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He was approached by John D. Williams of Easton, and in 1931 he finally built another log canoe, his third. Williams wanted a log canoe primarily for cruising, so John B designed the biggest log canoe built to that time. He even fitted her with a handsome wine glass transom, like a yacht. When racing skipper Buck Richardson of Oxford heard that John B was back in the game, he came for a look. Conv inced that John B’s new canoe was going to be very fast, Richardson urged Williams to race her, offering to be her skipper and provide a crack crew. Williams agreed, and when the Jay Dee was launched, Richardson and his crew took her to the races ~ and blew away the competition. They won every race they entered that year.

Her fine lines, her efficient sailing rig, her waterline length of 35½ feet, and Richardson’s sailing skills made her unbeatable. Many in the racing community were determined to beat her, however, or at least to impose a handicap. Arthur J. Grymes decided to fight fire with fire. (Twelve years later he would build the Tidewater Inn.) Grymes asked John B to build a log canoe that could out-sail Jay Dee, challenging him to better his own design. And thus, in 1932, was born Flying Cloud. These ama zing boats c a r r ied clouds of canvas, running spinnakers right to the top of the foremast and even setting huge square-sails. The races between Flying Cloud and Jay Dee became the stuff of legend. This photo (of Flying Cloud and Jay

Flying Cloud and Jay Dee. 161

Profile for Tidewater Times

November 2014 ttimes web magazine  

November 2014 Tidewater Times

November 2014 ttimes web magazine  

November 2014 Tidewater Times