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Hookers and Crack a nd you w i l l s e e t he f i f te ent h century Ross Castle,” yet another abandoned stone castle. “For a remarkable view of Lower Lake, you will want to make your way up to the for tress.” But before walking on to the castle, he had directed us to stop about halfway across the bridge and look downstream to the left. “Peer through the branches that overhang the stream bank s and you w ill see, in a sma l l clea r ing, a g roup of hookers.” Hookers!?! In this incredibly beautiful park!?! “Yes, and they will be in bright, vibrant colors, ver y clean, and in an orderly line

awaiting the arrival of the morning clients.” John had alerted us in advance that we would not have time to take the hookers out this morning and that after taking a good look we shou ld move on to see the castle. A nd just as sure as John had described them, there t hey were – br ig ht blue, g reen and yellow w ith natural tr im – sterns in the water, bows on the bank, oars in their locks, angled up and ready for the firm grip of calloused hands. Oh, Golly! I am sorry – I forgot to mention – “hooker” is the Irish word for a sma l l wo o den f i shing boat originally designed for use on Galway Bay. Hookers are

The hookers of Killarney National Park 142

Tidewater Times August 2011  

August 2011 Tidewater Times

Tidewater Times August 2011  

August 2011 Tidewater Times