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Tidbits® of Fort Wayne, Allen County • The COTTON (continued): • When we think of cotton, most of us think of comfortable blue jeans, flannel shirts, underwear or the 800-thread-count soft sheets that we sleep on at night. Cotton provides all of that and a whole lot more. • Cotton is used more than any fiber, natural or manmade, in the world. It is a daily part of our lives and is still today one of the leading cash crops for farmers in the United States. Every part of a cotton plant is useful. • The most important part of the cotton plant is the fiber, or lint, which is used to make cloth. The fiber has to be separated from the seeds, which are quite sticky. This is why the cotton gin was so important. When the fiber and seeds had to be separated by hand, it took many laborious hours. • “Linters,” the short fuzz remaining on the seeds after separation of the lint, provide cellulose for making explosives, plastics and other products. They are also incorporated into high quality paper products and processed into batting for the padding used in mattresses and cushions for furniture and automobile seats. • The cottonseeds are a valuable byproduct as well. They are crushed and separated into three products: oil, hulls and meal. Cottonseed oil is used for salad dressing, cooking oil and shortening. Cottonseed oil has no cholesterol has little or no transfats, making it a good option for healthy cooking. • The meal and hulls are used for livestock, poultry and fish feed and also fertilizer. After all of these parts are taken away, the remaining leaves and stalks of the cotton plant are plowed under to enrich the soil. • For years, the “Cotton Row” district of Memphis, Tennessee, was the center of the worldwide cotton trade market. The Cotton Museum at the Cotton Exchange opened in 2006 in the building that was once the place where cotton was inspected, bought and sold, and shipped around the world. The museum has artifacts and exhibits that tell the story of cotton, its history and its impact on the region and the world. • Another museum dedicated to cotton is The Audie Murphy American Cotton Museum in Greenville, Texas. This museum is dedicated to preserving the history of America’s cotton industry. The museum includes the oldest house in Greenville and an actual cotton patch.

states where cotton grows are sometimes referred to as the “Cotton Belt.” These states are all across the southern edge of the United States. They are Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California. The climate and soil conditions of these areas provide a great cotton-growing environment. Are you curious as to what can be made from one bale of cotton? How about 4,321 socks, 3,085 diapers (yes, the old fashioned cotton kind!), 1,256 pillowcases, 690 bath towels, 409 skirts or 250 pairs of pants! Most people have heard of “hand-medowns” and probably have worn them. Blue jeans are especially known for this because of their durability. Handme-down blue jeans were taken to a new level in 2006 when Cotton Incorporated created a marketing initiative to recycle denim for insulation for housing. The “Cotton. From Blue to Green. ®” denim drive was a studentrun campaign on several college campuses to educate students on the renewable and recyclable attributes of denim. Blue jeans were donated and then given a “new life” as housing insulation for houses. In the spring of 2007, 30 homes were built for families by Habitat for Humanity of Greater Baton Rouge (Louisiana) who lost their homes as a result of Hurricane Katrina. Twelve of those homes were insulated with UltraTouch™ Denim Insulation. A campaign by National Geographic Kids Magazine in 2009 asked readers to donate their old jeans with the goal being to set a Guinness World Record™ for the “most items of clothing collected for recycling.” The record was announced in Washington, D.C. on August 12, 2009, with 33,088 pieces of denim donated. These jeans were given to the “Cotton. From Blue to Green.®” campaign for more housing insulation projects. What a terrific way to help people, recycle and keep blue jeans out of our landfills! Cotton has been an important part of YOURyears OWN BUSI ourWANT livesTOforRUN many andNESS? will likely Publish ato be. AsPa peradvertisements in Your Area continue the If You Can Provide: Sales Experience · A Computer · say, it is theSoftware “fabric of our lives.” Cotton Desktop Publishing · A Reasonable Financial Investment We provide the opportunity success! is now grown in 70 for countries, with 1.800.523.3096 China Call producing the most at about www.tidbitsweekly.com 25 percent and the Unites States producing almost 20 percent. China and India are the largest producers of cotton, while the United States is the world’s largest exporter of cotton. Information in the Tidbits® Paper is gathered from sources considered to be reliable but the accuracy of all information cannot be guaranteed.

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Issue #13  

Read Issue #13 and have some fun with trivia!

Issue #13  

Read Issue #13 and have some fun with trivia!

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