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Morrison's Academy Nursery Day Care of Children Ferntower Road Crieff PH7 3AN Telephone: 01764 653885 Inspected by: Marion Neil Type of inspection: Unannounced Inspection completed on: 20 February 2013


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Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6

Page No 3 5 6 9 35 36 36

Summary About the service we inspected How we inspected this service The inspection Other information Summary of grades Inspection and grading history

Service provided by: Morrison's Academy

Service provider number: SP2003003588

Care service number: CS2003016199

Contact details for the inspector who inspected this service: Marion Neil Telephone 01382 207200 Email enquiries@careinspectorate.com

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Summary This report and grades represent our assessment of the quality of the areas of performance which were examined during this inspection. Grades for this care service may change after this inspection following other regulatory activity. For example, if we have to take enforcement action to make the service improve, or if we investigate and agree with a complaint someone makes about the service.

We gave the service these grades Quality of Care and Support 6

Excellent

Quality of Environment 6

Excellent

Quality of Staffing 5

Very Good

Quality of Management and Leadership 5

Very Good

What the service does well • The nursery staff and the Head of Nursery all knew the children very well, and had an exceptionally good understanding of their development needs. • The nursery staff team involved the children and their parents/carers in an inclusive and consultative way in the children's learning journeys, taking account of the curriculum for excellence principles. • The Head of the Nursery and the nursery staff were enthusiastic and motivated about their work, and provided a high standard of daycare.

What the service could do better • The manager told us that as an ongoing area for improvement, she and her staff team intended to ask parents/carers for their views on the content and structure of the questionnaires • As part of the settling in process to the new building, the nursery staff team will be reviewing the nursery resources and keeping only those that are relevant and purposeful for the modern curriculum.

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• Working together with the children and parents, the nursery staff team intended to develop the outdoor space to provide eg an outdoor classroom, dens, bivouac and low rope walks and to move the outdoor equipment from the old site.

What the service has done since the last inspection • The service has moved to a purpose built nursery within the grounds of Morrison's Academy. • The service was now very well settled into the new premises, due to the hard work and dedication of the nursery staff, ably led by the Head of Nursery. • The service has further involved parents/carers in planning their children's learning journeys.

Conclusion The nursery was now very well settled into their new purpose built facility. The nursery staff team, ably led by the Head of Nursery, were continuing to provide a high standard of daycare. Significant progress was made in involving the children and their parents/carers in planning the children's learning journeys.

Who did this inspection Marion Neil Lay assessor: Not Applicable

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1 About the service we inspected Morrison's Academy Nursery was registered with the Care Commission from 1 April 2002 for 30 children aged 3 to 5 years, and is a partner-provider of pre-school education for Perth and Kinross Council. The service operates five mornings a week, with the facility for children to stay on for lunch as well as an extended afternoon session. Premises consist of three playrooms, large cloakroom with toilets, kitchen, office, meeting rooms and resource rooms, in a purpose built facility within the grounds of Morrison's Academy. The nursery has access to a large, enclosed outdoor space on two sides. One of these areas is decked and provides free-flow play from the nursery. Since moving to the new premises, the nursery has made further extensive use of the primary school facilities, including the gym, astro turf, tennis courts, science lab and extensive grounds. The nursery is managed by the Head of Primary, with a Head of Nursery responsible for the day to day running of the service, assisted by a nursery teacher and three Early Years Officers. There is also weekly input from the main school's departmental staff in music and physical education. Morrison's Academy Nursery aims to: ".... to support children to become successful learners and effective contributors whilst becoming confident individuals and responsible citizens through providing a safe and stimulating environment in which children feel safe and secure." Based on the findings of this inspection this service has been awarded the following grades: Quality of Care and Support - Grade 6 - Excellent Quality of Environment - Grade 6 - Excellent Quality of Staffing - Grade 5 - Very Good Quality of Management and Leadership - Grade 5 - Very Good This report and grades represent our assessment of the quality of the areas of performance which were examined during this inspection. Grades for this care service may change following other regulatory activity. You can find the most up-to-date grades for this service by visiting our website www.careinspectorate.com or by calling us on 0845 600 9527 or visiting one of our offices.

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2 How we inspected this service The level of inspection we carried out In this service we carried out a low intensity inspection. We carry out these inspections when we are satisfied that services are working hard to provide consistently high standards of care.

What we did during the inspection This report was written following a unannounced inspection visit on 20 February 2013. The inspection visit was carried out by Marion Neil, Inspector, Care Inspectorate, the working title of Social Care and Social Work Improvement Scotland. She gave feedback about the inspection to the Head of Nursery and the Head of the Primary School, at the end of this visit, which took approximately 6 hours. There were 17 children present throughout the visit. We carried out a low intensity inspection. We carry out these inspections when we are satisfied that services are working hard to provide consistently high standards of care. We looked at 4 themes - the Quality of Care and Support, the Quality of the Environment, the Quality of Staffing and the Quality of Management and Leadership. We looked at evidence for 2 Quality statements in each of these themes. The nursery, as requested, sent us an Annual Return and a Self Assessment form. We talked to the manager, and her staff about the service and the progress made since the last inspection visit. We looked at a sample of the nursery's policies and procedures. We gave questionnaires to parents/carers who use the service. Eight of these were returned prior to the inspection visit. We sampled evidence to support what had been written in the nursery's Self Assessment, under these Quality Statements. We looked at the nursery's records during the visit. These included: • • • • • • • • •

certificate of registration, public liability insurance, attendance register, records of medication administered, accidents and incidents, written risk assessments, photographs of children taking part in a variety of activities, written permission for trips, outings, photos, sunscreen and toothbrushing, children's contact details, Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 6 of 37


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newsletters, questionnaires and surveys carried out by the nursery, consultation with the children, a sample of children's portfolios, information on the nursery noticeboards, information on the school's website about the nursery, including the nursery blogs, • and the nursery's self evaluation and quality assurance systems. We talked to some of the children and to their parents/carers when they came to collect them at the end of the session. We talked to the staff team about the activities the children do and how their progress is recorded. In this report we refer to the manager of the nursery as the Head of Nursery. The nursery staff included a nursery teacher and 3 Early Years Officers. In this report we refer to them as the nursery staff team or as nursery staff. We observed staff's child care practice during the visit, both inside and in the enclosed outdoor area. There were 17 children at the morning session and 15 children who stayed on for lunch on the day that we visited.

