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in the studio with keith brymer jones PAGE 26 8 pull-out illustrations

MAKE IT!

CROCHET

SUNGLASSES CASE

APPLI UE

COLLAR BABY KNITTED BLOCKS

MACRAME

PLANTER

MARBLE-EFFECT

DINING SET SILVER CLAY EARRINGS &more..

Green living make a summer th! succulent wrea


F420 The Innov-is F420 is packed with a huge range of features including 140 stitches, lettering, lock stitch button, automatic thread cutter, and Square Feed Drive System for strong, smooth, even sewing on all types of fabric.

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55FE The feature-packed Innov-is 55 Fashion Edition will shape your fashion dreams into reality. 81 stitches including 10 one step button hole styles plus lettering together with the included 12 accessory feet make this an excellent all round machine.

27SE The Innov-is 27SE offers fantastic versatility for both the beginner and experienced sewer. With fingertip controls, 50 stitches including 5 one step button hole styles and a protective hard case; it’s ideal for all kinds of sewing.

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macramé

appliqué

knitting

26 MOLLIEMAKES 3

MAIN IMAGE PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK

INSIDE THIS ISSUE ¤ FELT SUCCULENT WREATH ¤ SILVER CLAY EARRINGS ¤ EMBROIDERED PICNIC BLANKET ¤ EASY-SEW BACKPACK ¤ CROCHET SUNGLASSES CASE ¤ SUMMER DINING SET


CONTENTS

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18

ON THE COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK; MODEL: ALEXANDRA FIA

SUCCULENT WREATH

Talk to us! facebook.com/MollieMakes

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issue number eighty two

Summer dining set

INTRODUCING... LIVING The latest news from the world of handmade

Fill your life and home with crafted goodness

9 INTRODUCING…

49 LIVING

Handpicked crafty happenings

We find the loveliest hand-crafted, creative buys for your home

14 TRENDS Take inspiration from the Far East

52 HOME TOUR

18 FELT WREATH

Alice in Scandiland blogger Alice Collyer’s modern, minimalist abode

Go faux with a felt succulent wreath

57 MACRAMÉ PLANTER 26 TEA AND A CHAT We chat to potter Keith Brymer Jones

Show off your prettiest plants in an 70s-inspired ombré macramé hanger

33 SUNGLASSES CASE

60 DINING SET

Tapestry crochet with a zingy twist

Use clever marbling techniques to make plain tableware look dinner party-worthy

38 GOOD READ

@MollieMakes

MollieMakes

How to overcome imposter syndrome

64 PICNIC BLANKET

41 SWAN COLLAR

Raid your haberdashery stash to sew this colourful summer accessory

Appliqué your way to statement style

67 PULL-OUT PAPERS pinterest.com/MollieMakes

youtube.com/user/MollieMakes

44 HANDMADE AWARD WINNERS The 2017 Handmade Awards results!

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Brighten up gifts and walls with Louise Lockhart’s collage-style prints and posters


NEVER MISS AN ISSUE 24 Subscribe UK Subscribe today to get five issues for just £5 – that’s only £1 an issue!

93 Subscribe overseas International subscribers save up to 40%

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Easy-sew backpack

LOVING Treats and treasures to fall in love with

Origamifold bag

FEELING INSPIRED

33

Glasses case

91

I’m writing this just after the Mollie Makes Handmade Awards 2017 – one of my absolute favourite days of the year. It’s a unique opportunity to bring the UK’s creative community together, and our annual celebration of all things handmade never fails to inspire me. We were thrilled to welcome to our incredible panel of judges who chose this year’s deserving winners – step behind the scenes on page 44 and meet this year’s talented finalists. A common theme among even the most successful crafters we spent the day with is the fear of imposter syndrome – that nagging feeling your creative output isn’t quite good enough. Turn to page 38 to find out how to overcome it – we think you’re all awesome!

Summer T-shirt

Cath Dean Editor

75 LOVING Our pick of the most beautiful things for you to adore and make

77 BABY BLOCKS Knit up tactile shapes for a little ‘un

82 BACKPACK Get set for weekends away and mini adventures with this easy-sew rucksack

87 LEAF EARRINGS Imprint sage leaves into silver clay

91 NO-PATTERN TEE

64

Picnic blanket

Update your wardrobe in an afternoon

98 TEMPLATES All the shapes for this issue’s makes

106 BACK PAGE PROJECT Junk and Glitter’s Sophie Gibbons shares how she expanded her business Subscribe at molliemakes.com

Turn the page to discover your two free gifts! Turn to page 67 for your papers


Contributors

Deidre Kindall Deidre loves spending quality time with her scissors and glue gun, and her felt florals have reached celebrity status, appearing on Good Morning America and The Ellen Show. When she’s not crafting, Deidre loves to cook. Make Deidre’s succulent wreath on page 18. www.flohradesign.com

Keith Brymer Jones Keith’s fascination with clay began at the age of 11, when he made a ceramic owl. Alongside pursuing a career in pottery, Keith was also the lead singer in a band for years, and still appears in the occasional playful music video. Explore Keith’s studio on page 26. www.keithbrymerjones.com

EDITORIAL Editor Cath Dean Deputy Editor Nikki Arnold Senior Art Editor (on maternity leave) Helena Steele Art Editor Kit Cheung Production Editor Yvette Streeter Deputy Art Editor Becki Clark Digital Editor Nina Dyer Picture Editor Emma Georgiou Newsletter Coordinator Lottie Storey molliemakes@immediate.co.uk

ADVERTISING Call: 0117 300 8206 Senior Advertising Manager Penny Stokes Client Partnership Manager Beckie Pring Brand Sales Executive Lauren Morris

MARKETING & CIRCULATION Head of Newstrade Marketing Martin Hoskins Newstrade Marketing Manager Janine Smith Subscriptions Director Jacky Perales-Morris Direct Marketing Manager Penny Clapp

PRODUCTION Production Director Sarah Powell Production Managers Louisa Molter/Rose Griffiths Junior Production Coordinator Lily Owens-Crossman

LICENSING Director of International Licensing and Syndication Tim Hudson tim.hudson@immediate.co.uk

Louise Lockhart Louise spends her days creating designs from paper cutouts, dreaming up her own little worlds. She applies her illustrations onto all sorts, but loves giving traditional games a modern twist. Pass the parcel, anyone? Cut and stick Louise’s papers on page 67. www.louiselockhart.co.uk

Alice Collyer Mother, maker and picture taker, Alice shares her Scandi style inspiration, glimpses of her Cornwall home, and her parenting trials and tribulations on her blog. You’ll love both her sense of style and her sense of humour. Take a look around Alice’s home on page 52. www.alicejcollyer.wordpress.com

BUYING TEAM Paul Torre, Karen Flannigan, Corinne Mellerup

MANAGEMENT Publishing Director Catherine Potter Group Senior Editor Julie Taylor Chief Executive Officer Tom Bureau Managing Director, Bristol Andy Marshall

SUBSCRIPTIONS For new orders and back issue sales call 03330 162 142 or visit www. buysubscriptions.com/craft. For enquiries relating to your subscription email molliemakes@servicehelpline.co.uk or call +44 (0) 330 162 142.

COPYRIGHT GUIDELINES FOR PROJECTS We have requested permission from designers so you can make and sell selected projects on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. Please credit the designer where appropriate and when requested. Mollie Makes encourages creativity and as well as making for gifts and for yourself, we want to help you make small batches of handmade items to sell. You can individually handmake as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell for yourself, a local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) or go into mass production, so you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine or its kit is prohibited. Please respect one another’s copyright.

Amelia Flower Amelia is an illustrator who loves to travel. Studying people and environments to gather new ideas, she’s often inspired by everyday characters and situations, designing bright, bold pictures that put smiles on faces. See Amelia’s illustration on page 38. www.ameliaflower.co.uk

Chelsea Foy Chelsea was originally a musical theatre performer, and still breaks out into song and dance in her studio in California. A crafter and blogger, Chelsea spends her days painting things gold and oversharing. Make Chelsea’s picnic blanket on page 64. www.lovelyindeed.com

Other contributors Anna Alicia, Jessica Bateman, Valerie Bracegirdle, Margie Broadhead, Twinkie Chan, Sammy Claridge, Alexandra Fia @ Mustard Models, Sophie Gibbons, Charlotte Gray, Erin Hung, Maria Isabel, Kate Jenkins, Zoe Larkins, Nikki McWilliams, Laura Minter, Emma Mitchell, Fiona Murray, Hester van Overbeek, Amy Philip, Rebecca Rees, Rebecca Reid, Philip Sowels, Lottie Storey, Tia Williams, Fanny Zendenius

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Mollie Makes is published by:

Immediate Media Company Limited, 2nd Floor, Tower House, Fairfax Street, Bristol, BS1 3BN. Tel: 0117 927 9009 We abide by IPSO’s rules and regulations. To give feedback about our magazines, please visit immediate.co.uk, email editorialcomplaints@immediate.co.uk or write to Catherine Dean or Katherine Conlon, Immediate Media Co., Vineyard House, 44 Brook Green, London W6 7BT. Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited (company number 05715415) is registered in England and Wales. The registered office of Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited is at Vineyard House, 44 Brook Green, London W6 7BT. All information contained in this magazine is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price of products/services referred to in this magazine. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk. Although every care is taken, neither Immediate Media Company Bristol Limited nor its employees agents or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage.


your free gift!

Custard cream keyring kit Take a biscuity treat wherever you go with Nikki McWilliams’ quirky make

plus

THIS GIFT COMES WITH THE PRINT COPY OF THE MAGAZINE ONLY. ALTERNATIVE KIT ON SOME OVERSEAS COPIES. PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK

Sweet treats project book with 6 makes inside!

One is never enough… “I designed my custard cream cushion in 2010, and it’s still one of my favourites. Over the years we’ve created limited edition colours, and in 2015 I created mini versions for my pitch at the Mollie Makes Handmade Awards. They went down a treat with the judges, so I knew I needed to develop the idea. I’m so excited to see them as plush keyring kits for the magazine that first inspired them! This keyring is so easy to make – I love the

idea that you can take a little biscuit cushion with you wherever you go! I’ll be clipping mine to my favourite yellow backpack.” Nikki is Creative Director and Chief Biscuit Sampler at Nikki McWilliams Ltd. Her work is inspired by nostalgia, food and colour, and you can find her biscuit cushions, pins, accessories and stationery at www.nikkimcwilliams.com. Find instructions for sewing your keyring on page 97, then share it using #molliemakers.


15-17 September 2017 The Green at Hampton Court Palace

Join Kirstie Allsopp, Sophie Conran and Annie Sloan for a weekend of inspiration and creativity. Try wirework, calligraphy, or machine sewing in hands-on workshops, shop for unique handmade products from 350 sellers, and tickle your tastebuds with delicious food and drink.

Save £3 and get a

FREE Jewellery Maker kit worth £20 Quote

MOLLIE4

Book tickets today at thehandmadefair.com In association with

The Handmade Fair

Official partners

@handmadefair

The Handmade Fair

@handmadefair

Offer applies to adult Full Experience tickets, and tickets cost £29 + BF (usually £32 + BF). Offer closes 11.08. 2017 or when sold out. Kit includes all you need to make your own piece of jewellery, and will be collectable from the Mollie Makes Café at The Handmade Fair


INTRODUCING..

82

THE LATEST IN CREATIVE GOODNESS – HANDPICKED JUST FOR YOU

PHOTOGRAPHY: ROSA COPADO

Hit refresh! We Are Knitters invited photographer and creative Rosa Copado to re-imagine some of the brand’s most popular summer patterns. The result is their Rosa Copado collection, with Rosa modelling each of the seven designs, capturing them in a novel and inspiring light. www.weareknitters.co.uk

Subscribe at molliemakes.com

82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 9


TOP READ Explorer pals Whip up a crew of mini travel buds for your holidays with Ilaria Caliri’s new book, Amigurumi Globetrotters. From sightseeing monkeys to sunbathing bears, it features 15 critters for you to crochet. www. amigurumipatterns.net

Up your street cred with a screenprinted rucksack from Just Kim Prints. Handprinted and handmade in BethLondon, the texture-inspired range also features holdalls, shoppers and clutches. www.justkimprints.com

Helping us to stand out from the crowd, Manchester-based label LOELA creates hip, hand-printed clothing and jewellery. Their new Memphis necklace is a striking mix of clay shapes, striped beads and brass tubes. www.loela.co.uk

THIS MONTH’S WISHLIST It’s time to tell ‘em how it is with I Make Things With My Hands patches from The New Craft House. The rules? Iron or stitch onto jackets, jeans, tees, or whatever else you fancy and wear like a badge of honour – ‘cause it’s ace to be a maker. www.thenewcrafthouse.com

Bright, painterly and super-stylish, Katie Martin’s accessories are ethically-made, wearable works of art. Her crush-worthy wares are due to go on sale any day now at her new online store. You saw them here first... www.bystudiohand.com 10 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82


WWW.BURGONANDBALL.COM

Brie’s illustrations adorn homewares and gardening gifts

BRAND FOCUS Brie Harrison When illustrator Brie isn’t busy working on new designs for stationery and homewares in her Hackney studio, she relishes trips back to her native Suffolk countryside, where she soaks up the forests, beaches and gardens that inspire her work. Her botanical prints are worked into greetings cards, fabrics and accessories, tapping into our plant obsession and prettying up our homes with everlasting greenery. www.brieharrison.com

Passionate about bringing colourful storage to our homes, and equally generous with the makers behind it, La Basketry is the brainchild of sisters Tabara and Mamy N’Diaye. They work directly with female artisans in Senegal to create baskets that enrich our homes with ethical, boho style. www.labasketry.com

Her simple greeting cards have a distinctive style

WEBSITE TO WATCH

All designs are developed from hand-drawn sketches

Not the Kind

Subscribe at molliemakes.com

WWW.BURGONANDBALL.COM

It’s good to be different – a mantra that online shop Not the Kind holds dear to its heart. Bursting with design-led gifts, art, homewares, stationery and jewellery, every product is chosen on an individual – rather than collective – merit, meaning the site’s aesthetic is as distinctive and bright as the wares up for grabs. www.notthekind.com 82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 11


TOP READ Slow hands

Little trendsetters will love Olli Ella’s new Piki baskets – just the right size for transporting beach treasures, mini packed lunches and those must-wear summer accessories. www.olliella.com

We’re always stoked to see a new Nikki McWilliams design – have you seen this month’s free gift? – but she’s really outdone herself with this teatime tin pin. It opens up to reveal a tray of mini biccies inside. www.nikkimcwilliams.com 12 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82

We love trying out different crafts, and Making Books by the talented chaps at the London Centre for Book Arts has just provided the inspiration for our next endeavour. It’s a beautifully illustrated guide to the art of bookmaking, delivered with passion and expertise. We can’t wait to get started. www.pavilionbooks.com

Hailing from Marbella, on the coast of Spain, Viva Boho Kids make the most chic baby rompers we’ve ever seen. This pink and mint baby girl design is aaaahdorable, featuring boho cross stitch, ontrend tassels and pom pom trim. www.vivabohokids.etsy.com

Join us and Kirstie Allsopp at Hampton Court on 15-17th September for another unforgettable weekend of craft and creativity at The Handmade Fair. With new workshops, plus celebs, Mash Ups and shopping, it’s going to be the best one yet. Tickets are on sale now – use code MOLLIE4 to save £3! www.thehandmadefair.com


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Blogtacular

founder Kat

EVENT FOCUS

Molesworth addresses the

Blogtacular 2017

assembled bloggers.

