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as Day is ary 29th

OVER 5 MILLION READERS WEEKLY NATIONWIDE!

April 25, 2012

Issue 36

Published Weekly

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MODERN CONVENIENCES by Kathy Wolfe Think of all those little things you just couldn’t live without. How long have they really been around? This week, Tidbits investigates the origin of several of those conveniences we make use of on a regular basis. •

Earl Tupper founded his company in

1938, promoting his new line of polyethylene containers

with

airtight

seals

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named,

appropriately, Tupperware. The items were initially sold in department stores, but in the early 1950s, the marketing strategy was changed to the familiar Tupperware “party.” Tupper didn’t

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OPENING SUNDAY APRIL 1ST,2012 MID NOVEMBER SUNDAYS 8AM-5PM Contact John for General Information John @ 785-577-5410 bigjohnfleamarket@yahoo.com 2208 N. North 5th Salina, Kansas 67401

just make bowls and cups; he also had a contract to make gas mask parts during World War II. He

Bok Mart New & Used Clothing, Etc.

sold his plastics company in 1958 for $16 million.

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1845. Prior to that, folks simply folded letters both

Monday-Saturday - 9:00 AM-7:00 PM Sunday-Noon-7PM 427 S. Broadway Salina, Kansas Across From K-Mart Two doors down from Maggie Mae’s

• We all take our polio vaccinations for granted,

• If you think we’ve always used envelopes, think

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again! This simple item didn’t come along until ways and sealed them with wax. Pre-gummed envelopes weren’t introduced for another 50 years. but they weren’t administered for the first time until 1954, in the city of Pittsburgh, where Dr. Jonas Salk had been conducting his experiments. A 1952 polio epidemic that killed 3,300 and paralyzed thousands inspired Dr. Salk to develop a vaccine. turn the page for more!

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If you want to continue drinking, that is your business. If you want to stop drinking, that is our business. 215 W. Kirwin Salina, KS 67401 (785) 827-1311 M-F 9:00 AM -5:30 Sat 8:00AM-12:00PM

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Page 2

Tidbits® of Salina CONVENIENCES (continued): •

Chester Carlson spent a good part of his

life perfecting the copy machine, receiving a patent in 1937. However, the world didn’t share his vision

Chocolate-Pecan Ice-Cream Sandwiches

of one-touch copying, and 20 companies, including IBM, rejected his presentation before it was finally marketed for the first time in 1959 under the name

1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, cut up 1 bag (12 ounces) semisweet chocolate chips 1 can (14 ounces) sweetened condensed milk 2 cup pecan, chopped 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon vanilla extract 2 pint favorite ice cream

“Xerox 914.” By 1968, Fortune magazine ranked

1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Grease large cookie sheet. Place 2 jelly-roll pans or cookie sheets in freezer to use later for ice cream. 2. In microwave-safe large bowl, combine butter, chocolate chips and sweetened condensed milk. Cook in microwave oven on High 1 minute; stir. Microwave 30 to 60 seconds longer and stir again until chocolate and butter are completely melted. 3. Into chocolate mixture in bowl, stir pecans, flour and vanilla until combined. Drop dough by rounded measuring tablespoons, 2 inches apart, onto greased cookie sheet. With fingers, press each mound into 2-inch round. 4. Bake cookies 10 to 12 minutes or until firm when lightly pressed. Cool on cookie sheet on wire rack 2 minutes. With metal spatula, transfer cookies to wire rack to cool completely. Repeat with remaining dough. Store cookies between layers of waxed paper in tightly covered container at room temperature until ready to use or up to 2 weeks, or freeze up to 3 months. 5. Meanwhile, scoop ice cream by rounded 2 tablespoons into 24 mounds onto cold jelly-roll pans; flatten each mound into 2-inch round. Freeze ice cream rounds until firm, at least 1 hour. If not using right away, store ice cream rounds in freezer-safe container with waxed paper between layers, up to 1 week. 6. Just before serving, assemble ice cream rounds and cookies into 24 sandwiches.

Diners Club card, was introduced in 1950. Issued

Each serving: About 305 calories, 20g total fat (9g saturated), 32mg cholesterol, 85mg sodium, 31g total carbs, 2g dietary fiber, 5g protein. For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our website at www.goodhousekeeping.com/recipefinder/. (c) 2012 Hearst Communications, Inc. All rights reserved

Q: My friends and I watched the Wladimir Klitschko heavyweight-title bout against Jena-Marc Mormeck at our local bar, and were happy to see Wladimir retain his heavyweight title. One of my friends said he heard that Wladimir intends to start up an acting career when he’s done with boxing. Is that true? -John R., Indianapolis A: While it’s true that the handsome Ukrainian has dipped his foot in the Hollywood pool -- the documentary “Klitschko,” which centers on his and his older brother Vitali’s rise in the boxing world, has been making quite an impression on festival goers since premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival last year -- Wladimir is keeping his eye firmly on his boxing career. I spoke with him recently about the acting rumors, and he told me: “While I am asked often about being in movies -- usually it’s a Russian mob character -- it’s always the same thing. I did play myself in ‘Ocean’s Eleven,’ and I did two German comedies. But right now I’m playing the role called the Heavyweight Champion of the World, and it takes all of my time. I really like to play it, and I have to stay focused. So there’s no nonsense with any wannabe Hollywood stuff. If I lose my focus, then I’m going to lose the titles, and I don’t want to do that.” You can watch Wladimir defend his title July 7

Carlson among the richest people in America. • The 1950s brought all kinds of innovations to the modern home. Velcro, power steering, pocket transistor radios and Legos all hit the scene during this decade. The world’s first credit card, the in New York City, it offered credit at 27 restaurants. The American Express card came along eight years later.

