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Route 50

Bowdle Highley, who lived next to the bridge, opened Highley’s Beach for water sports which included beach umbrella rentals, concessions and even one ride ~ a slide down a sliding board into the muddy Choptank (sea net tles were optional). Still later, he opened Hi-Le Park for harness racing and a liquor store to cash in on all the thirsty traffic. Highley’s Beach, located on the skinny sands and usually placid waters of the Choptank, could not compete with the thundering surf and wide beaches at Ocean City, but his race track and liquor store were more popular. Since Dorchester County was dry as far as sales of alcohol were concerned, Highley’s liquor store had two names on its road sign: Last Chance Liquors for when you were heading into dry Cambridge and Dorchester County from wet Talbot County, and First Chance Liquors when you were coming back. He got you coming and going, as the phrase is and was in business for years. Highley, the son of a Methodist minister, knew how to cash in on people’s vices. Route 213 was the main road down the Shore to the beach then. It went f rom t he Bay fer r ies at Bet ter ton and Tolchester above Chestertown, then to Centreville, Wye Mills (at that time, the highway actually went under a huge branch of the Wye Oak), Easton on the old Wye Mills-Centreville road, then down Washington Street and left

opened 12 times for boat traffic. The jam of cars was a mixed blessing and a hint of things to come, and there wasn’t even a Route 50 there yet, as it was still years in the future. One Talbot County entrepreneur,

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Profile for Tidewater Times

Tidewater Times March 2019  

March 2019 Tidewater Times

Tidewater Times March 2019  

March 2019 Tidewater Times