is a hair designer at Kenneth’s Hair Salons in the Columbus area and Kevin, a licensed embalmer and funeral director, is employed by UPS.

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2000’s Christopher Foster, MSCJ 2000, Kent, Washington, is a Social Worker for the State of Washington. His, wife, Amy is employed by Seattle Pacific University. Together they have two children, Isaiah age 12, and Christopher age 1. Scott Langenderfer, Class of 2000, Bucyrus, Ohio, is an Accountant for Mizick Miller & Co., Inc. His wife Amber is a self-employed beautician. They have three children, Avery, Collin and Hayden. Mark Moore, Class of 2000, Oak Park, Illinois, is Program Manager for Kids Hope United. Drew and Angie Smith Price, Class of 2000, Grove City, Ohio, welcomed a son, Trace Andrew, born in December 2008. Diana Marie Lafferty, Class of 2001, Columbia Station, Ohio, is a selfemployed teacher/entrepreneur. She writes, “I have experienced a lot since learning at Tiffin. I have successfully owned and sold several businesses, and I am deeply involved in the non-profit community. Catch me if you can!” She has three children, Grace age 11, Nicholas age 9, and Emma age 1. Jermain Nelson, MSCJ 2001, and Stephanie Nelson, MSCJ 2003, Hephzibah, Georgia, welcomed their first child in April. Jennifer Johnson Fate, Class of 2003, North Ridgeville, Ohio, married Robert Fate in September. She is currently working as a Financial Account Manager for Paycor in Independence, Ohio. Her husband is a Technician in Olmsted Falls, Ohio.


Jeremy Marinis, Class of 2003, Tiffin, Ohio, and his wife, Jamie, welcomed a daughter, Karris Jo, born in January.

Kelsie Vance Cline, Class of 2007, Columbus, Ohio, renewed her vows with her husband Joshua Cline, on their first anniversary weekend in October. She is employed by Adoption Circle in Columbus, Ohio and her husband is employed by the U.S. Air Force.

Nischal Parajoo, Class of 2007, Pokhara, works as a cash supervisor for Pokhara Medical Hall.

Nicole Jordan, Class of 2004, Nashville, Tennessee, is employed by Vanderbilt University as a Victim Services Coordinator. Amy Ziegler, Class of 2004, Tucson, Arizona, was married to Erick Swanbeck in September. She is a Market Brand Executive for Whirlpool Corporation. Heather Hill, Class of 2005, Gibsonburg, Ohio, was hired as Assistant Treasurer for the Fostoria Community School Board. Kasanga Kaombwe, Class of 2005, Tanzania, is a banker for Bank of Africa in Tanzania. His wife, Esha, is a flight attendant.

Carolyn Lawrence, Class of 2008, Ellijay, Georgia, has published her first book of poetry. The collection, Saturnine, is work dedicated to historical sonnets and poems, focusing mainly on the Renaissance and Victorian eras of the British Empire, featuring photos by Lawrence. She owns and operates a writing and editing services business, Lawrence Creative Services, and is also an Independent Fitness Consultant for BeachBody. Lawrence writes, “I am currently shopping my young adult fantasy series, The Secrets of Undrencaul, to agents for representation, and hopefully a publication deal.�

Scott Frank, MSCJ 2006, Bowling Green, Ohio, married Jessica Serrato in November on a beach in Montego Bay, Jamaica. He is employed by the Bowling Green Police Division. Jessica works for Otsego Local Schools. Daryl Rodgers, MSCJ 2006, was inducted into the Trumbull County African-American Achievers Association Hall of Fame. He is the Supervisor of Trumbull County Drug Court. He is also an instructor for the Kent State University Police Academy and an associate minister at his church. Wayne Willcox, MSCJ 2006, Savannah, Georgia, was appointed Chief of Police for the Armstrong Atlantic State University Police Department. In his new position, he oversees all aspects of the police department. In 2007, the Ohio Senate recognized Wayne for innovative leadership. The following year, Governor Ted Strickland recognized him for community service. He was the recipient of the 2008 Bill Fox Community Service Award.

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our deepest sympathies > InMemoriam

1930’s

1970’s

Emil Ihnat, Class of 1939, Catawba Island, Ohio, passed away in February. He holds the Ohio state record for low hurdles in high school track and field. He was a member of St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, the Port Clinton Elks Lodge #1718, the VFW Stanley Jadwisiak Post #7572, and the Catawba Island Club.

Paul Ardner, Class of 1977, Tiffin, Ohio, passed away in March. He served in the United States Navy and worked for Webster Manufacturing for more than 40 years.