1. GEOGRAPHY: What is Europe's longest river? 2. TELEVISION: What was the fictional home state of "MASH" surgeon Hawkeye Pierce? 3. MOVIES: What was the name of the woodcarver and creator of "Pinocchio" in the Disney film? 4. LANGUAGE: What does "gesundheit" mean in German? 5. RELIGION: Who is the patron saint of dancers? 6. ROYALS: Who preceded Queen Elizabeth II in the English throne? 7. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the term for the pointed wheel at the end of cowboy boots' spurs? 8. LITERATURE: In Ian Fleming's spy novels, what agency did James Bond work for? 9. FOOD & DRINK: What fruit that is commonly eaten today was widely considered poisonous until the 18th century? 10. INVENTIONS: What popular drink did druggist John Pemberton invent in 1886?

• When your eyes begin to age, you’ll be thankful for one of Benjamin Franklin’s innovations. Our founding father invented bifocal eyeglasses at the age of 79. • Travelers have had the convenience of pulling into a Holiday Inn along the road since the chain opened its first hotel in 1952 in Memphis, Tennessee. • Masking tape was developed by the 3M Company, a sandpaper-making firm, in 1925. One of the company’s young engineers, Richard Drew, was testing sandpaper at an automobile plant and noticed that painters were having difficulty painting the newly popular two-tone cars. Drew went back to 3M and immediately began work on a product to solve the painters’ dilemma. Waterproof transparent “Scotch” tape came along five years later, also the creation of Richard Drew. A 3M coworker of Drew’s invented the tape dispenser with a built-in cutter blade in 1932. • Thanks to a Chicago inventor, Whitcomb Judson, you can zip up your pants! While experimenting in 1891 with a gadget that would make it easier to button and unbutton shoes, dubbed the “Clasp Locker and Unlocker for Shoes,” Judson came up with the zipper. • The fax machine has been around longer than you think. This device that transmits a facsimile of a

against Tony Thompson, and read my entire engaging interview with the charming heavyweight at www. celebrityextraonline.com. *** Q: I am so excited to see “The Avengers,” starring all of my favorite comic-book heroes, especially Captain America. Because of “The Avengers,” does that mean there won’t be a “Captain America: The First Avenger” sequel for a while? -- Fred D., via e-mail A: Walt Disney Studios recently announced that Chris Evans will again suit up in red, white and blue to save the world from the bad guys. You can expect the sequel to last summer’s blockbuster hit to arrive in theaters April 4, 2014. While it’s still too early to camp out for tickets, at least there’s a release date in sight. *** Q: I’m really sad about this being the final season of “Desperate Housewives.” How are the ladies of Wisteria Lane taking it? -- J.J. A: If one of Marcia Cross’ latest tweets is any indication, they are as sad as you are. Marcia recently lamented via Twitter: “How do you handle goodbyes? Me, not so well ... already feel so sad and vulnerable ... [I] will miss my ‘Desperate Housewives’ family terribly.” *** Readers: Here’s an update on release dates of various HBO projects that have been mentioned in past columns. First, season five “True Blood” premieres on June 10 at 9 p.m. with 12 all-new episodes. Also, “Newsroom” -- the Aaron Sorkin drama starring Jeff Daniels, Emily Mortimer and Sam Waterson -- premieres its 10-episode first season on June 24 at 10 p.m. Write to Cindy at King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475; or e-mail her at letters@cindyelavsky.com. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

Amazing Travel Maze Game "Please turn off all electronic devices," announces the flight attendant as the door is locked shut on the aircraft taking you and your kids to your destination. No longer tethered to gadgets and gizmos, you are officially an unplugged family. Now it's time for real, live entertainment. Take advantage of the incredible view through the frame of your seat window as your plane banks over your departure city. No matter how many times you've flown, it's always a new adventure to catch the scene below. Your kids may squeal, "Where's our house? Is that the Mississippi River? Wow, look at all the cars on the freeway during rush hour!" Not even Disney makes a ride like this. When you soar above the clouds, pull out this handheld toy and let it keep you entertained until the peanuts and pretzels arrive on your tray table. It's a maze made using simple supplies including a tiny bead, bendable straws for barriers, and a plastic CD case. Here's how to make a maze toy before your trip: 1. Open a CD case and remove the contents. Cover the bottom of the case with a sheet of heavy construction paper or craft foam. Cut to size and glue in place. 2. Be maze architects. Set the CD case in front of you. Determine where the "START" entry point and final goal will be near the bottom and make dots with a marker as a guide for construction, or simply write "START" at the top and "FINISH" at the bottom of the game board. To create a path for the game, sketch a route on the board with a pen from "START" to "FINISH." 3. Arrange different cut pieces of bendable straw lengths on the game board using the drawing as a guide. Include several dead ends along the way for a challenging course, and leave ample space for the size of the bead you choose to roll through the course. When you are satisfied with your design, glue the straw segments in place. Let dry. 4. To play, set a bead at "START," snap the case closed and let it roll. For an extra challenge, time the contestants with a stopwatch. When you really get the hang of it, try going through the maze without looking, using verbal cues from siblings, or Mom and Dad. Extra idea: Construct the game with a tiny bead that goes through the bendable straws instead of around them. *** Donna Erickson's award-winning series "Donna's Day" is airing on public television nationwide. To find more of her creative family recipes and activities, visit www.donnasday.com and link to the NEW Donna's Day Facebook fan page. Her latest book is "Donna Erickson's Fabulous Funstuff for Families."


