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One Road to Take

mous portrait of her Norwich Terrier appears to be leaping out of the Bay waters.” Fearless, the Nautical Norwich Terrier became her “signature” image. In her photographs of the Bay area, Constance captured the tranquil charm of the rivers and creeks, watermen, historic houses, farmlands, regattas and wildlife. As a young English teacher at Washington College in 1979, Ed Maxcy was an “unpaid” house sitter at at King’s Prevention, Constance’s home outside Chestertown, for a few months while she was in South Africa to attend her retrospective exhibitions. He found boxes and boxes of photographs and prints and negatives throughout the house and in a little summer shed behind the house as he did his “job” seeing that all was well and her outdoor cat was fed and healthy. When Constance returned, Ed encouraged her to exhibit to celebrate the bicentennial of Washington College. Initially

on a waterfront farm not far from Chestertown, where Sterling devoted his attention to farming, boating and hunting. Constance celebrated the many splendors of the Chesapeake in her photography, but she also became absorbed in a new interest, dog breeding, and took hundreds of pictures of dogs. When Constance was awarded an honorary doctorate by Washington College in 1986 (where she had been a driving force behind improving the arts), Douglas Cater, the president of the college, said her photographs “leap out of their frames even as her fa-

Fearless, the Nautical Norwich Terrier, 1977. Photo courtesy of the Chesa-

peake Bay Maritime Museum.

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Profile for Tidewater Times

Tidewater Times  

January 2019

Tidewater Times  

January 2019