Page 1

6

WORK-SHOPS

30

COLONNADES

46

ROOMS

64

WATER-WAVES

76

SLICES

90

BLOCKS

100

MINI-MALLS

114

BRICKS

122

LITTLE LOS ANGELES

TIANCI HAN 2014


Tianci Han’s GSD | Tsinghua Catalog of Design and Research Works

4


Design 5


Work-shops - research and design for new method of artistic production Studio work, 2013-2014 Fall Semester Instructor: Ben Van Berkel with Christian Veddeler Site: Overhoek, Amsterdam, Netherland Solo work

6


The research of this studio is focused on the new production method for working space in the future. For this work, it concentrates on the binary relationship between money (art foundations) and art (independent artists) . As one of the leading driving forces for art production, money plays the crucial role to determine the new method of artistic production in contemporary time with larger dimensional influence. The image above of one dollar bill signed with my name imatetes Andy Warhol’s work in 1950’s. It is an intriguing example to reprensent the tension between art and money in the most direct way. Starting from Andy Warhol’s period when the art-money relationship is intensely discussed, this research-based design tries to find a new way to spatialize the closer relationship of them with more involved social elements. 7


artist

patron

artist

artist

patron

patron

material

material church

The-Madonna-and-Child Duccio di Buoninsegna,13th C.

Portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and his Wife Jan Van Eyck, 1434

Annunciation Simone Martini,1333

Patrons often asked to be included in the painting they had commissioned. When they appear in a painting we usually call them donors. In this painting on the right, the donor is shown kneeling on the right before the Virgin Mary and the Christ Child. Or the artists mainly served the patrons for portraits to decorate the houses.

Madonna Adored by the Canonicus Van Der Paele Jan Van Eyck, 1436

In the Middle Ages, and even for much of the Renaissance, what made a painting valuable was the amount of gold and blue paint in it (blue paint was considered valuable because it was made from a semi-precious stone).

In the Middle Ages, the artists mainly served for the church and the subjects were focused on religious stories. A patron usually entered into a contract with an artist that specified how much he would be paid, what kinds of materials would be used, how long it would take.

apprentice

pupil

artist

patron

artist

apprentice

Cosimo de' Medici

artist

pupil

material material

apprentice

patron

apprentice

pupil

25 m

royal family

patron new material

pupil

artist

10 m

The Fall of Icarus Peter Paul Rubens, 1636

artist

guild

artist

The Milkmaid Johannes Vermeer, 1658

Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp Rembrandt H. van Rijn, 1632

In 1636 Philip IV of Spain wanted a lot of pictures, and in a hurry. Rubens drew the designs. Then he set a team of painters to slap away under his supervision. These were competent painters, and Rubens distributed the work among them with a shrewd sense of organization. The pictures (all as we would say today, with the Rubens touch) duly came off the production line: fifty-six large canvases in the astonishingly short time of fifteen months.

Rembrandt's own studio practice is a major factor in the difficulty of attribution, since, like many masters before him, he encouraged his students to copy his paintings, sometimes finishing or retouching them to be sold as originals, and sometimes selling them as authorized copies. Additionally, his style proved easy enough for his most talented students to emulate. Further complicating matters is the uneven quality of some of Rembrandt's own work, and his frequent stylistic evolutions and experiments.

Rembrandt’ House Jodenbreestraat 4, 1011 NK Amsterdam

apprentice

bussiness

dealer artist

dealer

Antoni Gaudi 1852-1926

patron

material

patron

gallery

artist

dealer

dealer

apprentice

apprentice

material

fair artist

dealer

artist

32 m

salon

artist

apprentice

dealer

Eusebi Güell 1846-1918

16 m

fair

Olympia Édouard Manet, 1863

Picture Gallery with Views of Modern Rome Giovanni Paolo Pannini, 1757

Salon de Paris, 1737 Palace of the Louvre

Güell became a 'Mediciesque' patron to architect Antoni Gau met at the start of the latter's career and found that they had interests, including religion (both were devout Catholics). G Gaudí as the man who could provide him with uniquely d buildings. Güell built a utopian town on the outskirts of Ba including Gaudí's crypt of the Colònia Güell.

Manet embarked on the canvas after being challenged to give the Salon a nude painting to display. His uniquely frank depiction of a self-assured prostitute was accepted by the Paris Salon in 1865, where it created a scandal.

In the Middle Ages, and even for much of the Renaissance, what made a painting valuable was the amount of gold and blue paint in it (blue paint was considered valuable because it was made from a semi-precious stone).

pupil press

patron

school

press

patron

readymade

artisan

pupil

artisan artist artist

patron

artist

gallery

artisan crafts

artist

patron

gallery

artisan

pupil artist

artist consumption

pupil

De Stijl

foundation

foundation

artisan

dadaism

collector artist

artist

artisan

pupil

Composition with grid 1 Piet Mondrian, 1918

In Advance of the Broken Arm Marcel Duchamp, (the original) 1915, replicated after 1945

Campbell's Soup I Marcel Duchamp, 1968

During late 1920 and 1921, Mondrian's paintings arrive at what is to casual observers their definitive and mature form. Thick black lines now separate the forms, which are larger and fewer in number, and more of them are left white than was previously the case.

Snow shovel on which he carefully painted its title. The first piece the artist called a "readymade." New to America, Duchamp had never seen a snow shovel not manufactured in France. With fellow Frenchman Jean Crotti he purchased it from a stack of them, took it to their shared studio, painted the title and "from Marcel Duchamp 1915" on it, and hung it from a wire in the studio.