Page 3

For Advertising Call (785) 404-1000 CONVENIENCES (continued): document through the telephone system has been around since 1944. And how about another item you’d think has been around forever, the ballpoint pen? It came out the same year as that fax machine. Nine years later, Bic introduced their now-famous brand of ballpoint pen. In 1973, Bic presented its next best-selling gadget, the disposable lighter. • Two unrelated items, the voting machine and waxed paper, were both invented by the same person, Thomas Edison. During the 1880s, this brilliant individual filed for a new patent on the average of every five days, equaling more than 1,300 items over the course of his creative life. The motion picture camera and projector, incandescent light bulbs and the phonograph are well-known Edison inventions, with lesser-known innovations being the stock ticker, dictating machine and electric pen. • What would your life be like without computers? Although many would claim the honor of inventing the world’s first computer, a 1973 American court decision officially awarded this achievement to Dr. John V. Atanasoff, a physics professor at Iowa State University. Although Dr. Atanasoff had devised his digital computer with a memory drum back in 1939, he was not credited as the “father of American computing” until after years of patent litigation. President George Bush conferred the National Medal of Science and Technology to him in 1990.

1. The Hunger Games (PG-13) Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson 2. American Reunion (R) Jason Biggs, Alyson Hannigan 3. Titanic (PG-13) Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate WinWANT TO RUN YOUR slet OWN BUSINESS? 4.Publish Wrath of a the Titans (PG-13) SaminWorthington, Paper Your Area Liam Neeson If You Can Provide: Sales Experience · A Computer · Desktop Publishing · A Reasonable Financial Investment 5. Mirror MirrorSoftware (PG) Julia Roberts, Lily Collins provide forJohnny success! 6. 21 We Jump Streetthe (R) opportunity Chris Parnell, Pemberton 7. Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax (PG) animated www.tidbitsweekly.com 8. Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (PG-13) Emily Blunt, Ewan McGregor 9. John Carter (PG-13) Taylor Kitsch, Lynn Collins 10. Safe House (R) Denzel Washington, Ryan Reynolds

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TRILOGY

goddess of victory. The company was originally named Blue Ribbon Sports, and remained so until the name change to Nike in 1978. • Listerine wasn’t named after its inventor, Dr. Joseph Lawrence, but rather after the acclaimed British surgeon, Dr. Joseph Lister, a pioneer in establishing sanitary operating room procedures.

“Shaq Uncut” by Shaquille O'Neal, with Jackie MacMullan (Grand Central Publishing, $27.99) Reviewed by Chris Richcreek Autobiographies face a challenge when it comes to believability, because they depend upon self-analysis, and it's hard to say how authentic someone is in examining his or her own motives. But Shaquille O'Neal’s "Shaq Uncut" is pretty spot-on when it comes to evaluating the NBA center's 19-year pro career. For comparison, take Bill Simmons' "The Book of Basketball," considered to be a pretty perceptive look at the NBA. Simmons ranked O'Neal just outside the top 10 players of all time and stated: "Basketball was never as much fun for Shaq as everything else in his life ... he happily settled for ... some top-five records, three Finals MVPs and a fantastically fun ride." In "Shaq Uncut," O'Neal wrote, "Although I love the game of basketball, I've never wanted that to be the only thing that defines me." He also summed up his legacy as "I was generous, I was dominant, I was unique." Successful autobiographies also satiate the reader's interest in the author's perception of those with whom he interacted. O'Neal does not disappoint on this front. Most basketball fans will enjoy O'Neal's take on a number of NBA stars he played with and against, including Dwyane Wade, LeBron James, Penny Hardaway, Dwight Howard, Yao Ming and Tim Duncan. Many words are utilized to lay out the complicated relationship between O'Neal and Kobe Bryant. O'Neal lauds Bill Russell and Jerry West, and throws some elbows at Pat Riley, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Bill Walton. Perhaps the best insight, however, comes from his statement that before he turned 25, he was "a basketball star, a rapper, a movie star and an endorsement king." That's about as accurate a picture of the modern, multiplatform star athlete as one can ask for. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

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simple means of access to fire.

