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Western Tidewater

Living

Tale of the table

Service is the focus at Franklin native’s restaurant in downtown Suffolk

Ain’t no mountain high enough

Jane Barham scales Mount Kilimanjaro in honor of her parents

Catching up with ... Carol Bishop Barker

SUMMER 2013 • vol. 4, no. 2


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4 western tidewater living

Western Tidewater

Living

letter from the publisher

When Merle Monahan, our

that I hoped Merle could get Aunt Betty to reveal her

writer who does the cooking pro-

recipe for red velvet cake. It’s so good that even if you

files for both Western Tidewater

think I put Merle up to profiling Aunt Betty, if you fol-

Living and The Tidewater News,

low the recipe you’ll thank me for it after your first bite.

approached me about profiling

When I married Betty’s niece eleven years ago, she

Betty Sue Young for our summer

asked me if I wanted her to bake one to have for the

issue of WTL I had two immedi-

groom’s cake. Just how good was it? Eleven years later,

ate thoughts. The first was that

I can honestly say that Aunt Betty’s red velvet cake was

everyone who knows I call her Aunt Betty would think

easily the second best thing I said yes to that day.

I had something to do with having her profiled for the magazine, and accuse me of nepotism. The second was

Tony Clark Associate Publisher Tidewater Publications


western tidewater living

5

contents summer 2013

Cover photograph by O’Neal Studio of Photography/ Allyn Brown ON THE COVER: Franklin native Harper Bradshaw, the chef/ owner of Harper’s Table in Suffolk, holds up a ham at the bar.

Western Tidewater

Living

Tony Clark Associate Publisher

INSIDE THIS EDITION

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PARTY PIX

Western Tidewater is celebrating several milestone anniversaries this year. Who will you spot in our photos joining in the celebration?

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30 western tidewater living

Catching up with Carol Bishop Barker

Carol Bishop Barker (seated) with some of her staff when she was the editor of The Advertizer-Herald in Bamberg, S.C. Others from left are Sports Editor Winn Clary, Ad Rep Roxanne Breland and Ad Manager Cindy Kilgus. Photo from mid-80s. story by Lucy Wallace photos submitted

F

ranklin native and FHS graduate (Class of 1967) Carol Bishop Barker credits her English teacher, Elizabeth Evans, with her love for writing. Her long and storied career in the newspaper business began with a high school column in her hometown paper and has culminated in winning over 40 South Carolina Press Association awards. The daughter of Ruby, who worked at the Virginian Drug Store and Bracy’s Cleaners, and “Long” John, a construction worker, Bishop grew up on First Avenue, in a two story house on the corner. She started working at The Tidewater News in the summer of her junior

year, then moved on to feature writing that summer. She also honed her skills setting copy, doing layout and paste up work. Barker attended the Henry W. Grady School of Journalism at the University of Georgia because a good friend of her mother’s went there and recommended it. “It was a good choice to make. I had some excellent teachers.” She came back to Franklin and began working full time as a reporter with The Tidewater News, under then editor Dave Woodruff. She covered everything from council meetings to the courts and wrote a column called “Looking Out My Back Door”. The move further south took place when

she got married and ended up in Savannah. Her next journalistic stop was the Garden City News, a weekly, but didn’t stay there long because the owners were a married couple who bickered all the time. She and her ex-husband Jim then moved to Fairfax, SC and she worked with another weekly, The Allendale Citizen as editor. After six years, she

Lucy Wallace Managing Editor Stephen Cowles Contributing Writer Merle Monahan Contributing Writer Rex Alphin Columnist Ryan Outlaw Designer

HARPER’S TABLE

Franklin native, Harper Bradshaw along with Gary Whittington Jr. strive to put hospitality at the forefront.

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western tidewater living

where am I?

Loretta Lomax Editorial Assistant Mitzi Lusk Advertising Director Kate Archer Marketing Consultant Michaela Chesson Marketing Consultant Michelle Gray Office Manager Western Tidewater Living is published four times a year by Tidewater Publications, LLC P.O. Box 497, Franklin, VA 23851 757-562-3187 Advertising rates and information available upon request to ads@tidewaternews.com. Subscriptions are $20 annually in-state, $24 annually out of state and $30 annually overseas.

In each edition, our magazine staff provides a challenge of sorts for readers, testing how much of Western Tidewater you really know. We photograph a scene in Western Tidewater that is visible to motorists or pedestrians. Whoever can identify the location pictured above will be entered for a chance to win a $25 gift certificate to any one of our partner advertisers.

26

RACING TREASURED

Dan Fowler, recovering from totalling his racing bike for the first time in his 40 year career and his family’s love of racing motorcycles.

CLIMBING IN MEMORY

Jane Barham, doer of the impossible climbs Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa in honor and memory of her parents

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For the spring edition, Dan Fowler of Clay Street, Franklin won the gift certificate for correctly guessing the above photo of 204A North Main Street, Franklin, which is now occupied by Perfected Praise Worship Center. He was the only one who correctly identified the building.

So, if you know where this issue’s photo was taken, let us know. If you’re right, you could be a winner. E-mail your answers to magazine@tidewaternews.com

Tell us where our photographer took this photo and get a chance to win a gift certificate.

46

Summer scents ace north, toward the mountains, and take a moment to breathe. Do you feel it? The warm breeze moves around you, sweeping the grass with a faint aroma of honeysuckle. Nothing escapes the quiet summer night when the trees sleep; we are all hushed by the slight wind as it leaves pockets of stillness in its wake. Feel the sheen of a bright moon; it glimmers and reflects a translucent luminosity in the sky. Now turn and encounter the east, and see the dew glisten at dawn. It is fresh and clean as it hydrates everything it touches. Lie down and let the grass dampen your clothes ... Can you hear it? The sun is awakening with fierceness, calling forth the song of the crickets, the melody of the toads, and the tune of the morning dove. Amidst the sun’s splendor, there is a voice beckoning from the distance: the ocean is ringing. Listen as it re-

43

Go out and enjoy Western Tidewater!

