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A Tale to Tell

r Fo lity l i l Ca ilab a Av

and crab shanties. A year ago, the president famously called Tangier’s mayor and assured him the island’s future was secure. But assurances haven’t turned into money for rock, which Tangier’s 400–500 people need desperately to stave off erosion that could end t hem w it h i n a not her c ouple of decades. Still, their community is holding together better than those of Smith Island, and it’s clear that a lot of the younger crowd will try to remain islanders. Some of them have heard of Poplar Island: “It’s a good thing to do for wildlife … but $700 million there and nothing for us?” Faith in Trump, for whom most of Tangier voted, remains strong. But a woman who has worked long and hard for a Tangier seawall confessed she’d begun thinking something truly unthinkable: “I wish I was a Marylander … at least they are willing to spend to keep their islands there.” Reprinted with permission from the Bay Journal. Tom Horton has written about the Chesapeake Bay for more than 40 years, including eight books. He lives in Salisbury, where he is also a professor of Environmental Studies at Salisbury University. 32

Profile for Tidewater Times

Tidewater Times  

January 2019

Tidewater Times  

January 2019