its first running shoes, named after the Greek

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Stopping a Leak From Toilet Base Q: I read your advice to Christine H. about figuring out where a puddle of water at the base of her toilet was coming from. You said that if no other source of the leak could be detected, such as from the inlet valve, she should contact a plumber to replace the seal at the base of the toilet. Why can’t she just tighten down the bolts on either side of the toilet base? This might fix the problem and cost zero dollars. -- Kent C., Atlanta A: That’s certainly worth a try, since it really doesn’t cost anything. But be careful that the bolts (or really, the nuts securing the bolts) aren’t tightened too much, as they could crack the porcelain base, requiring a complete replacement of the toilet. If this doesn’t resolve the issue, a plumber should come in, at least in the case of Christine H. For hearty do-it-yourselfers who have some experience repairing pipes or replacing faucets, replacing the wax toilet seal can be done in an afternoon or less. And the quicker it’s done, the better, as the leak isn’t just causing an inconveniently wet floor; it could also be affecting the subfloor and causing silent water damage. To replace the toilet seal, you’ll need a new wax toilet ring, some

HOLLYWOOD -- You can start calling Ashton Kutcher the multi-million dollar man! Word is he’ll be back next season on "Two And a Half Men" for $1 million an episode. But before he starts shooting his second season, he'll start shooting "Jobs," the Steve Jobs biopic about the late Apple tycoon. Looking at pictures of Jobs from his youth reveals he and Ashton could be twins. Job's former partner at Apple, Steve Wozniak, a former "Dancing With the Stars" contestant, has given his blessing and says, "Steve would have approved of Ashton playing him." *** Multiple Oscar-winning director Clint Eastwood is headed back to acting via the upcoming baseball pic "Trouble With the Curve," filming in Atlanta, hometown of the Braves. But have no fear, Clint still is in control -- he's producing and his partner, Robert Lorenz, is directing. They've rounded up a firstrate cast with Justin Timberlake, Amy Adams, Matthew Lillard, John Goodman and Scott Eastwood. Yes, Scott is Clint's son (with former flight attendant Jacelyn Reeves) and had roles in "Gran Torino," "Invictus" and the January 2013 release of "Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3D." And here's an update on Clint's "A Star Is Born" with Beyonce. Will Fetters, who wrote the screenplay, admitted he based the role that Tom Cruise may end up playing on Nirvana lead singer Kurt Cobain, who met a tragic, premature end. ***

plumber’s putty and a strong helper. Turn off the water at the shutoff valve, usually located on the wall behind and below the toilet tank. Flush the toilet, then remove as much water from the toilet bowl as possible, first using a small cup and then a sponge. Next, detach the inlet tube from the shutoff valve and from the base of the toilet tank. Unbolt the tank from the toilet base and carefully lift off. Then, unscrew the nuts attaching the base of the toilet to the floor. With your helper, carefully rock the toilet base back and forth to loosen the seals and caulking around the base, then lift the toilet base up. Next, tilt the toilet base so you can access the bottom and wipe away all the old putty and wax. Clean the floor and the area around the drain pipe as well, so it’s completely dry and free of putty. Put the replacement wax ring on the floor around the drain pipe. Then, place plumber’s putty around the foot of the toilet base -- one way is to create a putty “rope” and press it around the perimeter. With your helper, lift the toilet base and position it over the wax ring and drain pipe and bolts. Ease it into position by rocking and pressing the base down so that the new ring sits tightly in place. Attach the nuts to the bolts on either side of the base and tighten carefully. Reattach the tank to the base, attach the water supply line to the tank and shutoff valve, and turn on the water supply, checking to make sure the supply line connection doesn’t leak. Finally, trim away the excess plumber’s putty from the foot of the toilet. HOME TIP: Does the toilet base need to be sealed to the floor? Yes, for a number of reasons, and because it’s required by building code in most states. Send your questions or tips to ask@thisisahammer.com, or write This Is a Hammer, c/o King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475.

"The Help" Oscar-winner Octavia Spencer is trapped on a train full of travelers struggling to co-exist in a world covered in ice and snow in "Snow Piercer." Her fellow passengers are "Captain America" Chris Evans, "Man on a Ledge" co-star Jamie Bell, Oscar-winner Tilda Swinton ("Michael Clayton") and two-time Oscar nominee John Hurt. *** Carol Burnett celebrates her 79th birthday on April 26. Seems like we met only yesterday when I was 11 and she was 26 and starring at The Phoenix Theatre in "Once Upon a Mattress," later to move to Broadway, while moonlighting on "The Garry Moore Show." Her variety show, "The Carol Burnett Show," ran for 11 years on CBS. Carol maintains the networks couldn't afford to produce a show like hers today, which is one of the reasons she hasn't return to weekly television. Outside of a few guest shots on TV shows and voice-overs in two animated films, "Horton Hears a Who"('08) and "The Secret World of Arrietty" this year, she stays close to home with Brian Miller, her husband of 10 years. He’s a drummer and contractor for the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, and 23 years younger than she. Oh Carol, always a trendsetter ... you put the "cou-cou" in cougar before it was even a TV series! Send letters to Tony Rizzo’s Hollywood, 8306 Wilshire Blvd., No. 362, Beverly Hills, CA 90211.