1940’s William Warren Fletcher, Class of 1942, passed away in December.

Dennis Distel, Class of 1978, Tiffin, Ohio, passed away in December. He worked at the Fostoria Distribution Center as a coordinator for Church and Dwight Co. Inc. of Old Fort. He had previously had been an employee of National Machinery in Tiffin for more than 25 years.

Glen Zeiter, Class of 1949, Bloomville, Ohio, passed away in December. He retired after 29 years as the Payroll Timekeeper for the former C.E. Basic in Maple Grove, Ohio. He was a member of St. John’s Baseline United Church of Christ, the Quarter Century Club, C.E. Basic, the Board of Directors of Bliss Memorial Library, the Ohio State Patrol Auxiliary, and the Pinacle Club.

1950’s Pauline McDermott, Class of 1958, Sycamore, Ohio, passed away in November.

Tell Us about Yourself

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sports at TU > SportsScene

Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference With almost a complete full athletic year completed within the Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, the Dragons now have a good taste at what it takes to excel in the top tier conference. Many have seen success in individual ways but all are representing Tiffin University well.

The Tiffin softball team has seen firsthand the top competition in the GLIAC this year. They finished with an overall record of 23-25 and a conference record of 9-16. The team’s most notable win came against Ferris State University, who was ranked 8th in the nation at the time. The final score was 2-0 with senior pitcher Krista Sowers getting the victory throwing a complete game shutout and striking 7 bulldogs out. Krista Sowers broke the career strikeout record which was held by Stacy Ellinger since 1993. Krista currently ranks 5th in the GLIAC in strikeouts with 125. Freshman infielder Lauren Mazzuca ranks 3rd in the conference in runs scored with 36 and were a Second

The Tiffin University Dragons baseball program finished 20-31-1 while compiling a record of 13-21-1 in GLIAC play. The Dragons are ranked 4th in the GLIAC in team batting average with a .311 mark. The most notable victory of the season came against GLIAC foe Grand Valley State University, once ranked 1st in the nation for several weeks, with a score of 12-3. Sophomore left-handed pitcher Donnie Smith pitched a complete game only allowing 3 runs to cross the plate.

Senior Krista Sowers finished her Dragons softball career with a solid season, setting a new career strikeout record by fanning 559 batters. She led the team with 14 wins and 145 strikeouts.

Team All-GLIAC pick. Delaney Talmage has been the run producer for the Dragons ranking 2nd in the GLIAC in RBIs, 38, ranks 1st in the GLIAC in total bases, 81, and ranks 13th in the country in doubles per game. Tiffany Smith has shown her power leading the GLIAC in home runs with 9 and ranks 3rd in the GLIAC in RBIs with 37. Jess Ramirez ranks 2nd in the GLIAC in stolen bases stealing 10 bases on 12 attempts. Junior Ty Blake set a new single season record with 70 hits for the Dragons baseball team. He also led the team with a .402 batting average and 15 doubles.

The Dragons baseball team has seen several players excel throughout the season. Senior left-handed pitcher Eric Ludrowsky broke the single season strikeout record with 66 which was 65 formerly held by Pat Hyme and Gregg Prenzlin. Eric is ranked 13th in the GLIAC in ERA, 5.73, 2nd in the GLIAC in strikeouts, 66, and 1st in the GLIAC in games started with 11. Junior outfielder Ty Blake also set a new season record with 70 hits and finishing with a .402 average, one of the top marks in the GLIAC. Ty is also ranked 4th in the GLIAC in total hits, 62, 5th in the GLIAC in total bases, 91, and 5th in the GLIAC in total doubles with 13. Red shirt freshman Val Helldobler has swung a hot stick as well ranking 15th in the GLIAC for batting average, .363 avg., and ranks 5th in the GLIAC in total doubles, 13. Freshman first baseman Pat Curtin ranks 4th in the conference in homeruns, 9, 8th in the conference in runs scored, 37, and 5th in the conference in total doubles, 13.