Grading the service against quality themes and statements We inspect and grade elements of care that we call 'quality themes'. For example, one of the quality themes we might look at is 'Quality of care and support'. Under each quality theme are 'quality statements' which describe what a service should be doing well for that theme. We grade how the service performs against the quality themes and statements. Details of what we found are in Section 3: The inspection

Inspection Focus Areas (IFAs) In any year we may decide on specific aspects of care to focus on during our inspections. These are extra checks we make on top of all the normal ones we make during inspection. We do this to gather information about the quality of these aspects of care on a national basis. Where we have examined an inspection focus area we will clearly identify it under the relevant quality statement.

Fire safety issues We do not regulate fire safety. Local fire and rescue services are responsible for checking services. However, where significant fire safety issues become apparent, we will alert the relevant fire and rescue services so they may consider what action to take. You can find out more about care services' responsibilities for fire safety at www.firelawscotland.org

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The annual return Every year all care services must complete an 'annual return' form to make sure the information we hold is up to date. We also use annual returns to decide how we will inspect the service. Annual Return Received: Yes - Electronic

Comments on Self Assessment Every year all care services must complete a 'self assessment' form telling us how their service is performing. We check to make sure this assessment is accurate. The Care Inspectorate received a fully completed Self assessment document from the nursery. This identified what the nursery did well, along with the sources of evidence for these areas, and proposed improvements. However, the nursery's Self assessment form did not always reflect the outcomes for the children. The nursery may now wish to consider that when using the Self assessment document as part of the overall quality assurance of the nursery, they provide detailed examples of the nursery's high quality practice and how this impacts on the outcomes for children.

Taking the views of people using the care service into account We talked to the children during the inspection visit. We observed them taking part in a number of age-appropriate activities, including outdoor play. They were happy and contented at the nursery and engaged very well with their learning journeys. Their comments are included under the Quality statements in this report.

Taking carers' views into account Eight questionnaires were returned to us and all of them had additional comments. These, along with the views of parents/carers expressed to us on the day of the inspection, are included under the Quality statements in this report.

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3 The inspection We looked at how the service performs against the following quality themes and statements. Here are the details of what we found.

Quality Theme 1: Quality of Care and Support Grade awarded for this theme: 6 - Excellent Statement 1 We ensure that service users and carers participate in assessing and improving the quality of the care and support provided by the service. Service strengths We found that the nursery was performing exceptionally well in the areas we looked at under this Quality statement. We concluded this after talking to the nursery manager and the nursery staff. We observed staff practice throughout our visit. We looked at records associated with this Quality statement, including the nursery's feedback from the surveys and questionnaires that they gave to parents/carers. We took account of the children's views • We looked at their feedback about activities in the nursery. • We talked to them during the morning and afternoon session. We considered the views of parents/carers given to us in the questionnaires that they returned to us prior to the inspection visit. We received 9 questionnaires, 8 of which contained additional comments from parents/carers. We took account of what the manager had written in the nursery's Self assessment form. We looked at a sample of the nursery's policies and procedures, including the participation policy. We reported our findings for Quality statements 1.1, 2.1, 3.1 and 4.1, under this Quality statement. This was because we were very satisfied with the level of participation and consultation with the children and their parents/carers.We gave the nursery a grade 6 - excellent, for the areas we looked at under these Quality statements - 1.1, 2.1, 3.1, and 4.1.

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Inspection report continued We found that the nursery had a clear and effective policy and procedure about partnership with parents/carers and participation. In an example of ideal practice this stated that the nursery would work in partnership with the wider community as well eg supermarkets, post office, library, local care homes etc. Photographs we looked at confirmed this way of working eg nursery children visiting a local care home to sing Christmas carols. Other examples of partnership working in the local community included 1) Lady Willerby, Drummond Castle, opened the nursery - the children wrote and asked her to come. They visited Drummond Castle Gardens so that they could talk to her when she came to the nursery. 2) Visiting down town - to look for sugar mice. 3) Visited a member of staff and bought her dog a present - the puppy came to visit the nursery and sent a card back to the children, thanking them for the present. The participation and partnership policy was supported by a robust transition policy. This stated arrangements to help the children have a smooth transition from home to nursery, and from nursery to school. In an example of best practice, the nursery invited prospective parents to parents evenings, social events, and nursery open days. Working in this way meant that the children were very well supported when using the nursery for the first time. Parents/carers were encouraged to find out about the service prior to using it. The result was that they knew how the nursery operated and had first rate opportunities to meet nursery staff, prior to using it. The nursery staff worked with the children in an inclusive and consultative way. They were now making outstanding use of the wall space in the nursery to display children's work, their views and parents/carers views. Nursery staff gathered the children's views through the use of mind maps and talking and thinking books. We saw a high quality example of this in the children's mind map about water and in mind maps used for restorative thinking eg to look at when the children were sad and happy "I am sad when ..... "When I go outside and I get cold." "Having to go to bed." "When I hurt myself." I am happy when ...... "Lots of puzzles." "Snowball fights with Dad." "My Mummy." Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 10 of 37


Inspection report continued "Digging with my Grandpa." Using mind maps in this way means that the nursery staff can find out how much the children know about a topic. This means that the nursery staff can plan activities and learning experiences to extend the children's learning and to re-enforce what they already know. It assists nursery staff to base the children's learning experiences on their interests. Using restorative thinking in this way helps the children to develop their emotional intelligence. One ideal example of how the children's views were taken into account by nursery staff was the creation of a "My Space" board, which displayed individual children's ideas about their learning goals. Very commendably the 'My Space' was situated on the nursery 'wave' - a divider in the nursery cloakroom area, which gave parents/ carers first rate opportunities to see their child's learning goals. Examples included • • • •

One child would like to be able to do cartwheels like her mum and dad, Another found his numbers. Another wants to read lots of stories and watch stories on the smart board Another wants to do more running and jumping in PE.

