Page 170

Domination find some small thing that has been overlooked. Victor compares it to detectives revisiting the crime scene for the nth time, trying to find the hidden clue that will break the case. To review, the 470 is only a 16foot boat with a mast and three sails (including the spinnaker), a rudder and centerboard, two shrouds stretched over spreaders, a forestay, and a tangle of control lines. Everything must measure in to one-design parameters. Even so, when every millimeter counts, the combinations of trim are in the thousands. Add the constantly changing, subtle

dynamic positioning of two human bodies reacting to the two unstable mediums (wind and water) in which this sport is practiced, and the possibilities become infinite. After winning his gold medal in the Sydney Olympics, Tom King made the startling statement that he saw more room for improvement in his sailing than at any point prior to that. “The more time we spent training with Mathew and Malcolm,” King said, “the more opportunities we saw to be better at what we were doing. That was exciting. That’s why we spent so much time with them, because it’s not a static process of maintaining a level. It’s finding ways to be better

An Australian 470 team practicing in breaking conditions during a training camp off Gold Coast, Queensland. ©Victor Kovalenko 168

April 2018 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times April 2018

April 2018 ttimes web magazine  

Tidewater Times April 2018