Page 172

A Man and His Boats sketches for the yacht, as we know, and his multi-talented Captain Bezanson built a large detailed model of the vessel as imagined during Aloha’s winter layup at New London in 1908-09. While Clinton Crane was again the lead designer of the vessel, both Crane’s design firm, Tams, Lemoine & Crane, and the firm of A. Carey Smith & Ferris were involved. Nearly three years were spent planning before the building contract was placed, during which time six sets of plans were drawn (all by hand in those days), and six models were built. James was on top of the project the whole way.

The second Aloha.

Built of steel, Aloha would be the new f lagship of the New York Yacht Club. Rigged as a bark (a sailing ship, typically with three masts, in which the foremast and mainmast are square-rigged and the mizzenmast is rigged fore-and-aft), the yacht was 216 feet overall, 167 feet on the waterline, with a beam of 35 feet, 6 inches and a draught of 17 feet, 6 inches. Fully rigged, Aloha would weigh in at 659 tons. Her mainmast would just make it under the Brooklyn Bridge at mean high water (276.5 feet). Her lines were elegant. Her freeboard (distance from waterline to deck) was on the shallow side, giving a yacht of such size and tonnage an unusually racy look. The sweep of her sheer was subtle. Her overhangs fore and aft ~ 40 feet in total ~ were finely tapered. Her decks were teak, which was heavier but longer-lasting than the traditional pine. Noncorrosive white metal was used for deck gear and fittings instead of brass, which would have required constant polishing. Her service boats included steam launches of 30 and 21 feet, three lifeboats housed on a boat deck and launched by steam power, and a dinghy. Aloha would carry 20,000 square feet of sail, and make ten knots under the power of a 400-horsepower, tripleexpansion steam engine driving a feathering propeller (diesel power would replace steam in 1926). Below were six large staterooms

170

Profile for Tidewater Times

Tidewater Times March 2019  

March 2019 Tidewater Times

Tidewater Times March 2019  

March 2019 Tidewater Times