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The men’s and women’s track and field squad continued their success when they walked out of Oberlin College with championships at the Bob Kahn Invitational. The men’s team scored 259 points for its win in the ten team field, over a hundred points ahead of second place Oberlin College, which had 147 points. The women racked up 163.5 points, and Oberlin College again took second place with 121 points. Keith Reiter ended the meet on a high note by winning the pole vault and bettering his national qualifying mark. Reiter cleared the bar at 4.96m (16-3.25). Fellow vaulter Dan Snyder also placed third in the event with a clearance at 4.10m (13-5.25). Two Dragon


athletes also participated in the NCAA Indoor Championships and placed high. Anthony Thomas finished sixth out of nine runners in the finals of the 200 meters at the NCAA Division II Indoor Track and Field Championship. Anthony Thomas also set a new school record in the 100 with a time of 10.53. The second athlete competing in the nationals was senior Kristen Ameling who threw 46 feet, 4 inches on her second throw to claim an All-American spot in Andrea Bader enjoyed another strong track season, fourth. At the GLIAC Track qualifying for the NCAA National Championships in Championships, Ameling, the 60 meters and 200 meters in indoor track, and the 100 and 200 meters in outdoor track. Jeremy Lee, and Ramone Brant all won conference championships, as the team now prepares for the NCAA National Outdoor Championships coming soon.

COMMISSIONER’S AWARD WINNER The Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (GLIAC) announced the winter 2009 recipients of the GLIAC Commissioner’s Awards for Academic and Athletic Excellence. The awards, sponsored by Meijer Incorporated, are presented after the fall, winter, and spring athletic seasons to six male and six female student athletes that excel both in the classroom and on the fields of play. The six male student-athletes to receive the winter 2009 GLIAC Commissioner’s Awards are: Cauli Bedran and James Ekelberry of Wayne State; Thomas Buxton of Tiffin University; Steve Genther of Saginaw Valley State University; Greg Jarvis of the University of Indianapolis and Sean McGraw of Ashland University. Buxton (Worthington, Ohio) is the keeper of a 3.97 cumulative GPA, and is a senior Marketing major who helped lead Tiffin University’s Indoor Track and Field program this winter. Thomas set a new school Distance Medley Relay (DMR) record of 10:02.48 at the DII Challenge, ending the season ranked 15th in the DMR. He set a school record in the 4x800 with a time of 7:47.86, setting the national leading time in the event while also setting another school record in the open 800 with a time of 1:53.59, posting the top DII time in the race. He was the GLIAC runner-up in DMR, while ranking 19th in the country in the open 800.

Ramone Brant had a strong track season, winning the GLIAC Championship in the 110 meter hurdles and qualifying for the NCAA Division II National Outdoor Championships.

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sports at TU > SportsScene

We welcome our new Head Coaches

Under Hill’s direction, the Shenandoah athletic department experienced unparalleled success. The football team won USA South Conference championships in both 2003 and 2004, the men’s basketball team won a school record 10 USA South Conference games in 2003-04 and the women’s lacrosse team played in the 2004 USA South Conference Tournament championship game.

JOHN HILL NAMED HEAD MEN’S BASKETBALL COACH

Hill has also served as President of the Ohio Athletic Conference, Chair of the OAC’s Director’s of Athletics, a member of the NCAA Division III Regional Basketball Selection Committee, the NCAA National Women’s Soccer Committee and the NABC Ranking Committee.

John Hill has been named Head Men’s Basketball Coach at Tiffin University, taking over for departing Coach Rodney Martin. He will also serve as Associate Vice President for Development. “This presents an opportunity for me to follow my passion and love of basketball,” Hill, who has served as Athletic Director and Associate Vice President for Development at Shenandoah University in Virginia since 2002, said. “I am coming back to my home town, my community, my family and friends. Tiffin is a great place to live, a great town with two great universities. It allows me to take a step up in the coaching world by leading an up and coming Division II program.” “We are confident that John Hill’s many years of success as a head coach, along with his passion and enthusiasm, will provide the leadership that is needed for our men’s basketball program to excel. In addition to serving as the head men’s basketball coach, he will also assist with our efforts to raise funds for the athletic department and for construction of the new recreation center on campus,” said Tiffin University President Paul Marion. “We are excited John is joining the men’s basketball program,” said Lonny Allen, Athletic Director. “His passion for the game speaks for itself. He has a great knowledge of the game, is a leader in the community, and will help bolster our athletic department. He will take our program in the direction it needs to go. I expect for he and the team to have nothing but success on and off the court.” Hill, a member of both the Tiffin Columbian and Heidelberg University Athletic Halls of Fame, came to Shenandoah after a 27 year career as the Athletic Director and Head Men’s Basketball Coach at Heidelberg College. During those years, Hill won a school record 357 games. He also served at different times as head men’s tennis coach, head men’s cross country coach, head men’s golf coach and chair of the health, physical education and athletic training department. Hill has had many accolades over his head coaching career. One of the highlights came in 1983-84, when Heidelberg qualified for the NCAA Tournament with a record of 24-7, 10-3 in the OAC, marking the first team at Heidelberg to eclipse 20 wins. In all, Hill coached Heidelberg basketball teams to five OAC runner-up finishes and two NCAA appearances.