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leases its salty air, like a bittersweet ribbon wrapped around your hair, face, and in your ears. Together the sounds mingle to create a chorus in the morning light. And the sweet sights as you face south! Shift and embrace not only the clover’s fragrance, but also the shade of green it reveals. Bees love to hover above its carpet as much as butterflies delight in the forsythia bush. Do you see the lavish color? Sunflowers reflect the afternoon’s golden hue, while dandelions and buttercups are eager to beautify our entryways and kitchen counters. Everywhere there are bits of pigment, waiting to be discovered. Notice the red of the cardinal flying

column by Leah Lewis photo by Rex Alphin

against the spotless, blue sky. Every scene is clothed in the long light and shadows of the day’s haziness. Finally, another rotation and you are enveloped in the fragrance of the west. Twilight is approaching, yet not as swiftly as the distant thunder. Can you smell the coming rain? It is on the move and accompanied by a fierce and impulsive storm – the kind that only this time of year can bring. It smells of heat and humidity. It is dense and fills your senses with a promise to refresh the land ... Breathe deep as the smell of rain has already begun to depart with the clouds. And now, as the descending sun becomes visible again, a creation explodes in the sky, and the sunset becomes a thing of grandeur before your eyes. Savor it, and be overwhelmed with the satisfying scent of summer.

Columnist Leah Lewis takes you on a tour of the savory and sweet scents of summer


6 western tidewater living

party pix Hunterdale Ruritan Beef Barbecue Left, Earl and Bill Blankenship of Franklin at the Hunterdale Ruritan Beef Barbecue on May 15 at the Bronco Club; Left middle, Erin Turner, from left with Laurie Phillips, Marianne Turner, Rita Ashby and Erin Phillips; left bottom, Renee Jones, left and Chris Bishop, right; below, Dick and Rita Rose; bottom, from left, Jesse and Donald Goodwin and Beverly Myers PHOTOS BY MITZI LUSK AND LUCY WALLACE


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8 western tidewater living

Ivor High School Annual Reunion Below, left, Barbara Holland from Florida and Bobby Stephenson from Ivor attend the Ivor High School Annual Reunion on June 22 at the Ivor Municipal Building which was once Ivor High School; below, right, from left to right, Huntus and Lemuel Duke and Audrey Butler. The Dukes are from Dinwiddie and Butler is from Suffolk. Bottom left, from left to right, Joy Winstead, Averett Tombes and Agnes Stephenson, all from Richmond. Bottom right, in front from left, Teri Gilliland and Huntus Duke, in back from left, Ethel Owens and Barbara Gilliland. Duke is from Dinwiddie, Ownes is from Suffolk and the Gillilands are from Fredrick, MD PHOTOS BY MERLE MONAHAN


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10 western tidewater living

Franklin Shag Club Spring Social Above, from left, Kenny Smith, Bobby Duck, and Amelia Spivey at the Franklin Shag Club Spring Social held upstairs at Fred’s Restaurant. Below, left, from left, Alice DeGraff and Tommy Ellis. Below, middle, from left, Jim Roberts and Pat Jordan. Below, right, Sandy Edwards

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western tidewater living

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party pix

Southampton Memorial Hospital 50th Anniversary Top left, Jean Barker, left, with Pam Darden, middle and Dr. Robert Edwards, right at the Southampton Memorial Hospital 50th Anniversary celebration on June 12 at the Southampton Memorial Hospital grounds. Middle left, from left, Edna King and Phil Wright II. Bottom, Dr. Sharada Bhandary, middle surrounded by hospital staff. PHOTOS BY STEPHEN COWLES


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Troop 17 100th Anniversary Left, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Cutchins with Tommy Morgan, right together at the 100th Anniversary celebration of Boy Scout Troop 17 on June 7 at the Paul D. Camp Community College Regional Workforce Development Center. Middle left, from left, Suzanne Carpenito, Dean Wagonback and Brenda Malik. Middle right, from left, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brubaker and Mr. and Mrs. Bill Scarboro. Bottom, from left, Ira Jean, Bill Witt, Joel Bradshaw and Matt Vercher PHOTOS BY DON BRIDGERS


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37th Annual Windsor Ruritan Club Pig Pickin’ Left, from left, Tammy and Philip McCormack of Chesapeake at the 37th Annual Windsor Rurirtan Club Pig Pickin’ held at Foster’s Pond in Windsor on May 8. Middle left, from left, James Dickens of Zuni and Larry Evans of Windsor. Middle right, from left, Billy Cones and Sid Buffkin, both of Suffolk. Bottom left, Billy and Mary Franz of Edenton, NC. Bottom right, Lonnie and Betty Bess of Suffolk PHOTOS BY STEPHEN COWLES


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Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Basketball Tournament Top, Frank Davis, left, Gabby Douglas, Olympian, middle and Almeta Davis, right at the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Tournament held at the Norfolk Scope Arena in March. Bottom, from left, Yvonne Rose, Traci Tate, Nina Rose and Larry Rose SUBMITTED BY FRANK DAVIS


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20 western tidewater living

story by Lucy Wallace photos by Andrew Faison and Mitzi Lusk

“You either have it or not. That’s the thread – the vein – that runs through here. It’s a culture,” Gary Whittington Jr | General manager of Harper’s Table


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Harper’s Hospitality story by Stephen H. Cowles photography by O’Neal Studio of Photography/ Allyn Brown

H

ospitality and the employees at Harper’s Table in downtown Suffolk are the most important ingredients to the restaurant’s success. That’s according to Franklin native Harper Bradshaw and Gary Whittington Jr., the chef/ owner and general manager, respectively. “We have pretty incredible people on staff, and we’ve been really fortunate,” said Bradshaw. “We hire on hospitality, not experience.” Whittington, who’s responsible for hiring, reiterated that last statement. He said he can always teach a new employee the details of their position, but not a commitment to service. That dedication has to come from within. “You either have it (hospitality) or not. That’s the thread – the vein – that runs through here. It’s a culture,” said Whittington. Speaking of which, that’s just the word Bradshaw, who calls Suffolk home, uses to describe how he came to the cooking profession. “My grandmothers and parents (Chuck and Betsy Bradshaw of Franklin) were great cooks. I grew up in a culture of food,” he said, adding that a great-grandfather on his father’s side had restaurants in Burkeville and Crewe. “I’ve always enjoyed cooking,” Brad-


22 western tidewater living

Gary Whittington Jr., general manager at Harper’s Table, with hostesses Octavia Gould, left, and Peyton Brown. Hospitality is the culture for all who work at the restaurant.