Tidbits® of Salina

Page 4

When Medicines Fail to Quell Heartburn DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I am 25. I have a serious case of GERD. I’ve been put on four different medicines. They aren’t working. I also have palpitations throughout the day. I’ve been told by doctors and nurses that there is nothing dangerous about them. I’d like to know if this true. -- J.C. ANSWER: GERD -- gastroesophageal reflux disorder -- is heartburn. It’s the upward spurting of stomach acid and digestive juices into the esophagus, the swallowing tube, a place that is not able to cope with these corrosive juices the way the stomach is. Eliminate or go easy on foods that make GERD worse: citrus fruits; tomatoes; onions; carbonated drinks; spicy, fatty or fried foods; chocolate; peppermint; and caffeine. If you’re overweight, weight loss lessens GERD symptoms. Don’t lie down after eating. Don’t smoke. Sleep with your head, chest and stomach on a slope by putting 6-inch blocks under the bedposts at the head of your bed. That position keeps stomach acid in the stomach. Don’t wear anything that constricts your stomach, like tight pants or tight belts. Medicines called “proton pump inhibitors” nearly completely turn off acid production. Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec, Protonix, Aciphex and Dexilant are their names. If you still have heartburn while on these medicines, it’s OK to use an antacid along with them. If medicines fail, other causes of heartburn need consideration, things like

bile reflux or eosinophilic esophagitis. If these conditions aren’t found, then surgical treatment of GERD is an option that’s open to you. Palpitations mean a thumping or racing heart. They can be felt as a thud in the chest. The cause is an extra beat -- or more correctly, a premature beat -one that comes before it should. The beat after a premature beat is delayed. During the delay, the heart fills with more blood than usual, and that causes a thump in the chest when the heart empties. Premature beats are almost always innocent and need no treatment. You can believe your doctors and nurses. The booklet on GERD explains this common malady and its treatment. To order a copy, write: Dr. Donohue -- No. 501W, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. *** DEAR DR. DONOHUE: Can you give me insight into the Hamman-Rich syndrome? My father passed away from it. -- L.R. ANSWER: I can tell you only a little, because only a little is known about it. It’s a lung injury that comes on suddenly, with damage to the lung air sacs (the alveoli) and the spaces between the air sacs, the interstitium. The cause is unknown. Because of such destruction, oxygen cannot get into the blood. Patients are severely short of breath, have a fever and they cough. The only medicines are ones to keep the person going as best as possible. There is no cure medicine. Even with a ventilator, death happens to more than 60 percent of these patients. It’s an illness that reminds doctors that they don’t have an answer for every malady. You and your family have my condolences. *** Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475.

Collecting by Larry Cox is brought to you by CONVENIENCES (continued):

Forgotten Forgotten Treasures Treasures

We have new hours for Spring and Summer! THURS. 10-6, FRI. 10-7 SAT. 9-7 & SUN. 1-6

When Lawrence originated the formula in 1879 in his St. Louis laboratory, he intended the concoction to be used strictly in the medical profession as a

800 N. 9th Salina, KS 67401

surgical antiseptic. It wasn’t offered to the public until 1914 when it was marketed as the first overthe-counter mouthwash.

California Faience Bowl Q: I recently received a California Faience bowl from a relative who told me it was from the 1920s. I can't find anything about the company in any of my reference books. Can you help me? -- Laura, Earth City, Mo. A: California Faience was a brand that was started in about 1920 by William V. Bragdon and Chauncy R. Thomas at their tile shop in Berkeley, Calif. Pieces of their pottery are generally marked "California Faience" with a die stamp and are quite collectible. Typical prices are ashtray with stylized dog design in orange matt, $225; and burgundy gloss bowl, $250. *** Q: I have a set of Elsie and Elmer coffee cups that were given away as premiums by the Borden Company. They are mint. -- Milton, Albuquerque, N.M. A: Elsie was introduced during the 1930s as a mascot for the Borden Company. In 1940 she "married" Elmer, who began promoting Borden's glue. Together they had Beulah. Elmer and Elsie appeared on dozens of products, including, of course, your coffee cups. I suspect your set of four are worth in the $12 to $20 range. *** Q: I have a set of cuff links that originally belonged to a riverboat captain who worked on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. The set is in a leather case stamped "Currier & Ives by Squire" and are quite elaborate. Do you have any idea of what they might be worth? -Michael, Ormond Beach, Fla. A: Eugene Klompus is an expert and collector. His contact information is P.O. Box 5970, Vernon Hills, NJ 60061; genek@justcufflinks.com; and www.justcufflinks.com. *** Q: I have a pocket watch that is marked "I.W. Co., Springfield, ILL." The watch is quite heavy and requires a key to engage the spring. What can you tell me about it? -- Dean, Brutus, Mich. A: The Illinois Watch Company was founded in 1872 in Springfield, Ill. In 1928, the company was purchased by the Hamilton Watch Company of Lancaster, Pa. To determine the value of your timepiece, you should show it to a competent jeweler. Write to Larry Cox in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to questionsforcox@aol.com. Due to the large volume of mail he receives, Mr. Cox is unable to personally answer all reader questions. Do not send any materials requiring return mail. Questions of general interest will be incorporated into his column whenever possible. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

• What would sports fans do without instant replays? There was no such thing until 1963, when this was introduced in that year’s Army vs. Navy football game. Fans became so confused, TV stations were flooded with telephone calls. • Housewives across the country were thrilled when the Hurley Machine Company of Chicago launched The Thor, the first electric-powered washing machine, in 1908. It was a drum-like machine with a galvanized tub and electric motor. • Due to the efforts of Lillian Gilbreth, we have shelves and butter and egg trays inside refrigerator doors, an electric food mixer, an improved electric can opener and a trash can with a foot pedal lid opener. The mother of 12 children, this industrial engineer was immortalized in the book “Cheaper by the Dozen.” FAMOUS LANDMARKS OF THE WORLD: GREAT WALL OF CHINA It should come as no surprise that the Great Wall of China is the world’s longest wall. So what are some things you don’t know about this work of ancient architecture? Here are some highlights.