Snow shovel on which he carefully pain New to America, Duchamp had neve fellow Frenchman Jean Crotti he purch painted the title and "from Marcel Duc

artisan employee

press artisan

artist

foundation

gallery

public

employee

artisan

artisan

institute

employee employee

artisan

Relation in Space Marina Abramovic and Ulay, 1976

To the People of New York City Blinky Palermo, 1987

In 1976, after moving to Amsterdam, Abramović met the West German performance artist Uwe Laysiepen, who went by the single name Ulay. When Abramović and Ulay began their collaboration, the main concepts they explored were the ego and artistic identity. This was the beginning of a decade of influential collaborative work.

Dia’s exhibition program in New York City began in 1987 with the opening of a four-story converted warehouse at 548 West 22nd Street, called the Dia Center for the Arts. In 1987 when Dia:Chelsea opened its main space, it attracted about 16,000 to 17,000 visitors a year.

music

performance film

press

Balloon Dog Jeff Koons, 1995-1998

40m

16m

Dia’s exhibition program in New York City began in 1987 with the opening of a four-story converted warehouse at 548 West 22nd Street, called the Dia Center for the Arts. In 1987 when Dia:Chelsea opened its main space, it attracted about 16,000 to 17,000 visitors a year.

32m

DVD

construction

dealer

technology gallery

press gallery

material

dealer artist

ads

consultant

gallery artist

auction

de

foundation

dealer material

foundation Waterfalls Olafur Eliasson, 2008

The full series was released in a limited series of 20 sets of DVDs, sold each for at least $100,000, in custom packaging as fine art, rather than mass-market movies. In 2007 one disc (Cremaster 2) sold for $571,000.

New York City Waterfalls is a public art project by artist Olafur Eliasson, in collaboration with the Public Art Fund, consisting of four man-made waterfalls placed around New York City along the East River. At $15.5 million, it is the most expensive public arts project since Christo and Jeanne-Claude's installation of The Gates in Central Park.

Study of artists and art patronage 8

studio

art market

gallery Cremaster 1 Matthew Barney, 1995

gallery

mass production

government

public


For traditional art and patronage, the art production is finished in the art studio. The artist finished the paintings and took them to the patrons and got money paid. The process of art production is highly individual and functional. The working space for artists are purely private space where there is no idea exchange with the outer world.

patron artist

city aristocracy

material

artist

artist patron

patron

politics

artist

religion Medici Madonna Michelangelo, 1521-1534 Cosimo de' Medici used his vast fortune of an estimated 150 000 gold florins (almost 30 million USD or 22 million Euro today) to control the Florentine political system and sponsor a series of artistic accomplishments. Lorenzo's court included artists such as Piero and Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Andrea del Verrocchio, Leonardo da Vinci, Sandro Botticelli, Domenico Ghirlandaio, and Michelangelo Buonarroti who were involved in the 15th-century Renaissance.

guild

artist

In the Renaissance, the art production is spatially limited in a small region like city of Florence. The patrons and the artists live in the same city and work together to produce different kinds of art works which include paintings, sculptures and architecture. The spatial limit of art production determines the spread method of art. For instance, Michelangelo moved to Florence to serve for the Medici family. He made a living by art creation which was directly sponsored by the local patron.

dealer

patron auction

artist

dealer

patron

Michelangelo 1475-1564

Florence

Lorenzo de' Medici 1449-1492

dealer artist

Middle Age to Renaissance

patron

Guild of Saint Luke since 1579 The Guild of Saint Luke was the most common name for a city guild for painters and other artists in early modern Europe. On 29 December 1653, Vermeer became a member of the Guild of Saint Luke, a trade association for painters. The guild's records make clear that Vermeer did not pay the usual admission fee. In 1657, he might have found a patron in the local art collector Pieter van Ruijven, who lent him some money. In 1662, Jan Vermeer was elected head of the guild and was reelected in 1663, 1670, and 1671.

bussiness

artist

patron

artist dealer patron artist

material + technology

real estate

salon

artist

fair

Peter Paul Rubens 1577-1640

Amsterdam

In classical times, the scale of art production was extended internationally to a larger spatial range. The exchange of money and art works can be realised through continental transportation. In this sense, the successful artists can serve for different patrons from different regions at the same time. The influence of artists’ work has been also expanded significantly. In 1636 Philip IV of Spain wanted a lot of pictures, and in a hurry. Rubens drew the designs. Then he set a team of painters to slap away under his supervision.