shaw said. “I guess you could say it’s in my blood.” He continued to learn the craft while working at the dining hall at James Madison University and then summers at restaurants in Nags Head, N.C. Later meeting the woman who would become his wife (Laura), and then having children (Connor and Taylor) required him, as he put it, “to get a real job.” Working at Todd Jurich’s Bistro in Norfolk around 2003-04 is where Bradshaw met Whittington, but they both got to know one another when each went over to The Vintage Tavern in northern Suffolk. Bradshaw said he moved up from sous chef to chef de cuisine, under the guid-

ance of Sam McGann, the executive chef, whom he describes as a mentor. “He let me come into my own,” said Bradshaw, who got to make the menus and staff decisions for the kitchen. Whittington, meanwhile, both served guests and assisted the general manager, later graduating to that position. As the GM at Harper’s Table, he said he does everything from A to Z: Hiring, hospitality, ordering products and training staff, for a few examples. “Management is not telling people what to do, but working side by side,” said Whittington, who will help take orders and clean tables when necessary. “If they don’t know what I know, then maybe I’ve failed

a little bit. I try to train every employee to exceed me.” For example, he works closely with Lauren Wilson, who regularly tends bar and serves guests in her area. “Learning wine is so much fun to me. Gary helps me a lot,” said Wilson, who also regularly stays current on both wine and cocktails through lots of research. “I just found out from a friend about a super awesome person – Harper – who was looking for a bartender, and thought I should apply,” she said about how she came to work there. “I was used to doing high volume bartending for awhile, but wanted something upscale.” At 15, Wilson began her first job work-


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Lauren Wilson, bartender at Harper’s Table, serves a drink to Eric Cobb of Suffolk. In back are Sue Woolley, left, who’s visiting from the Isle of Man, her daughter, Maeve Bristow (of Black Creek Workshop), and granddaughter, Ishbel Bristow, of Franklin. Benjamin Bristow built most of the woodwork, including booths, tables, chairs and the bar.

ing as a waitress at Chubby’s. When she became 21, then bartending was made available to her. Naturally, she bartended during her time at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, earning a degree in human services/ counseling in 2009. Asked if she’ll use that for work, Wilson said with a smile, “Of course. Isn’t that what bartenders are for?”

nnn Bradshaw had resigned once before, but McGann convinced him to stay, and suggested that he needed more of a plan. “I thought Vintage Tavern was going to be my home forever,” Bradshaw said. “But

I realized I was destined to create my own identity and decision.” With said plan in mind, he finally left in mid-July 2011 and got right to work. Having the good fortune to find some investments, Bradshaw looked around for a place to call his own, knowing already that he wasn’t going to locate in a shopping center strip. “I saw something here we could create,” Bradshaw said about discovering the venue that would become his restaurant in downtown Suffolk. He’s grateful now for his naïveté in how much labor would be required. A lot of installing, ripping and tearing were needed

to make the space usable. Among the rewards for all that labor was the discovery of the Coca-Cola sign painted on brick when the wall was exposed. Black Creek Workshop’s Maeve Bristow did the preservation work for what’s become the centerpiece. Her husband, Benjamin, created the bar, booths, tables and chairs, many of which use repurposed wood and steel.

nnn As owner, of course there’s more for Bradshaw to do than preparing the meals. “Cooking’s the easy part,” he said smiling. To bring the restaurant into reality, he sought out Whittington.


24 western tidewater living

“..and the food is so damn good.” Lew Carr

Stephen Kenney, one of the kitchen staff, adds finishing touches to dishes before sending them out. The quote comes from Lew Carr. He and his wife, Ann, who live in Suffolk, are regular guests at Harper’s Table.

“We have the same vision of hospitality and taking care of our guests,” Bradshaw said about hiring him. “We can do that anywhere.” That way of life, combined with obviously delicious food, has invited people in since July 31, 2012. The anniversary will be celebrated in the first week of August as a way to thank both loyal staff and guests. Among the many regular patrons are Lew and Ann Carr of Suffolk, who willingly testify to both the service and food. “I have nothing but good things to say about Harper’s Table,” said Lew, speaking for both of them. “My wife’s a vegetarian and it’s not easy to find restaurants that can accommodate her. Ann and I first became aware of Harper, the chef, when he was at Vintage Tavern. As is our custom, when I called for reservations I would be certain to mention Ann’s dietary preference. We never want to drop that tidbit on a chef unexpectedly. He was always accommodating and we quickly became ‘Harper fans.’” Bradshaw said he’s never served Ann the same thing twice, adding that he strives to be attentive to guests who are vegetarians or have food allergies. “We were fortunate to be among the invitees to Harper’s “soft opening” in late July of last year and have been regular diners at Harper’s Table ever since. Harper’s Table is so convenient, just five minutes away from where we live, and the food is so damn good,” Carr said laughing. He praised Whittington for the “hell of a job” he’s done in training the employees, and described them as professional, attentive, but never hovering, and not “chirpy.” Carr said, “It’s a wonderful addition to downtown Suffolk.” Harper’s Table, located at 122 N. Main St., Suffolk, opens at 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For more information, call 5392000 or visit www.harperstable.com.


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Western Tidewater

Living

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26 western tidewater living

D

an Fowler had not totaled a racing bike in the 40 plus years he’s been in the sport until this past Father’s Day weekend. Now he’s rebuilding his bike and his body, as he mends his various broken bones at his home outside of Courtland. Fowler has been racing bikes wince he was 18. “1972 was when I started going to the race track,” he recalled, “just local tracks having fun.” Ten years later he and his brother, John, got together and started the Fowler Racing team and by 1987 were going to the big national races. In 1987, 1988 and 1989 Dan won the Eastern Drag Racing Division Championship. In 1989, he won the Gator National on the professional circuit in Gainesville, Florida. Back in those days, the Fowler brother raced the nationally sanctioned asphalt tracks in Rockingham, Piedmont, Bristol, TN, New Atlanta Speedway, Atco, NJ and New England Dragway. They switched to dirt tracks in 1999. Now, Fowler, 58, is in the Top Fuel class, which as he says, “is the meanest class out there.” For this particular class of motorcycle racing, Fowler says there are no rules as far as engine size or tire size. “The only rule we have is there is no rule. Whatever you build, you bring it and run,” he laughed. Fowler assembles all of his bikes at his shop on Wakefield Road. While a company in New Jersey does the machine work, he does all of the assembly. Fowler’s brother, who lives just six miles away, was his partner in the racing team for years, but was injured in 2005 and walked away from competition. These days, Fowler’s sons, Daniel Jr. (Danny) and Roman (Roma) race with the team, making up the core of Fowler Racing.

