Page 1

W ashington County

ounty in Alabama

First County in Alabama


CONTACT INFORMATION Washington County Economic Development Initiative Austin Monk, Director Phone: (251) 454-3525 P.O. Box 854 Chatom, AL 36518 amonk@mobilechamber.com http://www.washingtoncountyedi.org

View book compiled in conjunction with the Washington County EDI and students from The University of Alabama Manderson Graduate School of Business. Students who worked on the project include: Tatum Morrell Turner, Jessica Wright, Tiara Dees, Fathi Kara and Katie Pouncey. This view book was designed by Tiara


Table of Contents Introduction .............................................................................................. 1 Overview ...................................................................................................... 2 History of Washington County ........................................................... 6 Topography ................ ................................................................................. 7 Infrastructure ........................................................................................... 8 Tourism .......................................................................................................... 11 Education ..................................................................................................... 14 Religious Organizations ........................................................................ 25 Demographical Data ................................................................................ 26 Utility Numbers ......................................................................................... 31 Closing ......................................................................................................... 32

For more information, visit http://washingtoncountyal.com/


Introduction

T

his view book is designed to provide a snapshot of our county, especially for retail business and developers seeking viable locations for new business ventures. The Washington County Economic Development Initiative, in partnership with Austin Monk and the towns of Washington County, has launched efforts to attract new retail businesses and commercial establishments. Recent studies have shown that smaller cities within commuting distances of metropolitan areas are becoming a haven for those seeking “the good life.�

I

want to get involved in this community, lock arms and continue to build economic development activities with our stakeholders. — Austin Monk Washington County Economic Development Initiative Director

The Washington County Economic Development Initiative continues to pursue new industrial growth and expand our economic base. Since 2007, new industries have been located here, including the steel mill ThyssenKrupp. It has brought thousands of new jobs to our area. While statistical data only reflects our residents, the vacation traffic is phenomenal. The increasing traffic on US Highway 43 creates a perfect opportunity for a vibrant retail chain. We strongly advise you to take advantage of our steady growth trends and locate your business in our fine county. For more information, contact Austin Monk with the Washington County Economic Development Initiative or visit us on the web at http:// washingtoncountyal.com/.


W

County Overview

ashington County is a unique* community nestled in the heart of Southwest Alabama. Washington County residents place a premium on quality of life*. With a population of 18,000* is progressive, and boasts a very low crime rate and affordable cost of living. We have very active churches, exceptional health services, lovely homes, beautiful Lake Ellis, and a diverse array of recreational activities.

nearby metro areas Mobile 62 Meridian 85 Pascagoula 98 Biloxi 118 Pe School 120 Systems 157 Classification 194 Enrollment 202 Teachers 305 Leroy High 334 k-12 All estimates are in miles.

population & income County: 18,000 Income: Per Capita: $28,787 Average Income: $32,556 Median Family Income: $55,079 Source: US Census Bureau and EASI Demographics

education

School Systems: Classification: Enrollment: Teachers: Leroy High k-12 831 59 Fruitdale High k-12 496 36 Chatom Elementary k-4 344 30 Washington County High 5-12 594 38 Milry High k-12 628 48 Mcintosh Elementary k-5 358 30 Mcintosh High 6-12 306 28

government Towns: Mayor/Council County: County Commission* Garbage Collection: Yes Public Library: Yes Emergency Medical Services Paramedics: Yes E911: Yes Fire Protection*: Yes Fire Insurance Rating: Class Fire Departments: Chatom Volunteer Fire Department Hobson Volunteer Fire Department Iaton Hill Volunteer Fire Department Deer Park Shiloh Volunteer Fire Department Fruitdale Yellowpine Volunteer Fire Department Leroy Volunteer Fire Department McIntosh Volunteer Fire Department


County Overview government cont.