Creativity, collaboration and camaraderie! Find out what happened at this year’s Blogtacular, the biggest blogging event in the calendar

programme

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was packed with inspiring speakers. 03

Blogtacular is one of our favourite events, and never fails to leave us feeling inspired after meeting so many like-minded creatives. This year’s conference was bigger and better than ever, with bloggers from across the UK coming together to share ideas and learn from leaders in their field. Events kicked off the day before, with bloggers meeting to take in London’s most photogenic spots on a colour-filled photo walk. After a seriously impressive number of selfies, everyone congregated at West Elm for the legendary Friday night party – complete with unicorn smoothies! Subscribe at molliemakes.com

On the day, Baggage Reclaim blogger Natalie Lue got everyone in a creative mood with a talk on staying true to yourself in the ever-changing world of blogging. Mollie Makes Editor Cath Dean hosted a workshop on finding your creative niche, while guest speakers including Xanthe Berkeley, Kayte Ferris and Sas Petherick covered topics from working with brands to how to move beyond self doubt. The day ended with an inspirational keynote address by blogger, author and podcaster Emma Gannon. Book your tickets for next year’s event at www. blogtacular.com – we’ll see you there!

This year’s

Opening speaker

Natalie Lue takes to the stage. 04

Mollie Makes

Editor Cath Dean shares her tips on finding your niche. 05

Masses of

colour at Friday’s photo walk around central London.

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INTRODUCING trends

THIS MONTH WE’RE OBSESSING ABOUT...

ORIENTAL Fashion finds and homewear treats filled with Eastern promise

Sheer fabric and floral prints for balmy summer nights. www. anthropologie.com

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INTRODUCING trends 02

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These tasselled silk

lanterns are too good to let go. www.graham andgreen.co.uk 02

Light up your outfit

with Tatty Devine’s laser cut pendant. 04

www.tattydevine.com 03

Clicking ‘add to bag’

never felt so good. www. skinnydiplondon.com 08

04

Go Geisha with

feminine florals in the softest of hues. www.monsoon.co.uk 08

05

Far East style from

artisan makers. www. arthacollections.com 06

“Two tickets for the

Orient Express, please.” www.riflepaperco.com 07

Temporary tattoos,

permanently pretty. www.paperself.com 08

Bring the trend to

your table with wabi07

sabi aesthetics. www. shop-generalstore.com 05

MAKE IT! TURN THE PAGE TO DIY THE ORIENTAL TREND Subscribe at molliemakes.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY: HOLLY MARDER

06


INTRODUCING trends

SEW IT!

ORIGAMI–FOLD BAG

MATERIALS Q Patterned cotton fabric, 35 x 99cm (13 x 39") Q Plain cotton fabric, 35 x 99cm (13 x 39") Q Matching sewing thread Q Beige felt, 16 x 5.5cm (63/8 x 2 ") Q Tailor’s chalk Q Set square 01 Place the fabrics with right sides (RS) together and pin. Sew around all four edges using a 1.5cm (5/8") seam allowance, and leaving a 5cm (2") gap.

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02 Trim the seam allowance to 1cm (3/8") and clip the corners. Turn the fabric RS out and press, folding in the edges of the turning gap to the wrong side (WS). Sew the gap closed. 03 Positioning the fabric patterned side up, fold the bottom right hand corner up to meet the top edge, creating a triangle. Fold the top left corner down in the same way. 04 Make a diagonal fold along the middle of the patterned fabric, bringing the top right hand corner down towards you.

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05 Where the plain fabric edges meet, pinch together with patterned sides facing and pin 0.5cm ( ") in. Carefully turn the folded fabric over and pin where the edges meet on the other side in the same way. Sew the pinned lines, oversewing at the start and the end to secure. 06 Turn the bag RS (patterned side) out. Bring together the two points to form the handle, pin together neatly, then sew using zigzag stitch. 07 Wrap the felt lengthways around the section where the

points join, positioning the long edges on the underside of the handle. Pin the long edges together, then sew to secure.

Anna is a designer-maker with a fascination for historical craft, in particular, Japanese craft and design. All Anna’s contemporary accessories are handmade in her London studio using 100% wool felt and organic cotton, as ethical and environment concerns are central to her collections. www.aalicia.bigcartel.com


Zes� fo� you� nes�! When it comes to the cutest, trendiest treats and treasures for your studio, Moda has you covered! Start by storing your favorite craft supplies with these tins featuring art by

, , and

sew

There are many more goodies coming from Moda Fabrics this Fall, 2017. Be on the lookout at your favorite independent fabric retailer! © 2017 moda fabrics All Rights Reserved


PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK


Gree

ivin

Craft the current trend for succulents with Deidre Kindall’s fresh summer wreath


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HOW TO MAKE… A SUCCULENT WREATH MATERIALS Q Wool felt in mint green, pistachio, green, teal, pale pink and dark pink Q Wool felt balls in dark green, 2cm ( ") diameter Q Cardboard Q Hot glue gun

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Want to fill your home with greenery, but can’t even keep a cactus alive? Or maybe you’re a fully-paid up member of the crazy plant lady crew, looking to add to your collection? Either way, this faux-fabulous wreath will give your walls an on-trend pop of colour. You’ll glue together a whole host of shapes to create your display, so either use the templates on page 98, or download them at www. molliemakes.com and print them onto freezer paper. This can be ironed onto the felt and peeled off after, making cutting out a breeze.

01 To fill the wreath, make three of each succulent. To make the spiky succulents, cut three spiky petals from the mint felt, using the templates on page 98. Starting at one short end, roll up a strip, keeping the bottom long edge even. Glue the inside of the end section to secure, then repeat with the remaining two spiky petal strips. 02 To make the folded succulents, cut 18 large pointed petals from the dark pink felt using the template. Working with six of the petals, add a line of glue along the bottom and on one side as pictured. Fold each

petal in half along the width and hold until the glue is set. Next, glue two petals side by side, then repeat with another two petals. Glue the two pairs together with raw edges facing, then glue on a petal at either side to fill the gaps, aligning the raw edges. Repeat the step twice more with the remaining petals. 03 To make the scalloped succulents, cut 12 small scalloped petals and 18 large scalloped petals from the teal felt, using the templates. Glue four small petals into a fan shape, with each petal slightly overlapping the next. Roll it


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up to create the centre, adding a dot of glue to secure. Glue three large petals around the outside, slightly overlapping each one, then glue another three petals around the outside of those, slightly offset from the previous layer and overlapping each other. Repeat to make two more succulents. 04 To make the traditional succulents, cut 15 small basic petals and 18 large basic petals from the pistachio felt, using the templates. Glue five small petals into a fan shape, with each petal slightly overlapping the next. Roll it up to

create the centre, adding a dot of glue to secure. Next, glue six large petals into a fan shape, then glue the two ends to create a cupped shape. Place the centre piece into the cupped shape, then repeat the step twice more with the remaining petals to make three in total. 05 To make the clustered succulents, cut 45 oval petals from the mint felt, using the template. Glue five petals into a fan shape, with each petal slightly overlapping the next. Roll them up, adding a dot of glue to secure, then repeat twice more. Glue these three clusters

together, then repeat to make two more clustered succulents. 06 To make the artichoke succulents, cut 48 small pointed petals, using the template. Glue four petals to a felt ball as pictured, with the points lining up in the centre, and each petal lying flat against the ball. Glue a second layer of four petals flat against the first layer, alternating where the petals are placed. Continue this with two more layers of four petals, this time allowing the petals to pop out, instead of laying them flat. Repeat to make two more succulents. 82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 21


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HOW TO MAKE‌ A SUCCULENT WREATH 07 To make the snipped succulents, cut three 2.5 x 22cm (1 x 8 ") strips from the pale pink felt. Glue along the top of one long edge, then fold the strip in half along the length and hold until the glue dries. Cut along the length of the folded edge, roughly halfway along the width, to create a fringed effect. Roll up the strip at an angle, gluing as you go to secure the spiral, then repeat with the remaining two strips. 08 To make the skinny succulent, cut 30 skinny petals from green felt, using the template. Glue six petals into a fan shape, with each petal

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slightly overlapping the next. Roll up the fan to create the centre, making sure it has four points. Glue to secure, then attach four petals, one by one, between the centre four petals. Repeat twice more with the remaining 20 petals. 09 To make the wreath base, cut two hoop shapes with a 22cm (8 ") wide outer circle and a 14cm (5 ") wide inner circle from the cardboard. Glue the two shapes together, then use this as a template to cut two hoop shapes from teal felt. Glue these to the front and back of the cardboard hoop.

10 Measure the width of the cardboard, then cut strips of teal felt to the same width, to cover the inside and the outside of the wreath. Attach with glue to cover the cardboard completely. 11 Take one of each succulent, and position them in place on one third of the wreath. Once you’re happy with the placement, glue them down, then repeat twice more to fill the rest of the wreath. If you have any sparse areas, use the skinny petal template to cut additional shapes from the teal felt, and glue them into the gaps.


Deidre Kindall Deidre is the co-owner of fLOhRA, and has been making felt florals for over six years. She’s passionate about teaching and paying it forward, so in addition to selling patterns for her beautiful designs, Deidre also offers online classes and tutorials making wreaths and floral hair accessories. www.flohradesign.com


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Describe a typical working day. I get up at 6am to the sound of seagulls, get to the studio by 7am, then usually call my team in China, where the factory is based. If it’s a good day, I’ll be on the wheel developing new shapes, listening to Radio 4 and drinking black coffee by 8am. Alas, I very rarely spend the whole day on the wheel now, as my job consists of many other tasks, too.

Living your passion with...

KEITH BRYMER JONES We visited The Great Pottery Throw Down judge for a chat about clay, wheels, and what it’s like going from creative to celebrity Words: JESSICA BATEMAN Photographs: FIONA MURRAY

You’ll probably recognise Keith as the judge from one of our favourite crafty TV shows – BBC Two’s The Great Pottery Throw Down. But, when he’s not gracing our screens, he juggles running his own ceramics brand with his job as Head of Design at MAKE International. A born and bred Londoner, Keith discovered his love of ceramics at 11 years old, and became an apprentice for Harefield Pottery at 18. After his apprenticeship, Keith opened a studio in North London, supplementing his income by running ‘creative clay’ 26 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82

classes at a local special needs centre. He created pieces for retailers such as Heal’s, Laura Ashley and The Conran Shop, before being recruited by MAKE. The Throw Down came about after Rich Marrow of Love Productions saw a comedy video of Keith dressed as Adele (Rolling in the Clay), and asked if wanted to be in “the pottery version of Bake Off”. When he’s not on the show, you’ll find Keith at his Kent studio, where he hand-finishes every Keith Brymer Jones pottery piece. We visited to take a look around, and chat about his creative life.

Where do you find inspiration? It comes from various places. Sometimes I can be watching a film, travelling around a country or looking at architecture, and I’ll suddenly realise a certain path I want to take for a particular project. I rarely sketch, as the wheel is my sketchbook, but I do jot down weights and sizes of samples. How did you learn your craft? Practise, practise and more practise. Luckily, I had a very traditional training that really focused on the craft itself. In what I do now, of course, design is at the forefront, and the craft element follows through to achieve said design. What is it about working with ceramics that you love so much? There are so many things! The immediacy of producing a three-dimensional object, and the fact that ceramic production


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

‘Ceramic production is never-ending in terms of variations, finishes and use.’

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01

is technically never-ending in terms of variations, effects, finishes and end use. Which items couldn’t you be without? A wheel, a kiln, clay and my throwing bucket. And my tools, which consist of a sponge, a wooden triangle and a wire. That’s really all you need to throw with. Is there one thing that’s been key to achieving your creative goals? Having a strong team around me who understand what I’m trying to do. Anyone Subscribe at molliemakes.com

who says they did it all on their own is lying! Sure, there was a time when I did everything on my own, but there’s always a ceiling you can’t break through.

03

01

The quirky office

best known for

studio. The big

pre-Throw Down.

table is regularly

03

used for meetings.

Tell us the most important business lesson you’ve learnt along the way. Learn from your mistakes and accept that you will always make them!

range, which he was

space in Keith’s

02

White ceramics

from Keith’s Word

Keith’s vintage-

style range with its pretty pastelpainted interiors.

And what’s been your proudest achievement to date? Employing people and completing the 82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 27


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

02

dream/business plan that I created with my business partner Dominic. Which of your products is the most popular, and why do you think that is? The bucket mug. It’s simple in design, and I think it connects with people because of its fairly original shape. What’s been your favourite piece made on The Great Pottery Throw Down? Probably Clover Lee’s Russian doll set in Series 2. Not just because they were original and looked great – and they did – but because Clover had struggled with the whole make initially, and she was able to problem solve to an incredibly successful effect. What’s the saying? ‘It’s not just the destination, it’s the journey!’

01

01

The kiln – where

clay is baked – stacked with ceramic shapes. 02

Why do you think Throw Down was so successful with viewers? It shows the full process from design concept through to the end result. It also shows the progression in skills of some of the potters on the programme, and it does get emotional! Working with clay is sensual.

Paper examples of

a surface design not yet in production, pinned up on the studio wall. 03

Keith finishes off a

bowl on the wheel.

03

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How did you find the whole experience of making the show? I was in a band in my formative years so I’m used to performing, cameras and


INTRODUCING tea & a chat

‘Throw Down shows the progression in skills of the potters – it gets emotional!’ 02

01

so on. The main challenge in regards to filming is getting your message across in short sound bites, as the whole program is edited to within an inch of its life. It takes three days to create just one episode, so editing is crucial to a well-formed show. Do you get recognised more since appearing on television? In a word, yes! Airports are where I get recognised the most – it’s a bit strange. In some ways, it’s worse when people don’t say anything, but just stare at you as if Subscribe at molliemakes.com

there’s something wrong with your face, or your flies are undone. How would you describe the UK ceramics industry right now? Well, studio ceramics is very healthy, I think. I’m currently in negotiation with Stoke City Council about the possibility of moving into the old Spode site in Stoke on Trent, which would be amazing. If I’m successful, I’d like to create an educational program with various universities and colleges. All forms of craft have been

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Keith adds water

scales. These are

to clay to keep it

used to measure

supple as he throws

quantities of clay.

on the wheel. 02

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Stacks of weights

and weighting

Typewriter-style

font stamps, used on Keith’s Word range.

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INTRODUCING tea & a chat

02

severely cut in schools over the years, and I think it’s time to do something about it! Can you share what you’re currently working on with us? A couple of projects. One is with the jewellery company Tatty Devine, which is very exciting. Also, I’m working with the National Trust on a project which would be very fittingly produced in Stoke on Trent. What would be your dream project? To create an installation for the Turbine Hall in the Tate Modern. I have something in mind and, dare I say it, it would be stunning. I dream about it a lot!

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01

Keith wipes a set of

mugs smooth as they emerge from the kiln. 02

A variety of

ceramic and glass pieces from Keith’s Word range.

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Keith Brymer Jones Keith’s own-name label produces kitchen and tableware, and he still creates the prototype for each unique shape on his potter’s wheel, including his famous Word and Alphabet ranges. The Bucket Mugs are a long-time favourite – big enough to fit the amount of tea we like to drink! www.keithbrymerjones.com

Who are your creative heroes? Isaac Button, a fellow potter from the early 20th century – he was a true craftsman in every sense of the word. Also, Lucie Rie; one of the ceramic fraternity that put studio pottery on the map, not only as a craft, but as an art form. Lucie also had an ability to emulate her soul through work: delicate, original and very, very special. Finally, what’s the best piece of creative advice you’ve been given? Be relaxed, be open and make sure you have enough time to make mistakes. The first two are harder than one might think!


