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Eastern Neck habitat for Eastern Neck National Wildlife refuge inhabitants. The refuge is also a hot spot for fishing, crabbing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, biking and picnicking in all seasons. Take the sunscreen, bug spray and water in the summer and you will be fine. And it’s all free. Fall is one of the most popular times to visit the refuge, which was established in 1962. In autumn the waterfowl population swells with the arrival of Atlantic Flyway migratory birds, including white Tundra swan, Canada geese, and a variety of ducks. The refuge protects and provides habitat for migratory birds on the flyway. According to Refuge specialists, peak concentrations of swans, geese, and diving and puddle ducks occur from November to January. Under a clearing baby blue sky filled with puffy cumulus clouds, we took a leisurely drive heading to the refuge. We traveled north on Route 301 after the Routes 50 and 301 split. Corn fields lined the road intermingled with giant, old oak trees and the sun was reflected off of striking green oak leaves. Though the oaks and pine trees were green, the corn was only as high as an elephant’s eye. The stalks were turning brown at the bottom, perhaps due to the dry, rainless weather. There was a slight breeze, though, enough to set the pines and oaks to gently swaying. 60

Profile for Tidewater Times

Tidewater Times September 2011  

September 2011 Tidewater Times

Tidewater Times September 2011  

September 2011 Tidewater Times