Millry Volunteer Fire Department North Oak Grove Volunteer Fire Department Red Creed Volunteer Fire Department Yarbo Volunteer Fire Department Epworth Volunteer Fire Department Police Protection*: Yes Full Time Personnel: 8 Part Time Personnel: 5

transportation Highway Servicing Washington County: Hwy: AL 43 AL 45 State Routes: 17 13 56 57 Air Service: Name Latitude Longitude USGS Map Hawthorn Pines Airport 31.3867324 -88.0922861 Wagarville Roy Wilcox Airport 31.4508937 -88.1960409 Rutan

transportation cont. Rail Service:* Waterways: Tombigbee River Esctawpa River Parcel Service: USPS, UPS, FedEx Air Service Municipal:*

utilities Electricity: Suppliers: Clarke-Washington Electric Company, Alabama Power of McIntosh, and Power South Electric Cooperative. Natural gas: Suppliers: Conoco-Phillips, South Alabama Gas, Bay Gas and ClarkeMobile Gas. Water: Source: Chatom Utilities, Deer Park-Vinegar Bend and FPA, Frankville Water and FPA, Fruitdale Water System, Hobson Water System , Leroy Water and FPA, McIntosh, Millry Water Works, St. Stephens Water System, Tibbie Water and FPA, Wagerville Water System, Inc., and Washington County Water and FPA.


utilities cont. Sanitary Sewer: Provider: Chatom and Millry Utilities provide sanitary sewer service. The Town of McIntosh operates on septic tanks, but has plans to change to a new treatment facility in the near future.

communication Electronic Communications: Electronic communications are provided by BellSouth and Millry Communications. Newspapers: The Washington County News and The South Alabamian are the local newspapers and are distributed weekly. Television: Digital service Internet services: Local dial-up service: Yes Broadband: DSL Post Offices: US POST OFFICE 342 Deer Park Burbank Rd, Deer Park US POST OFFICE 46 Green St, Fruitdale US POST OFFICE 7595 Highway 43, Mc Intosh US POST OFFICE 77 Hawthorne Rd, Tibbie

County Overview communication cont.

US POST OFFICE 13486 Saint Stephens Ave, Chatom US POST OFFICE 15 Main St, Millry US POST OFFICE 180 Bates Lake Rd, Malcolm US POST OFFICE 19 Washington St, Leroy US POST OFFICE 19250 County Road 34, St Stephens US POST OFFICE 20191 Highway 43, Wagarville US POST OFFICE 2323 County Road 31, Frankville US POST OFFICE 1 Highway 43 N, Calvert

medical facilities Hospitals: Washington County Hospital and Nursing Home Hospital Number of beds: 25 Facility type: Short-term Acute Care Type of Ownership: Voluntary Non-profit/Other Accepts Medicare: Yes Accepts Medicaid: No


County Overview med. facilities cont.

Nursing Home Number of beds: 88 Accepts Medicare: Yes Accepts Medicaid: Yes Chatom Primary Care: Steve Donald, M.D. Restore Therapy Service: Kristen Daniels, P.T.* Other physicians near Washington County, Al: James A. Hassell, M.D. Denita Anderson, M.D. Nino Kurtsikidze, M.D.

recreational facilities Golf Course: Yes Movie Theater: No Ball Fields: Yes Fitness center: Yes Tennis Courts: Yes Swimming Pools: No Parks: Yes

Lakes Cont.: Lake Ellis, Chatom Bates Lake, Mt. Vernon Fishers Lake, McIntosh Three Rivers Lake, McIntosh

Other Facilities: Chatom Community Center St. Stephens Historical Park Lakes: Washington County Lake/Emmet Wood Lake, Millry

local taxes Property Taxes: State Tax: County Tax: Municipal Taxes: Total:

Income/Occupational Tax: City Occupational Tax: County Occupational Tax:

Retail Sales Tax: City: State: County: Total:

Inventory Tax:

largest employers Company: ThyssenKrupp Location: Calvert, AL Product/service: Steel Number of employees: 1,650 Company: BASF Chemicals Location: McIntosh, AL Product/service: Chemicals/ Brighteners Number of employees: 926 Company: Power South Electric Cooperative Location: McIntosh and Leroy, AL Product/service: Utility Number of employees: 300

Company: Olin Corporation Location: McIntosh, AL Product/service: Chlorine/Caustic Chemicals Number of employees: 300

