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Rolls-Royce

car. He used it to drive cross-country on Rolls-Royce rallies while jauntily wearing a leather aviator’s helmet and goggles. The subsequent owner, Phil Peterson of Worcester, Massachusetts, returned #2380 to its New England roots and poured lots of time, effort and even more money into fully restoring the mechanics of the car until it was, as he described it in a letter to a friend, “a cream puff.” Caribbean hotelier Nic Moller, who spilt his time between Curaçao and Ithaca, New York, bought the car from Peterson’s estate and drove it on a regular basis. He even had it shipped to Europe and drove in the 80-anniversary reenactment of the Great Alpine Rally of 1913. Moller

saved #2380 from being turned into a tank during a World War II scrap-metal drive. Fast-forward three decades: The curators at the Ford museum decided to concentrate their collection more on American-made cars and put a few European cars up for sale, including #2380. A Rolls-Royce collector bought it for $7,000 in 1968. He partly restored it and gave it back to the museum. Finally, in 1979, Millard Newman, a flamboyant Tampa, Florida, cigar manufacturer known by his fellow Rolls-Royce lovers as “Mr. Silver Ghost,” pried it loose from the museum again by swapping his 1927 LaSalle for the old touring

Cullen unwraps rebuilt engine parts. 38

Profile for Tidewater Times

October 2017 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times October 2017

October 2017 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times October 2017