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Citru

wis

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK

Freshen up your accessories game with Maria Isabel’s crochet sunglasses case

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HOW TO MAKE… A SUNGLASSES CASE MATERIALS Q Cascade Yarns Ultra Pima, 100% cotton, 100g/200m per ball, one ball each in China Pink (3711), Chartreuse (3746) and Spring Green (3762) Q 3.5mm (UK 9, US E/4) crochet hook Q Pink zip, 10cm (4") Q Swivel lobster clasp, 4cm (15/8") Q Stitch marker Q Pink sewing thread TENSION Each square is approx. 10 x 10cm (4 x 4") ABBREVIATIONS (UK) st(s) stitch(es) ch chain ss slip stitch dc double crochet WS wrong side rep repeat 34 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82

TENSION 24 sts and 20 rounds to 10 x 10cm (4 x 4") FINISHED SIZE Approx. 10 x 18cm (4 x 71/8")

Pay homage to Pantone’s Colour of the Year – or to that zesty twist in your G&T – with Maria’s fun, fresh sunglasses case. The mini lime motifs are crocheted as you go, using a technique called tapestry crochet. Similar to Fair Isle knitting, it’s ideal for creating playful patterns, and this mini project makes a great introduction to the method. Instructions This pattern is made in one piece, starting from the bottom. It’s worked in rounds using tapestry crochet, in a continuous spiral. Use a stitch marker in the first stitch of each round. The pattern uses concise crochet, for example 6dc means 1dc in each of the next 6 sts. Tapestry crochet Tapestry crochet is used to create a multi-coloured fabric, working two or more colours of yarn on

each round, and ‘carrying’ the yarn by working over the unused yarns to encase them. The chart (above right) shows the colour of the stitches, with each square of colour representing a stitch. For Rounds 2-34, you can either use the chart or follow the pattern. For colour changes, work the last dc before the new colour up to the last yarn over, drop the working colour, yarn over with the new colour, and close the stitch. Make the necessary dc with this new colour, encasing the other two colours, then switch colours again according to the pattern. Sunglasses case Foundation using Yarn A, ch24 Round 1 2dc in 2nd ch from hook, 21dc, 3dc in next ch, continue on the other side of the foundation ch, 22dc, do not join but continue working in a spiral using a marker at the start of the round [48sts]


Chart

key 1dc with Yarn A 1dc with Yarn B 1dc with Yarn C

Round 2 start working tapestry crochet, encasing Yarn B and Yarn C from the start of the round (leaving a 10cm (4") tail) 10dc in Yarn A, *4dc in Yarn B**, 12dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times, ending last rep at **, 2dc in Yarn A Round 3 9dc in Yarn A, *6dc in Yarn B**, 10dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times, ending last rep at **, 1dc in Yarn A Rounds 4-5 (9dc in Yarn A, 7dc in Yarn B) 3 times Round 6 (10dc in Yarn A, 6dc in Yarn B) 3 times Round 7 9dc in Yarn A, *2dc in Yarn C, 4dc in Yarn B**, 10dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 1dc in Yarn A Round 8 9dc in Yarn A, *2dc in Yarn C, 1dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn C**, 11dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 2dc in Yarn A Round 9 13dc in Yarn A, *2dc in Subscribe at molliemakes.com

Yarn C**, 14dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 1dc in Yarn A Round 10 4dc in Yarn A, *4dc in Yarn B**, 12dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 8dc in Yarn A Round 11 3dc in Yarn A, *6dc in Yarn B**, 10dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 7dc in Yarn A Rounds 12-13 3dc in Yarn A, *7dc in Yarn B**, 9dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 6dc in Yarn A Round 14 4dc in Yarn A, *6dc in Yarn B**, 10dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 6dc in Yarn A Round 15 3dc in Yarn A, *2dc in Yarn C, 4dc in Yarn B**, 10dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 7dc in Yarn A Round 16 3dc in Yarn A, *2dc in Yarn C, 1dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn C**, 11dc in Yarn A; rep from * two

more times ending last rep at **, 8dc in Yarn A Round 17 7dc in Yarn A, *2dc in Yarn C**, 14dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 5dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn B Round 18 2dc in Yarn B, (12dc in Yarn A, 4dc in Yarn B) 2 times, 11dc in Yarn A, 3dc in Yarn B Round 19 3dc in Yarn B, *10dc in Yarn A**, 6dc in Yarn B; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 3dc in Yarn B Round 20 4dc in Yarn B, *9dc in Yarn A**, 7dc in Yarn B; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 3dc in Yarn B Round 21 4dc in Yarn B, (9dc in Yarn A, 7dc in Yarn B) 2 times, 10dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn B Round 22 4dc in Yarn B, (10dc in Yarn A, 6dc in Yarn B) 2 times, 9dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn C, 1dc in Yarn B Round 23 3dc in Yarn B, *10dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn C**, 4dc in 82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 35


HOW TO MAKE‌ A SUNGLASSES CASE Yarn B; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 1dc in Yarn A Round 24 2dc in Yarn C, (11dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn C, 1dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn C) 2 times, 14dc in Yarn A Round 25 1dc in Yarn A, *2dc in Yarn C**, 14dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 5dc in Yarn A, 4dc in Yarn B, 4dc in Yarn A Round 26 8dc in Yarn A, 4dc in Yarn B, 12dc in Yarn A, 4dc in Yarn B, 11dc in Yarn A, 6dc in Yarn B, 3dc in Yarn A Round 27 7dc in Yarn A, (6dc in Yarn B, 10dc in Yarn A) 2 times, 7dc in Yarn B, 2dc in Yarn A Round 28 7dc in Yarn A, *7dc in Yarn B**, 9dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 2dc in Yarn A Round 29 7dc in Yarn A, 7dc in Yarn B, 9dc in Yarn A, 7dc in Yarn B, 10dc in Yarn A, 6dc in Yarn B, 2dc in Yarn A Round 30 8dc in Yarn A, 6dc in 36 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82

Yarn B, 10dc in Yarn A, 6dc in Yarn B, 9dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn C, 4dc in Yarn B, 3dc in Yarn A Round 31 7dc in Yarn A, *2dc in Yarn C**, 4dc in Yarn B, 10dc in Yarn A; rep from * two more times ending last rep at **, 1dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn C, 4dc in Yarn A Round 32 7dc in Yarn A, *2dc in Yarn C, 1dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn C**, 11dc in Yarn A; rep 2 times from * ending last rep at **, 15dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn C, 3dc in Yarn A Round 33 11dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn C, 14dc in Yarn A, 2dc in Yarn C, 19dc in Yarn A Round 34 48dc in Yarn A Round 35 9dc in Yarn A to reach

the fold of the case. Ss in next st Fasten off. Cut Yarn B and Yarn C leaving a 10cm (4") tail Weave in all ends. Finishing Turn the case WS out and pin the zip and case WS together. Sew, then turn the case right side out. Cut 34 12cm (4 ") lengths of Yarn B and pull them through the swivel on the lobster clasp. Fold the yarn in half, aligning the ends, then tie a 25cm (97/8") length of Yarn B around the folded end to form the tassel. Weave in the loose ends, trim to neaten, then insert the hook into the zip pull to finish.

Maria Isabel Maria is a crochet designer, and specialises in bags and accessories. She loves to start her days with a cup of tea, enjoys bike rides on the weekends, and is always thinking of new ways to create colourful pieces for everyday life. www.chabepatterns.com


A handpicked collection of fabrics ... delivered to your door

www.misformake.co.uk


ILLUSTRATION: AMELIA FLOWER


INTRODUCING good read

BLOGGER OR BLAGGER? Imposter syndrome can be crippling to creatives waiting to be ‘found out’, but how can we readjust our mindset? Lottie Storey investigates Words: LOTTIE STOREY Illustration: AMELIA FLOWER

W

hat’s so unusual about the online world is that there are no exam boards for bloggers, crafters and creatives, no official bodies to rubber stamp our work, no qualifications for being creative, entrepreneurial and successful. Forget performance reviews and pay rises – success is marked by ‘likes’ and ‘follows’, online purchases and prestigious commissions. And, if you didn’t make your foray into a creative career until later on in life, that sense of accomplishment can be even harder to gain. Take fine artist, author and illustrator Lisa Congdon (www.lisacongdon.com), for example. “My journey began when I was 31 years old. I took an art class for fun, with zero experience in art and zero intention of becoming a professional artist,” she recalls. Fast forward seven years, and Lisa started her ‘official’ art career in 2006, aged 38. “I had a horrible case of imposter syndrome because I didn’t study art in school, and didn’t become an artist until later on in life,” she confesses. “I avoided even talking to artists I admired because I thought they wouldn’t like or respect me. I thought they were secretly saying: ‘Ah, that’s Lisa over there! She isn’t a real artist like us!’”

THE COMPARISON TRAP It’s easy to get hung up on what other people think. Alison Perry (www.notanothermummyblog.com) is a fulltime blogger who battles with imposter syndrome all the time. “Like many creative freelancers and business owners, I fluctuate wildly between feeling fired up to take on the world, and a desire to crawl back into bed where no one can see what a huge failure I am!” Describing a cycle known well to many, Alison tells us: “As soon as I’ve had a pitch accepted, a panic washes over me. ‘Oh no, now I actually have to do this! What was I thinking? I’m going to mess this up!’” Working alone, or from home, can be isolating, and while creatives often rely on social media for validation, comparing ourselves to others is never a good idea. “One thing I’m really working on is getting out of the validation trap,” agrees Alison. “That sense of only feeling good about my work when I land a great

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job, I’m shortlisted for an award, or I get praise from someone I consider to be awesome.” So how’s it done? “It’s important to work out what my measures of success are, and when I hit those goals, to celebrate and pat myself on the back. By hooking my self worth on the actions of others, I’m not in control and that’s quite a damaging place to exist in,” Alison points out. “That said, other people’s words and praise can be a great boost on days when I’m having a wobble. One great piece of advice I got recently from the brilliant Emma Gannon (www.emmagannon.co.uk) is to save emails from people raving about your work into a special folder.” That way, any time you’re having a bad day, you can read them out loud for motivation.

BE KIND TO YOURSELF Self promotion isn’t easy, especially for those of us hard-wired not to take compliments. It’s ‘easier’ to credit our success to luck, to being in the right place at the right time. But, not only is it important to believe what people say, you need to be able to convince others that you’re worthy of what you’ve achieved. For Kat Molesworth, founder of Blogtacular (www.blogtacular.com), imposter syndrome is something that crops up again and again among the bloggers and business owners she works with. “Interestingly, it often comes up as a theme with our keynote speakers at Blogtacular. People who many look up to as being at the top of their industry share their secret anguish that they’re not good enough, unqualified and somehow working in a space they don’t belong.” Kat’s advice for overcoming the social awkwardness you feel when promoting yourself, or celebrating your achievements, is to “ask yourself whether you’d say the same things if it were a friend you were talking about. Would you say they didn’t deserve the award, or don’t deserve to succeed?”. Kat continues: “I think we all need to give ourselves permission to succeed. If we don’t promote our work, we’re sowing the seeds for failure, whether we admit it or not.” Wise words. Pep talk over, it’s time to get back to work – this selfbuilt empire won’t run itself. Creatives, let’s do this!

82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 39


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rus

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK; MODEL: ALEXANDRA FIA

Make a statement with Zoe Larkins’ detachable swan collar

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82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 41


01

04

06

07

HOW TO MAKE… A SWAN COLLAR MATERIALS Q Yellow cotton fabric, 42 x 24cm (16 x 9 ") Q Pink cotton fabric, 42 x 24cm (16 x 9 ") Q Tailor’s chalk Q White faux leather Q Orange faux leather Q Black faux leather Q Green faux leather Q Two gold seed beads

42 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82

Q Pink satin ribbon, 2.5cm (1") wide, 1m (393/8") Q White sewing thread Q Yellow sewing thread Q Fabric glue

Forget chunky necklaces – this collar is the ultimate way to elevate an outfit from plain Jane status. Embellished with faux leather appliqué swans and a big pink bow, it might sound crazy, but it looks so right when paired with a simple shift dress or top. In fact, it’ll add a quirky designer vibe to any outfit, whether you’re making an effort at the office, or going for cocktails with friends. Personalise your version any way you like, switching up the fabric shades, or changing the colour of the ribbon. And, you can even adapt the size, using a photocopier to shrink the templates slightly and make a mini version.

01 Fold the yellow and pink fabrics in half along the length. Cut out the collar template on page 98, then align the straight edge with the folded edge of the pink fabric and pin in place. Mark a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance around the outside, cut out, then repeat with the yellow fabric. Open out each collar piece. 02 Using the templates on page 98, cut a swan body from the white faux leather, a lily pad from the green faux leather, a large beak piece from the orange faux leather, and a small beak piece from the black faux leather. Flip each of the templates, then repeat the process to cut a second set of shapes facing the opposite way.


06

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03 Place the yellow collar piece wrong side (WS) up, then fold the two ends in towards the middle, with WS facing. Using the main image as a guide, glue the swan bodies onto the RS of the collar, then glue the lily pads, the orange beak piece, and the black beak piece on top. 04 Using white sewing thread, appliquĂŠ stitch around the edge of each of the faux leather pieces, then sew a gold bead onto each black beak piece to make an eye. 05 Place the pink collar piece right side (RS) up. Cut the ribbon in half along the length, on the diagonal, then roll up both pieces up from the diagonal end, leaving the

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straight edge overhanging. Pin the roll to secure, then pin each one to either end of the collar, positioning them 1cm (3/8") in from the inside edge, with the ribbon end overhanging the fabric. 06 Place the yellow collar piece on top, WS up and aligning the raw edges. Pin, then sew around the outside of the collar pieces using

a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance, and leaving a 10cm (4") gap on the top straight edge for turning. 07 Cut notches into the seam allowance, turn the collar RS out, and press. Avoid pressing the faux leather, as this can damage it. 08 Fold the raw edges at the turning gap to the WS, press, then slip stitch the gap closed to finish.

Zoe Larkin Designer-maker Zoe started stitching fashion jewellery and accessories back in 2001. 16 years later, and she can’t imagine a life without sewing! A kitsch enthusiast, Zoe’s designs are a colourful nod to the 1950s, as well as the wildlife that surrounds her New Forest home. www.lovefromhettyanddave.co.uk 82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 43


INTRODUCING out & about

Xanthe Berkeley led our photo walk & craft drop...

Step behind the scenes at our annual celebration of craft and creativity at The Mollie Makes Handmade Awards Photographs: WILL IRELAND

n 3rd July, it was all aboard the Good Ship Mollie to celebrate our fourth annual Mollie Makes Handmade Awards at The Yacht London. This year’s awards were our biggest and best ever, with hundreds of talented designer-makers entering their handcrafted businesses into our UK-wide competition. The day was a unique chance for finalists to pitch their businesses to our star judging panel. Kate Allchin (Pinterest), Kat Molesworth (Blogtacular), Kate Faulkner (West Elm) and Patricia van den Akker (The Design Trust) were joined by illustrators Jane Foster and Donna Wilson, The Brand Stylist Fiona Humberstone, and blogger Sara Tasker of Me & Orla.