Company: Capstone Bank, Inc. Location: Chatom, AL Product/service: Banking Services Number of employees: 100

Company: First Community Bank Company: Huntsman Corporation, Location: Millry and Chatom, AL Inc. Product/service: Banking Services Location: McIntosh, AL Number of employees: 100 Product/service: Polymers Production Number of employees: 200 Company: Brown and Root, Inc. Location: McIntosh, AL Product/service: Construction Number of employees: 120


N

Washington County History

amed after General George Washington, Washington County, Alabama is rich with historical significance. Washington County was the first county in Alabama. The county is home to the first chartered school, the state’s first bank, and the location of the first territorial capital. Washington County is located in southwest Alabama and enclosed by the Mississippi state line, Choctaw County, the Tombigbee River and Mobile County. The area was long inhabited by indigenous peoples. In historic times, European traders encountered the Choctaw and later Creek Indians, who were driven southwest from Georgia by encroaching European settlement.

European-American settlers organized Washington County in Tombigbee District by proclamation of Governor Winthrop Sargent of Mississippi Territories on June 4, 1800. It is the oldest county in the State of Alabama and was settled mostly by people from the Southeast moving west after the American Revolutionary War. Washington County is home to the site of St. Stephens, the first territorial capital of Alabama, and was the scene of the 1807 capture of Aaron Burr at Wakefield, Alabama during his flight from prosecution for treason. Although in the 1830s, the United States government moved most of the Choctaw and Creek Indians to Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River, some chose to remain in this area and become state citizens. They have struggled to maintain Choctaw culture throughout changing times. In 1979 the MOWA Band of Choctaw Indians was recognized by the state. The people are concentrated along the border of Mobile and Washington counties. The county was declared a disaster area in September 1979 due to damage from Hurricane Frederic. Effort is under way by the Washington County Historical Society and Washington County Museum Board to preserve the artifacts and legends that reveal the historical treasures within the county. The recent archeological excavations at Old Fort St. Stephens are of great interest to historians. With local and State funding the site has been transformed into a State Park.

Quick Facts • The county is about 60 miles north of the Gulf of Mexico, and exceeds 682,000 acres and about 1,065 square miles. • About 88 percent of the land area is situated forest and pine plantations. • Urban areas comprise about 7,900 acres in the towns of Chatom, McIntosh and Millry. • Leroy, Al. is a large geographical community of approximately 800 residents. • The average annual temperature is 74 degrees and the average annual rainfall is 57 inches. Washington County's population is approximately 18,097 people. • Farming is an important part of rural Washington County.


Topography

W

ashington County is located in southwest Alabama and enclosed by the Mississippi state line. Choctaw County, the Tombigbee River and Mobile County. The county is about 60 miles north of the Gulf of Mexico, and exceeds 682,000 acres and about 1,065 square miles. About 88 percent of the land area is situated forest and pine plantations. Urban areas comprise about 7,900 acres in the towns of Chatom, McIntosh and Millry. Leroy, Al. is a large geographical community of approximately 800 residents. The average annual temperature is 74 degrees and the average annual rainfall is 57 inches. Washington County’s population is approximately 18,097 people. Farming is an important part of rural Washington County.

Chatum, Ala.

Source: Wikipedia


Infrastructure Address: 1379 Ciba Road, McIntosh, Alabama 36553 Start of Production: 1952 Location: Located in south Alabama, north of Mobile, on Highway 43 Site Manager: Tom McAdams Number of Plants: 3 production Units Number of Employees: 600 (400 BASF employees, 200 contractors)

Infrastructure

PRODUCT/USES: AO (Antioxidant) Production Unit

T

he AO Unit produces a group of products that counteract the effects of heat and time in plastics. This results in exceptional color, higher durability and a high level of purity for food contact packaging. Another product made here is added to industrial lubricants, engine oils and transmission fluids to protect equipment and motors from deposit formation. Light Stabilizers Unit The two main product families produced in this unit are Tinuvins and HALS (Hindered Amine Light Stabilizers). Tinuvin products are light absorbers that function like sunscreen to absorb damaging UV light. These products are used in automotive finishes to preserve the shine, in photographic inks to keep colors vivid, and in outdoor stain to protect the wood. HALS products improve stability by stopping a polymer’s degradation from absorbed UV Rays. They are used in a variety of products including milk jugs, outdoor furniture, carpet, automotive coatings and yogurt containers, among others.