Philip IV 1605-1665

Madrid

Renaissance to Romanticism

Self-Portrait Paul Cézanne, 1895

udí. They d mutual Güell saw designed arcelona,

From 1890 until his death he was beset by troubling events and he withdrew further into his painting, spending long periods as a virtual recluse. His paintings became well-known and sought after and he was the object of respect from a new generation of painters.

pupil

press

patron

school

In the modern age, the art production is finished in the gallery. How to exhibit your work is an important part of art production. This means that the consideration about art production covers how to communicate with the visitors in gallery and the potential possibilities for the visitors to participate in. The modern art production becomes open-source and public.

public

pupil

artist

factory

n employee

artist

n

art market

pop

employee

museum

artist

studio pupil

salon

foundation

artist

foundation

employee

foundation

press

dealer

pupil

gallery

employee

n

artist

gallery

pupil

dealer

n

n

patron

artist

dealer

artist

Modernsim

nted its title. The first piece the artist called a "readymade." er seen a snow shovel not manufactured in France. With hased it from a stack of them, took it to their shared studio, champ 1915" on it, and hung it from a wire in the studio. 1992

1992

media lab

Kassel

dealer artist

auction

1992

2001-

Bilbao

Greenwich New York

museum

2000

Jeff Koons 1955-

1997

dealer Puppy, Jeff Koons

foundation foundation

press

dealer

40m 40m

gallery

Jeff Koons’ Studio 601 W 29th St, Manhattan, New York

1995

Cosimo de' Medici used his vast fortune of an estimated 150 000 gold florins (almost 30 million USD or 22 million Euro today) to control the Florentine political system and sponsor a series of artistic accomplishments. Lorenzo's court included artists such as Piero and Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Andrea del Verrocchio, Leonardo da Vinci, Sandro Botticelli, Domenico Ghirlandaio, and Michelangelo Buonarroti who were involved in the 15th-century Renaissance.

Sydney

pupil

artist

pupil

dealer

artist

pupil

technology

pupil

education

artist

artist

For now, the art production can cover the whole process from the artists’ individual thinking, fabrication, exhibition, to the selling in the market. People can participate in the open and public production process and influence the art itself. Like Ai Weiwei’s famous porcelain sunflower seeds, people can do the online shopping to buy them which can be also seen as part of the unfinished art production.

tourist dealer

government

consultant

ealer

tourist

citizen

auction

60 m

citizen

dealer

Demolished Ai Weiwei Shanghai Studio

public

foundation

56 m

Sunflower Seeds Ai Weiwei, 2010 In October 2010, Sunflower Seeds was installed at the Tate Modern Turbine Hall, London. The work consists of one hundred million porcelain "seeds", each individually hand-painted in the town of Jingdezhen by 1,600 Chinese artisans, and scattered over a large area of the exhibition hall.

artist

art market

material

mass production

Legend

press gallery

gallery

gallery

dealer

Money Process of art production

Contemporary Art

Dimensional expansion of art patronage 9


work

Studios Club

communication / entertainment

60 m

Ai Weiwei Shanghai Studio (demolished) Jiading, Shanghai P. R. China

56 m

40m

16m

32m

thinking/ management production

communication

idea

Studio

factory

Lab

40m

Jeff Koons’ Studio 530 West 28th Street, Manhattan

40m

12.7 m

8m

Tokujin Yoshioka Studio Daikanyama-cho 9-1, Shibuyaku Tokyo, Japan

80m

live Residence work social

Work

Exhibition

Studio / Living

32 m

25 m Rembrandt’ House Jodenbreestraat 4, 1011 Amsterdam, Netherland

10 m

artist

10

foundation

Spatial relationships of different art spaces

Salon de Paris 1737 Palace of the Louvre Paris, France

16 m

production

gallery

technology


work administration communication

Studio Gallery Office

Dia: Chelsea 530 West 28th Street, Manhattan NY, USA

private

42 m Management Office Exhibition

painting studio

film

10 m

Andy Warhol Factory 33 Union Square West, Manhattan New York, NY

Schaulager/Laurein Foundation 530 West 28th Street, Manhattan Kassel, Swiss

Amsterdam Kassel Paris New York Tokyo Shanghai

Art market is not a free market. It is highly manipulated by the ‘ruling class’ of art world. Mostly, the ruling class is the patronage who can provides money for artists to live and produce. They can not only meet the basic demand of artists to live a good life, but also throw a super important influence upon the art production itself. The binary relationship between art and patronage is penetrating through the whole history of art. In the Middle Age, the relationship was quite simple. The artists served for the church and got the payment from it. Art in that time was like a functional service. In the Renaissance and Romanticism period, this relationship became more complex in terms of the organization of bigger studios with pupils and social events like public exhibition or art salon. Today, the money for art comes from multiple sources and the main patronage is large art foundations. Thanks to the art dealers, critics or curators from art foundations, many new art movements have been promoted and at the same time accepted by more public people. Such as Engineer consultants, factory workers, public press and products designers, many people from different disciplines have been involved in present-day’s art production.

11


foundation

De Stijl

foundation

at what is to k black lines number, and se.

pupil

In Advance of the Broken Arm Marcel Duchamp, (the original) 1915, replicated after 1945

Campbell's Soup I Marcel Duchamp, 1968

Snow shovel on which he carefully painted its title. The first piece the artist called a "readymade." New to America, Duchamp had never seen a snow shovel not manufactured in France. With fellow Frenchman Jean Crotti he purchased it from a stack of them, took it to their shared studio, painted the title and "from Marcel Duchamp 1915" on it, and hung it from a wire in the studio.

Snow shovel on which he carefully painted its title. The first piece the artist called a "readym New to America, Duchamp had never seen a snow shovel not manufactured in France. With f Frenchman Jean Crotti he purchased it from a stack of them, took it to their shared studio, pa the title and "from Marcel Duchamp 1915" on it, and hung it from a wire in the studio.

employee artisan

employee

artist

artist

press

film

16m

Dia’s exhibition program in New York City began in 1987 with the opening of a four-story converted warehouse at 548 West 22nd Street, called the Dia Center for the Arts. In 1987 when Dia:Chelsea opened its main space, it attracted about 16,000 to 17,000 visitors a year.