O

READ MORE ABOUT OUR SHORTLISTED NOMINEES ON OUR BLOG www.molliemake.com

44 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 56

Our nominees mingled with some of the UK’s top designer-makers, and took part in a Tatty Devine bunting necklace workshop before hitting the streets for a photo walk and craft drop with Xanthe Berkeley. There was speed pitching with Pavilion Books, before hearing from Nikki McWilliams, Zeena Shah, Teri Muncey of The Lovely Drawer, and Ben Treanor of Old English Company on how to grow your brand. “The day was an incredible celebration of all the amazing designer-makers that make the UK craft scene so special,” says Mollie Makes Editor, Cath Dean. “I love the passion our finalists have for their businesses, and seeing them making connections and being inspired is amazing!”

02

and 03 @iamacrylic @little_dut

04

@finestimaginary

01

See more at #HandmadeAwards

SHORTLISTED START-UP AWARD: Cath Chamberlain, Kara Leigh Ford, Lucy Tiffney ESTABLISHED BUSINESS AWARD: Miesje Chafer, Coco & Wolf, Rosa Pietsch HANDMADE CHAMPION AWARD: Joanne Hawker, Head & Hands, Home by Kirsty BEST ILLUSTRATOR AWARD: Emma Block, Jacqueline Colley, Dick Vincent BEST WORKSHOPS AWARD: I Am Acrylic, Origami Est, TWOME


INTRODUCING out & about

Guests loved the Tatty Devine workshops!

Illustrator Donna Wilson gave our keynote address

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A fun photo walk on the South Bank

DECORATIONS COURTESY OF TALKING TABLES WWW.TALKINGTABLES.COM

Our star-studded panel of fantastic judges


INTRODUCING out & about

N TIO IA E IR C A H SO T E F AS ITH D IN W MA ND HA

WINNER START-UP AWARD

WINNER ESTABLISHED BUSINESS

WINNER HANDMADE CHAMPION

LUCY TIFFNEY

ROSA PIETSCH

JOANNE HAWKER

The judges loved the bold colours and illustrations in Lucy Tiffney’s hand-painted wallpapers and fabrics. To help Lucy develop her business, which only launched in January, she’s won a £500 voucher for online training with The Design Trust, a stand at Crafty Fox Market in London, a starter advertising package in Mollie Makes and a day of learning at Etsy UK. “I felt absolutely ecstatic when I found out that I had won the award. I was beyond happy, I think because all the judges were amazing and they had chosen me and my work! It was reassuring to know I’m progressing in the right direction. “I’m so excited about the prizes too – I know that The Design Trust can offer me invaluable advice about how to grow my business.” www.lucytiffney.com

Rosa Pietsch’s intricate laser cut jewellery and bold designs won over our panel, who were impressed by her unique style. To help her develop her business, Rosa has won a stand at The Handmade Fair at Hampton Court Palace worth £545, a Mollie Makes Instagram takeover, a pop-up at West Elm’s Tottenham Court Road store, and a mentoring session with The Brand Stylist, Fiona Humberstone. “The pitch at the Handmade Fair and the pop-up at West Elm will both be fantastic opportunities to show and sell my designs to a new audience. I’m also looking forward to my mentoring session with Fiona – I struggle to ask for advice, and this will definitely kick-start me changing this and seeking the help I need to grow!” www.rosapietsch.com

Joanne’s incredible Instagram hashtag, #MarchMeetTheMaker, took the creative community by storm this year, and the panel were excited about the huge potential she has to grow the concept. Joanne wins a feature in Mollie Makes, business mentoring with Blogtacular’s Kat Molesworth, an Instagram training session with Sara Tasker of Me & Orla, and a day of learning at Pinterest UK. “I honestly couldn’t believe it, because I was up against some really great people and I didn’t expect to win,” says Joanne. “The prizes couldn’t have come at a better time, or be more fitting. I’m in the early stages of a rebrand and really want to get into blogging and up my Pinterest game. I can’t wait to tell the maker community!” www.joannehawker.co.uk

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INTRODUCING out & about

W RY NE GO TE CA

W RY NE GO TE CA

W RY NE GO TE CA

WINNER BEST WORKSHOPS

WINNER PRODUCT OF THE YEAR

JACQUELINE COLLEY

ESTHER THORPE

The judges fell in love with Jacqueline’s delicate botanical designs and love of technique. Her prizes – a one-to-one mentoring session with illustrator Jane Foster, a paid opportunity to design the bonus papers or Good Read illustration in an issue of Mollie Makes, and a Q&A feature on the Mollie Makes blog – will help to take her business to the next level. “I was ecstatic when I found out I’d won! There was some lovely work in my category so I wasn’t expecting it. I’m so excited about the mentoring from Jane Foster, as at the judging I gained invaluable advice. It’ll be lovely to chat to her about her career, which has been so varied and exciting. An opportunity to design an illustration for Mollie Makes is the icing on the cake! www.jacquelinecolley.co.uk

Better known as Origami Est, Esther Thorpe’s origami workshops wowed the judging panel. Esther’s prizes include a feature in Mollie Makes and the opportunity to host a workshop at West Elm’s Tottenham Court Road store, along with a mentoring session with West Elm Marketing Manager Jessica Sims on how to promote the event. “I was so overwhelmed to know the judges had enjoyed what I had to share enough to select me,” says Esther. “Before going in to see the judges I was a bag of nerves, which I hadn’t anticipated – I’m very used to speaking in front of large numbers of people. There were some challenging questions, but all with the desire to help spark new ideas and further my creative business potential!” www.origamiest.co.uk

DOUGHNUT PATTERN WEIGHTS, OH SEW QUAINT

WINNER BEST ILLUSTRATOR

Oh Sew Quaint’s colourful doughnut pattern weights were the winners of our all-new Product of the Year category, voted for by Mollie Makes readers. Danni Painter’s winning product will be shot and styled in the Mollie Makes studio, and featured in a news story in the magazine. They’ll also appear in a post on the Mollie Makes Instagram account, which has over 120,000 followers worldwide. “To have come out on top feels incredible, especially as the voters had a fantastic selection of products to choose from,” says Danni. “The craft community is wonderful, and to know these same people have voted for my product gives me a warm fuzzy feeling!” www.ohsewquaint.co.uk

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INSPIRATION ALERT! SPACES, PLACES & NEW DESIGNERS TO WATCH Turn your bedroom into an oasis of late summer calm with elegant Scandi-inspired bedroom furniture from Heal’s. Stay true to the vibe by adding pared-back bedding, simple lighting and a geo-inspired rug – verdant forest view beyond the window optional. www.heals.com

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Head back to the nursery with Rachel Powell’s minimalist Milk print – we’re loving the retro vibe. Or, go mono with Jane Foster’s funky panda print, then add a pop of colour with a bold frame. www.rachelj powell.com; www.janefoster.co.uk

GET THE LOOK

Tiny trinkets need a display space to avoid getting lost amid the general clutter. Make them centre of attention with The Round Dorm shelf from Ferm Living. www.fermliving.com 50 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82

SO SCANDILOUS

This Mini Gaston Lamp in Pretty Pink is just what your creative area is missing. We’ll be popping it next to a pastel sewing machine for a swoonworthy deskspace. www.loaf.com

Sian Elin’s hand-drawn prints combine a fresh look with pastel colour palettes. Snazz up your sofa with her Granada and Tress bolster cushions. www.sianelin.com

You’d think summer would put a stop to our throw obsession, but we’re just taking them outside for when the sun goes down. This Oliver Bonas grid design is a beaut. www.oliverbonas.com


Funnily enough, we’re rather keen on everything by Dutch design label All Things We Like. Currently taking our fancy are these geometric wooden hanging planters – we’ll have one of each please. www.allthingswelike.com

Find modern artwork for kids with attitude!

BRAND FOCUS This Modern Life This Modern Life stocks modern, retro and vintageinspired items for children’s rooms, and launched when founder Suzanne struggled to find what she wanted to decorate her first son’s nursery. Passionate about supporting other small businesses, it’s full of unique finds for on-trend little ’uns. www.thismodernlife.co.uk

Fill a nursery with bags of personality

WEBSITE TO WATCH OYOY Design company OYOY was founded by Lotte Fynboe in 2012. The unusual name was inspired by the OY letters used on every Danish aeroplane around the world – an instant way to convey the company’s Danish roots. Stocking fun but functional home and kitchenwares, it’s a must-visit for fans of Scandinavian design. www.oyoy.dk Subscribe at molliemakes.com

Kids will love this bold elephant bedding

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LIVING home tour

This Ercol Studio daybed is Alice’s proudest find. “I’d always dreamed of owning one!”

Explore Alice Collyer’s Scandi home, a wonderland of modern, minimal style Words: LOTTIE STOREY Photography: REBECCA REES

When Lewis Carroll’s Alice fell down the rabbit hole, she found herself in a jam-packed world of Mad Hatters and angry royals – maximalists to the extreme. Better known as Alice in Scandiland, blogger Alice Collyer’s world is a little less cluttered, and a lot more modern. Her Cornish home is a dream, a paean to Scandi style. But where did this story begin? Eleven years ago, Alice moved in with her then boyfriend, Stu, who bought the house in

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LIVING home tour

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LIVING home tour

OUTDOOR LIVING Stu, Alice’s husband, built this summerhouse himself, using wood from old pallets, and adding in a skylight for extra natural light. Acting as a mini extension to the house – Alice uses it as a craft room – Stu also created a steep staircase winding up the side of the summerhouse that leads to a leafy little platform. That way, both Alice and the kids can play outside in the sunshine!

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his early twenties. “When my husband moved in, every wall was covered in woodchip paper, disguising a number of issues – including a door that had basically just been papered over!” For Alice, it was the polar opposite of her style, “but to be honest, we were more interested in holidays than the house back then”. Alice grew up in a period home in the country, so living in an 80s box took a bit of getting used to. “It was the light that sold it,” she explains. “And even though we’re in a town, the outlook at the back is as though you’re in the country.” The house has evolved to reflect the couple’s taste, and the life they lead with their two daughters, Nancy and Eula, aged five and three. But, the biggest development has been the extension they built last summer. “We lived for years in a house I felt was too small for us, especially since having children,” says Alice. “We viewed a few properties last year, 54 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82

all of which involved us making compromises. I then dreamed up the extension, and all of a sudden it was happening.” The design converted their unremarkable 1980s end-of-terrace into something special. “I’m proud that I could see beyond what the house was, to what it could be.” And she should be proud. The extension transformed the ground floor, joining the kitchen, dining room and living room into one continuous loop, breathing new life into every space. “I love the way it all feels so together,” Alice smiles. “It’s cohesive, and includes many of my favourite pieces – the wishbone dining chairs, Muuto dot wall hooks, custom-made ply wall cupboard and matt white grid kitchen tiles, which were a recent change.” Alice describes her style as a blend of modern, rustic, and Scandinavian. “But maybe relaxed Scandi,” she adds. “I struggle with defining my style, especially since Scandi has become so

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important feature in Alice’s home, her favourites being cheese plants and pilea peperomioides. 02

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beautiful wooden school lockers store crockery in the kitchen.


Nancy and Eula play in the new extension. “We’re surrounded by greenery beyond our garden, which feels like part of the house now.” 75 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 55


LIVING home tour

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popular.” Alice’s interpretation includes white walls – everywhere except Nancy’s room – an uncluttered space and a mix of new and vintage furniture. “I love a mix of the two. Vintage pieces add soul to a room, and I often wonder where something has been before I found it.” Equally though, Alice finds modern additions help to set off the older pieces. “In the kitchen, the birch-faced ply table I made, with its mint hairpin legs, sits opposite the battered, beautiful wooden school lockers, while the Hans Wegnerinspired wishbone chairs rest between the two.” A sprinkling of plants completes Alice’s vision. “They’re a huge feature within our home, and an essential part of interior design for me. If an area is feeling flat, plants can instantly lift it.” So where does Alice go for inspiration? “Instagram is an endless treasure trove – I love to see how people develop and change their homes, but also the daily life that goes on within 56 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82

these inspirational interiors.” But there’s one place you can guarantee to find Alice – Pinterest. “I’m forever getting caught up there. You find one picture that inspires you, and it’s like falling into the rabbit hole in Alice in Wonderland. You discover more and more the deeper you go.” It’s only a matter of time before Alice’s Scandiland will be the one inspiring Pinterest’s audience, pulling them into a rabbit hole of modern minimalism they’ll never want to leave.

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Alice built this

shelving system and desk for Nancy’s room. 02

Eula’s bedroom

is a calm space, with soft pink tones throughout.

Alice Collyer Alice is an interiors blogger who writes Alice in Scandiland, documenting the progress of her ever-evolving home both there, and on Insta @alicescandiland. She adores white walls, vintage furniture and mixing up wood tones. www.alicejcollyer.wordpress.com


PHOTOGRAPHY: KIM LIGHTBODY

Modern macramé Indulge your floral obsession with Fanny Zedenius’ contemporary boho plant holder


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HOW TO MAKE… A MACRAMÉ PLANT HOLDER MATERIALS Q 42m (46 yrds) of twined 0.5cm ( ") cotton rope Q Four wooden beads, 2.5cm (1") diameter with a 0.5cm ( ") hole Q Pink fabric dye Q Paint brush

If you’ve got more plants than places to put them, this dip-dyed macramé hanger is an essential make. Not only can you use it to brighten up your garden or interior, the retro ombre vibe will give a laid-back feel to any space. We’re loving the comeback for all things macramé, as not only does it add texture to a room, the only tools you need for this craft are your hands. Turn to page 98 to master the knots used, and you’ll have this 70s look tied up in no time – spider plant optional. 01 Cut the cord into four 3.4m (3 yrd) lengths, two 6m (65/8 yrd) lengths, one 7.4m (81/8 yrd) length

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and one 8.6m (9 yrd) length. Take the four 3.4m (3 yrd) lengths and the two 6m (65/8 yrd) lengths, and lay them out parallel to each other, with the midpoint of each cord aligned. These will be used as filler cords in the top loop. Take the two remaining lengths and place them on either side of the others, aligning the tops of both with the top end of the 6m (65/8 yrd) cords. These will be used as the working cords for the loop. 02 Use the longer end of each working cord (the end not aligned with the other cords) to tie a line of 11 square knots (SK) directly underneath each other at the centre of the bundle of filler

cords. This series of square knots is called a sennit. 03 Fold the cords in half along the length to bend the sennit into a loop. Use the long end of the working cords to tie a spiral of right-twisting half square knots (RTHSK) around all the other cords. The spiral should be about 6cm (23/8") long – roughly 10-15 RTHSK. 04 Divide the cords into four bundles, each containing two long cords and two short cords. Begin by tying each bundle into a sennit, each with 15 SK. 05 Drop down the cord by roughly 10cm (4"), then tie an SK in each of the bundles of cord. Thread a bead onto the two filler cords in


each bundle, then tie another SK underneath the bead. 06 Under each SK, tie a spiral of RTHSK, each about 13cm (5 ") long – roughly 20-24 RTHSK. 07 To make the net, tie two rows of alternating square knots (ASK), alternating the filler cords and working cords. Place the knots with about 6-7cm (23/8 - 25/8") of space above and below them. 08 To tie the cords together at the base, make a 4-ply crown knot (4-CK), using the four sets of cords as working cords, as shown. Place your hand on a table with the tail of the plant hanger held upside down, and lay the cords down to make it easier to work the crown Subscribe at molliemakes.com

knot. Place the crown knot about 6-7cm (23/8 - 25/8") down from the square knots above it. Tie five to six rounds of the crown knot. 09 Take the longest remaining cord and tie a 5-6cm (2-23/8") long wrap knot (WK) around all the other cords to finish.