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For Advertising Call (785) 404-1000 GREAT WALL (continued): Is Human Remedy Safe for Dogs?

• Construction began on this edifice in the 7th century B.C. by feudal warlords. At that time, China was broken up into many small states, with each state having its own walls of defense, in essence, several short Great Walls. • During the Qin Dynasty in the 2nd century B.C., the northern part of China was in danger of attack by the Mongolian and Manchu empires, and the emperor of China ordered that all the northern sections be joined together to create one unified defensive wall. Once that was completed, the Wall stretched more than 3,100 miles (5,000 km) across the country.

DEAR PAW'S CORNER: Our dog, "Kerry," has pigmentary keratitis, and our vet prescribed tacrolimus and gentamycin solutions, which are very expensive. Instead, we are trying Similasan dry eye relief in Kerry's eyes. Is this safe to use? It seems to be working. -- C. Tobias DEAR C.: Pigmentary keratitis can be difficult to treat, and often is chronic in many dogs. According to vision4pets.com, this clouding of the cornea is caused by chronic inflammation stemming from a number of possible issues, such as constant irritation from hairs, decreased tears, an incomplete blink reflex, abnormally shaped eyelids or very prominent eyes -- such as those seen in pugs and other

short-faced breeds. Because it's chronic, Kerry likely must be treated with eyedrop solutions like the ones you mentioned, and they are indeed often expensive. Using Similasan may be one option. According to justanswer.com's veterinary section, while this dry-eye treatment is normally for humans, it can be applied to your dog's eyes two or three times a day. The website didn't find Similisan to be very effective, but if it's working for Kerry, then it's worth a try. Just be sure to tell Kerry's vet that you're using it so that he can monitor its effectiveness and make sure that it's safe for your dog. As far as using it long term, definitely consult the vet. Treating pigmentary keratitis properly is important, because not only does it make your

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• The Han Dynasty followed the Qin, and the Wall was at its longest up to that point, more than 5,000 miles (8,000 km). • As the years wore on, the Wall suffered erosion, was rebuilt and added on to many times. The Ming Dynasty, 1368 – 1644, was the time of the most recent construction, bringing the Wall to what we know today. A 2009 investigation determined that the Great Wall of the Ming Dynasty totals 5,500 miles (8,852 km). It includes 723 beacon towers, 7,062 lookout towers and 3,357 wall platforms. It’s difficult to estimate the actual length of the Wall, considering all the side branches that don’t actually contribute to its west-to-east length. It is believed that the fortifications extending in all directions throughout all of Northern China added together exceed 13,000 miles (50,000 km). • It is estimated that more than a million workers perished during the various states of construction of the Great Wall, earning it the nickname of “the longest cemetery on Earth.” Laborers included peasants, unemployed intellectuals, disgraced noblemen, guards and convicts. Family members of the dead workers traditionally carried a coffin with a caged white rooster on top. The rooster’s crowing was said to keep the spirit of the dead awake until he had crossed the Wall. If the rooster did not crow, it was thought that the spirit would escape and wander forever along the Great Wall. • Before the Ming expansion, rammed earth, adobe and stone comprised the Wall, mortared with a rice flour mixture. After the Ming, bricks were used in construction. In some places, the Wall’s height reaches 25 feet (7.6 m). Its average width is about

dog more comfortable, it also slows or prevents the pigmentation of the cornea, which can cause vision loss. Send your questions or tips to ask@pawscorner.com, or write to Paw's Corner, c/o King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. For more pet care-related advice and information, visit www.pawscorner.com. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

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Tidbits® of Salina GREAT WALL (continued): 32 feet (10 m). • Portions of the Wall began admitting tourists in 1955, with the final section opening to the public in 1957. Both sightseers and erosion pose a serious threat to the Wall, and it is considered one of the world’s most endangered monuments. With millions of visitors annually and tourists helping themselves to souvenir bricks, the Wall actually becomes a little shorter each day. • The Wall’s primary purpose has always been to defend the Chinese Empire. The last battle fought along the edifice was in 1938 during the SinoJapanese War between the Republic of China and the Empire of Japan. Bullet marks from the battle can be seen along the Wall’s length. POST OFFICE TRUTHS The United States Post Office delivers mail to every city and every town in every state, nearly 151 million homes, businesses and P.O. boxes. Here are some details about the origin and operation of this immense delivery system, one that receives none of its income from tax dollars. • During the early colonial days, mail was delivered by friends, traveling merchants or Native Americans. A service between England and its colonies was developed in 1639, and a Boston tavern became the first post office mail drop for overseas mail. The colonies instituted their own monthly post route between New York and Boston, known as the Old Boston Post Road, now part of U.S. Route 1. • Pennsylvania’s founder William Penn established that area’s first post office in 1683. In 1737, 31-year-old Benjamin Franklin, a local printer and publisher of the Pennsylvania Gazette, was appointed as postmaster of Philadelphia. Thirtyeight years later, Franklin became the nation’s first Postmaster General, and was paid $1,000 a year for the position.