32m

DVD

construction

dealer

technology

ads

consultant

press gallery

material

dealer gallery

gallery

artist

gallery

artisan

Balloon Dog Jeff Koons, 1995-1998

40m

Dia’s exhibition program in New York City began in 1987 with the opening of a four-story converted warehouse at 548 West 22nd Street, called the Dia Center for the Arts. In 1987 when Dia:Chelsea opened its main space, it attracted about 16,000 to 17,000 visitors a year.

performance

press employee

To the People of New York City Blinky Palermo, 1987

West German performance artist n Abramović and Ulay began their ego and artistic identity. This was k.

foundation

employee

artisan

institute

pupil

artist

artisan

pupil

music

media lab

artisan

public

gallery

press employee

artisan

artist

pupil foundation

artist

artist press

artist

artisan

dadaism

collector

artist

auction

artist

art market

studio

dealer

foundation

dealer foundation

material

foundation

market

gallery Waterfalls Olafur Eliasson, 2008

maker

dealer

critic

gallery

mass production

citizen government

public tourist

56 m

Demolished Ai Weiwei Shanghai Studio

New York City Waterfalls is a public art project by artist Olafur Eliasson, in collaboration with the Public Art Fund, consisting of four man-made waterfalls placed around New York City along the East River. At $15.5 million, it is the most expensive public arts project since Christo and Jeanne-Claude's installation of The Gates in Central Park.

dealer

intelectual

STIMULUS factory

new inspiration

new art products

institutional critique

VALUES

production technology

technology

financial reward

new art value

consultant

new media

public participation

dealer

public media

media lab

social influence

people bussiness management

gallery

museum

dealerinternal stimulus

art market

external stimulus

undation

press

dealer

sponsorship

dealer

gallery

financial success

spread

dimensional expansion

newart artproducts movement new

dealer exhibition

young artists

thinking artists

art stars

creation fabrication

studio

technology

OPLE

art products

reproduction

consultant

CONTENTS

12

Different spatial organizations for art spaces reflect different relationships among stakeholders involved in the current art production. The artists, art foundations, technology consultants, fabricators and art dealers are highly interacted and the roles between them can be even exchanged. For traditional ways, the spatial organization of art and none-art world is quite static. In present days, the spatial relationship is much more flexible and interchangeable. People involved in art production have more and more ambiguous identities as participants or stimulators.


foundation

dealer

pupil

gallery

Modernsim

made." fellow ainted

pupil

artist

artist 1992

pupil

Kassel

dealer auction

1992

1992

museum

pupil

technology

reproduction

dealer

2001-

Bilbao

Greenwich New York 2000

1997

artist

artist

Puppy, Jeff Koons

foundation

pupil

dealer

40m

1995

Cosimo de' Medici used his vast fortune of an estimated 150 000 gold florins (almost 30 million USD or 22 million Euro today) to control the Florentine political system and sponsor a series of artistic accomplishments. Lorenzo's court included artists such as Piero and Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Andrea del Verrocchio, Leonardo da Vinci, Sandro Botticelli, Domenico Ghirlandaio, and Michelangelo Buonarroti who were involved in the 15th-century Renaissance.

40m

Jeff Koons’ Studio 601 W 29th St, Manhattan, New York

art products

Sydney

pupil

dealer

artist

pupil

foundation

auction

pupil

dealer

critic

foundation

dealer

dealer

public artist

art market

material

mass production

Contemporary Art

Legend

press gallery

Fair

dealer

artist

press citizen

auction

Sunflower Seeds Ai Weiwei, 2010

public tourist

dealer

In October 2010, Sunflower Seeds was installed at the Tate Modern Turbine Hall, London. The work consists of one hundred million porcelain "seeds", each individually hand-painted in the town of Jingdezhen by 1,600 Chinese artisans, and scattered over a large area of the exhibition hall.

education

government

consultant

dealer 60 m

citizen

artist

artist

For now, the art production can cover the whole process from the artists’ individual thinking, fabrication, exhibition, to the selling in the market. People can participate in the open and public production process and influence the art itself. Like Ai Weiwei’s famous porcelain sunflower seeds, people can do the online shopping to buy them which can be also seen as part of the unfinished art production.

artist

pupil

technology

market maker dealer

tourist

government

consultant

dealer

Jeff Koons 1955-

public event

gallery

dealer

gallery

education

intelectual

dealer Money Process of art production

banquet

Network of people involved in current art production People

s tu ta ls ia c so

ts uc d ro tp r a

w ne

ue al tv ar

repro d

new exh metho ibitio d of n

ucti

y og ol hn c te

on

pub

lic p

arti

cipa tion

Stimulus

Contents th or lw ia c er m m co

new

med

ia

People

Interaction of different stakeholders

13


studios

offices

ARTISTS

FOUNDATION

art stars young artists

gallery art dealers art critics

CLUB

public participation education

FAIR

FACTORY

exhibition auction

technology lab

Five elemental programs

Evolved relationships of elemental programs

ARTIST

FOUNDATION

ARTIST

FOUNDATION

TECHNOLOGY

14

CLUB


The basic X structure can not only realize the intertweaving of two different programs, but also create different fields attached to the X bones.

