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My First Building Boom From these sources, we knew what our fort needed. It had to be strong like the Alamo or hidden and inaccessible like Tarzan’s house. It should be provisioned in case it was besieged and have a secret exit in case of emergencies. After our first simple nests in the brush, we built a couple of stick forts that reminded us of the palisade forts of the English colonists. After that, we went underground. We began by digging a trench about 30 inches deep and 6 feet long. We covered the trench with an old door, then camouf laged the door with a layer of dirt and brush. To enter our fort, we excavated a narrow slit at the end of the door, through which we slipped inside, pulling some bushes over the opening to hide it. After careful consideration, we cut

a second opening at the other end to be used as a last, ditch escape route in case we were overwhelmed by our enemies. For light, we cut little shelves in the dirt walls where we put candles. One of the guys brought a loaf of bread and a canteen of water from home, and we had a grim mid-battle meal just like we’d seen in the movies. For a few days, we loved our strong, well-camouflaged for t, but the excitement quickly faded. Being confined in our dark little bunker limited our imaginations and our thirst for action. This shortcoming inspired the final and most ambitious phase of our fort-building summer. In one last, dramatic battle, we destroyed our underground fort and then immediately began plans for the gold standard of fort building: the tree fort. From a military standpoint, tree forts had two distinct advan-

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Profile for Tidewater Times

June 2018 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times June 2018

June 2018 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times June 2018