Asking the children to define their learning goals in this way provided the nursery staff with a wealth of material and ideas for their planning. It meant that the children knew that they were listened to by staff and that staff valued their ideas. Another ideal example of the consultation with the children, was that after moving to the new nursery building, nursery staff asked the children for their views. Two children told them that it was not as good as the old nursery. They told the nursery staff that this was because they missed the sand tray. They said they didn't want to tell staff this in case they upset them. The sand tray was now in place in the new nursery. The nursery used questionnaires with the children and their views were fed back to their parents/carers. For example a recent questionnaire was about letter sounds children's views included "No, it's not fun, it's hard work." "I love to find things that begin with the letter of the week." Seeking children's views in a variety of ways and settings was following best practice guidance. This is because some children were happier giving their views in an informal setting. Some responded better when asked directly about what they think.

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Inspection report continued Throughout our visit to the nursery, we saw that nursery staff used open ended questions when talking to the children. This was an example of the ideal way to encourage children to give their views and take part in discussions. Although there was a structure and routine in the nursery, we saw that nursery staff also gave the children choices, allowing them to choose what they wished to play with, and what they wanted to do next eg in the afternoon, children were given the choice of playing outside, or staying in the nursery play room. All the children wanted to go outside - see Quality statement 1.3 and 2.2. We saw ideal evidence that children were involved in assessing risks eg when playing outside - see Quality statement 2.2. Working in this way meant that the children were encouraged to make choices and decisions. It promoted their independence and developed their understanding decision making. Parents/carers were given exceptional opportunities to give their views about the nursery. These opportunities were both informal and formal • parents/carers were provided with verbal feedback from nursery staff each day when they collected their child, • the manager had an open door policy - parents could approach her with concerns or suggestions, • each child had a named key worker and parents/carers could discuss their child's progress with them, • parents/carers evening were held regularly, • the nursery had an annual open day, • parents/carers were invited to nursery events eg sports day, • parents/carers were sent weekly newsletters, • parents/carers were sent questionnaires and surveys electronically this resulted in a 97% response rate, • there is a suggestions box, • the nursery made highly effective use of the noticeboards in the entrance and cloakroom areas to provide parents/carers with information eg on the curriculum for excellence, child protection, exclusion dates for infectious illnesses, their children's learning journeys. In an example of best practice the nursery had asked parents/carers what kind of questionnaires they would prefer - most parents wanted to choose from a selection of options, with a space for additional comments. As with the children, giving parents/carers a variety of information and communication methods, increased the chances of parents/carers responding. The result was that the nursery had a very high response to recent questionnaires. Parents/carers knew that the nursery listened to their suggestions for improvement. Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 12 of 37


Inspection report continued An example of how well parents/carers were listened to by the staff team was Following the move to the new premises, one parent/carer stated that she was no longer sure who her child's key worker was. The next day a list of key workers and their key children was posted on the 'wave'. This meant that all parents/carers could refresh their memories about just who their child's key worker was. Parents/carers views in the questionnaires returned to us confirmed this "The communication from the nursery is excellent and feedback from parents is welcomed and encouraged." "A weekly newsletter is e-mailed out and details all the activities the children, along with weekly blogs, we are kept fully informed." A parent who spoke with us also said "Very approachable staff, weekly e- mail, plus blogs - really useful for grandparents." In conclusion, the nursery staff, ably led by the highly effective manager, encouraged the children and their parents/carers to participate fully in the children's learning journeys. Children's views informed the planning of learning experiences. Communication with parents/carers, both formal and informal, was of an exceptionally high standard. Areas for improvement The manager told us that as an ongoing area for improvement, she and her staff team intended to ask parents/carers for their views on the content and structure of the questionnaires. Grade awarded for this statement: 6 - Excellent Number of requirements: 0 Number of recommendations: 0 Statement 3 We ensure that service users' health and wellbeing needs are met. Service strengths We found that the nursery was performing exceptionally well in the areas we looked at under this Quality statement. We concluded this after • talking to the Head of Nursery and the nursery staff,

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Inspection report continued • speaking to the children and their parents/carers when they came to collect them at the end of the sessions, • looking at records associated with this Quality statement, including children's portfolios, medical protocols for the administration of medication, planning for learning journeys and experiences and records associated with additional support. We took into account what the Head of Nursery had written in the nursery's Self assessment form. We took account of parents'/carers' views, as given to the nursery in surveys, to us in questionnaires returned to us and directly when we talked to parents/carers. We looked at evidence to confirm best practice in the following areas - staff's understanding and development of the curriculum for excellence, how well the nursery used the space in the new building; how children's additional support or health needs were managed by the nursery staff; healthy lifestyles, including healthy eating and infection control. We gave the nursery a grade 6 - excellent for the areas we looked at under this Quality statement. We noted that each child had a portfolio. This contained • An 'All about me' form. • This included the child's personal details, including family, I can do lots of interesting things, favourite books, colours etc, what makes me happy and sad, and included the child's drawings. • There was a follow up 'All about me' - part 2. • This included drawing again, the child's friends, activities at nursery, what the child enjoyed when not at nursery, favourite books and nursery rhymes, and any changes at home. • A settling in report, mid year report and end of year report. Gathering this kind of information in this way helps key workers to get to know their key children. It helps the nursery staff to plan activities and learning experiences around children's interests. We found that nursery staff had an exceptional understanding about how to monitor the children's progress. Each portfolio had monthly updates showing the child's achievements. Achievements were linked to the curriculum for excellence statements, supported by photographs and by staff observations of the child. This information assisted the nursery staff in the monthly report for each child. This was an example of ideal practice as it meant that parents/carers could see their child's achievements. Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 14 of 37