X Structure

Studios(for artists), offices(for art foundation), factory(for technology lab), club(for public participation) and a fair(for new value system) are the basic components for the final design. They are organized in a diagrammatic structure generated from basic ‘X’ shape to reflect the highly interactive relationships between different components. The basic structure can be developed in different ways to meet the demand for the interaction between different roles. For club and factory spaces, they are subordinate to the leading roles of studios and art foundation offices. For fair, it works more alike a spatial atmosphere to wrap up every element in a very inclusive way.

FAIR

FAIR

ARTIST

FOUNDATION

TECHNOLOGY

CLUB

ARTIST

FOUNDATION

TECHNOLOGY

CLUB

15


X Foundation

How to distinguish the different roles for the people in this complicated network of art production? This is the first important question raised by this research topic. Except for the study about who are taking part in contemporary art production, I focus on three more issues including the stimulus, contents and values evaluation for art. Technology as a kind of new media for art creation is not only a tool box to realize the art production in practical ways, but also jumps up to a higher intellectual level to inspire the artists working with more fantastic ideas. As a new stimulus, people working for technology as consultants are highly involved in the early phase of art production which forms a undividable relationship with the artists. In terms of the new contents for art production, public people consciously or unconsciously interact with the artists and art work itself in a very important way. Through the diverse interaction with public people, the dimension of art has been largely expanded with more new contents or definitions endowed to art itself. Additionally, because of the dimensional expansion of art production, the value system for art projects has been changed as well, with more consideration with new art value and social value. The commercial worth of art projects are also institutionally determined in a complicated way integrating multiple factors related to art. Based on the observation of these new social factors infused into art world, a factory-like space, club-like space and fair-like space are highly emphasized in this design work to reflect the important issues.

16


ART

17


Art

18

Money

This building is a working space which reflects the network of current art production and provides new opportunities for young artists to get money and support from people who appreciate their talent. What a young and ambitious person needs to do is to prepare a very good portfolio and come to this building, and find a good art dealer here to convince him/her that you have the talent to become a promising artist. After that, people can get their own studios and may have their solo exhibitions in the fair, and finally get known to the public or even published by the art press. This can be the first step for young people to become successful artists in the future, both financially and academically

Site Plan


Money 24.00

m

24.00

m

20.00

m

16.00

m

12.00

m

8.00 m

4.00 m 0.00 m

Art

Fair

Club

+ Factory

19


+ Factory Art + Club

Money

28.00

m

24.00

m

20.00

m

16.00

m

12.00

m

8.00 m 4.00 m 0.00 m -4.00

m

Isometric Section 20

rance

c Ent Publi


Art + Bussiness

Connection

Fair

Traffic Core

This building is a working space which reflects the network of current art production and provides new opportunities for young artists to get money and support from people who appreciate their talent. What a young and ambitious person needs to do is to prepare a very good portfolio and come to this building, and find a good art dealer here to convince him/her that you have the talent to become a promising artist. After that, people can get their own studios and may have their solo exhibitions in the fair, and finally get known to the public or even published by the art press. This can be the first step for young people to become successful artists in the future, both financially and academically.

21


STUIDO

OFFICE

CLUB

FAIR

TECHNOLO

Plans and Programs 22


Based on the early research about current art production which highly relies on the ‘ruling’ of art foundations or other institutions, I get the conclusion about the spatial components for my building to provide working spaces for different roles in the art world. It needs the working space for both artists and art foundations through which the binary relationship between these two roles should be reflected. For the artists, they need to communicate with the art foundation but at the same time they also need to keep an isolated place belonging to themselves without disturbance. At the same time, the technology lab should be integrated with the art studios to provide more inspirations and stimulus for art production. Space for public participation and interaction should be organized directly by art foundations where the artists can also get a lot of opportunities to contact with public people. At last, a fair-like space should work as an atmosphere or basement for the whole building. Through this fair-like exhibition space, the new value system for art can be very well discussed and established in a more open and friendly way. This diagrammatic design tries to articulate the complex network of present-day art production world in a clearly spatial way and provides new potential possibilities to inspire futuristic methods for art production.

Conclusion of design intentions

PRIVATE CIRCULATION

PUBLIC CIRCULATION

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

SEMI

Interior model

23


24


25


26


Skin and structures

27


Based on the early research about current art production which highly relies on the ‘ruling’ of art foundations or other institutions, I get the conclusion about the spatial components for my building to provide working spaces for different roles in the art world. It needs the working space for both artists and art foundations through which the binary relationship between these two roles should be reflected. For the artists, they need to communicate with the art foundation but at the same time they also need to keep an isolated place belonging to themselves without disturbance. At the same time, the technology lab should be integrated with the art studios to provide more inspirations and stimulus for art production. Space for public participation and interaction should be organized directly by art foundations where the artists can also get a lot of opportunities to contact with public people. At last, a fair-like space should work as an atmosphere or basement for the whole building. Through this fair-like exhibition space, the new value system for art can be very well discussed and established in a more open and friendly way. This diagrammatic design tries to articulate the complex network of present-day art production world in a clearly spatial way and provides new potential possibilities to inspire futuristic methods for art production. 28


29


Colonnades - Thermodynamic Re-interpretation of Nuevos Ministerios Studio work, 2012-2013 SpringSemester Instructor: Inaki Abalos with Mattihas Schuler Site: Neuvos Ministerios, Madrid, Spain Solo work

