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Smart Guys

shape in 1969, when Xerox Corporation purchased Scientific Data Systems. SDS’s chief scientist, Jack Goldman, submitted a proposal for an Advanced Scientific & Systems Laboratory to do research in computing and solid state physics. A little more than a year later, Xerox opened PARC more or less along the lines of Goldman’s proposal. In his book Dealers of Lightning – Xerox PARC and the Dawn of the Computer Age, Michael Hiltzik lists four factors that made PARC one of “the most unusual and prolific... and explosively creative... research centers in history: • Xerox’s money, a seemingly limitless cascade of cash f lowing from its near monopoly on the office copier [Xerox reported revenues of $500 million in 1965]. • A buyers’ market for high-caliber research talent [the Vietnam War and a recession were cutting into military and corporate research budgets]. • The state of computer technology [....never before or since would computer science be poised to take

“Intriguing” turned out to be a colossal understatement. At the time, Xerox PARC (Palo Alto Research Center) was arguably the best collection of technological minds ever gathered under one very large roof. It began taking

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Profile for Tidewater Times

July 2017 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times July 2017

July 2017 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times July 2017