A Need for Speed story and photos by Lucy Wallace


western tidewater living

photo by Stacy Collis

But it is a family affair, as Fowler’s grandsons Cameron and Blake; granddaughter, Haley; niece Trinity; nephew Austin and family friend Hunter Collis all compete under the Fowler Racing umbrella. The class they race in depends on the engine size. Danny races in the Big Block 500 Class and Roma runs in the Open Class. Danny’s sons Cameron and Blake both run in the 50 class and Cameron also does the 80. Niece Trinity runs the 50 class and Nephew Austin runs the 100 class. Granddaughter Haley also runs in the 50 class, as does Hunter Collis, son of webmaster and Facebook administrator Stacy Collis. The bike Fowler wrecked June 15 has a 1500 cc motor, which produces 325 horsepower. He uses nitrous oxide applied off the throttle, which gives the bike a boost. “It will jump it to almost 500 HP,” he stressed, “but I haven’t found a track that can hold that yet.” He says he switched to dirt tracks because asphalt tracks got boring. “On dirt, if you don’t have the knowledge on how to ride, you lose. The dirt always changes.”

The main track he races on is at Slade’s Park in Surry. It is a 380- foot track and the fastest time there is 4.19 seconds. “A lot of people don’t understand – you are going from a dead stand still to the end of the track,” Fowler explained. The starting green light gives the signal and the race begins and often ends in a photo finish. The class Fowler competes in now, Top Fuel, is the extreme end of the sport’s spectrum. He was competing at Blair-Bedford Track in Pennsylvania when he wrecked. “When I hit the brakes, the front brakes didn’t activate. I het them three times before they applied and by then I was in the danger zone,” he explained. “There was no where to stop.” He reaches speeds of up to 150 miles per hour and was probably going about 60 mph when he crashed. Having attended drag racing school in Florida, Fowler knew that he had to make a split second decision. “I knew I wasn’t going to hit head on so I slid it (the bike) sideways into the barrier.” He is now recovering from a cracked ankle and pelvis, four cracked ribs, a

cracked bone in his back, bruised kidneys and spleen and a concussion. He was very fortunate and was protected by all of the safety gear he had on. Asked if he was going to retire after being so badly banged up, he shook his head no. “I love the game – it was my fault I wrecked. And I always look for a safe buffer zone just in case something doesn’t work out right.” He said dirt tracks are violent and will bounce the bike around such that things go wrong, as in this instance. “It (the track) opened the brake pads up too wide.” He said, “If I get to the point where I can’t react, I’ll look at getting out.” “I enjoy it. Racing is what I do.” Besides Surry and Pennsylvania, the team also races in Tappahannock and Elizabeth City. A new track is opening in Fredericksburg and he was supposed to go June 22, but he’s still recovering. “It’s a great sport and there are good people in it. Everybody helps each other. It’s a big family out there at dirt drags. I must have had 150 phone calls since the wreck.” Any money made for winning races,

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goes back into the business. Trophies from wins over the years line one side of the workshop but now Fowler says his team requests that the trophies be given to young people, spectators who can boast of having been given a “Big Daddy” Fowler trophy. He urges caution and safety gear for all young people who get on dirt bikes. He was wearing a leather suit, chest protection, boots, knee protection and a helmet when he wrecked. “If I hadn’t had that on, I would have been in trou-

ble. Kid’s please wear your gear – it can happen in a heartbeat.” Fowler and his wife, Janet, also have a firewood business, Double F Firewood. The native of Southampton County says his family is everything to him and there is always something going on out behind his house, from playing baseball to racing bikes. He’s been racing the same motorcycle in his trademark rainbow colors since 1982; he’s just modified it to race on dirt tracks. Fowler’s love of the sport

shows when he talks about it. He gets very animated. Even though he was in obvious pain, he joked about the extreme rush he gets from racing. In the Top Fuel Class, he says he has crossed from insanity to lunatic. But continues to enjoy the challenge and the fun of the race. For more about Fowler Racing visit their website at www.fowlerdragracing. com or their Facebook page at www. facebook.com/fowlerdragracing


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Carol Bishop Barker (seated) with some of her staff when she was the editor of The Advertizer-Herald in Bamberg, S.C. Others from left are Sports Editor Winn Clary, Ad Rep Roxanne Breland and Ad Manager Cindy Kilgus. Photo from mid-80s. story by Lucy Wallace photos submitted

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ranklin native and FHS graduate (Class of 1967) Carol Bishop Barker credits her English teacher, Elizabeth Evans, with her love for writing. Her long and storied career in the newspaper business began with a high school column in her hometown paper and has culminated in winning over 40 South Carolina Press Association awards. The daughter of Ruby, who worked at the Virginian Drug Store and Bracy’s Cleaners, and “Long” John, a construction worker, Bishop grew up on First Avenue, in a two story house on the corner. She started working at The Tidewater News in the summer of her junior

year, then moved on to feature writing that summer. She also honed her skills setting copy, doing layout and paste up work. Barker attended the Henry W. Grady School of Journalism at the University of Georgia because a good friend of her mother’s went there and recommended it. “It was a good choice to make. I had some excellent teachers.” She came back to Franklin and began working full time as a reporter with The Tidewater News, under then editor Dave Woodruff. She covered everything from council meetings to the courts and wrote a column called “Looking Out My Back Door”. The move further south took place when

she got married and ended up in Savannah. Her next journalistic stop was the Garden City News, a weekly, but didn’t stay there long because the owners were a married couple who bickered all the time. She and her ex-husband Jim then moved to Fairfax, SC and she worked with another weekly, The Allendale Citizen as editor. After six years, she


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was approached to help start a new paper and she began working with The Allendale County News Leader. This all took place during a point in her life when she’d suffered a horseback accident breaking both wrists and crushing vertebrae in her back. Moving on, Barker went to a bigger paper in Bamberg, SC, as editor where

she stayed for 13 years. “That’s where I got my wings. I was operating my own dark room and did most of the news. They (the owners Carl and Betty Kilgus) gave me a lot of freedom to do what I wanted to do. I had fun. We had 30-page papers sometimes – which for a weekly is unheard of.” She continued, “I did layout and