Inspection report continued Currently key worker meetings were twice a year. The Head of the Nursery asked parents/carers how often these should be held. The majority of parents/carers wanted a key worker meeting termly. The Head of Nursery confirmed that the nursery was now changing to this. Providing parents/carers with a regular opportunity to discuss their child's progress with their key worker was an example of first rate practice. It provided the parents/carers with ideal opportunities to make suggestions or raise any concerns. When we sampled children's portfolios we found that the key workers were assessing the children against the appropriate learning experiences and outcomes from the curriculum for excellence. We saw that • samples of children's work, • all about me forms and updates, • and details of attributes and skills development, were now linked to the principles of Getting It Right For Every Child (GIRFEC). The Head of the Nursery confirmed that work in this area was still developing. Two of the staff team had completed Restorative Approaches training. The nursery staff were now introducing this eg using restorative questions when dealing with behaviour. Parents/carers were kept informed about both these initiatives as the nursery had issued them with leaflets on Using My World triangle and on Restorative Approaches. This evidence confirmed that the nursery staff were provided with first rate training opportunities to ensure that their childcare practice was up to date, and following best practice guidance. We found that planning learning experiences took account of children's views and interests. It was firmly embedded in identified areas of the curriculum for excellence. Planning took account of SHANARRI principles - Safe, Healthy, Achieving, Nurtured, Active, Respected and Responsible, and Included. The nursery staff had an ideal understanding of these and displays eg on the cloakroom wall and wave were encouraging parents to think about them too. An example of this way of working was The learning objectives for the month were clearly displayed for parents along with the success criteria eg I can show you how I can use the mouse. I know the name of water in solid, gas and liquid form. This meant that parents/carers were kept very well informed about their children's learning journeys, and how learning objectives related to the curriculum for excellence.

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Inspection report continued We saw outstanding examples where the children and their parents/carers were involved in their learning journeys. Examples of this were 1) The school took part in a 'Right Wee Blether.' This was where Scotland's Commissioner for Children and Young People, Tam Baillie, asked children between the ages of 2 and 5 to have their very own creative conversation using their own forms of expression. Morrison's Nursery asked parents/carers to discuss 5 key questions with the children as part of the school's Rights Respecting School project. Their views were then passed back to Tam Baillie as part of the 'Right Wee Blether' project. Involving parents/carers in this way means that they can help their children in developing different skills as part of their learning journeys. 2) The nursery blog and interactive white board confirmed parents' involvement in celebrating and learning about Chinese New Year. The nursery used lots of clips of children celebrating in China. The children visited a restaurant in Perth for a Chinese New Year meal, at the invitation of one of the parents. The nursery was presented with an authentic dragon puppet, as part of the celebration. Another parent brought back red envelopes for Chinese New Year gifts. We found that the new facilities were an ideal setting to develop all the areas for the curriculum for excellence. The nursery now had 3 main play rooms, one of which was used as a quiet room. In an example of best practice this room had an interactive white board as well as a number of computers for the children. The other 2 playrooms were also spacious. They interconnected with one another, and the result was that the children had free flow play between the different activities eg wet play room, home corner, construction, small world toys and dressing up area. A great deal of thought had gone into the design of the new build. Two of the playrooms had ideal access to an enclosed outdoor decking area. The Head of the Nursery explained that this area would be further developed with a canopy to allow outdoor play and learning experiences even in bad weather. At the time of the inspection, the nursery had only been in the new premises for less than 2 months. They were involving the children in helping to decide what activities worked best in which areas. The children's views were also informing where the display boards should go, to ensure that these were accessible to the children. The very spacious hallway and cloakroom area was suitable for indoor push and ride toys and a trampoline. In an example of best practice the children had helped to make up simple rules for this area "When we ride the scooters inside we make sure to -

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• use the timers to take turns, • to put the chairs at the top and bottom to show the pathway, • not to bump into anyone." Working in this way meant that the children were involved in decision making to make sure that the new environment was used most effectively. The result was that they had settled into the new building very well and were really enjoying the spacious environment. The new environment meant that the children now had ideal access to extra school facilities. These included • • • • • • • •

going for lunch in the school dining hall, increased opportunities for music making - the music teacher visits regularly, Primary 1 teacher comes almost every week for transition, plus PE takes place across in main school facilities with a specialist nursery trained PE teacher, nursery children use the school's climbing wall, access to the school's science teacher and science lab, joint working with the geography teacher, primary children are visiting the nursery to help with Scottish culture, music and poetry for Burn's night.

In an ideal example of the school and nursery working together the nursery children were at the school's science lab the week before our inspection visit. The Head of the Nursery confirmed that school staff were working even better with nursery staff to improve and enhance the curriculum. An example of this was that the geography teacher and science teacher have provided additional information for the nursery's water topic - eg water cycle and making clouds, plus growing crystals. Not all of the nursery children would be moving to Morrison's Primary School. However, meeting Primary teachers, using primary school facilities and mixing with primary aged children helps to prepare the children for their transition to primary school. The nursery's medical form was ideal. It included information on allergies. All of this information was stored electronically on the school's PASS system (an electronic database for school use). The nursery was very well supported by the school nurse.

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Inspection report continued For example if any child at the nursery had a life-long condition eg a severe allergy, a medical protocol was in place and the school nurse would attend to the child at the nursery. The Head of the Nursery confirmed that this system worked very well. The school nurse ensured that any recording of the administration of medication was satisfactory. She had also assisted the nursery in teaching the children about hand washing routines. The school nurse had, the Head of the Nursery told us, two sessions with the nursery children on hand washing. She was now carrying out weekly checks with the children to ensure that they were following the hand washing rules. There were illustrated posters about hand washing in the toilets. The children were now familiar with the hand driers. Special arrangements were in place for one child who found the hand drier too noisy to use. The children had developed a poster for the hand driers "Hand washing - When we dry our hands we move them up and down in the dryer. The water is blown away." Throughout the day we saw that nursery staff encouraged and reminded the children to follow simple hygiene routines eg washing their hands before snack and after they had been to the toilet. Having the support of the school nurse was ideal. It meant that the children's learning about hygiene was re-enforced by another adult. The result was that the children had a first rate understanding about why they should wash their hands. Working in this way minimises the risk of infections spreading. The nursery had a very good system in place to carry out tooth brushing. They did this 4 days per week. We saw photographs of the children enthusiastically cleaning their teeth. A first rate system was in place to make sure that the tooth brushes were suitably stored and that the holders for them were cleaned regularly. Health and safety checks were in place in the separate kitchen area eg • daily checks of the fridge temperature, • food was only re-heated if it came from a tin - the temperature of the food was checked with a probe, • individual chopping board and colour coded knives were in place, along with colour coded mops and clothes, • nursery staff followed the latest food safety guidance, • a separate hand washing sink was in place as well as one for preparing food.