COMMUNITY RELATIONS:

The McIntosh site contributes in several ways to improve the quality of life through community involvement and corporate giving: • Community Advisory Panel • Scholarships at Alabama Southern Community College • Science Labs at the Gulf Coast Exploreum and Washington County Public Library • United Way ECONOMIC IMPACT: • Annual payroll with benefits of $48 million* • Payment of $1.5 million in local and state taxes* • Typical capital investment of $8-15 million in new plant and equipment *Year-end 2011 data ** All data pulled from the BASF fact sheet, which can be found at BASF.com

Stilbenics Production Unit The Stilbenics Production Unit provides optical brighteners found in most laundry detergents to make white clothes whiter and in photographic paper to make images brighter.

BASF SE McIntosh, Ala. Chemical Plant


Infrastructure Infrastructure Address: ThyssenKrupp Steel USA, LLC, 1 ThyssenKrupp Drive, P. O. Box 456, Calvert, AL, 36513

Phone: +1 (251) 289-3000 Internet: www.thyssenkruppsteelusa.com OVERVIEW:

CONTACT: Scott Posey, Director of Communications Phone: +1 (251) 289-3000 Email: scott.posey@thyssenkrupp.com All data taken from the ThyssenKrupp Steel Fact Sheet, which is located at www.thyssenkruppsteelusa.com.

T

hyssenKrupp Steel USA is located in Calvert, Alabama. It is a member of the global technology group ThyssenKrupp headquartered in Essen, Germany. The company was created in 2007 to construct and operate a carbon steel processing facility to serve customers in the NAFTA market. The company began the first of its operations in July of 2010, with the capacity to process 4.3 million metric tons of flat rolled carbon steel products annually. • The facility includes a river terminal, hot strip mill, cold rolling mill, four hot dip galvanizing lines, rail yard and supporting infrastructure. • The facility receives its raw material carbon steel slabs used in processing from ThyssenKrupp CSA, a newly constructed steel making facility located in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil which began operations in 2010. • The company employs approximately 1,800 Team Members. CUSTOMERS & PRODUCTS: The company serves the automotive, construction, pipe and tube, service center, and appliance/HVAC industries in the NAFTA region with a comprehensive list of coiled products in a full range of steel grades for high-value applications including hot rolled bands, hot rolled pickled and oiled, cold rolled, and coated (galvanized, galvannealed, aluminized and Galvalume®)

ThyssennKrupp Steel USA, located in Calvert, Ala.


Infrastructure

Infrastructure

Address:

SAFETY IS ONE OF OUR MOST IMPORTANT PRODUCTS:

1638 Industrial Road McIntosh, AL 36553

One of our main goals at the Olin McIntosh plant is a safe working and living environment for our employees, their families and our neighbors. Olin McIntosh has invested $45 million in plant improvements, including new hydrochloric acid burners, essential maintenance and repair, and additional equipment upgrades. Olin takes precautions to ensure that no employee or community member is ever put at risk.

Phone: (251) 944-2231 Website: http://www.olinchloralkali.com OUR HOME:

O

ur relationship with the community began more than 60 years ago. We were first attracted by an unusual geographical feature. It was a giant underground salt dome. Because salt is one of the essential elements in our manufacturing process, Olin Chlor Alkali built a plant here, and operations started in 1952.