30


Nuevos Ministerios is a building serving for political ideologies and political propagandas, but not for people. Therefore, this largest single building in Madrid, is actually a great place to rethink how to make this giant structure, in the sense of public space, care more about the real feeling of people’s body, and people’s real experience in comfortable physical environment. According to general and integrative analysis of shadow, wind and solar radiation of this large plaza, the main purpose of this project is to use architectural actions to greatly influence the daytime physical environment providing multiple and diverse places with micro climates. At the same time, more diverse experiences will also be created along with different thermodynamic environments. 31


The original drawing of Secundino Zuazo Ugalde

Francisco Franco Nuevos Ministerios constitute a government complex that houses the headquarters of several ministries in Madrid. It was built in 1930’s under Franco’s reign. The original project was designed by architect Secundino Zuazo Ugalde who was famous for rationalist architecture design. The large-scaled building is a representation of the political ideology of that specific period, which is quite similar with other Fascism buildings in Italy, East Europe or China. The rational architectural language used through the whole design also determins the specific physical environment it would create.

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The photography of Nuevos Ministerios after construction in 1930’s


Neuvos Ministerios and Cuatro Caminos

Urban Fabric

Buildings

Existing structure of Nuevos Ministerios

Details of the Facade of Nuevos Miniterios Park

Parking

Architect Secundino Zuazo’s Original Drawing Slope Roof

Psychrometric Chart and Potential Strategies

Wind in Winter 8am to 4pm d Above 12 m/s

Summer Noon w Below 5 m/s

Wind

mmer the nd comes ast for the Jun, Jul,

Flat Roof

Integrating the consideration of dry bulb temperature, relative humidity and wet bulb temperature, there are many strategies with the potential benefits for the extension of comfort zone. For summer, the use of sun shading, natural ventilation cooling and evaporating cooling is crucial to get comfort in a hot weather. For winter, because of the strong influence of wind, the only important strategy for winter is to block the wind and provide a warm indoor space with heating.

Size and ScaleMar 21

Dec 22

Scale comparison of Nuevos Ministerios Dryand BulbCuatro Temperature of Madrid Caminos

Hot Weather in Summer From 9am to 6 pm Above 30 Compared to the neighbourhood Cuatro Caminos next to Nuevos Ministerios, the contrast of scales is huge and outstanding. The neighbourhood is composed by small residential blocks in typical size. The scale can provide convenient and humane urban spaces for living. However, the huge building of Nuevos Ministerios is single functional with unfriendly physical environment. Even though the large plaza is open to the public, there are very few people using this place. It is an important question to think about the reason behind this poor utility of such a large public plaza Winter Wind and howTemperature we can improve it in the architectural way. The sharp contrast also Dry Bulb Windreflects Speed the different design thinking influenced by different social backgrounds. The neighborhood of Cuatro Caminos is a pre-modern community design project based on traditional European urban forms, which prevalent wind in Low Humidity in modernism Summer and The Nuevos Ministerios is definitely an extreme example about the rationalist pushed winter is from the North by the political ideology in the special times. Around Noon which brings a lot of cold Below 20 weather if not blocked.

More Wind in Winter From 8am to 4pm Speed Above 12 m/s

Less Wind in Summer From 6am to Noon Speed Below Below 5 m/s

Madrid and Site Stripe

33 Tianci, Han


Problems of current situation

Solar study

Wind study

Thermodynamic monumentality Based on the quantative analysis of the solar condition and wind condition of Nuevos Ministerios, we can get a scientific evidence about the extremity of the thermodynamic environment of it. The most extreme moment of the shadow analysis is at noon of summer solstice. It’s purly an empty place fully exposed in the strong sunshine of the summer sun. The most extreme moment of wind analysis is about November to December’s wind. The average speed is above 10km/h and the direction is directly from the North. Not only for the spatial and architectural issue, contrast of the building of Nuevos Ministerious and the neighborhood is also sharp in terms of thermodynamic analysis. The hugeness of the single building brings the hugeness and extreme charateristics for its physical environment. Based on the simulation of radiation map, there is no shaded places in the large plaza of Nuevos Ministerios. It is true that such a monumental modernism building creates a kind of thermodynamic monumentality successfully, and it is also the design basis to figure out how change it with more environmental convenience and humanity.

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Shadow Shadow

WinterWind WindEnvironment Environment Winter

Solar Access Solar Access

Evaluation Added to to the the Site Site Evaluation After Large Boxes Added

Spring Garden Summer Garden Fall Garden Winter Garden

The first step of the design is to use several middle-scaled volumes to provide the main public programs such as galleries, studios and library. The forms follows the For the single building, it also has different strategies for winter and has sum-difFor the single building, it also design intention of the original design of Zuazo which was not realized mer. Because it is crucial to get and wind sumfor ferent strategies for through winter summer and theitprevalent fromfor mer. Because is crucial wind to getiswind real construction. After the middle-scaled boxes are brought in,southeast, the micro climates windthepassages are cutis for summer and prevalent wind from letting more wind go through the buildsoutheast, wind passages are cut for of the whole place has already changed which can be categorized ing whichmore is into both good for itself and the letting wind godifferent through the buildwhole plaza. For winter, terraces ing which is both good forthe itself and the climate zones based on the seasonal change of wind and daylywith change sun balconies provide better solar whole plaza. can Forof winter, the acterraces access to get heated south. with balconies can from provide better solar cess. The second step is focused on the relationship of solar access and different access to get heated from south. dimensions of garden-like spaces in smaller scales. Gardens with specific shapes Harvard Graduate School of Design | Spring 2013the best thermodynamic environment in a certain and University dimensions can provide Harvard University Graduate School MADRID, of Design | Spring 2013GOOD LIFE 1606_THERMODYNAMIC A NEW season. In conclusion, what we need to do is to put the right sized garden in the 1606_THERMODYNAMIC MADRID, A NEW GOOD LIFE right climate zone integrating the results from both step 1 and step 2.

