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Tidewater Gardening

effective for caterpillars in the early stages of growth. Keep an eye out for azalea lace bugs on your azaleas. These small white lacy-winged insects can be found on the undersides of the azalea leaves. They are a sucking insect whose feeding results in the stippling or speckling of the leaves, giving them a gray appearance. When you first notice the damage, spraying the undersides of the azalea leaves with a horticultural oil or soap spray is an effective method of control. For heavy infestations, a stronger insecticide like Malathion, Sevin, or Imidacloprid may be needed. Spring flowering shrubs such as azaleas, lilacs, deutzia, weigela, viburnum and forsythia should be

June. Each little “Christmas ornament” hanging on your cedar tree now contains between 200 and 1,000 eggs ready to hatch when the temperatures are correct. Bagworms are best controlled as soon as they hatch, as the older and bigger they are, the harder they are to control with insecticides. The best “organic” control method is to hand pick and destroy the bags before June 1. Treat the bags you can’t reach and remove with an insecticide. Early in the hatch, spraying the plant with Bt, or Bacillus thuringiensis, is the best control. Sold under the trade names of Dipel, Bt or Biotrol, this naturally occurring bacterium is

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Profile for Tidewater Times

June 2014 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times June 2014

June 2014 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times June 2014