WE’VE BEEN AWARDED FOR OUR EFFORTS:

That kind of performance has led to a number of environmental and safety awards. We recently received the Alabama Department of Environmental Management Pollution Prevention Award. The department presented us with the award for our efforts in WE CONTRIBUTE TO THE LOCAL ECONOMY: preserving the “Treasured Forest.” We also received the Norfolk Southern Thoroughbred Award for the seventh year in a row for More than 300 people come to work at Olin McIntosh every day. Olin spends more than $85 million a year with all sorts of local businesses, purchasing goods and services “incident-free handling” of chemical rail shipments, and Olin McIntosh also is OSHA VPP star certified. This certification is that support more than 300 local jobs. Olin generates another $1.5 million in annual taxes—taxes that go to schools, to community services and development, and to those awarded for doing an excellent job in putting our people’s safety and health first. in need. WE’RE RESPONSIBLE TO THE COMMUNITY: As a corporate neighbor, it’s important that we add value to life in McIntosh. Adding value means giving of ourselves to charitable and worthwhile efforts in the community, whether it’s creating them or contributing to them. Olin McIntosh is the third-largest contributor to United Way for Southwest Alabama. We also support education in McIntosh Community schools. Recently, we donated property that was converted to a beautiful walking trail and a boat landing. We continue to support the McIntosh Area Betterment Association, an organization that provides funding for worthwhile projects, such as the community center, the public library, the fire department and the rescue squad. Besides our involvement with the Area Betterment Association, we fund an annual two-year scholarship to Alabama Southern Community College. And many of our employees work as volunteers supporting such organizations and programs as United Way, Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts, Little League, Sheriff ’s Reserve, Relay for Life and other worthy causes.

All information was taken from the Olin Fact Sheet, which is located at www.olinchloralkali.com.

Olin Mcintosh, Ala. Plant. Photo credit: Mobile Press-Register


Tourism St. Stephens T

he now-abandoned settlement of St. Stephens sat atop a limestone bluff overlooking the Tombigbee River and hosted Alabama’s first seat of government. The location, approximately 67 miles north of Mobile in present-day Washington County, had been occupied by the Spanish before its cession to the United States in 1799. The town later served as the capital of the Alabama Territory between 1817 and 1819 before the government abandoned it in favor of Cahaba. Today, the site of the town is referred to as Old St. Stephens and is a historical park and archeological site.


Museum

T

he St. Stephens courthouse served the county seat for 53 years until the county seat was moved to Chatom in 1907. The St. Stephens Courthouse is now open to the public as a Visitor Center and Museum. Visitors can tour the beautifully restored courthouse from 7:30-4:00 Monday through Friday. No reservations are required, and large groups can call ahead for a guided tour of the Courthouse and Museum and also the nearby Old St. Stephens Historical Park.

Golf Club D

Tourism

eerfield Golf Club, a privately owned and operated, magnificent 18 hole golf course, offering memberships, but is open to the public. It also has a driving range, restaurant and pro shop. The course is located approximately three miles east of downtown Chatom, AL on Highway 56. It has been is operation since August, 1993 and offers both public play and private memberships. The front 9 is relatively flat and open while the back 9 is more rolling and slightly challenging.


Tourism

Other Attractions and Events

W

ashington County is home to the St. Stephens Historical Park. A visit to the park is a way to introduce children and adults to Alabama’s rich heritage. There are many recreational activities available for visitors, including fishing in the park’s 100-acre lake, RV camping, primitive camping, biking, birdwatching, horseback riding, picnicking, and hiking. Washington County is a hunter’s paradise. From the swamps of the Tombigbee, the piney woods of Tibbie and Deer Park, to the hills at the north end of the county, wild game flourish.

“Fountain of Youth”

Tennis Courts

Emmett Wood Lake near Millry, Ala.

In The Pines Music Festival In the Pines Music Festival, presented by the Washington County Chamber of Commerce, is usually scheduled every May on the sprawling grounds outside the Chatom Community Center, which overlooks scenic Lake Ellis. In the Pines Musical Festival has had some well-known artists visit and perform including: JJ Grey and Mofro, Ashton Shepard, Randy Houser, Thompson Square

Emmett Wood Lake near Millry, Ala.


