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Bucket List Trip goats could be seen on the craggy peaks above. Buzzards and eagles glided high above the hills, riding thermals generated by cold Atlantic waters to the west. County Kerry in far southwestern Ireland is a rugged, mountainous land pounded by the wild Atlantic Ocean. Kerry has been inhabited for more than 5,000 years. Indeed, a 3,000-year-old stone ring fort and an even older brewery can be found on the Cloghvoola property. After our walk, we drove along narrow roads to learn the area and see Lough Currane in particular. This was not an easy task. The car path up from the paved one-lanewith-turnouts valley road ascended to Cloghvoola more than 1000 feet. This track, “road” being too generous a label, was composed of crushed stone and loose gravel. It

rose and fell sometimes at grades of 30 degrees. Oh yes, they drive on the left side in Ireland. This can be nerve wracking for an American, even riding as passenger. Lough Currane is about 5 miles long and 2,500 acres in area. It empties into a short eponymous river that runs into the ocean at Waterville. This lake is a non-tidal glacial remnant with holes as deep as 120 feet. Both wild Atlantic salmon and sea run brown trout swim and reproduce in its cold, clear, tea-colored water. These gamefish have been caught by sportsmen in a traditional manner for centuries. There is a rich literature about flies and tackle used when fishing Irish waters. The lodge had a complete library of such books. It was fun blending text with practice. Salmon don’t eat after entering fresh water; they spawn, then die. Fooling these creatures re-

Sixth century beehive monastic stone hut on Church Island in Lough Currane. 186

Profile for Tidewater Times

November 2014 ttimes web magazine  

November 2014 Tidewater Times

November 2014 ttimes web magazine  

November 2014 Tidewater Times