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We noted that the snack menu promoted healthy eating. It included fruit, and took account of children's preference. There was dietary information in place in the kitchen for any children who had allergies. This meant that staff were vigilant when preparing snack. This ensured that children were not given any foodstuffs that they were allergic to. The Head of nursery confirmed that an Individual Education Plan (IEP) was in place to support a child who has additional support needs. We noted that a Referral letter was in place. The IEP was comprehensive to ensure that the nursery was working well with the external professional. The IEP was updated termly and additions made as required. A copy was always sent to the parent. This meant that the nursery staff were supporting the child and parent to ensure the physical needs of the child were met. This support was confirmed by a parent who returned a questionnaire to us - she wrote "A wonderful school nursery where my child flourishes. She has recently been diagnosed with some physical problems and the nursery implemented a program immediately to support her. She adores nursery and wants to go all day, every day!" The nursery had established strong links with a external professionals eg a physiotherapist and a Speech and Language Therapist (SALT). These professionals emailed additional exercises to the nursery. Nursery staff work with individual children with these exercises, in full consultation with parents/carers. We noted that working in this way was following best practice guidance. It meant that children were supported to fulfil their potential, with support from the nursery staff. The Head of the Nursery confirmed that the new building had other additional advantages • a meeting room that can be used by parents, • the meeting room has parents information leaflets and nursery resource books for parents use, • play at home books and nursery policies were kept in the meeting room for parents/carers, • children's folders will now be kept in the wet room play room, where they were accessible to parents/carers.

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Inspection report continued The Head of the Nursery gave us a copy of the nursery Improvement Plan Overview, issued to parents/carers. This confirmed parental involvement in the curriculum for excellence learning experiences as well as the use of the new meeting room "A major part of our plan involves parents being more easily consulted on aspects of our planning, through our new planning board, and their child's achievements and next steps, through the My Space area. The new purpose built meeting room should facilitate this and make it easier for staff:parent interaction." Feedback from parents/carers to the nursery staff included - when talking about their 'Stay and Play' sessions "She adored my visit and has been very excited about it for days " "I enjoyed seeing what my son gets up to at nursery as he tells me when he comes home that he does nothing." "Fantastic how much the children learn and create in one session. .... The nursery has had such an impact on her development - thank you to all the staff." Comments from parents/carers who spoke with us on the day of the inspection included "My child loves the nursery - they go the extra mile." "I miss the coziness of old nursery but am pleased with the purpose built new one. Staff are brilliant - my son just loves it and daughter is getting first rate support to ensure her development needs are met. Also feeds into after school club which is brilliant too." In conclusion, the nursery staff, ably led by the Head of the Nursery, had worked very hard to ensure that the transition to the new building was a smooth one. They were now very well settled into the new space. The children were involved in helping staff decide what worked best in the new space. The spacious rooms resulted in highly effective use of the space and new facilities. This ensured that the curriculum for excellence continued to be developed. The skilled staff team were knowledgeable about childcare and ensured that the development needs and health needs of the children were met. Areas for improvement Key workers may wish to consider recording matters discussed with parents in a more systematic way, ie not just recording any concerns raised. Grade awarded for this statement: 6 - Excellent Number of requirements: 0 Number of recommendations: 0

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Inspection report continued

Quality Theme 2: Quality of Environment Grade awarded for this theme: 6 - Excellent Statement 1 We ensure that service users and carers participate in assessing and improving the quality of the environment within the service. Service strengths What we looked at for this Quality statement is reported under Quality statement 1.1. Based on these findings, we gave the nursery a grade 6 - excellent for the areas we looked at under these Quality statements. Areas for improvement These are detailed under Quality statement 1.1. Grade awarded for this statement: 6 - Excellent Number of requirements: 0 Number of recommendations: 0 Statement 2 We make sure that the environment is safe and service users are protected. Service strengths We found that the nursery was performing to a very high standard in the areas we looked at under this Quality statement. We looked at the progress made in the areas for improvement identified at the last inspection. We looked at the current health and safety of the service, including risk assessments. We considered how well the service was using its outdoor space and the plans to develop this. We spent time outside with the children and nursery staff. We talked to the nursery staff, the children, the Head of Nursery and to parents/carers. We gave the nursery a grade 6 - excellent, for the areas we looked at under this Quality statement. The following areas for improvement were identified in the previous inspection report. We have noted the progress made under each one. 1) The storage of the mop and bucket in the messy play area was not satisfactory. Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 21 of 37


Inspection report continued This was no longer applicable, as the new premises have a separate cleaner's cupboard. 2) The service now needed to record the attendance of all the children, including those who are only visiting. We saw that the nursery now had a separate visitors book where visitors and any visiting children will be signed in and out. Once any visiting children were registered at the nursery, they would be transferred to the nursery's daily register. We viewed this on the day of the inspection visit and found it satisfactory. 3) The involvement of the school nurse where a child has an accident should be recorded on the accident form. The accident from now has whether or not the school nurse was in attendance clearly stated. 4) The risk assessments for each room should contain detail similar to the service's generic risk assessment. We viewed the updated risk assessments on the day of our inspection visit, along with the children's risk assessments. More information about these are noted below. 5) The nursery should now store all resources and equipment in the main storage cupboard tidily and safely. This is no longer applicable as there are separate storage cupboards in the new building. 6) The height of the keyboard and computer screen should be reviewed. The keyboards and computer screens were now at the correct height as they were now in a purpose built area of the nursery. We confirmed that the Head of Nursery had satisfactorily completed all the areas for improvement. We found that in the new building the standard of overall safety was very high. This included • A fire drill report was in place. This showed that a fire drill was carried out with the staff and all of the nursery children, at least termly.

Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 22 of 37


Inspection report continued • A risk assessment along with written consent from parents was in place for visits out of the nursery. A comprehensive checklist was in place for staff to ensure all safety aspects were followed eg first aid kit, mobile phone, pen, emergency card and child protection card. • A cleaning schedule for toys and resources was in place. This was under review and the Head of Nursery confirmed that staff were now making effective use of steam cleaning to sterilise the toys and resources. • Daily generic risk assessments were in place. The Head of Nursery had completed risk assessment training. She told us that she was currently redefining these for all areas of the new nursery, including the outdoor space. • There were specific risk assessments in place for all the different activities in the nursery eg sand tray, snack table, walking in the school campus etc. • The Head of Nursery confirmed that she was given great guidance on Internet safety and on infection control. • She confirmed that she had taken advice on infection control from the Care Inspectorate's Professional Adviser for Infection Control. She stated that the advice was invaluable. In addition to these safety measures, the nursery staff developed ideal risk assessments with the children. We saw photographs of the children taking part in an activity and their views as to risks were clearly recorded in a children's risk booklet eg When the lambs visit us we - wash our hands after touching them, - do not put our hands in our mouths or on our face, - we use our quiet voice so that we do not frighten the lambs. Involving the children in this way helps them to understand about risky situations and provides them with a basic understanding about how germs are spread. It is following best practice guidance to work in this way. We spoke with the cleaner. She confirmed that she had access to outstanding training - food safety, cross contamination training and COSH training. She confirmed that the new building was easy to keep clean. There was a wet room disabled toilet, a locked cleaning cupboard, a spacious toilet, and child friendly hand driers. She confirmed that she had a cleaning schedule. The Head of Nursery told us that as a result of recent training, the cleaning schedule was changed to minimise the risk of cross contamination. The cleaner confirmed that her hours had changed and told us that this was now working very well. This was an example of the nursery staff following best practice guidance, to minimise risks.

Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 23 of 37


Inspection report continued We found that the nursery had a robust child protection policy in place. As an independent school they used the Scottish Council for Independent Schools (SCIS), child protection policy document as an additional reference. The nursery had a copy of the local authority guidelines. The local authority held meetings with the child protection coordinators of the independent schools in their area. The Head of Nursery confirmed that she attended these and found them highly effective. She said that they provided first rate opportunities to network with other professionals. All nursery staff we spoke with had a very good understanding about child protection reporting procedures. The Head of Nursery had very good links with the local authority and stated that she would seek advice from them if required. Having additional support in place eg through local authority links or through the Scottish Council for Independent Schools was very good practice. It means that should a child protection incident arise, the Head of Nursery and her staff have ideal sources of advice and guidance. The nursery had, in addition to the decking area accessed from the play rooms, an extensive outdoor space with a number of trees. It was an enclosed safe area, but had not yet been developed. This was because • the nursery wished to take time to develop it to provide a variety of learning experiences for the children, • there were still some outdoor equipment to come up from the old nursery, • the nursery wished to involve the children in decision making about how to develop the space, • the parents group was meeting shortly to discuss plans for the space, • the Head of Nursery and her staff wished to assess how the children used the space in order to make effective use of it. Despite the poor weather since the nursery had moved to the new building, the children had already used the outdoor area very regularly. The Early Years Officer confirmed that when it was snowy the nursery staff made very effective use of the outdoor space to give the children sledging and snowman building experiences. On the day we visited, the children spent time outside. Their activities included • • • • •

playing on push and ride toys, running about, playing with small world toys, gathering sticks, and using a Kelly kettle to make hot chocolate outside.

Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 24 of 37


Inspection report continued This last activity was very popular. The Early Years Officers used this experience to extend the children's learning. They gathered sticks and pine cones to light a fire in the Kelly kettle to heat the water for the hot chocolate. The children's comments during the activity confirmed that they had made hot chocolate outside before and had learned simple safety rules "Sticks go inside and are hot to boil the water." "Stand back - cos it's a little bit dangerous." "I can smell the smoke." "We're making hot chocolate and we've got marshmallows." "Let's snap it - pine cones - they can burn." "Good because there are tractors and the toy farm is up here. That's warm." One child told me that he liked playing outside best "Playing outside - all the bikes and just playing and running." and another confirmed that - "There's more space for playing." The Head of Nursery confirmed that in addition to the outside space the nursery also had access to the the whole of the school grounds including the astro turf and the tennis courts eg these areas could be used for push and ride toys and games. She said that this was especially useful if the weather has been poor as these areas are not muddy. Providing the children with ideal opportunities to develop their physical skills in a safe environment was first rate practice. The large outdoor space that the nursery now had meant that a wide range of learning opportunities could be developed for the children, in a safe enclosed environment. The area was ideal for exploring, running, jumping, climbing, planting and growing, and further developing the nursery's eco credentials (they had their Green Flag). Some of the nursery staff's ideas for this area are detailed under areas for improvement for this Quality statement. Parents/carers who completed questionnaires for us, confirmed that the nursery had a warm, caring environment: "It is a warm, loving, caring place." "Seeing them (her daughters) thrive in a safe and stimulating environment where they are happy is very reassuring as a parent." and a parent who spoke to us said "Happy friendly environment."

Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 25 of 37


Inspection report continued In conclusion, the nursery staff and Head of Nursery had an exceptional understanding about how to keep the children safe. The new building was purpose built as a nursery and was built following best practice advice with regards to health and safety and infection control. The nursery staff team worked hard to ensure that appropriate risk assessments were in place. The staff team, children and parents/ carers intended to develop the outdoor space to provide outstanding learning experiences. Areas for improvement The following ongoing areas for improvement were identified and discussed with the nursery team 1) As part of the settling in process to the new building, the nursery staff team will be reviewing the nursery resources and keeping only those that are relevant and purposeful for the modern curriculum. 2) Working together with the children and parents, the nursery staff team intended to develop the outdoor space to provide eg an outdoor classroom, dens, bivouac and low rope walks and to move the outdoor equipment from the old site. Grade awarded for this statement: 6 - Excellent Number of requirements: 0 Number of recommendations: 0

Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 26 of 37


Inspection report continued

Quality Theme 3: Quality of Staffing Grade awarded for this theme: 5 - Very Good Statement 1 We ensure that service users and carers participate in assessing and improving the quality of staffing in the service. Service strengths What we looked at for this Quality statement is reported under Quality statement 1.1. Based on these findings, we gave the nursery a grade 6 - excellent for the areas we looked at under these Quality statements. Areas for improvement These are detailed under Quality statement 1.1. Grade awarded for this statement: 6 - Excellent Number of recommendations: 0 Number of requirements: 0 Statement 3 We have a professional, trained and motivated workforce which operates to National Care Standards, legislation and best practice. Service strengths We gave the nursery a grade 5 - very good for the areas we looked at under this Quality statement. We concluded this after talking to the Early Years Officers and the Head of Nursery. We looked at staff training and took into account the nursery's Self assessment form. We looked at the support given to the Head of Nursery by her line manager and by the Head of Nursery to her nursery staff. We talked to the nursery staff about their qualifications. The Head of Morrison's Primary School was the line manager of the Head of Nursery. When we spoke with him he confirmed that he met with the Head of Nursery at least weekly. He held regular meetings with the Head of Nursery. The school was committed to involving the nursery in the life of the school. Joint assemblies were held with the primary school and nursery once a month. The Rector of Morrison's academy visited the nursery monthly. It is following good practice to ensure that all staff are appropriately supervised. Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 27 of 37