Chatom Elementary School Principal: Belinda Crouch Phone: (251) 847-2946 Address: 592 Ray Coaker Road Chatom, AL 36518 Website: chatom.al.wce.schoolinsites.com Grades: K-4th Student Count: 344

I

moved to Chatom from Mobile and am the mother of a 1st grader, 2nd grader and a junior in in high school. My children have been in public and private schools in Alabama and Fl. I feel that my move to Chatom has been the best thing to happen to my children. The values that seem to be taught on a daily basis as well as the easy access to the teachers and the principal have made it more than a wonderful sexperience.They have kept me as a parent very updated and they also make learning fun for the children. I have attended almost all school activities since the move and kept my children very involved. I read the previous posting and I am in awe of how this parent has come to feel this way. —Submitted by a Parent

Education


Education

McIntosh Elementary School Principal: Edna Billingsley Phone: (251) 944-2481 Address: 8945 HWY 43 North; P.O. Box 357 McIntosh, AL 36553 Website: mcintosh.al.wce.schoolinsites.com Grades: K-5 Student count: 368

T

he first grade teachers have been a blessing. My son was diagnosed with ADHD last year and they have helped in every way possible.

—Submitted by a Parent


Fruitdale High School

Education

Principal: Dr. Alfred Taylor Phone: (251) 827-6655 Address: 13077 County Road 1 Fruitdale, AL 36539 Website: fruitdale.al.wch.schoolinsites.com Grades: K-12 Student Count: 426

T

hey care about your kids. It’s not a popularity contest. My child is doing so much better in school since moving to this school district. I even want to participate in all the activities such as the fall festival and PTO. I love it! Hooray for a great school and great teachers. —Submitted by a Parent

Continued on the next page


Education

Fruitdale High School


Leroy High School

Education

Principal: T. Danny Patterson Phone: (251) 246-2000 Address: 26301 Hwy 43 Leroy, AL 36548 Website: leroy.al.wch.schoolinsites.com Grades: K-12 Student Count: 806

L

eroy High School is the best School inWashington County. I am proud that my son attends a school that excels in academics and extracurricular activities. The teachers are of the highest quality and take pride in teaching. The students are their top priority and this means a lot to me and my family. I am looking forward to becoming more involved with the school through the PTO. The PTO this year is off to a very good start. I hope we can keep up the good work for our kids and all the LHS student body. —Submitted by a Parent

Continued on the next page


Education

Leroy High School


McIntosh High School

Education

Principal: Joannee Barnes Phone: (251) 944-2441 Address: P.O. Box 359; 7010 Hwy 4 McIntosh, AL 36553 Website: mcintosh.al.wch.schoolinsites.com Grades: 6-12 Student Count: 307 students

M

cintosh high school is an excellent learning enviroment that is not given enough credit. Although there is negativity, the positivity defintely outweighs it all. Throughout the years Mcintosh has improved tremendously. The teaching staff, discipline, academic and athletic programs, along with their docile students are all something that should be praised. I will unfortunately not be able to say I was a graduate from MHS, but I am an alumni. If Mcintosh keeps up the good work, more blessings will be in store! I am now a high school senior that appreciates the lessons that MHS has given me. So in conclusion, congratulations MHS. (State champs!) —Submitted by a Former Student Continued on the next page


Education

McIntosh High School


Millry High School

Education

Principal: John Carter Phone: (251) 846-2987 Address: 1 Wildcat Drive Millry, AL 36558 Website: millry.al.wch.schoolinsites.com Grades: K-12 Student Count: 605

I

drive 30 miles from another county, just so my children can attend this school. Very satisfied with the overall involvement with this school. Not only do the teachers teach but they are genuinely concerned for their students. The parents can depend on the teacher to be involved in the education. The administrative staff is always cooperative. In short, everyone in this school seem to be working toward the same end. —Submitted by a Parent

Continued on the next page


Education

Millry High School

Washington County Career Technical Center Principal: Harold Crouch Phone: (251) 847-2040 Address: 16478 St. Stephens Avenue Chatom, AL 36518 Website: washington.al.wct.schoolinsites.com Grades: 7-12

About The School Career Technical Education is any education at any level that prepares students to meet the skilled training needs of society and individuals within a society. The Washington County School System offers two career technical education programs in each high school and five programs at the Washington County Career Technical Center.