Tianci, Han PROF. IĂ‘AKI ABALOS AND MATTHIAS SHULER Tianci, Han PROF. IĂ‘AKI ABALOS AND MATTHIAS SHULER

Design possibility of micro climate zones

Best for Winter

Best for Spring\Fall

Best for Summer

Orig

Evaluation of Courtyards with Different Sizes

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Co


Different Gardens Best for Different Seasons

Different Gardens Best for Different Seasons

Spring | Summer | Fall | Winter Gardens Dimensions and Radiation Maps of Different Gardens

Dimensions and Radiation Maps of Different Gardens

Harvard University Graduate School of Design | Spring 2013

1606_THERMODYNAMIC MADRID, A NEW GOOD LIFE

Tianci, Han PROF. IĂ‘AKI ABALOS AND MATTHIAS SHULER

The original orthogonal thermodynamic architype with different micro climates The first step of the design is to use several middle-scaled volumes to provide the main public programs such as galleries, studios and library. The forms follows the design intention of the original design of Zuazo which was not realized through real construction. After the middle-scaled boxes are brought in, the micro climates of the whole place has already changed which can be categorized into different climate zones based on the seasonal change of wind and dayly change of sun access. The second step is focused on the relationship of solar access and different dimensions of garden-like spaces in smaller scales. Gardens with specific shapes and dimensions can provide the best thermodynamic environment in a certain season. In conclusion, what we need to do is to put the right sized garden in the right climate zone integrating the results from both step 1 and step 2. The diagram above shows the design result after step 2.

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Dimensions and Radiation Maps of Different Gardens

Fall

OriginalofPortico with Arches Transformation the colonnades interface

Transformed Portico

Radiation Map of the Interface

Harvard University Graduate School of Design | Spring 2013

2

1606_THERMODYNAMIC MADRID, A NEW GOOD LIFE

1

Continuous Change of the Interfaces between Outside and Inside 3

4 Most of the design work is focused along the large building where are more affected by shadow of the building itself. The final step of the design is to strech and transform the original architype to disturb the large plaza in a more significant way which divides the whole open space into three middle scaled plazas. The transformation follows the prevalent wind direction for specific seasons.

1. MAR

2. JUN

3. DEC

4. SEP

Tianci, Han PROF. IĂ‘AKI ABALOS AND MATTHIAS SHULER

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The functions of the gardens with corresponding pavilions are also site-specifically different: Spring/Fall Gardens- Restaurants and Bars (with the appropriate ground materials); Summer Gardens- Cafeterias (with trees and water pools); Winter Gardens- Basketball Playground and Shops. As a historic background with memory of Fascist Spain, the new addition of Nuevos Ministerios will be a great place to provide large numbers of diverse places with different physical environments and dynamic public functions. It will be the genuine humane care for people in Madrid. These different micro climates are mainly realized by the transformation of the original portico. The whole design work is highly mixed with spatial intervention in different scale levels - small scaled garden, middle scaled architectural volumes and large scaled plazas. All the spatial elements work together to improve the spatial experience of Nuevos Ministerios in a very dynamic way and provide diverse micro climates which are perfect for Madrid people who like the outdoor space particularly.

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0m

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Bridview from Paseo de la Castellina

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Section 40


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07

Gardens

Variation and Diversity of Thermodynamic Environments

Evaluation of Courtyards with Different Sizes

Original

Cont

The whole design work is highly mixed with spatial intervention in different scale levels - small scaled garden, middle scaled architectural volumes and large scaled plazas. All the spatial elements work together to improve the spatial experience of Nuevos Ministerios in a very dynamic way and provide diverse micro climates which are perfect for Madrid people who like the outdoor space particularly.

Different Gardens Best for Different Seasons

Diverse Functions of Pavillions

0M

50 M

Functions of Large Boxes

100 M

150 M

2nd and 3rd Floor Plan

200 M

Dimensions and Radiation Maps of Different Gardens

Harvard University Graduate School of Design | Spring 2013

1606_THERMODYNAMIC MADRID, A NEW GOOD LIFE Harvard University Graduate School of Design | Spring 2013

1606_THERMODYNAMIC MADRID, A NEW GOOD LIFE

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Tianci, Han PROF. IĂ‘AKI ABALOS AND MATTHIAS SHULER


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New Nuevos Ministerios 44


The new climate and spatial atmosphere is mainly improved by the transformed porticos which have blured the indoor-outdoor interface in multiple ways. On the same time the strong spatial system is also disturbed. For the other side, along Paseo de la Castellana, the newly designed large volumn boxes will form a new street facade for this main traffic avenue. People will get information about the the events going on inside this new public space. The ‘new’ Nuevos Ministerios is a new hub for Madrid urban life with multi-functional programs.