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In addition to his undergraduate work at Heidelberg, Hill earned a master’s degree from SUNY-Buffalo and an Education Specialist degree from Bowling Green State University. In addition to doctoral work at the United States Sports Academy, Hill has both Level I and Level III certification from the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA).

DOUG JESSE NAMED HEAD WRESTLING COACH Doug Jesse enters his first season as the head wrestling coach at Tiffin University. He is responsible for all aspects of the program. Jesse returns to Tiffin after coaching for four years in Staten Island, NY at Division I Wagner College, where he served as the head wrestling coach for the Seahawks. He had previously coached at Division III Heidelberg College as an assistant coach for one year. Jesse is no stranger to the mat, as he was a four-year member of the Cornell University wrestling team, helping the Big Red to three Ivy League titles in his four years. Jesse graduated with a bachelor of science in Human Development in 2004. He has Masters Degrees in Early Childhood Education (BirthGrade 2/Special Education) and Childhood Education (Grades 1-6/Special Education) from Wagner College. A local product of Hopewell-Loudon High School, Jesse graduated in 2000 as a four-time State qualifier. He twice placed second in the finals as a freshman and a senior. He also had a third place finish as a junior. In addition to his head coaching responsibilities, Jesse has been active on the summer camp circuit, previously serving as an instructor at the Cornell and Hopewell-Loudon High School wrestling camps.


MARK SCHREIBER NAMED HEAD WOMEN’S LACROSSE COACH Mark Schreiber has been named Head Women’s Lacrosse Coach at Tiffin University, as the school announced the addition of its latest intercollegiate athletic program. Schreiber, an Eastern Kentucky University graduate with a Master’s degree from the University of Louisville, served as Head Women’s Lacrosse Club Coach at the University of Kentucky in 2008. He helped lead the team to a best ever 8-3 regular season record with an impressive 51.6 percent shooting percentage while defensively allowing just 6.6 goals per game. Prior to the University of Kentucky, Schreiber built the women’s lacrosse club program at Noblesville (IN) High School from 2004 to 2007. In the first three years of the program, the team twice placed in the top three defensively in the state. He has coached numerous players that went on to play collegiate lacrosse, including a starter for Ohio State, while also coaching 9 Academic Scholar Athletes and a First Team All-State player. Schreiber employs a unique coaching style that stresses passing and receiving while on the run along with a decision making process that allows players to know each other’s moves before they execute the play. Women’s Lacrosse is the 19th NCAA Division II athletic program offered by Tiffin University. It is also the 10th women’s athletics program the university offers. The team will compete as an Independent program beginning in the spring of 2010 and will compete at the Paradiso Athletic Fields. A total of 42 NCAA Division II institutions compete in women’s lacrosse, including programs at Gannon University, Mercyhurst University, Seton Hill University, Notre Dame College, and Wheeling Jesuit University. Women’s lacrosse is also a sponsored sport of the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference. “I am grateful to President Marion and Athletic Director Allen for giving me this opportunity. Tiffin impressed me as a school that can embrace out-ofthe-box thinking and in that spirit our program will feature a unique style of play. My philosophy is based on my conviction that lacrosse is a player’s game, not a coach’s game,” said Schreiber. “We will play a Kentucky Fastbreak style of attack that stresses unified decision making at the individual level. My players also play a major role in managing the game. I believe it is vital to teach our student athletes how to think rather than what to think. Our program will teach our players how to thrive in chaos on and off the field.” “We are excited at the prospect of adding women’s lacrosse to our athletic department,” said Lonny Allen, Athletic Director. “It is an up-and-coming sport similar to what women’s soccer was in the late 1980s. We felt it was a good time to be proactive and expand into what we see as a growth sport. Coach Schreiber has a real passion for the sport. It will be a pleasure to watch him bring his love of coaching and recruiting into the program as it develops over the next year.”

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sports at TU > SportsScene EQUESTRIAN

Tiffin University Debut at Hunt Seat and Western Regional Finals Success

athlete and also played soccer for TU. He is from Reading, Ohio near Cincinnati and placed 2nd in the Beginner Horsemanship, qualifying him for the National Semifinals.

Eric Pettigrew and Melissa Cassidy qualified for the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association National Semifinals in Western Beginner Horsemanship held at West Texas A&M in Canyon, Texas March 20-22. “Eric and Melissa worked hard for this. Even before the team was officially established he started going to watch competitions. He has been attending extra practices to improve his skill and ability and earned this accomplishment,” said Head Coach Julie Vogel.