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paste up – I did news and sports. We published on Wednesday and I would work all night on Tuesdays and slept in a recliner in my office.” “It gave me the time to concentrate and do the bet job with layout. We won a lot of wards back then from the press association. I was very proud of that paper.” Once the owner’s decided to sell The Advertizer-Herald, she moved over to work with editor Lee Harter at The Times and Democrat in Orangeburg, where she has remained for the past 17 years and is currently regional editor. “I have never regretted it,” she stressed. Barker was instrumental in coordinating a correspondence network of amateur reporters, which she said was a “wonderful system” and is still going strong today. Remembering her days at FHS, Barker, now 64, was on the girl’s basketball team and a member of the library club. “I remember running laps in the old gym. I loved my years of playing basketball. We were undefeated my senior year.” English teacher Evans encouraged Barker to write. “She told me to pursue a writing career. At an early age I started it and have never regretted it.” In closing she said that while she worries about the newspaper industry surviving in the digital age, she believes newspapers will survive in some form. “I’ve been able to excel in what I chose to do in my life.” And that’s saying something. She has a few health problems now, but keeps in touch with old friends through Facebook and spends time with her two dogs, a Pekinese and a Beagle, at her Lexington, SC, home.


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From Barter, To Buffer, To Be H

istory is being talked about in new ways in Western Tidewater by an increasing number of visitors making their way to tiny Capron, Virginia. A permanent exhibit developed for the Nottoway Tribe of Virginia Community House and Interpretive Center was supported with a recent Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (VFH) grant to the Virginia Nottoway Indian Circle & Square Foundation. According to Nottoway chief Lynnette Alston, visitors to the Center have more than doubled since the permanent exhibit opened last year, with

figures climbing well above the 2,000 mark. “Organizations and clubs are holding their business meetings here and then view the exhibit,” notes Allston. “We have groups of educators coming, social studies teachers looking for ways to incorporate new connections to the Standards of Learning. We had an international group of theological educators. One fellow was from Australia, others were from Missouri and Ohio. They are coming to learn about the history of Virginia.” “What we’re finding is they go to visit Jamestown and then they come to us,

story by Jeanne Nicholson Siler photos by Vincent Shilling

even though we are an hour’s drive [from there],” she adds. “I believe they are especially interested in an exhibit that is operated by a Virginia Indian tribe. And, we offer them a chance to have a discussion about history.” Tours at the center are always accompanied by an interpretive guide. The center is housed in a building that is more than a century old and was once a Masonic hall. It opened in November 2011. The steadily increasing flow of visitors is fulfilling the early hopes of tribal and community leaders, who envisioned the center as both an educational landmark and a conven-


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Nottoway chief Lynnette Alston touring visitors around the Nottoway Tribe of Virginia Community House and Interpretive Center.

ing place, capable of stimulating tourism and economic activity in this rural Southside Virginia region. VFH grants director David Bearinger sees the exhibit as “addressing one of our core VFH interests—in Virginia Indian history and tribal cultures in the present day. It also takes place within and will directly benefit the Western Tidewater region where we are working to develop a stronger presence.” When the permanent exhibit was unveiled on May 5, 2012, more than 600 local residents and visitors from around the state met, conversed, and viewed the exhibits on the lower floor of the two-

story building and under tents outside. They studied storyboards and artifacts that together address pivotal points in Nottoway Indian history, including cultural heritage traditions such as hunting and fishing, agricultural practices, cosmology, and oral storytelling. Titled Nottoway Indian History: From Barter … To Buffer … To Be, the exhibit’s storyline is divided into three parts. “From Barter” explains the interaction of the Nottoway with other tribes before and after colonization. “To Buffer” discusses the impact of the actions of the Nottoway and Virginia’s colonial

government during the growth of Virginia. “To Be” addresses the evolution of the Nottoway as citizens of Virginia. The Nottoway are an Iroquoianspeaking tribe whose ancestral home is within the region served by the VFH’s Western Tidewater Regional Council— mainly in what is now Southampton County. Two branches of the Nottoway were formally recognized by the Commonwealth of Virginia in 2010, the Nottoway of Virginia being the larger of the two. Both are descended from Iroquoian-speaking peoples—as opposed to the Algonquian-speaking tribes of the Powhatan paramount chiefdom and


34 western tidewater living its tributaries to the north and east, and the Siouan-speaking Monacan, who are native to the Blue Ridge. Speaking at the exhibit opening last May, Capron mayor Nick Kitchens said, “We have a new gateway to our town that expresses the sentiment of inclusion and offers an educational opportunity to all who visit.” Programs at the Center include classes on beading, native shawl making, quilting, and flute making, as well as community “Let’s Talk” sessions on a broad range of topics. These informal discussion sessions may run as long as two hours, with lots of questions and answers. “We are very intimate,” says Allston. “We rarely have more than twenty or twenty-five in our programs, and sometimes the discussions can get very opinionated.” History can seem sterile, but when we talk about it, we give it life. – Nottoway chief Lynnette Alston “History can seem sterile,” she explains, but “when we talk about it, we give it life. Just last Tuesday, the Drewryville Woman’s Club came for a program. They told us, ‘We live right here and this is a whole part of history that we don’t know about.’” The Nottoway Indian Tribe of Virginia Community House and Interpretive Center is open to the general public, free of charge, each Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and by appointment during the week. The center is staffed entirely by community and tribal volunteers.

“History can seem sterile, but when we talk about it, we give it life. Lynnette Alston | Nottoway chief


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 Enjoy a summer afternoon sipping tea and delighting on a tasty meal or try a sip of our delicious flavored iced teas at Pam’s Tea Room. Our patio section is open and makes the perfect spot for summer lunches.