Inspection report continued The Head of Nursery told us that the regular meetings with her line manager were supportive. The Rector, Head of Primary and Head of Nursery worked closely to ensure that the nursery staff team were supported. The Head of Nursery and the Head of Primary had completed training on quality assurance. This training included how to support both teaching and nursery staff. The result of this was that observations of practice were now more frequent. Any observations of practice were followed up with a support meeting. Working in this way is first rate practice. It provides staff with ideal opportunities to discuss their practice, and enables managers to identify areas for improvement or suggest further training opportunities. The nursery staff who spoke with us confirmed that they had regular support meetings with the Head of Nursery. They said that they received a great deal of informal support as well. They confirmed that the Head of Nursery had an open door policy, that she spent a considerable amount of time in the playrooms. This meant that she offered support and made constructive suggestions on a daily basis. The Early Years Officers confirmed that as the staff team worked together for some years, they were comfortable providing each other with constructive feedback. Discussing practice issues in this way was following best practice guidance. It provides staff with additional information and extends their knowledge and understanding of childcare. Parents/carers who returned questionnaires to us confirmed that they thought highly of the staff team "The staff really care for each child and their relationships with each other and they give them the best start for primary school." "Staff are welcoming and approachable." and a parent who spoke with us told us that the staff team were "Awesome. Fantastic attention they give the kids, with a genuine interest in their development." The nursery staff team confirmed that they had a wide range of training opportunities. These included training offered by the local authority. Recent training had included further child protection training and training in Restorative approaches, which focuses on the underlying ethos of behaviour management. We looked at the nursery training calendar for this academic year. It confirmed that training was selected to take account of the nursery improvement plan as well as staff's own interests. Examples included -

Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 28 of 37


Inspection report continued • • • •

Emergency First Aid and Baby and Child First Aid, Food Safety Management, Nutrition and Healthy Eating, Introduction to Autism, Attachment Theory.

We found that the staff team were appropriately qualified. The team comprises a Head of Nursery, a qualified teacher who was registered with the General Teaching Council (GTC), and 3 Early Years Officers. All of the Early Years Officers held appropriate qualifications and were registered with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC). The nursery staff confirmed that they held weekly planning meetings. This provided them with a first rate opportunity to discuss practice issues with the Head of Nursery. It meant that she ensured that planning • took account of children's interests, the curriculum for excellence, Getting It Right For Every Child, and the SHANARRI principles, • was based on each child's learning journey, • took account of children's next steps for learning. Ensuring that members of the staff team • • • •

were appropriately qualified, were registered with professional bodies, had ideal training opportunities, and were appropriately supervised,

resulted in a a staff team who were motivated, knowledgeable, up to date about current childcare practice and enthusiastic about their job. The result was the standard of childcare in the nursery was very high. In conclusion, we found that the nursery staff team were knowledgeable and enthusiastic about their work. They held appropriate qualification, were registered with professional bodies, and had first rate training opportunities. Areas for improvement We recognised that over the past few months the whole nursery team and especially the Head of Nursery, had worked extremely hard to ensure that the move to the new nursery building was seamless. However, now that the nursery was well established in the new building the Head of Nursery and the staff team may wish to consider taking their time to effect further changes. In particular, the Head of Nursery should work together with her line manager to identify areas for delegation to other members of the nursery team. Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 29 of 37


Inspection report continued Grade awarded for this statement: 5 - Very Good Number of requirements: 0 Number of recommendations: 0

Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 30 of 37


Inspection report continued

Quality Theme 4: Quality of Management and Leadership Grade awarded for this theme: 5 - Very Good Statement 1 We ensure that service users and carers participate in assessing and improving the quality of the management and leadership of the service. Service strengths What we looked at for this Quality statement is reported under Quality statement 1.1. Based on these findings, we gave the nursery a grade 6 - excellent for the areas we looked at under these Quality statements. Areas for improvement These are detailed under Quality statement 1.1. Grade awarded for this statement: 6 - Excellent Number of requirements: 0 Number of recommendations: 0 Statement 4 We use quality assurance systems and processes which involve service users, carers, staff and stakeholders to assess the quality of service we provide Service strengths We found that the nursery was performing very well in the areas we looked at under this Quality statement. We concluded this after talking to the Head of the Primary School and the Head of Nursery about the quality assurance systems in place. We looked at the nursery development plan, along with the self evaluation that informed this. We took account of the nursery's Self assessment. We noted the way that the Head of Nursery informed parents/carers about the development plan. We took account of the ideal communication she had with parents/carers, as described under Quality statement 1.1. We gave the nursery a grade 5, very good for the areas we looked at under this Quality statement. The Head of Nursery and her staff team had a first rate understanding of the nursery's quality assurance systems. The Head of Nursery understood her responsibilities to carry out regular audits to inform the nursery quality assurance systems - these included Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 31 of 37


Inspection report continued • • • •

health and safety checks, audits of accidents and incidents, regular observations of staff practice, regular support meetings for staff.