10 To dip dye the plant holder, follow the manufacturer’s instructions to make up the dye, then place the tail of the plant hanger into it. Let the dye soak up the hanger until you’re happy with the results, then take it out and leave it to dry.

Macramé: The Craft of Creative Knotting for Your Home This project appears in Macramé: The Craft of Creative Knotting for Your Home by Fanny Zedenius, published by Quadrille (£12.99). Beginning with the basics, it includes step-bystep guides to 30 of the most popular knots, and 21 inspiring makes to create using them. www.quadrille.co.uk

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK


Pretty in pink Create a summery tablescape with clever marbling techniques – Hester van Overbeek shows you how


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HOW TO MAKE… A MARBLED DINING SET MATERIALS For the plates Q Plain white plates Q Disposable plate Q Marabu porcelain paint in Black (073), White (070) and Cherry Red (123) Q Small paint brush Q Flat paint brush Q Sponge For the napkins Q Linen fabric, 30 x 30cm (117/8 x 117/8") Q Baking tray Q Shaving foam Q Fabric paint in red and black Q Disposable gloves

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For the glasses Q Glasses Q Marabu glass paint in Carmine Red (432) Q Plastic bowl Q Washing up liquid For the candlestick holders Q Fimo polymer clay in White (579), Black (9) and Rose Quartz (206) Q Candle cups (we got ours from www. norfolkcandleco.co.uk)

Make your summer gatherings feel extra-special by giving plain tableware and handmade linen napkins a luxury upgrade. Using simple techniques, Hester shows how to create a delicate marble effect in soft hues of pink and grey, giving these pursefriendly items an on-trend look. Add a few seasonal blooms to the table, and you’ve got a stunning set up that’ll really impress guests. For the plates 01 Mix the paint on a disposable plate – we used white and black to make light grey, and white and red to make light pink. Use the sponge to paint a slightly wavy pink stripe across a small plate, just off centre. 02 Using the small brush and grey paint, drag a line down the centre of the pink paint, twisting the brush as you go, and changing the pressure to create uneven texture.

03 Add smaller pops of darker pink and black paint along the light pink stripe, then use the flat brush to drag the grey paint sideways, creating a marbled effect. 04 For the big plate, apply the paint as per Steps 1-3, this time around the rim of the plate. 05 Leave the paint to dry for an hour, then follow the manufacturer’s instructions to set the paint, making it food safe. We baked ours for 30 minutes at 100°C/210°F/Gas mark .

For the napkins 06 Fold a 1cm hem to the wrong side (WS) along each fabric edge, pin in place, and sew. 07 Spray a thick layer of shaving foam onto the baking tray. Using a flat brush, swirl on squiggles of the fabric dye, as shown. We mixed some of the dyes with shaving foam to dilute the intensity of the


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colours, creating different shades of red and pink. 08 Wearing disposable gloves, place the fabric on top the foam, right side (RS) down, and gently press it into the foam. Peel the fabric off, then scrape the excess foam from the fabric. 09 Rinse the napkin in lukewarm water and leave to dry, then press to set the dye. For the glasses 10 To create a marbled effect, fill a plastic bowl with water, then drizzle glass paint across the surface. Dip the base of a glass in the bowl, then leave it to dry upside down for 48 hours. 11 To create a speckled effect, make a foam using lukewarm water and washing up liquid. Drizzle the paint onto the bubbles and dip the base of a glass in the foam. Leave to dry upside down for 48 hours.

For the candlestick holders 12 To make one candlestick, separate out one pack of white clay, three strips of pink clay, and one strip of black clay. 13 Divide the white clay into three pieces and the pink clay into two pieces, then roll out three 15cm (6") long white rolls, two 15cm (6") long pink roll and one 15cm (6") long black roll. 14 Twist one white and one pink roll together, then roll this out to 30cm (117/8"). Repeat with another pink and white roll, then finally with the remaining black and white rolls.

15 Fold the long rolls in half along the length, twist, and roll out to 30cm (117/8"). Repeat once more, then plait the three together and roll back into a 30cm (117/8") length. 16 Fold the single roll in half along the length, twist, then roll out to 30cm (117/8"). Roll up into a spiral, then mould it into a ball shape. 17 Press a candle cup into the middle of the ball, reshaping the ball around it if needed. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to set the clay – we baked ours in the oven for 30 minutes at 110°C/230°F/Gas mark .

Hester van Overbeek Hester is a DIY blogger and author, currently working on her next title involving reclaimed timber makes. She posts weekly craft tutorials, and you’ll often find Hester’s tools and a freshly baked cake on the same table in her home. www.hestershandmadehome.com

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park life Impress fellow picnickers with Chelsea Foy’s embroidered pom pom blanket

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HOW TO MAKE… A PICNIC BLANKET MATERIALS Q Patterned cotton fabric, 137 x 137cm (54 x 54") Q Plain cotton fabric, 137 x 137cm (54 x 54") Q Pom pom trim, 4.5m (5 yrds) Q Fabric glue Q Yarn Q Yarn needle Q Pencil Q Twine

Team Mollie likes nothing better than showing off our crafting skills, so Chelsea’s simple sew is right up our street. Using just a few haberdashery essentials, this fun blanket will earn admiring glances whenever you hit the park. If you want to make your outdoor lounging a bit comfier, add a layer of wadding between the fabric circles before sewing them together. Or, to make it more hardwearing, use a medium weight cotton canvas fabric for the base.

Chelsea Foy Chelsea is the maker, blogger, and adventurer behind Lovely Indeed, her creative lifestyle blog. Known for its fun, friendly feel and inspirational posts, Lovely Indeed focuses on DIY, travel, family, style, and all the other things that make life so lovely. www.lovelyindeed.com

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01 Cut a circle from your patterned fabric, as large as the fabric will allow. The easiest way to do this is to find the centre of the fabric, tie a piece of twine to the pencil, then hold (or pin) the end of the twine at the centre of the fabric. Next, draw a circle onto the fabric with the pencil and cut out. You can then use this shape as a template for the plain fabric. 02 With the patterned circle right side (RS) up, pencil on the words you want to embroider, keeping them central – we chose ‘good vibes’. If you prefer, you could print out a phrase, or enlarge one on a photocopier, and trace this directly onto the fabric. 03 Thread a length of yarn through the needle and knot the two ends together, then bring it up from the wrong side (WS) of the patterned fabric at the start of the first letter. Following the pencil line made in

Step 2, bring the needle back down, roughly 1cm (3/8") away. 04 Continue embroidering the lettering with a chain of split stitches. To create a split stitch, come up through the fabric about 1cm (3/8") away from your first stitch. Insert the needle back down into the fabric in the middle of your first stitch, splitting the yarn, then pull the needle through. Repeat along all the pencil lines, tying off the yarn ends when starting a new length. 05 Once finished, make sure all the yarn ends are tied, and weave in or trim any loose ends. Place the patterned and plain fabric circles together with RS facing, pin around the outside, then sew, leaving a 7.5cm (3") gap for turning. 06 Turn the blanket RS out though the gap, then slip stitch the gap closed. Stitch or glue the pom pom trim around the edge of the blanket, then leave to dry.


EXCLUSIVE PAPERS! Quirky shapes, mini motifs and collage-style prints to cut, stick and washi-tape to your walls. Share your makes using #molliemakers Illustrations: LOUISE LOCKHART WWW.THEPRINTEDPEANUT.CO.UK


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OH, YOU PRETTY THINGS! MOODBOARDS & MUSINGS TO INSPIRE US

PHOTOGRAPHY: NELL MALLIA, WWW.NELLMALLIAPHOTOGRAPHY.COM, IG: @NELL_MALLIA

Keep your tiny person cool this summer by treating them to The Pattie dress in Alabaster by Apolina Kids. With delicate botanical embroidery and crochet-trim detail at the neckline, it’s a must for mini mes with a bohemian spirit. www.apolina-kids.com

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Advertisement feature

fabulous foliage Pantone’s 2017 Colour of the Year is Greenery, but there’s more than one way to fill your house with plants... Here’s how we’re embracing the trend this month

LAUREN RADLEY

CHLOE HALL ILLUSTRATION My name’s Chloe Hall, and I’m a freelance illustrator and pattern designer. Inspired by nature and plants, I enjoy creating loose-line work and watercolour illustrations. I often use the first illustrations I sketch as the basis for my final prints, rather than over-developing each design until it’s ‘perfect’. I want my work to feel fresh, so the people that buy it feel as though they’ve brought a little bit of the outdoors in. Having always lived on a canal boat, I’m constantly surrounded by nature. I think spending time outside, walking and being surrounded by greenery and nature is so important, not just for our wellbeing, but for helping us to focus, and for sharpening our thinking and creativity, too. www.chloe-hall.co.uk

Lauren Radley is a stationery, gift and homeware company, often inspired by the beauty in nature. You’ll find a whole range of gorgeously illustrated botanical designs on their website, including this Moroccan Pots print, featuring a selection of cacti and succulents in colourful terracotta pots. Each design is hand-drawn and painted, then printed at their home studio. www.laurenradley.com

MISS ELLA Visit the world of Miss Ella to find whimsical illustrations inspired by cats, nature and fantastical dreams of faraway places. Find their high quality fine art prints, cards, kits and homewares on their website, and check out their Instagram at @missellaillustrator. Plus, Mollie Makes readers can save 20% on any purchase using code Mollie17. www.missella.co.uk

LUCY ELISABETH Lucy Elisabeth is a wirework artist creating delicate, simple wirework illustrations, beautifully framed and ready to be hung. The natural world provides a wealth of inspiration for her foliage-based wire artwork, available in 2D and 3D, and she also makes bespoke designs. Visit her website, or find Lucy on www. notonthehighstreet.com/lucyelisabeth. www.lucyelisabeth.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK. CHILDREN SHOULD BE SUPERVISED AT ALL TIMES WHEN PLAYING WITH THESE BLOCKS

Block party Tactile textures and sweet motifs make Amy Philip’s baby toys a must-knit


HOW TO MAKE… BABY BLOCKS MATERIALS Q Wool and the Gang Shiny Happy Cotton, 100% cotton, 100g/142m per ball, one ball each in Yellow Brick Road (Yarn A), White Noise (Yarn B), Jog Grey (Yarn C), TV Static (Yarn D), Perfect Peach (Yarn E) Q Three cubes of soft foam, 10cm (4") wide Q Pair of 4mm (UK 8, US 6) knitting needles Q Tapestry needle ABBREVIATIONS (UK) st(s) stitch(es) k knit p purl st st stocking stitch

mb make bobble – k the first stitch, leaving the old st on the needle. Bring the yarn to the front between the needles and p (2 sts). Return the yarn to the back between the needles and k, slipping the sts off the needle (3 sts). Turn work and p the 3 sts. Turn work and k the 3 sts. Turn work and p the 3 sts. K the three sts together knitwise TENSION 19 sts and 24 rows to 10cm (4") over stocking stitch on 4mm needles FINISHED SIZE Approx. 10 x 10cm (4 x 4")

Reader offer Get 15% off all Shiny Happy Cotton yarn at Wool and the Gang using code SHINYHAPPYCOTTON15. Offer valid until 31st August 2017. www.woolandthegang.com

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Sensory play is so important for babies, and these tactile blocks are the loveliest way to engage a little ‘un. Using a range of knitting techniques to create a variety of textures and patterns, their pudgy hands will love exploring each side, as they take in all the different colours, shapes and motifs. Amy’s picked Wool and the Gang’s Shiny Happy Cotton yarn to give the softest finish, in a contemporary colour palette that’ll make mum and dad proud to put them on display in the nursery. Knit a set that baby can stack up and knock down to their heart’s content and you’ll definitely be first in line for some extra cuddles. Instructions Each block is made from six knitted squares, which are then sewn together using mattress stitch. Knit each square three times to make a set of three blocks. The intarsia method is used for the Heart and Cloud squares, where you’re knitting two blocks of colour. When changing colour, be careful with your tension and twist your

yarn strands to avoid any gaps. Don’t allow the unused colour to stretch over the back of the work, but pick up a new ball when you need to use that colour again. You may find it easier to ball up short amounts of the yarns used for the intarsia sections (roughly 20g) and work with these instead, or work from two ends of one ball. Charts are provided on page 98 for the relevant squares of intarsia, with each square on the chart representing one st. The chart reads from the bottom upwards. RS is in k and reads from right to left, and WS is in p and reads from left to right. The Fair Isle method is used for the Polka dot square, where two yarn colours are repeated continuously across a row. You will need to hold two lots of yarn at the same time, and leave the unused yarn looped on the WS of the work. Again, a chart is provided on page 98. Thick stripe square Using Yarn A, cast on 21 sts Working in st st throughout, starting with a k row, work 9 rows


Change to Yarn B and cut off Yarn A, work 9 rows Change to Yarn A and cut off Yarn B, work 9 rows Cast off loosely, leaving a 30cm (12") tail for sewing Thin stripe square Using Yarn D, cast on 21 sts Working in st st throughout and stripe sequence of 2 rows Yarn D, 4 rows Yarn B, work 26 rows in total – you should end with 2 rows in Yarn D Cast off loosely, leaving a 30cm (12") tail for sewing Heart square Using Yarn C, cast on 21 sts Working in st st throughout, starting with a k row and using intarsia, follow Chart 1 to work the heart design in Yarn A Cast off loosely, leaving a 30cm (12") tail for sewing Polka dot square Using Yarn B, cast on 21 sts Working in st st throughout, starting with a k row and using Fair Isle, follow Chart 2 to work the dots Subscribe at molliemakes.com

pattern in Yarn D Cast off loosely, leaving a 30cm (12") tail for sewing Cloud square Using Yarn C, cast on 21 sts Working in st st throughout, starting with a k row and using intarsia, follow Chart 3 to work the cloud design in Yarn B Cast off loosely, leaving a 30cm (12") tail for sewing Bobble square Using Yarn E, cast on 20 sts Working in st st, starting with a k row, work 4 rows Row 5 k5, mb, [k3, mb] three times, k2 Work 7 rows in st st Row 13 [k3, mb] four times, k4 Work 7 rows in st st

Row 21 k5, mb, [k3, mb] three times, k2 Work 4 rows in st st Cast off loosely, leaving a 30cm (12") tail for sewing Finishing Weave in all ends except the 30cm (12") yarn tails. Block the squares by holding a steam iron over the top, gently stretching them into shape, then leaving them to dry. Lay out the squares as shown in the guide on page 98, then using a tapestry needle and mattress stitch, sew the squares together using the yarn tails, leaving two sides open for stuffing. Insert a foam cube into each block, then sew together the last two sides of the block to finish.

Amy Philip Amy lives in Brighton with her husband, two little girls and baby boy. She loves to dream up new knitwear designs for babies and toddlers, and you can find her creations on Instagram @buttonandblue, or in her Etsy shop. www.buttonandbluestore.etsy.com

82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 79


The team behind Simply Sewing magazine bring you 52 fantastic projects to make from fat quarters of fabric. Find full-size templates to stitch homewares, gifts, accessories, wearables, toys and more.