Pam’s Tea Room • 757-516-6400 107 E. Third Ave. Need a caterer? Call Dot’s Kitchen at 757-562-4434


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Cooking is second nature story and photos by Merle Monahan

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etty Sue Lowe Young said she learned when she was growing up that it was not unusual for people visiting her family to stay for a meal. So being the oldest girl, it was her duty to help her mother in the kitchen. “My parents were very hospitable,” she said with a smile. “Folks would be sitting around talking and when it got to be mealtime, Daddy would say, ‘Y’all are going to stay to eat, aren’t you?’ Then Mama would get up and head for the kitchen.” “I can’t blame our visitors, though,” she added with a grin. “Everybody around our neighborhood knew how good a cook mama was.” “Naturally, I learned everything I know about cooking from her,” Young went on. And, she said, her learning experience didn’t start in the kitchen. ”When I was just old enough to tag along after her, we’d go out to the garden. I knew that much of what we ate first had to come from the garden, especially during the summer time.” “Then it had to be prepared—butter beans had to be shelled, or potatoes had to be peeled before they could be cooked, for instance. Mama insisted that I help, though, and I just learned by helping.” “Actually, Mama seemed to have a knack for cooking,” Young added. “She could turn out the best meals in no time. She didn’t have to follow a recipe; she just seemed to know what to do. I just hope I’m half as good as she was.” Although Young says she still cooks, including can-


western tidewater living ning, putting up jams, pickling and freezing, the way her mother did, she has veered off a little from the basics. “I do use a recipe and I love to try new things, especially for festive occasions like Christmas and the Fourth of July. Now that I’m retired”—Young worked 23 years for Bank of America in Franklin—“I can spend a lot more time in my kitchen.” The oldest of the four daughters of J. B. and Beck Lowe, Young is one of five children. She was born and grew up on a farm just outside of Berlin. Cooking for a large number of people is just “second nature,” she said. She admits, however, that she loves it and it’s a good thing she does. For the Lowe family children and their families, aside from the holidays when they all get together, every single relative -- grandchild, niece, nephew, cousin, brother, sister, brother and sister-inlaw -- gets a birthday party. “And we don’t serve just cake,” Young says. “More often than not, we start with a meal.” “The birthday girl or boy, of course, usually gets to invite friends, so that group is varied. But when all the Lowes get together,” Young said, “there are about 35 of us.”

A big part of the crowd is the family of the active grandmother and her husband, Walter Luther, Jr., who have four children and eight grandchildren. She laughed and added that just her immediate family alone, can fill up a good part of the birthday calendar. It goes without saying that Young and her siblings are close. “We were brought up to respect and love each other and we do. That’s one reason we have so many family get-togethers. “When one of these ‘occasions’ rolls around, the sisters talk it over, plan the menu and each cooks different dishes so they don’t double up.” Young laughs as she remembers what someone once said about her family, “This person remarked that, ‘You don’t pick a fight with anyone in that family unless you want to fight the whole clan’.” Young, of course, considers herself lucky to have such a close family. A real farm girl, she left her parents’ home and moved with her new husband to his farm off Delaware Road near Franklin. After more than 50 years, they’re still there. What’s more, all four of the Young’s chil-

dren and their families live within a mile of the Young farm, which delights the elder Youngs to no end. “We get to see them all the time,” Young said with a big smile. “In fact, my grandchildren often get off the school bus here and you know they’re hungry.” “I always have a snack waiting for them,” she added.

Strawberry Pretzel Salad

BETTY SUE LOWE YOUNG’S RECIPES RED VELVET LAYER CAKE Ingredients: ½ cup lard 1 ½ cups sugar 2 eggs 2 oz red food color 2 oz water 2 Tbls coco 1 cup buttermilk 1 tsp vanilla 1 tsp salt 1 tsp vinegar 1 tsp soda 2 ½ cups plain flour Directions:

Cream lard and sugar, add eggs. Make paste of food color, water and coco and add to egg mixture. Add one at a time the buttermilk, vanilla, salt, vinegar, soda and flour and mix well. Bake in greased pans two to three layers at 350 degrees until wooden pick comes out clean. Frosting Ingredients: 1 ½ cups sugar 1 ½ cups softened butter 1 ½ cups warm milk 6 Tbls plain flour Directions: Mix warm milk with flour ( Mix flour with small amount of water until there are no lumps before adding to

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milk) Whisk until thickened. Place in refrigerator until completely cooled. (overnight is good) Beat into cooled milk mixture sugar and butter, about 3 to 5 minutes. Frost cake. STRAWBERRY PRETZEL SALAD Ingredients: 1 ½ sticks margarine 3 Tbls sugar 2 ½ cups crushed pretzels 8 oz softened cream cheese ½ cup sugar 8 oz non-dairy whipped topping 1 (6 oz) pkg. strawberry gelatin 20 oz frozen strawberries


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Betty Sue Young cutting a slice of her famous red velvet cake.

Directions: Crush pretzels, 3 Tbls sugar and 1 ½ sticks margarine in food processor. Press into 9x13-in-pan and bake at 375 degrees for 15 minutes. Cool. Beat together cream cheese, ½ cup sugar and whipped topping and pour over crust. Disolve gelatin in 2 cups boiling water, add strawberries and mix well. Pour over cream cheese mixture and refrigerate. TOMATO BACON TARTS Ingredients: 8 slices of bacon or real bacon bits ½ small onion, chopped

½ cup mayonnaise 1 or 2 small tomatoes, cut into small pieces 3 oz Swiss cheese, chopped 1 tsp basil 1 (10 oz) pkg large refrigerated biscuits. Directions: Cut each biscuit in fourths and press one piece into each small muffin space. Mix all ingredients except tomatoes. Top each muffin with a small amount of mixture, then top muffin mixture with a piece of tomato. Bake at 375 degrees for 11 minutes.

ASPARAGUS BERNARD Ingredients: 1 pound fresh asparagus, sliced on the bias 3 Tbls soy sauce 1 tsp sugar 1 tsp white vinegar 2 Tbls corn oil 1 tsp salt Directions: Mix all ingredients except asparagus. Set aside. Bring water to boil in large pot. Add asparagus. Boil one minute or slightly longer. Drain and cool with ice to stop cooking. Dry Asparagus, add sauce and chill.


Dr. Siddharth “Sid” Bhende

Comprehensive Vascular Care. Sentara Obici Hospital provides expert diagnosis and treatment of blockages, clots and other disorders of the veins and arteries.

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or Western Tidewater residents, Sentara Vascular Specialists provide convenient access to leading-edge vascular care. Our vascular specialists offer state-of-the-art diagnosis and treatment of blockages, clots, abnormal narrowing, and other disorders of the veins and arteries. Dr. Siddharth Bhende, a board-certified, fellowship-trained vascular surgeon with Sentara Vascular Specialists, has expertise in the latest minimally invasive techniques and access to the most recent clinical trials and research. To make an appointment, call (757) 226-9186.