Six of eight equestrian athletes placed in their competition. “We had two sophomore riders, Elizabeth Buskey and Alison Ditman, qualify and ride in both Hunt Seat and Western. This is a very unique accomplishment. Eighty– Eight riders competed in the competition and only two other riders qualified in Hunt and Western. We also have a freshman, Melissa Cassidy, who qualified for Regionals after 8 competitions and a Junior, Kaitlin Foster, who qualified in two divisions for Regionals. Most athletes require more than 8 competitions to earn 35 points and rarely does someone qualify for two divisions. These athletes have worked hard this year and we are so proud of them. Our Hunt Seat Team and our Western Team worked on specific strategies to improve their performances and their competition results reflected their hard work. The Equestrian team is only two years old and we have been competing against teams that have been established for years. Our region is large and very strong. Last year’s Western National Championship winner was Ohio State University, a team we compete against in our Region,” said Coach Vogel.

Western Regional Competition The Regional Competition was held at Lake Erie College in Concord, Ohio. Riders had to qualify for the competition by earning 35 points. Only those riders who received a first or second place moved on to the National Semifinals. Pettigrew is a senior majoring in Marketing in the school of Business at Tiffin University and will be graduating in May of 2009. Pettigrew is a scholar 54

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Other members who qualified for Regional Competition in Western were: • Megan Bates, senior (Delta, Ohio) Beginner Horsemanship placed 5th ; • Elizabeth Buskey, sophomore (Rootstown, Ohio) Intermediate Horsemanship; • Melissa Cassidy, freshman (Fostoria, Ohio) Beginner Horsemanship placed 3rd.; • Alison Ditman, sophomore, (Winterhaven, Florida) Intermediate Horsemanship placed 6th ; • Amanda Hoile, sophomore (Dublin, Ohio) Beginner Horsemanship placed 4th ; • Trisha Hellein, sophomore,( Latrobe, Pennsylvania) Beginner Horsemanship placed 6th. The TU team placed 4th out of 8 teams in high points for the year. In first place was Ohio State University, 2nd place was a tie between Lake Erie College and Ohio University, 3rd place Oberlin College, 4th place Tiffin University, 5th place University of Akron and 6th place College of Wooster.

Regional Hunter Seat Competition Tiffin University also qualified three riders in the Regional Hunter Seat Competition. Riders needed to earn 35 points to compete. Elizabeth Buskey and Alison Ditman qualified in both the Western and Hunter Seat Regional Competition. Buskey competed in Walk Trot Canter and Ditman competed in Novice Flat, taking 6th place. Kaitlin Foster qualified in two divisions - Novice Flat and Intermediate Fences. She was unable to compete due to an injury sustained just prior to the competition. The Tiffin University Equestrian Hunter Seat Team took 4th place for year high points competing against 10 teams. First place, Ohio University, 2nd place Lake Erie College, 3rd place Ohio State University, 4th place Tiffin University, 5th place Oberlin College, and 6th place University of Akron.


and Earn Income Help TU Students As a nation of generous people and friends of Tiffin University, we all understand the importance of charitable endeavors in our society. As a result, many people support our goals and our academic programs. However, our natural instincts also tell us that we must first be concerned with our personal and family security before we consider being of financial assistance to Tiffin University. The Charitable Gift Annuity makes it possible for you to satisfy this dual objective of personal and family security and financial support of Tiffin University. Our Charitable Gift Annuity allows you to make an immediate gift to us without loss of income. In many instances, the gift annuity can actually increase your spendable income. In exchange for your gift of money, real property or securities, Tiffin University will pay you a certain specified annuity for life. The annual amount of annuity is fixed at the time of the gift, usually more than

typical dividends or interest and remains stable throughout your life. It will not fluctuate with the economy, so you will know exactly how much income you will receive. What’s more, you have no investment worries because the annuity payments are guaranteed until your death. Many TU alumni and friends are using this attractive program because it allows you to make a significant gift to the University and still get the equivalent of the income from the money as long as you or your spouse survive. The Charitable Gift Annuity at Tiffin University is highly flexible and very personalized to your needs. Please call Michael A. Grandillo, Vice President for Development and Public Affairs at 419.448.3282 or email mgrandil@tiffin.edu. A Tiffin University Charitable Gift Annuity can: ■ Increase your spendable income ■ Provide joint and survivor annuities and deferred gift annuities ■ Ease capital gain taxes

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