Buying Long-Term Storage Food If you’ve considered laying in a store of long-term storage food for future emergencies, there are some things to think about before you spend your money. Freeze-dried foods: Because of the way freeze-dried foods are processed (a flash-freezing and drying process), they’re more likely to retain their nutrients than foods processed other ways, but they also take up more storage space. Dehydrated food: Typically vacuum-sealed in Mylar bags and stored in food-grade 5-gallon tubs, many dehydrated foods can last up to 15 years, depending on how they’re stored. Dehydrators are available, but you’ll pay a hefty price for a good one. Do-it-yourself dehydrating can be a risky venture if you don’t run the machine long enough to get enough of the moisture out. Botulism can grow in moist food (for example, brown rice, dehydrated vegetables and certain grains) in an environment where the oxygen is removed, such as with vacuum sealing. Mystery meals: You don’t really know what’s in the sealed cans or bags unless you open them, thereby canceling any benefits of storing long term. Storage: The food must be kept cool and dry, in a dark environment and away from insects and mice. Nutrition: Don’t buy any foods that don’t clearly state all

the nutritional values. “Seventy-five servings” in a bulk buy doesn’t tell you how many calories are in a serving. Many of the manufactures of long-term storage food consider a few hundred calories to be a serving. High sodium content is very common. Stick to what you know: Don’t buy foods that you don’t eat now, or that will require complicated preparation. If you don’t bake bread from scratch, it’s not likely that you’ll want to face 50 pounds of wheat that you’ll need to grind into flour. If one of your family members is lactose intolerant, it won’t do you any good to have a year’s worth of pasta dinner products that all have milk as an ingredient. Read online reviews of the different foods: Call to ask which manufacturer they use. There are only a halfdozen or so, and some companies buy those and put on their own label. If you buy, get a wide variety of types and flavors. Best bet: Order a sampler pack and see if you like the food. If your family won’t eat it, there’s no sense in ordering a year’s worth. David Uffington regrets that he cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into his column whenever possible. Write to him in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to columnreply@gmail.com. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.


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TOP TEN VIDEO, DVD as of April 16, 2012 Top 10 Video Rentals 1. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (R) Daniel Craig 2. The Sitter (R) Jonah Hill 3. Hop (PG) animated 4. The Descendants (R) George Clooney 5. Immortals (R) Henry Cavill 6. Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G) animated 7. Jack and Jill (PG) Adam Sandler 8. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (PG-13) Tom Hanks 9. Tower Heist (PG-13) Ben Stiller 10. Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (R) Gary Oldman Top 10 DVD Sales 1. Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G)(Fox) 2. Hop (PG) (Universal) 3. The Muppets (PG) (Buena Vista) 4. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (R) (Sony) 5. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (PG-13) (Warner) 6. Game of the Thrones: The Complete First Season (TV-MA) (Warner) 7. Happy Feet Two (G) (Warner) 8. Puss in Boots (PG) (Paramount) 9. The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn (NR) (Paramount) 10. Immortals (R) (Fox)

1. Who was the first majorleague player from the Dominican Republic? 2. What major-league player had the most atbats as a designated hitter. 3. Who was the first NFL running back to rush for consecutive 1,000-yard seasons? 4. Who was the last Harvard basketball player before Jeremy Lin to play in the NBA? 5. Who scored four goals to lead the U.S. men’s hockey team to the gold medal in the 1960 Olympics. 6. Name five of the nine NASCAR Cup drivers to have won at least three season titles. 7. How many times did Jimmy Connors play in the men’s singles final at the Australian Open?

by Samantha Weaver It was British doctor and author Alec Bourne who made the following sage observation: "It is possible to store the mind with a million facts and still be entirely uneducated." In 2007, a world record was set off the coast of Brazil when a single wave was caught by 84 surfers. Have you ever heard of a book called "Never Again" by Doug Nufer? Probably not -- it's not on any bestseller lists and hasn't been reviewed by any notable critics. It's quite possibly unique in literary history, however; in its entire 192 pages, not a single word -- even basic words such as a, an, the, of and for -is used twice. If you were to stack up a million $1 bills, they would weigh about one ton. The Twist dance craze in the 1960s changed the culture in America and spread around the world. Most people don't realize, though, that the song "The Twist," which started the fad, wasn't originally sung by Chubby Checker, though he was the one who

sent the single up the charts and has since been irrevocably associated with the dance. The song was originally written and performed by an R&B singer named Hank Ballard. A deejay in Baltimore saw teenagers dancing to Ballard's song and called Dick Clark, host of "American Bandstand." Clark loved it and invited Ballard to perform the song on the show, but it didn't work out. Instead, Clark found someone else to perform the song: Ernest Evans, who changed his name to Chubby Checker. It made his career. Colonel Sanders started selling chicken when he was 65 years old, and his only goal was to make $1,000 a month. *** Thought for the Day: "It takes only one drink to get me drunk. The trouble is, I can't remember if it's the thirteenth or the fourteenth." -George Burns (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