Sentara Vascular Specialists provide: • Advanced vascular testing • Treatments for blockages, clots, and abnormal narrowing of the veins and arteries • Amputation prevention and rehabilitation • Aortic aneurysms repair • Vein access for dialysis and chemotherapy

Sentara Vascular Specialists | 2790 Godwin Boulevard, Suite 320, Suffolk, (757) 226-9186 SentaraVascularSpecialists.com

Your community, not-for-profit health partner


40 western tidewater living

On Top of the World story by Merle Monahan photos submitted

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Holding up photos of her late parents, who motivated her mountain climb, Jane Barham stands at the summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro.

on’t tell Jane Barham that she doesn’t have what it takes to get a job done. She’ll prove you wrong every time. The fitness enthusiast, who works as a physical therapist, has more “impossible” feats to her credit than most women and some men; her latest being a trek of more than a week up Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzinia, Africa, after which, she took off on a three-day safari. “Climbing the mountain was a tough journey,” Barham said of the nineday trek. “Kilimanjaro is the highest (19,340 feet) free-standing mountain in the world and climbing it takes a lot of stamina, but I try to keep in shape.” The slender, 5-ft-10-inch athlete does indeed keep in shape. She has her own gym, outfitted with every conceivable piece of weight-training equipment, including a tread-wall for climbing. She tries to train every day, although she says she sometimes doesn’t have time. She does improvise, however. She tells a story about a conversation she had with her father, Ira “Pete” Barham, who sadly passed away last year. She was showing her dad some of the work she’d done in her home, which she built almost single-handedly, when he asked why she had a heavy rope


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hanging from her upstairs ceiling to the downstairs. She recalls that she told him she climbs and descends the rope for exercise while she is working. She said he looked up, then down and finally said, “Baby, don’t you think you’re being a little hard on yourself?” But getting back to the house, Barham said she, with just a little help, built her house out of heart pine salvaged from seven old houses on the Barham property. This feat took a while, she said, but it is exactly what she wants. It is filled with photos and memorabilia of her ancestors, as well as furniture, including a woodburning cook stove that she uses all the time and her grandmother’s bed. An artist who studied at Virginia Commonwealth University, she designed a cathedral window enclosed with pieces of heavy slate for her bedroom. As for her other building abilities, Barham also rebuilt a barn, which belonged to her grandmother. Located on her property, she designed decorative hinges and

had them made for the barn doors. About one-half of the Inside of the barn is where she maintains her gym. Her trip to Africa came about, she said, when she just happened to run across the information on the internet. “I was missing my Dad,” she said, “and thought that climbing the mountain would be a fitting tribute to his and my Mom’s memory.” Barham said she contacted the Tusker Trails Agency, which gave her all the information she needed, like how to manage transportation to Africa, what gear to buy for the climb Here Jane Barham of Capron suits up for a recent skydive adventure, just one of the many activities she has done recently.

and other necessities. She left the airport in Richmond the fourth week in January and after two layovers, landed in Tanzinia just a few days

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42 western tidewater living before the climb was scheduled to start. “There were seven climbers, plus two guides, in our group,” she said. “Then there were porters who traveled ahead of us to set up tents, including a dining tent and a restroom tent.” “We started our climb on January 24 and seven days later, reached the summit. I had taken pictures of my parents with me and the first thing I did when we reached the summit, was to take out their pictures and say, ‘I did it Dad!’” “I can’t tell you how exhilarated, as well as emotional, I felt. Mom and Dad had been with me in spirit all the way.” Barham added that there is a trait that runs through the Barham family. “We don’t give up. I knew I would make it even before we started.”

She said the climb was a little more difficult than she expected. “You go through several climate changes,” she said, “and we caught some of the worst weather.” “We had sleet, snow, and a cold rain.” “I remember leaving my tent to use the bathroom tent one night and the snow was so heavy, the bathroom tent had collapsed.” Although the trip was hard physically, Barham said of course she’d do it again. “We made the trek down the mountain in two days,” she went on. “We reached our base on February 1.”

Barham said she wasn’t through with the trip when the climb ended, however. “I decided it would be foolish to travel all the way to Africa and not experience a safari, so I did.” “I had my own jeep and my own driver. We went out to the Maasai country for three days. It was awesome to see all the animals up close.” Barham admits that she is somewhat of a risk taker, although she doesn’t call it that. “I always believe I can complete what I start and sometimes I do take on some dangerous endeavors,” she said. “Just a couple months ago, for instance, I went skydiving.” “I came away unscathed,” she said with a grin.


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where am I? In each edition, our magazine staff provides a challenge of sorts for readers, testing how much of Western Tidewater you really know. We photograph a scene in Western Tidewater that is visible to motorists or pedestrians. Whoever can identify the location pictured above will be entered for a chance to win a $25 gift certificate to any one of our partner advertisers.

For the spring edition, Dan Fowler of Clay Street, Franklin won the gift certificate for correctly guessing the above photo of 204A North Main Street, Franklin, which is now occupied by Perfected Praise Worship Center. He was the only one who correctly identified the building.

So, if you know where this issue’s photo was taken, let us know. If you’re right, you could be a winner. E-mail your answers to magazine@tidewaternews.com Go out and enjoy Western Tidewater!

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44 western tidewater living at Sedley Baptist Church on Johnsons Mill Road. All Veterans and their families are invited.  The program will feature patriotic music, Joe Winn will talk about experience on Navy submarine, light refreshments and group photo.  The event is sponsored by GFWC Sedley Woman’s Club.

what to do

7/27-8/31—SOUTHERN CULTURE PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW Location: Rawls Museum Arts, 22376 Linden St., Courtland Featuring Jeffrey Allison, Glen McClure, Brenda Wright and Leeta Harding, Main Gallery. Southern Sites photography Show, Francis Gallery.