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Come and say hello at the Mollie Makes Café at The Handmade Fair at Hampton Court Palace on 15-17th September – book your Full Experience tickets online today using code MOLLIE4 to save £3. www.thehandmadefair.com Crafty Fox Market are back in Peckham from 1617th September as part of the Peckham Festival. Find them at the CLF Art Cafe in the Bussey Building, with two floors of the very best designer-makers around. www.craftyfoxmarket.co.uk Sign up for Imogen Owen’s Beginners’ Modern

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK; MODEL: ALEXANDRA FIA


Adventure calls Get set for mini excursions and summer day trips with Anna Alicia’s backpack

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HOW TO MAKE… A BACKPACK MATERIALS Q Upholstery fabric, 1.5m (591/8") (we used Xander furnishing fabric in Steel from www. johnlewis.com) Q Faux leather, 50cm (19 ") Q Matching sewing thread Q Two D-rings, 3cm (1 ") wide Q Two strap adjusters, 3cm (1 ") wide Q Magnetic popper fastener Q Tailor’s chalk Q Rotary cutter

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Not that you need an excuse to add to your bag collection, but we reckon this rucksack is the handiest thing you’ll sew this summer. Just the right size for a weekend away, a day at the beach, or your packed lunch and a picnic blanket, you’ll wonder why you didn’t swap your handbag sooner. Combining monochrome fabric and tan faux leather, Anna’s make is definitely less school playground and more casual chic. Use any leftover fabric to sew a mini matching purse, or to add extra pockets, inside or out. 01 Using the templates on page 98, cut out two flaps from the faux leather, adding a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance to the template. With right sides (RS) together, pin and sew along the curved edge, using a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance. Cut small triangles into the seam allowance, then turn RS out. 02 Following the manufacturer’s instructions, add the positive side of the popper fastening to one side of the flap, roughly 2cm ( ") down from the centre of the curved edge.

03 To make the straps, cut two 12 x 11cm (4 x 43/8") pieces from the faux leather, and two 70 x 11cm (275/8 x 43/8") pieces from the fabric. Fold each piece in half along the length with wrong sides (WS) facing, unfold, then fold the long edges into the centre with WS facing. Fold in half again, enclosing the raw edges, then pin and sew along the open long edge, 0.25cm (1/8") in. 04 To make the pocket, cut two 27 x 13.5cm (105/8 x 53/8") pieces of fabric. With RS together, pin and sew along the two short edges and one long edge. Turn RS out and press. 05 Cut an 83 x 38cm (325/8 x 15") piece of fabric. Place the fabric RS up, then align the raw edge of the pocket with the centre of the bottom edge. Pin, then sew along the two short edges of the pocket, 0.25cm (1/8") in from the edge. Sew a third line down the centre of the fabric to create two pockets. 06 Cut an 83 x 11cm (325/8 x 43/8") piece of faux leather. Place this onto the large piece of fabric with RS facing, aligning one long edge with the bottom long edge of the fabric and pocket. Pin in place.

07 Take the two faux leather strips made in Step 3 and thread one through each of the D rings, folding the strip in half so the ends meet. Measure 15cm (6") in from the right hand edge and tuck the ends of one strip between the faux leather and fabric, aligning the raw edges of all three. Pin in place, then sew along the bottom long edge, 1.5cm (5/8") in from the edge. 08 Open out the sewn panel, then fold in half along the length with RS together. Pin along the short edges to create a tube, then sew, 1.5cm (5/8") in from the edge. 09 Use the rotary cutter to cut a 28.5cm (11 ") diameter circle from the faux leather. With RS together, pin the circle to the faux leather end of the tube. Sew 1.5cm (5/8") in from the edge, then turn RS out. 10 To make the lining, cut an 83 x 46cm (325/8 x 181/8") piece, and a 28.5cm (11 ") diameter circle from the fabric. Fold your rectangle in half along the length with RS facing, pin the aligned short edges, then sew, 1.5cm (5/8") in from the edge. Sew the circle to the bottom of the tube as per Step 9.


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11 Fold the top raw edge of the bag outer to the WS by 1.5cm (5/8") and press. Fold the top edge of the lining to the WS by 1.5cm (5/8") and press. Place the lining inside the bag outer, matching the back seam and the top edges. Add the other half of the magnetic popper fastening to the centre front of the bag, 11cm (43/8") down from the top edge, so the back of the popper is hidden between the outer and lining fabrics. 12 Take one of the fabric strips made in Step 3, and loop one end over the bar at the centre of a strap adjuster by 7cm (2 "). Fold the same end of the strap under by 2cm ( "), then fold the remaining 5cm (2") flat and pin in place. Sew a 2.5 x 2.5cm (1 x 1") square across the folded square to secure the end and close the loop. 13 Thread the other end of the strap through one of the D rings on the bag, then back through the bag adjuster. Repeat Steps 12-13 with the second strap. 14 Slide the raw edge of the faux leather flap (from Step 1) between the bag lining and outer by 1.5cm

(5/8"), aligning the middle of the flap with the back seam of the bag, and with the fastener facing the front. Pin, then tuck the raw ends of both straps in behind the flap, one on either side, and 1cm (3/8") in from the flap edges. Check to make sure they’re not twisted, then pin and sew around the top of the bag, 0.5cm ( ") down from the edge. 15 To make the cord, cut a 110 x 3cm (433/8 x 1 ") piece of faux leather. Fold the short ends to the WS by 1cm (3/8") and sew. Fold the long edges in to the centre, then fold in half along the length, hiding the raw edges. Pin, then sew along the middle of the cord length. 16 Sew around the top edge of the bag again, 2cm ( ") below the first seam, to create a channel for the cord. Cut a small hole in the front

centre of the bag, between the two rows of stitching, and through the front layer of fabric only. Fold the edges of the hole to the WS and oversew by hand to make a neat opening. Thread the cord through the channel created. 17 Cut a 7.5 x 4.5cm (3 x 17/8") piece of faux leather. Fold both long edges and one short edge to the WS by 0.5cm ( ") and sew. Next, fold the shorter edges in with WS together so they overlap in the middle by roughly 0.5cm ( "). Pin, then sew along the centre where the edges overlap, creating two channels for the cord. 18 Thread both cord ends through, then use this toggle to hold the bag closed once you’ve tightened the cord drawstring. Tie a knot at the end of each drawstring to finish.

Anna Alicia Anna is a designer-maker, author of craft title Make it Your Own, and the face behind ecoethical jewellery and homeware label, A Alicia. Her designs are inspired by her childhood travels, and the buzz of living in London. www.aalicia.bigcartel.com

82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 85


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Natural impressions

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK; MODEL: ALEXANDRA FIA

Capture the tinest details of nature with Emma Mitchell’s imprinted silver earrings

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HOW TO MAKE… SILVER CLAY EARRINGS MATERIALS Q 6g art clay silver Q Craft knife Q Plastic rolling pin Q Leaf-shaped cutter, 2-3cm ( -1 ") long Q Sage leaves Q Greaseproof paper Q Flat glazed tile Q Kitchen towel Q Cooking oil Q Firing gauze Q Gas hob or camping stove Q Long tweezers

Q Brass polishing brush Q Pro-polishing pads (we got ours from www.metalclay.co.uk) Q Long-nosed pliers Q Wire cutters Q Silver necklace chain with 2mm (1/8") links, 12cm (4 ") long Q Six silver jump rings, 4mm ( ") diameter Q Silver earring wires

Silver clay is a magical substance, made by combining cotton and paper fibres with the finely ground silver recovered from printed circuit boards. Available in most craft shops, you mould or shape the clay any way you like, then burn away the binding materials to leave pure silver in a delightful kind of alchemy. Emma’s imprinted a sage leaf into the clay, creating a set of cascading leaf earrings that echo a flourishing branch – a unique way to wear the botanical trend and pretty up a plain outfit.

Emma Mitchell Emma is a jewellery designer, craft teacher and nature lover. She teaches silver clay workshops at her cottage in Cambridgeshire, as well as venues around the UK, and loves to transform small, natural finds into wearable silver versions.

www.silverpebble.net

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01 Make sure the tile is clean and dry, then rub a small drop of cooking oil onto it to prevent the clay from sticking. Cut a 10cm (4") square piece of greaseproof paper and place it near the tile. 02 To make the first leaf shape, cut a 0.5cm ( ") square piece of

clay from the pack (roughly 1g) and place it onto the oiled surface. Roll it out into a rough leaf shape, approximately 1.5mm (5/8") thick. 03 Place the reverse of a sage leaf onto the clay, ensuring the stalk overlaps the edge. Place the sheet of greaseproof paper on top, then use your finger to gently rub the leaf through the paper, impressing the details into the clay. 04 Lift the paper off the clay, then use the stalk to carefully peel off the leaf. Position the leaf-shaped cutter over the clay, ensuring the pointed end is touching the central vein of the leaf imprint. Press the cutter into the clay, then use the craft knife to cut away any excess clay from around the outside. 05 Use a pin to make a hole in the clay, roughly 0.25cm (1/8") down from the rounded base of the leaf. Press the pin down through the clay, then move it in tiny circles


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to open up the hole – this will be where you thread the jump ring. Use your finger to carefully flatten any raised areas around the hole. 06 Repeat Steps 2-5 five more times to make six leaves in total – three for each earring. 07 Place all six leaves onto the tile, then bake for 15-20 minutes at 100°C/350°F/Gas mark 4 to remove any moisture from the clay. Put the tile to one side and leave to cool. 08 Carefully remove one leaf from the tile. Supporting the edge of the leaf with your fingers, gently use a damp piece of kitchen towel to brush off any sharp pieces from around the outside. The clay can be extremely brittle at this stage, so try not to apply too much pressure. Repeat this step with the five remaining leaves. 09 Check the hole in each leaf goes through to the other side. If not, place it on a hard surface and use

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the pin to carefully open the hole again, as per Step 5. 10 Place the firing gauze over a hob on the gas cooker or camping stove, then light the gas and turn it up to the hottest temperature. Wait until the gauze turns red hot, then use the tweezers to gently place each leaf onto one of the red hot areas of the gauze. 11 As the cotton and paper fibres within the clay burn away from the silver, the leaves will give off a flame. Wait until the flame has died down, then leave the gas on for 10 minutes to ensure the fibres burn away completely. Leave to cool on the gauze for five minutes. 12 Hold a leaf firmly and use the wire brush to polish the white silver oxide away, revealing the silver underneath. As the pendant is now made of silver, you don’t need to be as careful as before. Repeat with the remaining leaves.

13 If you prefer, you can use the leaves as they are, with a matt, brushed silver finish. Alternatively, use the Pro-polishing pad on each one to create a shiny surface. 14 Cut the chain into six different lengths: two lengths with 27 links, two lengths with 15 links, and two lengths with three links. 15 Use the pliers to open the six jump rings, then thread the end of each jump ring through the hole in each of the leaves. In addition, thread the first link from a length of chain onto each of the jump rings, then close all six rings. 16 Open up the loops on both of the earring wires using the pliers. To make each earring, thread on the end of the longest length of chain, then the end of the middlelength chain, and finally the end of the shortest chain to create the cascading effect. Close the loops with the pliers to finish.

82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 89


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Update your wardrobe in an afternoon with Sammy Claridge’s no-pattern top

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HOW TO MAKE… A SUMMER TEE MATERIALS Q Cotton fabric, 100 x 115cm (393/8 x 453/8") Q Contrasting cotton fabric, 10 x 15cm (4 x 6") Q Bias binding Q Matching sewing thread Q Erasable fabric marker

Easy summer style? We’ve got it down to a tee. A casual, simplesew, pattern-free tee, that is. With its flattering cap sleeves, cute contrasting pocket and not a template in sight, Sammy’s lightweight top is as effortless to wear as it is to make. All you need is a sewing machine, fabric, a tape measure, and a couple of spare hours. And, if you’re unsure whether you’ve taken the correct measurements, compare them with a top you already own. 01 Measure your bust line, then divide this by two and add 8cm (31/8"). This is the measurement for the width of your panels. Next, measure from your shoulder to the length you’d like the top to be.

Sammy Claridge Designer Sammy is a busy lady. As well as running her online haberdashery shop, Sew Crafty, she blogs with her best friend, H, over at Live it. Love it. Make it. Plus, you can now catch her as a guest designer on the Sewing Quarter TV channel.

www.sewcraftyonline.co.uk

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02 Cut two panels from the cotton fabric using the measurements in Step 1, then put one panel to one side. Fold the second panel in half along the width, marking the centre of the top edge. Measure and mark 12cm (4 ") out from either side of the centre mark – this will be the width of the neck opening. 03 Measure and mark 5cm (2") down from the centre mark. This will be the depth of the neck opening, so if you would prefer a lower neckline, or a V-neck, you can alter it at this point. 04 Use a curved ruler or a plate to join the width markings with the depth marking, creating the shape of the neckline. Again, you can alter the shape at this stage if you prefer. 05 Cut away the fabric above the neckline and sew a line of stay stitching around the curve, 0.5cm ( ") down from the raw edge. 06 Measure 25cm (97/8") down from the top edge along one side and mark this point, then repeat on the other side. This is where the bottom of both sleeves will sit. 07 Pin the front panel and back panel with right sides (RS) together.

Sew along the top raw edge, from the top left corner to the neckline, then from the other side of the neckline to the top right edge. Sew both sides from the bottom sleeve mark to the bottom raw edge. 08 Double fold a small hem to the wrong side (WS) around the armholes created, and along the bottom raw edge of your top. Pin in place, then sew. 09 Take a length of bias binding and iron out the folded edges. Turn the top RS out and pin the bias binding around the neckline, aligning the raw edges. Sew along the edge, using the fold line in the bias as a guide. 10 Fold the bias binding to the WS of the top, then topstitch around the neckline to secure it in place. 11 To make the pocket, pin a small hem to the WS along the two long sides and bottom short edge, and a slightly larger hem along the top edge. Sew around all four edges. 12 Try on the top and roughly pin the pocket in place. Remove the top, ensure the pocket is straight, then sew around the two sides and the bottom to attach it.


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TH ON AU SA GU LE ST 2

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NEXT MONTH’S ISSUE PLANS!

Hook up a colourful basket

Sew a no-pattern pinafore dress MAKE IT

make a découpage fruit bowl

¤ EASY-SEW CIRCUS PALS ¤ NATURAL-DYE FLORAL SCARF ¤ KNITTED RAINBOW CUSHION ¤ BEADED STATEMENT NECKLACE ¤ SEWING MACHINE COVER ¤ EMBROIDERED HOOP ART

PLUS! FREE BUMPER CROCHET PROJECT BOOK 24 new & exclusive patterns inside! 96 MOLLIEMAKES 26

83 COVER GIFT AND CONTENTS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.


MAKES

TEMPLATES All the shapes for this issue’s makes. Unless otherwise stated, templates are shown at 100%.You can find the full-size templates ready to download from www.molliemakes.com YOUR FREE GIFT BY NIKKI MCWILLIAMS PAGE 7

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01 From the piece of fabric supplied, cut out the front and back biscuit shapes along the black dotted lines. Next, cut out the hanging loop, leaving a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance around the black dotted line. 02 Fold the long edges of the hanging loop to the wrong side (WS), making sure the dotted lines sit on the same side as the

raw edge – that way, they’ll be hidden when the piece is sewn together. Fold the loop in half along the length, enclosing the raw edges, then sew the open long edges using the yellow thread and blanket stitch. 03 Place one of the biscuit shapes right side (RS) up, then fold the hanging loop in half along the length. Pin the two

short ends of the loop centrally along one short end of the biscuit, aligning the raw edges. 04 Place the remaining biscuit shape on top with RS together, aligning the edges, and making sure the writing faces in the same direction on either side. Starting at the short edge without the hanging loop, backstitch the two biscuit

shapes together along the outside of the printed edge using yellow thread, and leaving a 2.5cm (1") gap for turning. 05 Turn the keyring RS out, then turn the edges of the gap to the WS and press in place. Stuff the keyring firmly, neatly backstitch the gap closed, then thread the enclosed silver ring onto the hanging loop to finish.

