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Casseroles mixture of meats, such as chicken or sweetbreads (the thymus and pancreas glands of animals. I reckon not many of us have them lying around, even in the back of the freezer). Around the 1870s, casseroles began to look like the meals we know and love today. In the 1950s, casserole cooking took center stage

It’s no secret that our busy schedules limit the amount of time we can spend in the kitchen. Some of us love to look in our pantries and be inspired by the ingredients we have on hand to concoct a great dinner. Others can open the same pantry and think ... HELP! One thing’s for sure ~ when there is a chill in the air, we all want a delicious meal that is not only hearty, but also easy to prepare. Throwing everything into a pot and calling it “dinner” is not a new idea. People have been cooking food in earthenware containers for thousands of years. The word casserole is a relatively new term: it comes from an early 18th century French phrase for “little saucepan.” The Brit-speak version of casserole is “bake.” And somewhere on the Internet, I read that our friends in Minnesota sometimes refer to a one-dish meal as “hotdish.” Early casserole recipes started with rice that was pounded, pressed, and filled with a savory

5th century B.C. earthenware pot. 65

Tidewater Times February 2013  

Tidewater Times February 2013

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