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Buckley’s Kayaking Quest

strength and drive to keep going.” When asked about preparing and packing, Buck ley said, “It takes finesse and experience to pack a 15-foot kayak for a four-month trip. Less is better. I knew what to take from previous hiking and kayaking trips. A solar panel on the kayak bow provided cell phone charging. Sometimes I mailed stuff back home that I didn’t need. Sometimes my support team of Rotarians, friends and family mailed me things, and sometimes I stayed at a hotel in a town or with Rotarians for a normal meal, a nice hot bath and comfortable bed, and to stretch my kayakcramped legs.” “We tend to take things for granted,” Buckley mused. “Hot and cold

were offset by camping on beautiful beaches, obser ving gorgeous sunrises and sunsets, landscapes, quaint towns, friendly Rotarians, and eagles soaring overhead. When I asked Buckley why he takes on these gr ueling ef for ts, he shared several ref lections. “It makes me feel so alive. It hurts so good. I like to confront challenges for my personal enrichment. I enjoy the outdoor scenery. I take life one day at a time. I especially enjoyed this trip, meeting Rotarians along the river, as well as schoolchildren, journalists, writers and artists, and working for a cause. Most everyone, especially Rotarians, gave me the

This was a typical campsite on the lower Mississippi below St. Louis, Missouri. It had white pristine sugary sandbars that rival the Caribbean. 54

March 2017 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times March 2017

March 2017 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times March 2017