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand-make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 97


MAKES

BABY BLOCKS BY AMY PHILIP PAGE 77

Chart 1 - Heart square

Chart 2 - polka Dot square

Chart 3 - cloud square

layout guide

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand-make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

98 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82


MAKES

SUCCULENT WREATH BY DEIDRE KINDALL PAGE 18

Small basic petal Cut 18

Large basic petal Cut 18

Large scalloped petal Cut 18

Large pointed petal Cut 18

Small scalloped petal Cut 12

Small pointed petal Cut 48

Skinny petal Cut 30

Oval petal Cut 45

Spiky petal Cut 3 Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand-make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

SWAN COLLAR BY ZOE LARKINS PAGE 41

Fold line

Collar Cut 2

Swan body Cut 2

Small beak Cut 2 Large beak Cut 2

Lily pad Cut 2

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand-make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

100 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82


MAKES

CAKE CUSHIONS BY REBECCA REID SWEET TREATS PROJECT BOOK PAGE 8

FIND FULL SIZE TEMPLATES ON molliemakes.com

Icing Cut 2 Photocopy at 300%

Doughnut Cut 2 Photocopy at 300%

Cake top/bottom Cut 2 Photocopy at 400%

BISCUIT MAGNETS BY LAURA MINTER AND TIA WILLIAMS SWEET TREATS PROJECT BOOK PAGE 13

Ring biscuit Cut 1

Bourbon Cut 2

Custard cream Cut 2

Jam heart biscuit Cut 2

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand-make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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MAKES

BACKPACK BY ANNA ALICIA PAGE 82

Photocopy at 400%

FIND FULL SIZE TEMPLATES ON molliemakes.com

Bag flap Cut 2

MACRAMÉ KNOT GUIDE USE TO MAKE YOUR MACRAMÉ PLANT HOLDER BY FANNY ZEDENIUS ON PAGE 57 02

01

4-ply crown knot 01 Lay out the four strands in four different directions as pictured above, holding them in place in the centre with your non-dominant hand.

01

03

02 Take any of the strands and fold it around the strand next to it, creating a loop. Take the second strand and fold it around the first and third strand.

03

03 Take the third strand and fold it around the second and fourth strand. For the fourth strand, fold it over the third, then the first, and pass it through the

02

loop formed by the first strand. Gently pull each strand, one at a time, to tighten the knot. 04 Repeat Steps 2-3 until the knot reaches the desired length.

03

A

A

B

B

B

A

Square knot 01 Move Cord B to the left across the filler cords, behind Cord A. 02 Move Cord A behind the filler cords, and pass it up through the

loop from behind. Pull Cord A gently to the right, and Cord B gently to the left, while holding the filler cords straight.

03 Move Cord B to the right across the filler cords, forming a loop, and behind Cord A. Move Cord A behind the filler cords,

and pass it up through the loop created by Cord B, from behind. 04 To tighten, pull A and B while holding the filler cords straight.

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand-make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

102 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82


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02

03

A

A

B B

Right-twisting half square knot 01 Pass Cord B to the left over the filler cords, forming a loop, and behind Cord A. Move Cord A behind the filler cords, and pass it up through the loop from behind. Pull Cord A gently to

01

the right, and B to the left, while holding the filler cords straight. 02 Pass Cord A to the left over the filler cords, forming a loop, and behind Cord B. Move Cord B behind the filler cords, and

pass it up through the loop from behind. Tighten the working cords equally so the knot looks the same front and back. 03 Repeat Steps 1-2 to form a spiral. The knot is reversible, so

02

Alternating square knot 01 Tie a row of square knots. On the second row, use the outer working cord of each pair of adjacent square knots as the filler cords, and the nearest pair of filler cords as the working cords, so the second row of square knots will be offset, as pictured.

01

Wrap knot 01 Gather the filler cords together and place the working cord on top, folded in a U-shape. Begin wrapping one end of the working cord around all the cords, starting at the top. For the

when the knot has twisted half a turn, continue from the ‘back’ as before. If necessary, push the knots upwards while holding the filler cords straight. Continue repeating Steps 1-2 as required.

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first wrap, hold the working cord in place with one hand (where the working cord passes over itself), while wrapping with the other hand. As you continue, let go and turn the bundle as you

02 Tighten each square knot, placing it close to the first row to create a fine net, or further apart from the first row to create a looser net. 03 Continue alternating the filler and working cords used to tie the knots on every other row, creating a net-like pattern.

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wrap, so all wraps are placed neatly together. 02 Stop wrapping when you can see 1cm (3/8") of the folded loop left. Pass the working cord through the loop from the front.

03 Pull the top of the working cord so that the loop slides up behind the column of wrapping. If required, you can now cut the top and bottom ends of the working cord to trim.

Thank you for making this project from Mollie Makes. We have requested specific permission from designers so that you can recreate and sell selected projects from this issue on the following conditions. Just look for this icon. You can individually hand-make as many as you wish of our labelled projects, to sell either for yourself, your local event or to raise money for charity. You cannot sell in shops (online or otherwise) and you cannot go into mass production, which means you cannot manufacture in large quantities, especially by machine. Selling photocopies of any part of this magazine, its kits or supplements is prohibited. We don’t mind if you make a copy of the templates for a friend but please do not make any part of the templates or instructions available to others through your website or a third party website, or copy it multiple times without our permission. Please respect one another’s copyright.

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82 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 103


To feature in the Marketplace contact Jordana Widt (0117 300 8539, jordana.widt@immediate.co.uk) or Isabel Higuero (0117 300 8538, isabel.higuero@immediate.co.uk)

FABRIC & MATERIALS

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Nellies quality handmade children’s clothes and crafts. Lovingly crafted beautiful dresses, dungarees and more with hint of vintage. To find out more visit: www.lovenelliesshop.co.uk

01579 384376 We supply wooden, MDF, papier mache & galvanised items to decorate yourself. Products include boxes, mini chests of drawers, trays, planters & clocks. orders@boxylady.co.uk www.boxylady.co.uk

01453 839454 Needle felt kits and supplies including hedgehog fabric, birds legs, wool batts and glue-in eyes, starter packs, monthly Makerss boxes, free tutorials. 10% discount code: MM10. info@themakerss.co.uk www.themakerss.co.uk

Designer fabrics including Frou-Frou, Blend, Sevenberry Lecien and Dashwood Studio. Wool blend felt, buttons, trims and hair accessory supplies. Use code MOLLIE10 for 10% off your first order. www.carrowaycottage.co.uk

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Tinytinks specialise in handmade heirloom dolls for your little one to treasure for a lifetime. All dolls are custom made and one of a kind. Please pop over to our website for more details. www.tiny-tinks.co.uk

FABRIC & MATERIALS

01246 807575 or 07976 845 662 StraightCurves provides a wide range high quality arts and crafts courses and workshops for all ages and abilities from 2 to 102. Our professional friendly team teach in a relaxed way to small groups from our accessible studios in the heart of Chesterfield. Discount code: MM03. 104 Saltergate, Chesterfield, Derbyshire S40 1NE info@straightcurves.co.uk www.straightcurves.co.uk

FABRIC & MATERIALS

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07796 620139 Kits, patterns, books, fabrics, eyes and supplies to crochet, knit, needle felt and sew a magical world of dolls, bears and other cute animals. info@amazingcraft.co.uk www.amazingcraft.co.uk

01333 429597 Contemporary cross stitch, blackwork and needlepoint kits, both functional and beautiful. Game boards by stitching, painting by stitching, creating by stitching and your own photo charts. www.doodlecraftdesign.co.uk

To feature in the Marketplace please contact either: Jordana Widt:

Isabel Higuero:

0117 300 8539

0117 300 8538

jordana.widt@immediate.co.uk

isabel.higuero@immediate.co.uk


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Lots of Sophie’s designs feature hand-lettered typography

Sophie Gibbons shares how she took her designs from paper to fabric

These mini embroidered hoops make unique gifts

Name: Sophie Gibbons Occupation: Illustrator and designer-maker

I started Junk and Glitter in 2015, designing prints and stationery, as it was an excuse to do something I loved. After I had my second daughter in January, I struggled to find time to sit at the computer and design. I wanted to develop a unique product in my style, but it needed to be easy to produce when trapped under a baby who would only sleep on me. Seven months later and she’s still attached to me all day! Shifting my focus from paper to textiles has definitely opened up a new audience to my work. I was anxious at first, but taking

i love the freedom embroidery gives me – when I sew, it’s mostly freestyle Sophie takes colour inspiration from her huge stash of craft supplies

Her distinct style works well across a variety of mediums

my designs in a new direction has been such a positive decision. The embroidered hoops I stitch are a great alternative gift idea, and I’ve had lots of custom orders for weddings and new babies. I love the freedom designing embroidery gives me, and when I sew, it’s mostly freestyle. I choose which threads and stitches work best, so each piece is unique. And, I’ve got exciting plans to work on some bigger pieces inspired by my original prints and patterns.

Currents Visit www.junkandglitter.etsy.com to buy Sophie’s hoops, request your own bespoke design, or shop her prints and stationery. Follow her on Insta at @junkandglitter.

Next issue: Living a colourful life with Gudrun Sjödén 106 MOLLIEMAKES.COM 82

Reading: Nobody Told Me by Hollie McNish – an incredible book of poems about parenting. Watching: Glow on Netflix – I’m obsessed with the 80s leotards! Listening to: Paramore’s new album, After Laughter. One of my favourites, they never disappoint.


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SWEET TREATS PROJECT BOOK lolly piÑata

INSIDE! 6 makes TASTY PROJECTS TO INSPIRE YOU! clay Biscuits

Cake cushion


Sweetest thing If there’s anything to rival our passion for making, it’s probably found in the biscuit tin – Team Mollie has something of a collective sweet tooth. This issue’s custard cream keyring cover gift by Nikki McWilliams gave us a serious sugar rush, so we’ve put together this whole booklet of sweet projects to treat you. Don’t forget to share your makes on Instagram using #molliemakers.

PS. You can find all the instructions you need to make your keyring on page 98 of the main magazine – enjoy!

doughnut cushion PAGE 8 602 MOLLIEMAKES.COM


crochet milkshake PAGE 4

biscuit magnets PAGE 13

nice-cream PAGE 20

lolly piĂąata PAGE 17

cake cushions PAGE 8


Shake it up

PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK

Treat yo’self to Charlotte Gray’s sweet amigurumi milkshake

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MATERIALS Q Rico Creative Cotton Aran, 100% cotton, 50g/85m per ball, one ball each in White (80) (Yarn A), Violet (16) (Yarn B), Light Blue (32) (Yarn C), Light Pistachio (44) (Yarn D), Vanilla (62) (Yarn E), Powder (61) (Yarn F), Rose (00) (Yarn G), Candy Pink (64) (Yarn H) Q 3.5mm (UK 9, US E/4) crochet hook Q Tapestry needle Q Soft toy filling Q Two black safety eyes, 1cm (3/8") Q Black embroidery thread Q Sewing needle Q Straw Q Small piece of cardboard Q Stitch marker TENSION Tension is not important for this project, but the stitches need to be tight enough so that the stuffing doesn’t show through

ABBREVIATIONS st(s) stitch(es) ch chain ss slip stitch dc double crochet inc increase by working 2 dc into the same stitch dec decrease by working 2 dc together magic ring to make a magic ring, hold yarn in your hand and wrap working yarn around forefinger twice to create ring, slip ring off your finger and insert hook to pick up first st, ch1, then work the necessary sts for Round 1 and close the ring tightly by pulling the loose end FINISHED SIZE Approx. 15cm (6") high

What could be better than an extra thick milkshake, topped with whipped cream and a cherry? Not much, but we reckon this kawaii-cute version in rainbow shades just about tops it. Feel free to be creative with yarn colours, depending on your favourite treat (mint choc chip, anyone?), and take care when stuffing the milkshake so it doesn’t lose its recognisable shape. Instructions All the parts of the milkshake, excluding the straw, are made in continuous rounds. Use a stitch marker to indicate the end of each round. The straw is worked in rows. Crocheting into the back bar (or back bump) is required in Round 7. The back bar is the loop located behind the back loop of a stitch. The pattern uses concise crochet – for example, 6dc means work 1dc in each of next 6 sts. Milkshake Round 1 using Yarn A, 6dc into a magic ring, pull ring closed [6sts] Round 2 inc 6 times [12sts] Round 3 (1dc, inc) 6 times [18sts] Round 4 (2dc, inc) 6 times [24sts] Round 5 (3dc, inc) 6 times [30sts] Round 6 (4dc, inc) 6 times [36sts] Round 7 crochet in the back bar (back bump) st, 1dc in each st [36sts] MOLLIEMAKES.COM 5


HOW TO MAKE‌ A CROCHET MILKSHAKE Round 8 crochet in both loops again, 1dc in each st [36sts] Change to Yarn B Round 9 (11dc, inc) 3 times [39sts] Rounds 10-11 1dc in each st [39sts] Change to Yarn C Rounds 12-14 1dc in each st [39sts] Change to Yarn D Rounds 15-17 1dc in each st [39sts] Change to Yarn E Rounds 18-20 1dc in each st [39sts] Change to Yarn F Rounds 21-23 1dc in each st [39sts] Change to Yarn G Rounds 24-25 1dc in each st [39sts] Round 26 (12dc, inc) 3 times 6 MOLLIEMAKES.COM

[42sts] Change to Yarn A Round 27 1dc in each st [42sts] Round 28 crochet in the front loops only, 1dc in each st [42sts] Finish with a ss, weave in ends Attach the safety eyes between Rounds 16 and 17, with roughly 8sts between each eye. Cut a circle from the cardboard, the same size as the base of the milkshake. Place inside the milkshake before stuffing to give it a sturdier base.

Round 2 inc 6 times [12sts] Round 3 (1dc, inc) 6 times [18sts] Round 4 (2dc, inc) 6 times [24sts] Round 5 (3dc, inc) 6 times [30sts] Round 6 (4dc, inc) 6 times [36sts] Round 7 (5dc, inc) 6 times [42sts] Finish with a ss and leave a long tail for sewing. Stuff the milkshake, then sew to the top of the milkshake, onto the back loops from Round 28. Continue stuffing the milkshake as you sew.