Washington County High School Principal: David Wofford Phone: (251) 847-2851 Address: 21 School Street P.O. Box 1239 Chatom, AL 36518 Website: washington.al.wch.schoolinsites.com

C

areer Tech, through KBR construction, for students preparing for the careers after high school. In 2012 WCHS initiated a partnership with the University of West Alabama and began Dual Enrollment/Dual Credit ProgWashington County High School is a hidden gem nestled in a rural setting... Walking through the schools in Chatom is reminiscent of a visit back in time to a place called “Mayberry”. However, the schools provide an outstanding, 21st century education for students. Washington County has graduates that have become medical doctors, lawyers, PhDs, engineers, nurses, educators, entrepreneurs and politicians. Students attending schools in Chatom are exposed to the latest technologies and teaching strategies. — David Wofford, Principal

Education


Religious Organizations African Methodist Church Antioch Baptist Church Baptist Church Pine Level Barlow Chapel Methodist Church Barlow Church Bethel Church Bethel United Methodist Church Big John Baptist Church C & J Church of God Calvert Methodist Church Cathedral of Praise Cedar Curve Church of God Cedar Grove Church Center Ridge Baptist Church Chalker Memorial UMC Chalker Memorial United Methodist Church Chapel Hill Baptist Church Charity Chapel Charity Chapel Church Chatom Church of God Chatom United Methodist Church Chatom United Methodist Parsonage Choctaw Friends Center Church of God Church of God Pentecostal Church of the Brethren Clearwater Church Copeland Assembly of God Copeland Assembly of God Church

Copeland Church of God Cortelyou Baptist Church County Line Missionary Baptist Church Dearmon Church Deer Park Methodist Church Double Branch Assembly of God Church Ebenezer Methodist Church Epworth United Methodist Church Epworth United Methodist Church Escatawpa Baptist Church Fairhope Baptist Church Faith Church of the Nazarene Family Life Community Church First Baptist Church of Leroy Flat Branch Assembly of God Church Four Points Baptist Church Frankville Church Friendship Baptist Church Friendship Church Friendship Missionary Baptist Church Fruitdale Baptist Church Happy Gospel Church Hawthorn Road Church Hill Spring Baptist Church Hobson Assembly of God Church Hobson Assembly of God Church Howard Town Baptist Church Howardtown Baptist Church Independent Community Church James Chapel Baptist Church

King Chapel Church Knight’s Chapel Baptist Church Lang’s Chapel African Methodist Espiscopal Zion Church Laton Hill Baptist Church Leroy Baptist Church Leroy Church Lewis Grove Missionary Baptist Church Liberty Baptist Church Liberty Baptist Church Little Bethele Baptist Church Little Sunflower Baptist Church Magnolia Church McIntosh Baptist Church McIntosh Church of God Pentecostal Midway Assembly of God Millry Baptist Church Millry Church of the Nazarene Millry Church-God House Prayer New Hope Ame Church New Testament Tabernacle Odom Sarah Reynolds Holiness Church Sand Ridge Church of God Sand Ridge Church of God Spring Bank Baptist Church Spring Hill Baptist Church


Demographical Data

Source: Easi Demographics

Source: Easi Demographics


Demographical Data

Source: Easi Demographics

Source: Easi Demographics


Demographical Data

Source: Easi Demographics

Source: Easi Demographics


Demographical Data

Source: Easi Demographics

Source: Easi Demographics


Demographical Data

Source: Easi Demographics

Source: Easi Demographics


Demographical Data

Source: Easi Demographics

Source: Easi Demographics


Electricity CWEMC Address: P.O. Box 398, Jackson, AL 36545 Phone: (251) 246-9081 (251) 847-3280 Web: www.cwemc.com Gas South Alabama Gas Address: P.O. Box 527, Chatom, AL 36518 Phone: (251)847-3280 Web: www.southalabamagas.org Communication Millry Communications, Inc. Address: P.O.Box 561, Millry, AL 36558 Phone: (251) 847-2911 Web: www.millry.net Solid Waste Solid Waste Department Address: 401 Court Street Chatom, AL Phone: (251) 847-2642