On May 6, 1911, George Maledon, the man who executed at least 60 men for “Hanging Judge” Isaac Parker, dies of natural causes in Tennessee. Paid $100 for each hanging, he tried to be a conscientious hangman who minimized suffering with a quick death. Maledon considered the job “honorable and respectable work.” On April 30, 1927, the Federal Industrial Institution for Women, the first women’s federal prison, opens in Alderson, W.Va. All women serving federal sentences of more than a year were to be brought there, with the vast majority imprisoned for drug and alcohol charges imposed during the Prohibition era. On May 1, 1931, President Herbert Hoover officially dedicates New York City’s Empire State Building. The entire 102-story building went up in just over a year, under budget (at $40 million) and well ahead of schedule. During certain periods of building, the frame grew an astonishing four-and-a-half stories a week. On May 5, 1945, in Lakeview, Ore., six people are killed while attempting to drag a Japanese balloon out the woods. The explosive balloon was one of a handful of Japanese attacks against the continental United States, which were conducted by Japanese submarines and later by highaltitude balloons carrying explosives or incendiaries. On May 3, 1952, a ski-modified U.S. Air Force C-47 becomes the first aircraft to land on the North Pole. On the flight was Dr. Albert P. Crary, a scientist who in 1961 traveled to the South Pole by motorized vehicle, becoming the first person in history to have stood on both poles. On May 4, 1965, San Francisco Giants outfielder Willie Mays hits his 512th career home run to break Mel Ott’s National League record. Mays would finish his career with 660 home runs, good for third on the all-time list at the time of his retirement. On May 2, 1972, Steven Spielberg begins filming “Jaws.” The production, which used three mechanical sharks to great effect, enthralled audiences and grossed $458 million in its theatrical release. (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.


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Tidbits® of Salina

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“Kinyarwanda” -- In this drama, different stories are woven together to give a multidimensional perspective on the massacre in Rwanda in 1994. The characters include a young couple and their son -- all three are in danger because the parents are from different ethnic groups. This, however, isn’t a story about survival, but of the issues involved before, during and after the genocide.

The songs can be catchy and impressive and even a little uplifting. It’s the script and the vacant humor that knock this one off key.

EDITOR'S NOTE: DVDs reviewed in this column will be available in stores the week of April 30, 2012. PICKS OF THE WEEK “Joyful Noise” (PG-13) -- Dolly Parton and Queen Latifah go head to head in this high-volume shipment of cheese and song. Vi (Latifah) is the director of a small-town church choir with dreams of winning the National Joyful Noise Competition. Choir veteran G.G. (Parton) thinks it’s time the whole choir thing should go “Sister Act 2” and get a new style. Soon, G.G.’s talented bad-boy grandson (Jeremy Jordon) and Vi’s talented-choirgirl daughter (Keke Palmer) start getting too close. For those who cannot digest TV’s “Glee,” steer wide and clear of this one.

“Haywire” (R) -- Somebody at the big, morally ambiguous spy office sure goofed again, because another trained killer has “gone rogue” after a failed backstabbing. This time it’s Gina Carano, a mixed-martial arts fighter trying on her first movie role as Mallory Kane, an assassin bent on getting revenge on those who betrayed her. The story is familiar, but well-executed Director Steven Soderbergh utilizes his female lead well. You can tell it’s her in the action sequences, and when she’s not fighting, she’s surrounded by more experienced actors. Carano makes a great action hero because you believe she really could do that move where she strangles a hitman with her legs while twisting his arm.

DOG OF THE WEEK “New Year’s Eve” (PG-13) -- What happens when you pack as many stars as you can fit into a romantic comedy set around one day? An unlovable lump of cameos and an annoying ad campaign where it’s obvious that many of the stars couldn’t be paid to do a promo shot. This movie is the toxic runoff created by overpressured mediocrity. It’s the fruitcake of film; a dense, unwanted amalgamation of unused tidbits that forces its way

into our lives around the holidays. It stars Hilary Swank, Robert De Niro and a ton of other people who don’t mind being left off the list. Each cluster of stars forms its own little love story that is somehow vaguely connected to the other vignettes. In the end, all the half-baked stories come to a big undeserved climax that unconvincingly demands that you experience tender emotions. TV LISTINGS "Covert Affairs: Season Two" "Suits: Season One" "Kojak: Season Four" "Shazzan: The Complete Series" (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

Trivia Quiz

Answers 1. Ozzie Virgil played with the New York Giants in 1956. 2. Harold Baines, with 5,806 at-bats as a designated hitter during his 22-year major-league career. 3. Joe Perry of the San Francisco 49ers, 1953-54. 4. Ed Smith played with the New York Knicks in 195354. 5. Roger Christian. 6. Richard Petty (7), Dale Earnhardt (7), Jimmie Johnson (5), Jeff Gordon (4), Lee Petty (3), David Pearson (3), Tony Stewart (3), Darrell Waltrip (t3) and Cale Yarborough (3). 7. Twice -- he won the title in 1974 and lost in 1975.

Answers 1. The Volga River 2. Maine 3. Geppetto 4. To your health 5. St. Vitus 6. Her father, George VI 7. Rowel 8. MI6 (Military Intelligence Section 6) 9. The tomato 10. Coca-Cola (c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

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