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Mummies of Wye Mills for one or two later ones. Another theory is that he was one of the local gentry killed in a family feud, or other such fracas. But there is not proof of that, either. Since Fisk coffins were very expensive and normally used to transport corpses over long distances, it is unlikely one would have been used to encase someone who died locally, only a few miles from the cemetery, since not even the rich in these parts were known to have used expensive Fisk Metallic Burial Cases. It is most curious that whoever had the money to afford a Fisk would not also have put up a tomb-

The mummy case at Wye Mills was uncovered about four feet under the ground. Excavators estimated it weighed about 300 pounds. It was six feet long and 20 inches across at the chest. {photo by Hank Montgomery}

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stone. But there was no tombstone to be found. Nor did either coffin (if there are two) have a name plate, which is most unusual. So the mystery is not just who the 1970 mummy was, but who it was they found thirty-six years earlier. Conflicting descriptions seem to indicate that, as incredible as it seems, there may well be not one, but two rare and expensive Fisk Metallic Burial cases interred there: one for a man and the other for a woman. The one found in 1970 was in good condition and seemed not to have been opened or tam196

June 2014 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times June 2014

June 2014 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times June 2014