Utility Numbers

Water & Sewer Chatom Town Hall Address: 27 Cochran Avenue, Chatom, AL 26518 Phone: (251) 847-2580

McIntosh Water Department Address: 107 2nd Avenue, McIntosh, AL Phone: (251) 944-2083 Millry City Hall Address: 107 2nd Avenue, Millry, AL Phone: (251) 846-2698 Washington County Water Authority Address: 45 Court St, Chatom, AL 36518 Phone: (251) 847-6654 Hours: Monday - Friday 8:00 am – 4:30 pm Satellite Services Direct TV New Customer: (800) 783-1376

Existing Customer: (800)-531-5000 Dish Network Phone: (866) 642-0799 Cellular Services AT&T Wireless Phone: (866)732-2468 Southwest Communications Address: 34 Jefferson Street, Chatom, AL 36518 Phone: (251) 847-6220


Closing P

T

We are fortunate to have the chemical plants, the power plant system and the steel mill in our area. Tae and Lyle returned to our are last year at their previous site in Ala. State Rep. Elaine Beech McIntosh and gave the county approximately 80 jobs. Previous employees filled 50% of the jobs with other 50% being filled by new employees.

Austin’s leadership coupled with the new addition of the Marketing program at The University of Alabama leaves me Ala. State Senator Marc Keahey with no doubt - Washington County’s future is bright!

resently, most economic development in Washington County has occurred on Highway 43, on the east side of the county, due to the river system, rail system and the better highway system. Transportation is a great expense and companies tend to develop where they can transport their product the cheapest.

The town of Chatom is working to develop a new industry that would be a spin-off from the steel mill and could possibly employ up to 40 people. For our area that would be tremendous. These employees could be people who previously held jobs in the sewing factories and at the present are unemployed. Our county has an abundance on timber and I would love to see an industry come to our area that could utilize this resource. So many people work in this industry and travel from county to county with this product. I think we have a “diamond in the rough” with our timber. Infrastructure is the key to economic development. You must have a good transportation system, along with a good public utility system in order to attract businesses. Also, education plays a major role. Our education system must graduate a product that is conducive to the businesses preparing to develop in our area. The community, county and town must be willing to work with the industry to promote any economic development. Our governor has pledged to hep rural Alabama bring industry. He realizes rural areas need jobs as much as urban areas do. Washington County is fortunate to have received $10.5 million in ATRIP funding to improve our roads and bridges. This will go along way to improve economic developement through infrastructure. As you as see, I believe a collaborative approach is the key to promote economic development. — Alabama State Representative Elaine Beech

he biggest asset of the Washington County Economic Development Initiative is the county it promotes. The approach should begin with Washington County simply being Washington County. We don’t need to try to be Mobile County anymore than we need to try to be Madison County. All we need to do is simple - be Washington County and be proud of it! The perception that Washington County will portray to industry prospects will be one they cannot say no to.

— Alabama State Sentator Marc Keahey

L

ocated in the heart of southwest Alabama and directly north of the city of Mobile, Washington County offers exceptional opportunities for anyone. In our county we are home to worldwide companies such as BASF Corporation. Other companies that reside here include Olin Corporation, Tate & Lyle, producer of Splenda ®, and PowerSouth. To learn more about our industries, please visit www.washingtoncountyedi.org. Though we are connected internationally, we also have rich connections statewide and locally. When you visit the Austin Monk area, you will have the opportunity to experience the rich historical background of county with St. Stephens, the first territorial capital of Alabama. If you prefer a more relaxed visit, you can readily fish at the Washington County Lake or the Chatom Community Lake or you enjoy in a nice trip down the Tennessee-Tombigbee River in a canoe. Additionally, several private hunting and fishing opportunities exist in our area. If you get hungry while visiting, you can experience some of our homemade wholesome goodness at local restaurants located throughout the county. A county rich in history and a place known for its southern hospitality and exceptional business environment, Washington County is sure to be the place to visit, work, and play. — Austin Monk, Washington County Economic Development Initiative Director


Washington County, Ala. Viewbook  

Viewbook for potential businesses for the Washington County, Ala. Economic Development Initiative.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you