FLORIDA-GEORGIA LINE

CALENDAR OF EVENTS THROUGH 7/11—EMERGING 2013, Rawls Juried Art Exhibition Location: Rawls Museum Arts, 22376 Linden St., Courtland Juror Jessica Sims– Main Gallery 7/11-9/26—‘WE BE JAMMIN’ SUMMER CONCERT SERIES Location: Barrett’s Landing at 300 S. Main St. in downtown Franklin. Enjoy live music from local and regional bands and refreshments from 6 to 10 p.m. every Thursday. Visit www.webejammin.com for details.

will be available on the Duke Street parking lot, which is accessible from Court Street to A Street to Duke. 7/4—VETERANS RECOGNITION PROGRAM Location: Sedley Baptist Church The special Veterans Recognition Program will begin at 10 a.m., July 4th

7/26-7/28—FHS CLASS OF 1993 20 YEAR REUNION Location: Franklin The Franklin High School’s Class of 1993 20-year Reunion is planned for July 26 through July 28. The two-day event includes a Friday-night fellowship at Fred’s Restaurant, a Saturday family cookout at the Franklin YMCA and a Saturday night dinner/dance at the American Legion building, Armory Drive, Franklin. For further information and payment details contact Okema Harper Bowers at (757 582-7282. 7/31-8/3—NORTH CAROLINA WATERMELON FESTIVAL Location: Murfreesboro

JULY-DECEMBER—FRANKLIN FARMERS’ MARKET Location: 210 S. Main St. next to Franklin Depot/Visitor Center. Hours are 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Saturday. 7/4—FOURTH OF JULY EVENT Location: Windsor The Town of Windsor will celebrate its annual Fourth of July Celebration at 5 p.m. Activities include music by Island Boy, an antique car show, children’s inflatables, a parade, a corn hole competition, dinner and fireworks. Church Street will be closed from the intersection at Rout 460 until 8 p.m. Handicap parking

WINDSOR FOURTH OF JULY


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This year’s theme is The NC Watermelon Festival Takes Flight, celebrating Murfreesboro’s link to early aviation. Activities include a variety of entertainment, arts and crafts, food, a 5K Race/Walk, rides and games. Featured bands include Steve Owens and the Summertime Bank July 31, The Emily Minor Band Aug. 1, Moonshine Bank (afternoon) and North Tower Band Aug. 2 and Pizazz Aug. 3. For further information call (252) 398-7695. 8/14-8/17—FRANKLINSOUTHAMPTON COUNTY FAIR Location: Fairgrounds at Route 58 and New Market Road in Courtland. Enjoy great local and special foods, home arts, exhibits, crafts, livestock shows, midway rides, ATV mud bog, corn hole tournament, talent shows, and pageants. Entertainment includes award winning artists Florida Georgia Line Friday, Aug. 16 and 7 Bridges, Sat. Aug. 17. For information, call 562-3765. 9/1—ALL YOU CAN EAT SEAFOOD FEST Location: Heritage Park, Windsor The Isle of Wight County Fair annual kickoff will be held from 5-9 p.m. Tickets are $25 and should be purchased in advance. Call (757) 357-2291 for more. 9/12-9/15—ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY FAIR Location: Joel C. Bradshaw Fairgrounds, Heritage Park, Windsor

7 Bridges

This year’s Fair celebrates 20 years of Agricultural Heritage and Family Fun. Featured entertainment will include Horses Horses Horses!, a performing horse how for all ages; the King BMX Stunt Show; and the Zerbini Family Circus. Main Stage Entertainment will feature Country Stars Chris Cagle on Friday, Joe Nichols on Saturday and The Farm on Sunday. For further information call (757) 357-2291.

COLLEGE 10TH ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT Location: Cypress Creek Golfer’s Club, Smithfield 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. - Registration 12:30 p.m.  - Shotgun Start 5:00 p.m.  (approximately)  - Dinner *Rain date:  Thursday,  Sept. 26, 2013 For more information call  (757) 569-6791. The event is held to raise funds for student scholarships and educational support.

9/13—PAUL D. CAMP COMMUNITY 9/14—HERITAGE DAY FESTIVAL Location: Southampton Agriculture & forestry museum & Heritage Village, Heritage Lane, Courtland. Hundreds of visitors will help celebrate Southampton County’s rich cultural heritage from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Attractions include local arts and crafts, entertainment, food and fun. New vendors are expected this year. For information, call 653-9554. 9/20-11/11—JESSICA SIMS, Maybe This Time Art Exhibition, Main Gallery. Location: Rawls Museum Arts, 22376 Linden St., Courtland Winner of the 2012 Juried Show Wet on Wet, Plein Air Painting Competition and Exhibition, Francis Gallery.

ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY FAIR


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Summer scents F

ace north, toward the mountains, and take a moment to breathe. Do you feel it? The warm breeze moves around you, sweeping the grass with a faint aroma of honeysuckle. Nothing escapes the quiet summer night when the trees sleep; we are all hushed by the slight wind as it leaves pockets of stillness in its wake. Feel the sheen of a bright moon; it glimmers and reflects a translucent luminosity in the sky. Now turn and encounter the east, and see the dew glisten at dawn. It is fresh and clean as it hydrates everything it touches. Lie down and let the grass dampen your clothes ... Can you hear it? The sun is awakening with fierceness, calling forth the song of the crickets, the melody of the toads, and the tune of the morning dove. Amidst the sun’s splendor, there is a voice beckoning from the distance: the ocean is ringing. Listen as it re-

leases its salty air, like a bittersweet ribbon wrapped around your hair, face, and in your ears. Together the sounds mingle to create a chorus in the morning light. And the sweet sights as you face south! Shift and embrace not only the clover’s fragrance, but also the shade of green it reveals. Bees love to hover above its carpet as much as butterflies delight in the forsythia bush. Do you see the lavish color? Sunflowers reflect the afternoon’s golden hue, while dandelions and buttercups are eager to beautify our entryways and kitchen counters. Everywhere there are bits of pigment, waiting to be discovered. Notice the red of the cardinal flying

column by Leah Lewis photo by Rex Alphin

against the spotless, blue sky. Every scene is clothed in the long light and shadows of the day’s haziness. Finally, another rotation and you are enveloped in the fragrance of the west. Twilight is approaching, yet not as swiftly as the distant thunder. Can you smell the coming rain? It is on the move and accompanied by a fierce and impulsive storm – the kind that only this time of year can bring. It smells of heat and humidity. It is dense and fills your senses with a promise to refresh the land ... Breathe deep as the smell of rain has already begun to depart with the clouds. And now, as the descending sun becomes visible again, a creation explodes in the sky, and the sunset becomes a thing of grandeur before your eyes. Savor it, and be overwhelmed with the satisfying scent of summer.


©2011 Anheuser-Busch, Budweiser® Beer, St. Louis, MO


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Western Tidewater Living - Summer 2013  

Western Tidewater Living life magazine covering Franklin, Southampton and Isle of Wight, Virginia.

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