Working in this way provided the Head of Nursery with an overview of the work of the nursery. It meant that she could, by carrying out regular audits, identify any areas for improvement. The nursery identified the following quality assurance systems in their Self assessment form "We complete the centre evaluation annually for local authority purposes which is based on the local authority Improvement planning system to systematically assess all areas of our service over a manageable time frame. We are piloting a Strategic Planning model which it is hoped will replace the current improvement planning system which has become a little stale and cumbersome. We will also be part of the new quality assurance system being implemented at the School next session." When we talked to the Head of Nursery she confirmed that the improvement planning included a self evaluation against the quality indicators for the curriculum for excellence. All strategic areas have a clearly defined person who is responsible, a timescale and resources including any external support. This is following good practice as it means that the Head of Nursery can monitor the progress of each strategic area and ensure that work is taken forward timeously. Nursery staff confirmed that they were involved in the self evaluation process. Recent developments in this area included assessing progress against GIRFEC and SHANARRI. We looked at documents which confirmed this - the nursery's current position against the curriculum for excellence quality indicators were clearly stated, along with targets in each area for 2012-13 and longer term targets for 2013-14. Working in this way was an example of first rate practice. The Head of Nursery had written to all parents/carers, providing them with an overview of the nursery development plan. In this letter she highlighted key areas in the plan, including • parents being more easily consulted on aspects of planning, through the nursery's new planning board and 'My Space' area (see Quality statement 1.3), • using the whole school facilities, maintaining and expand the nursery's use of the community - establishing the parents/carers garden group and joining the school Eco group to maintain the nursery 'Green Flag' status, • developing the learning from the Restorative Approaches training (see Quality statement 1.3 and 3.3). Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 32 of 37


Inspection report continued In the letter she highlighted that copies of the full improvement plan were on display in the nursery, and that she would welcome input from parents/carers. Keeping parents/carers informed in this way was a first rate example of the nursery's commitment to actively involve parents/carers in their children's learning journeys and in improving the work of the nursery. As part of the planned move to the new building, the Head of Nursery and her staff team identified key targets to ensure that parents/carers and their children "feel part of settling into and developing the new nursery as we move in". Examples of these key targets included • Setting up a parents/carers group to look at ways of celebrating children's achievements - this was now in place, meeting regularly and using the meeting room in the nursery. • Designating a member of nursery staff to sit on the school's Health Promoting School's committee and provide information and support for parents to use at home - this was now in place. • Contact all local schools regarding the nursery transition and continue to build professional relationships with mainstream school staff - this was ongoing the liaison with mainstream staff described in Quality statement 1.3 showed that the nursery staff had made very good progress with this. We noted that parents/carers were kept very well informed about all aspects of the move to the new nursery building. An example of this was the detailed information provided on the school's website and in the nursery blogs. The Head of Nursery highlighted in the Self assessment form other ways that the nursery kept parents/carers informed about improvements - she wrote "We produce a Standards and Quality Report for service users each year which is based on the Improvement Plan and this will have involved all staff and service users during its production. By looking at key areas each year the whole process becomes workable for all concerned. As mentioned previously, within the past year great progress has been made to harness the viewpoints of all our service users which has been put to excellent use in our service implementation." Parents/carers confirmed in the questionnaires returned to us that they thought that the nursery was well run "..... we have now experienced 3 nurseries and it is my opinion that Morrison's Academy has provided the best level of care and opportunities." Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 33 of 37


Inspection report continued "A wonderful school nursery where my child flourishes ..." "The wide variety of activities and resources provided establish great building blocks for their learning - they love being nursery girls!" "My son has developed into a confident, well rounded boy with a wide range of interests during his time at the nursery .... " In conclusion, the nursery, as part of the whole school complex, was well led by the Head of Nursery and the Head of the Primary School. There was a robust quality assurance system in place. This involved the nursery staff team in evaluating the work of the nursery. Self evaluation and self assessment informed the improvement and development plans for the nursery. Parents/carers were kept very well informed about planned improvements. Areas for improvement The following areas for improvement were identified by the nursery as ongoing areas for improvement, as detailed in the nursery's Self assessment form • Head of Nursery is part of the communications review team for the whole school to look at innovative ways to improve and enhance the relevancy of communication with our service users - covering all aspects of our service. • We have been part of the school processes to gain Health Promoting status, Rights Respecting level 1, Eco Flag and different members of nursery staff have responsibility for these areas. They are all ongoing and require sustainable effort to maintain. • The school is due to sign up for Investors in People for the next session and the pre-liminary study has been carried out. The nursery will be part of the team. Grade awarded for this statement: 5 - Very Good Number of requirements: 0 Number of recommendations: 0

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Inspection report continued

4 Other information Complaints No complaints have been upheld, or partially upheld, since the last inspection.

Enforcements We have taken no enforcement action against this care service since the last inspection.

Additional Information None noted.

Action Plan Failure to submit an appropriate action plan within the required timescale, including any agreed extension, where requirements and recommendations have been made, will result in SCSWIS re-grading the Quality Statement within the Management and Leadership Theme as unsatisfactory (1). This will result in the Quality Theme for Management and Leadership being re-graded as Unsatisfactory (1).

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Inspection report continued

5 Summary of grades Quality of Care and Support - 6 - Excellent Statement 1

6 - Excellent

Statement 3

6 - Excellent

Quality of Environment - 6 - Excellent Statement 1

6 - Excellent

Statement 2

6 - Excellent

Quality of Staffing - 5 - Very Good Statement 1

6 - Excellent

Statement 3

5 - Very Good

Quality of Management and Leadership - 5 - Very Good Statement 1

6 - Excellent

Statement 4

5 - Very Good

6 Inspection and grading history Date

Type

Gradings

14 Jun 2010

Unannounced

Care and support Environment Staffing Management and Leadership

6 - Excellent 5 - Very Good Not Assessed Not Assessed

7 Nov 2008

Unannounced

Care and support Environment Staffing Management and Leadership

6 - Excellent 6 - Excellent 5 - Very Good 5 - Very Good

All inspections and grades before 1 April 2011 are those reported by the former regulator of care services, the Care Commission.

Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 36 of 37


Inspection report continued To find out more about our inspections and inspection reports Read our leaflet 'How we inspect'. You can download it from our website or ask us to send you a copy by telephoning us on 0845 600 9527. This inspection report is published by the Care Inspectorate. You can get more copies of this report and others by downloading it from our website: www.careinspectorate.com or by telephoning 0845 600 9527.

Translations and alternative formats This inspection report is available in other languages and formats on request.

Telephone: 0845 600 9527 Email: enquiries@careinspectorate.com Web: www.careinspectorate.com

Morrison's Academy Nursery, page 37 of 37

Inspectionreport  

http://www.morrisonsacademy.org/assets/0001/8807/InspectionReport.pdf

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