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‘Midst Shot & Shell

don’t go looking for them without permission). Speaking of Wye House, in the 18th century, Colonel Edward Lloyd III (1711-1770) ordered two small brass signal cannons from London for use on one or more of the three large schooners that he named for his children: the Eddie Lloyd, the Betsy Lloyd, and the Dickie Lloyd. He specified that they should give a thunderous report. Nothing but the best for Colonel Lloyd #3, so the craftsmanship of these cannons is impeccable. Two tiny leaping dolphins adorn the top of each barrel, and the cascabel (the knob at the back of the barrel) is a pineapple design. In the 18th century, the pineapple was a symbol of hospitality, wealth and power, as only the rich could afford them. The small-wheeled gun carriages are made of lignum vitae, a rare and exotic wood from the Caribbean. The wood is so dense it is nearly indestructible, with the result that the carriages are in virtually the same condition as the day they were made more than 250 years ago. The barrels are two feet long, have a one caliber or one-inch bore, and were loaded with gunpowder and a wad only, as they were used to signal port authorities when entering a harbor, and not intended to fire projectiles, although they probably could. Somehow t he Feds didn’t get

on the Miles River, when authorities came to confiscate two large cannon balls, big 12-inchers and mementos of the Mexican War, that he had mounted on his gateposts. Richard Tilghman tells the story that the soldiers were in the act of prying the cannon balls loose when Buchanan saw them from his window, threw on his uniform jacket, ran out and ordered the soldiers to stop, which they did when they saw the captain’s stripes on his sleeves. Buchanan resigned his commission in the U.S. Navy, joined the Confederacy and attained the rank of Admiral. Famously, he was captain of the C.S.S. Virginia (a.k.a. the Merrimack) during the battle w it h t he Monitor of f Ha mpton Roads, Virginia. A lthough the Admiral was on the wrong side of history about the Civil War, he had the last laugh. His cannon balls mark his grave at Wye House (which is private property, so

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Profile for Tidewater Times

July 2017 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times July 2017

July 2017 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times July 2017