Top Round 1 using Yarn A, 6dc into a magic ring, pull ring closed [6sts]

Cream Round 1 using Yarn A, 6dc into a magic ring, pull ring closed [6sts]


Round 2 inc 6 times [12sts] Round 3 (1dc, inc) 6 times [18sts] Round 4 (2dc, inc) 6 times [24sts] Rounds 5-7 inc in every st around for 3 rounds Finish with a ss and leave a long tail for sewing. Cherry Round 1 using Yarn H, 6dc into a magic ring, pull ring closed [6sts] Round 2 inc 6 times [12sts] Round 3-5 1dc in each st [12sts] Round 6 dec 6 times [6sts] Stuff the cherry, then sew the hole together, leaving a long tail of thread for sewing to the cream later. Using a small amount of green

yarn, ch4. Tie the ends, then sew through the top of the cherry to create a stalk. Weave in the ends. Straw Using Yarn C, ch51 (leave a long tail at the start of your chain for sewing) Change to Yarn A Row 1 1dc in 2nd chain from the hook then in each ch across [50sts] Finish with a ss and leave a long tail for sewing. Wrap the crochet firmly around the straw at an angle, as shown. Trim off any excess straw, then sew together the crochet at either end to stop it from unravelling. Carefully weave the yarn tail in and out along the length of

the work, to further secure the crochet in place. Cheeks (make 2) Round 1 using Yarn H, 6dc into a magic ring, pull ring closed [6sts] Ss in the first dc Fasten off, leaving a long tail for sewing. Finishing Sew on the cheeks using a tapestry needle and the main image as a guide. Using black embroidery thread, stitch on the smile between the eyes. Fold the cream so it resembles ripples, then sew to the top of the milkshake. Place the cherry and straw on top of the cream and sew in place. MOLLIEMAKES.COM 7


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Cherry on top

PHOTOGRAPHY: SIMPLY SEWING MAGAZINE WWW.SIMPLYSEWINGMAG.COM

Make every day a party with Rebecca Reid’s scrummy cake cushions

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HOW TO MAKE… CAKE CUSHIONS MATERIALS Q Soft toy filling For the cake slice Q 60 x 112cm (235/8 x 441/8") main fabric (we used Cloud 9 Fabrics Brushstrokes by Holly Degroot in Trellis Purple) Q 80 x 112cm (31 x 441/8") contrast fabric (we used Cloud 9 Fabrics Brushstrokes by Holly Degroot in Speckled Purple) Q Red pom pom

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For the doughnut Q 60 x 112cm (235/8 x 441/8") main fabric (we used Cloud 9 Fabrics Brushstrokes by Holly Degroot in Trellis Coral) Q 50 x 50cm (19 x 19 ") contrasting fabric (we used Cloud 9 Fabrics Brushstrokes by Holly Degroot in Confetti Multi) Q 50 x 50cm (19 x 19 ") iron-on interfacing

If you’re stuck for birthday gift ideas – especially for tricky-tobuy-for tweens – whip up these bakes on your sewing machine. Made using colourful patterned fabric, these cake and doughnut cushions can easily be whipped up over a weekend. Use those pretty fat quarters you’ve been squirreling away, or visit www. hantex.co.uk/cloud9 for stockists of Cloud 9 Fabrics. And, make sure to use a 1cm (3/8") seam allowance throughout unless stated. For the cake slice 01 Using the template on page 98 of the main magazine, cut a cake bottom from the main fabric, and


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four 13 x 52cm (5 x 20 ") pieces for the cake sides. From the contrasting fabric, cut a cake top using the template, a 32 x 32cm (125/8 x 125/8") piece for the cake back, four 6 x 32cm (23/8 x 125/8") pieces for the icing strips and a 10 x 60cm (4 x 235/8") piece for the icing frill. 02 Place an icing strip on top of one cake side, right sides (RS) together and aligning the long edges. Pin and sew, then repeat to attach another icing strip to the remaining long edge of the cake side. 03 Sew a second cake side to the remaining long edge of

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the icing strip in the same way, then press the seams open. Repeat Steps 2-3 to make the opposite side of the cake. 04 Fold the icing frill in half along the length with RS together. Pin and sew along the short edges, turn RS out, then fold in half along the length and press. 05 Sew the open long edges using a gathering stitch, then gather the fabric evenly along the length so it fits along the top edge of the cake back, starting and finishing 1cm (3/8") in from each short edge. 06 Tack the frill to the cake back with RS together, aligning

the raw edges of the frill and the top edge of the cake back. 07 Place the cake sides with RS together, matching the fabrics and aligning the raw edges. Pin and sew one short end. 08 Pin the long edges of the cake top to the two top edges of the cake sides (the icing strips) with RS together. Sew from the base of the cake top to the point on one long edge, then on the second long edge, to help create a neat point. 09 Repeat Step 8 to attach the cake bottom to the cake sides, turn RS out and press the seams, then turn back to the wrong side (WS). MOLLIEMAKES.COM 11


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HOW TO MAKE… CAKE CUSHIONS 10 Pin the cake back to the top, sides and bottom, making sure the frill is positioned on the top edge. Fold the frill to the inside to prevent it getting caught in the seams. Starting and finishing along the bottom edge of the cake back, sew around all four sides, leaving a 15cm (6") gap. 11 Turn through to the RS and press. Fold the edges of the turning gap to the WS by 1cm (3/8") and press in place. 12 Stuff the cake, pushing the stuffing into the corners, and making sure it’s firm, but that the sides still lie flat. Slip stitch the gap closed, then sew the pom pom to the top to finish.

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For the doughnut 13 Using the templates on page 98 of the main magazine, cut two doughnut pieces from the main fabric and one icing piece from the contrasting fabric. Flip the icing template, then cut one icing piece from the iron-on interfacing. 14 Back the icing piece with the iron-on interfacing, following the manufacturer’s instructions. Place a doughnut piece RS up, then peel off the backing from the icing piece and place it on top, matching the inner circles. Press in place. 15 Using zigzag stitch, sew around the outside and inside of the icing piece.

16 Place the doughnut pieces with RS together, aligning the raw edges. Pin and sew around the outside, then turn RS out and press the outer seam so it lies on the edge. 17 Turn WS out again, then pin the inner circles of the doughnut together, sewing small 6cm (23/8") sections at a time, as this can be quite fiddly. Leave a 10cm (4") gap for turning through. 18 Snip into the seam allowance to help the inner circle lie flat, then turn RS out and press. Stuff firmly, then fold the edges of the gap to the WS by 1cm (3/8") and slip stitch closed to finish.


PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS; STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK

Tea sugar coffee milk

Sugar rush Pay tribute to the humble biscuit with Laura Minter and Tia Williams’ fridge magnets MOLLIEMAKES.COM 21


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HOW TO MAKE… BISCUIT MAGNETS MATERIALS Q White air-dry clay, 250g (10oz) Q Rolling pin Q Cling film Q Acrylic paint in beige, brown, red, yellow and pink Q Cocktail stick Q Biscuit cutters, 3.5cm (13/8") and 4.5cm (17/8") diameter Q Circular pen lid, 1cm (3/8") diameter Q Fine sandpaper 14 MOLLIEMAKES.COM

Q Strong glue Q Gloss varnish Q Magnetic strip

Ahh, biscuits. The perfect partner to a good cuppa, they’re always there for you in times of need. And, while it’s easy to get your head turned by a luxury chocolate-coated version, there’s nothing better than a classic dunk. Inspired by some of our favourite brands, Laura and Tia’s fridge magnets make for the handiest eye candy we’ve seen in a while. 01 To make the custard cream, roll the clay out to 3-4mm (1/8 - ") thick between two sheets of cling film.


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Use the template on page 98 of the main magazine to cut out two custard cream shapes, then use a cocktail stick to score the text and pattern detailing onto one shape. Don’t worry too much about any rough edges, as these can be sanded away later. 02 To make the bourbon, repeat Step 1 with the bourbon template, cutting out both shapes and marking on the detail. 03 To make the jam heart biscuits, roll out the clay as per Step 1, then use either the jam heart biscuit

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template or the 3.5cm (13/8") biscuit cutter to cut out two shapes. Mark the heart shape in the centre of one circle using a cocktail stick, then use a sharp knife to cut it out. 04 To make the ring biscuit, roll out the clay to 0.5cm ( "). Use either the ring biscuit template or the 4.5cm (17/8") biscuit cutter to cut one shape, then use the circular pen lid to cut away the centre. 05 Leave the biscuits in a warm place to dry overnight. Once dry, lightly sand each one to create a smooth finish, then go over any MOLLIEMAKES.COM 15


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HOW TO MAKE‌ BISCUIT MAGNETS markings and patterns with a cocktail stick once more. 06 To make the filling for the custard cream, bourbon and jam heart biscuits, take small lumps of fresh clay and press them out to make 3-4mm (1/8 - ") thick circles, slightly smaller than each biscuit. Press in between the two biscuit sides, then leave to dry overnight. 07 If the sandwich biscuits are not sealed together once the clay filling has dried, use glue to secure them in place. Paint the custard cream, the bottom of the 16 MOLLIEMAKES.COM

ring biscuit and the outside of the jam heart biscuit beige. Paint the bourbon brown, the top of the ring biscuit yellow and the filling of the jam heart biscuit red. Leave to dry. 08 Paint diagonal lines of pink across the top of the ring biscuit, as shown, then leave to dry again. Once dry, paint varnish onto the ring biscuit and onto the centre of the jam heart biscuit. 09 To finish, cut a length of magnetic strip slightly smaller than each biscuit, then glue to the reverse. Leave to dry before using.


Piñata party Liven up a summer gathering with Kate Jenkins’ ice lolly piñata

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HOW TO MAKE… A LOLLY PIÑATA MATERIALS Q Coloured tissue paper Q Corrugated cardboard Q Cable ties, 14cm (5 ") Q Glue stick Q Sticky tape Q Craft knife Q Cutting mat Q Ruler Q Sweets

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Take a casual barbecue to the next level, courtesy of Pinyatay’s essential party decoration. Made in sunglasses-worthy neon brights, this ice lolly not only looks good, but you and your pals can smash its sweet-filled contents all over the garden after dinner. You could make it for a kids’ party too, but why should they get all the fun? 01 Cut two 20 x 30cm (77/8 x 117/8") pieces of corrugated cardboard, then round off the top corners to make the main body of the lolly. Cut an 11 x 6cm (43/8 x 23/8") piece of corrugated cardboard for the lolly stick, then cut a 100 x 8cm (393/8 x 31/8") strip of corrugated cardboard,

ensuring the corrugated stripes run across the width of the strip. 02 Attach the 100 x 8cm (393/8 x 31/8") strip around the edge of one of the main lolly body sections at a 90˚ angle, using strips of sticky tape. Make sure to leave gaps between the tape as shown, so it’s easier to smash. Trim away any excess cardboard, then carefully cut a 6cm (23/8") slit in the centre of the base of the lolly. 03 Cut two 3cm (1 ") slits along one short edge of the lolly stick to create three tabs. Push this end through the slot in the bottom edge of the lolly, fold over the tabs to open them out, and stick them down to the inside of the base.


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04 Cut two small rectangles of card and stick them inside the top edge, using the image for placement. Cut two small slits in one of the cardboard rectangles, both going out through the top edge of the piñata. Push a cable tie out through one slit and back inside through the other, then pull the cable tie tight on the inside. Repeat with the second rectangle. 05 Fill the piñata with your choice of goodies – we used sweets, but you could use party bag toys instead. Tape the other side of the lolly body on top as per Step 2, making sure to align the edges. 06 Cut four sheets of the same shade of tissue paper into 3cm

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(1 ") wide strips, then snip along one long edge to create a fringe. Spread a generous amount of glue across the width of the lolly, then, starting from the bottom and working your way up, stick down the uncut section of the tissue fringe in rows. Keep adding glue and rows of different coloured tissue until the whole side is covered. Repeat on all four sides. 07 Trim off any excess fringing. Cut 8cm (31/8") lengths of colourmatching fringe strips and glue these onto the remaining exposed areas. Leave to dry. To use, loop a length of string or ribbon through the cable ties to hang it, then hit with a broomstick or similar. MOLLIEMAKES.COM 19


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Ice and a slice

PHOTOGRAPHY: JACQUI MELVILLE

Cool down with Margie Broadhead’s deceptively healthy nice-cream lollies

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HOW TO MAKE… NICE-CREAM LOLLIES YOU WILL NEED Q Loaf tin, 21 x 11 x 7cm (8 x 43/8 x 2 ") Q One handful of fresh raspberries Q Lolly sticks For the base Q Rolled oats, 75g (2 oz) Q Four pitted Medjool dates Q 1 tbsp desiccated coconut Q tbsp maple syrup For the lime layer Q 1 banana, peeled and frozen Q ripe avocado Q Zest of 3 limes Q Freshly squeezed lime juice, 125ml (4 fl oz) For the raspberry layer Q 1 banana, peeled and frozen Q Raspberries, 125g (4oz) Q 1 tbsp tinned coconut milk, chilled (thick part only) Q 2 tbsp almond milk For the mango layer Q 1 banana, peeled and frozen Q Mango chunks, 160 g (5oz) (about a mango) Q 1 tbsp tinned coconut milk, chilled (thick part only) Q 2 tbsp almond milk For the topping Q Freeze-dried raspberries Q Raspberry powder Q Crushed pistachios

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Delectable, refreshing, and packed with all-natural ingredients, these mango, berry and lime nice-cream slices are so virtuous, you could eat them for breakfast. A dairy-free alternative to ice cream, nice-cream has the same scoopable texture, but is made using frozen bananas. And, this recipe adds in even more fruit, for the tastiest way to hit your five-a-day. 01 Line the inside of the loaf tin with cling film. Blend the ingredients for the base together in a food processor, and press into the tin. 02 For the lime layer, blend all the ingredients to form a thick nice-cream. Pour into the loaf tin, on top of the base. Freeze for 20 minutes to firm up, then add on the fresh raspberries. 03 Blend the ingredients for the raspberry nice-cream layer.

Spread this over the fresh raspberries and freeze for another 20 minutes. 04 Repeat with the mango layer, blending the ingredients, then pouring on top of the raspberry nice-cream layer. 05 Stick six lolly sticks into the loaf at equal intervals and sprinkle the surface with the freeze-dried raspberries, raspberry powder and crushed pistachios. Freeze for at least two hours. When ready to serve, remove from the loaf tin and slice into six portions.

Guilt-Free Nice Cream This recipe appears in Guilt-Free Nice Cream by Margie Broadhead, published by Hardie Grant (RRP £12.99). Inside, you’ll find over 70 recipes for making delicious dairy-free nice-creams. www.hardiegrant.com


With thanks to... Laura Minter & Tia Williams Laura and Tia are the Brighton-based mums behind Little Button Diaries, a crafting and baking blog full of ideas and tutorials. www.littlebuttondiaries.com

Charlotte Gray Determined to learn how to crochet, Charlotte spent hours staring at YouTube tutorials and now sells her makes from her home in Melbourne, Australia. www.littlehappygorgeous.bigcartel.com

Rebecca Reid Rebecca is an expert on all things sewing related. Currently working on Simply Sewing magazine, she also designs for TV channel Sewing Quarter. www.simplysewingmag.com

Kate Jenkins Kate makes colourful piñatas, inspired by her children’s love of party planning. She started crafting them for fun, and now runs Pinyatay. www.pinyatay.com

Margie Broadhead Margie’s book, Guilt-Free Nice Cream (Hardie Grant, £12.99), has over 70 different recipes using bananas as a base, making them delicious and dairy-free. www.hardiegrant.com

Twinkie Chan Twinkie Chan designs fun food-themed crochet accessories, from cupcake scarves to hot dog purses. She lives in San Francisco with her two happy pups. www.twinkiechan.com

Editorial team Editor Cath Dean, Deputy Editor Nikki Arnold, Senior Art Editor (on maternity leave) Helena Tracey, Art Editor Kit Cheung, Production Editor Yvette Streeter, Deputy Art Editor Becki Clark, Digital Editor Nina Dyer, Picture Editor Emma Georgiou


THIS BOOKLET AND THE BISCUIT KEYRING KIT ARE FREE GIFTS WITH THE PRINT VERSION OF MOLLIE MAKES ISSUE 82. STYLING: KIT CHEUNG AND BECKI CLARK PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILIP SOWELS

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