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Beastie Boys Rather than changing directions, it always seemed like the band was adding a new layer to their sound ~ making it richer, deeper, more complex ~ while maintaining their humor, erudition and ability to write songs that you sing over and over again in your head. “It never dawned on us to not make music that was inclusive of whatever influence came to us,” Diamond said in the NYT interview. “Thankfully we got to make records over a good period of time, because you’re not going to discover everything at any one time.” In my mid-20s, working as a line cook in the kitchen at Latitude 38, the Beastie Boys’ song Intergalactic was an anthem. It came on the radio frequently, and you could watch the entire kitchen, of different ages, from chef to dishwasher, bobbing and nodding their heads to the beat. It was during that same time

that we studied the poet T.S. Eliot in modern literature at Washington College. As we started to pull apart his poem The Waste Land, where he borrowed lines, thoughts and references from other, earlier writers, I immediately thought, “like the Beastie Boys.” Obviously, that’s chronologically backwards, but they taught me that concept first. And it put them in a literary tradition ~ they were working with and inside of a modern world landscape, where existing art was part of the palette. The book feels like their music. You pick up something new, or some nuance, anytime you flip through it or read another essay. You add something to the mix, another ingredient, maybe. Eliot famously wrote, “And the end of our exploring / Will be to arrive where we started / And know the place for the first time.” Let’s go back to the summer of 1989 and the album Paul’s Boutique. The album ends with a 12-minute opus called B-Boy Bouillabaisse, which has 70

Profile for Tidewater Times

Tidewater Times December 2018  

Tidewater Times December 2018