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THERMODYNAMIC MONSTER

Large Volume Interventions and the Change of Physical Environment

Before

After

Before

After

Before

After

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Rooms - micro-living system design for Kyoto Studio work, 2012-2013 Fall Semester Instructor: Toshiko Mori Site: Kyoto, Japan Solo work

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This project as a micro living system in the old city of Kyoto, focuses on the global issue of urban density and its conflicts with the preservation of old city. These conflicts demand the newly designed architecture to keep dense and compact especially for the residential buildings. The spatial organization of this highly dense building follows the subdivision logic which plays an important role from the urban design of the whole Kyoto city to the planning of a small street block. This kind of continuous subdivision is important for me to realize the maximization of the urban density in a historical city with a fragile beauty.

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Blocks

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Study of a typical Kyoto block

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From the perspective of urbanism, Kyoto is a city with a simple logic to subdivide a rectangular land into more smaller gridded blocks. Furthermore, one block (cho) continues to be divided with a regular grid order into different parcels with different size and scale. This continuous subdivision from large scale to smaller and smaller ones inspires me to keep this inward subdivision as the most logic to organize the design inside one parcel land of 8m wide and 30m long.

Blocks in Heiankyo

Parcelization of Kyoto in 1890

Parcelization of Kyoto in 2010

Subdivision 50


Considering about the high density of Kyoto City and the large demand of young people for more affordable houses, I intend to design a micro-living system with small living rooms. That will be a dense and compact project. The design thinking comes from the section to subdivide a traditional house further into more smaller and similar micro houses and rooms.

Rooms

51


The final project is composed of 13 small houses with 44 single rooms. There are two types of houses and both types have the shared function space with restroom, kitchen and laudry. One smal house can be used by a family or shared with 3 or 4 young single people who spend most of the time in urban public spaces.

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Room Types

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The inner space of one micro house continues the spatial logic of subdivision. Using natural materials such wood, paper and mud, the interior design follows the modules of traditional scale of Tatami and Kyoto wall. The inside space is built totally with natural materials while the outer skin is built with concrete wall and steel columns to support the whole building and provide it with infrastructure. The size and portion of Kyoto wall and Tatami control the design of the single room and the organization as a micro house. It is a crowded and dense space with a warm and comfortable atmosphere.

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Interior Modules

Interior Modules


Modules and Materiality

The inner space of one micro house continues the spatial logic of subdivision. Using natural materials such wood, paper and mud, the interior design follows the modules of traditional scale of Tatami and Kyoto wall. The inside space is built totally with natural materials while the outer skin is built with concrete wall and steel columns to support the whole building and provide it with infrastructure. The size and portion of Kyoto wall and Tatami control the design of the single room and the organization as a micro house. It is a crowded and dense space with a warm and comfortable atmosphere.

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Rooms 59


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Small Stories

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Subdivision 62


This project as a micro living system in the old city of Kyoto, focuses on the global issue of urban density and its conflicts with the preservation of old city. These conflicts demand the newly designed architecture to keep dense and compact especially for the residential buildings. This project is an experimental building which can provide the maximum accommodation for 44 people who can share and live together in a very limited space. The spatial organization of this highly dense building follows the subdivision logic which plays an important role from the urban design of the whole Kyoto city to the planning of a small street block. This kind of continuous subdivision is important for me to realize the maximization of the urban density in a historical city with a fragile beauty.

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Water-waves - a megastructure model depicted by digital Ukiyo-e Studio work, 2010-2011 Spring Semester Instructor: Weiguo Xu Site: Tokyo Bay, Japan Collaboration with Xuezi Jia

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The traditional water pattern is actually a mathematic logic hidden in this kind of water pattern. This pattern has been sophisticated for such a long history, but can match perfectly with the form of Trigonometric functions, which is familiar to us when we were in high school. This pattern is about traditional aesthetic taste, and the math function is based on modern science. By using digital tools to re-desicribe the traditional water-wave pattern, a new urban typology can be potentially explored.

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Digital Water-waves 66


The traditional water pattern is actually a mathematic logic hidden in this kind of water pattern. This pattern has been sophisticated for such a long history, but can match perfectly with the form of Trigonometric functions, which is familiar to us when we were in high school. This pattern is about traditional aesthetic taste, and the math function is based on modern science.

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Generation of the unit form comes from the water patterns in traditional paintings which are very common in eastern culture. The original Minimal Surface is generated from Mathematica and can form a 3D space range with specific characteristics. We want this water-pattern forms can act as the main structure of every Fuji unit responding to the water environment around and make interior space more interesting. In software of Mathematica, we try to generate different space units with different maths formulas. These units can be copied continually and unlimitedly in 3D range . We combine several units and use Fuji shape to carve out the final form of our different spaces.

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Slices - Audi House Professional Work in Aterlier FCJZ, Studio work, Jan, 2011-Mar, 2011 Site: Shanghai, China Project Team: Yung Ho Chang, Kelvin Lin, Han Tianci, Liu Jing.

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This project is not a building with specific function. It is more alike an installation art work. It goes back to the basic interest of to see and to be seen with a simple construction. This is a pavilion for a car’s show, and also a micro park full of fun and childhood memory. It can easily remind you of the simple game named ‘hide and seek’. By several glass slices, this pavilion has changed the tradition way of showing and watching. The car is hidden in the transparent pavilion which can make the image of the car distorted and fascinating with the reflection and refraction of glasses in different angles.

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Mode 1

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Mode 2

Mode 3

Mode 4

Xia Xiaowan’s art installation gives us much inspiration to re-think the method of wathing a showing car. How to change the watching method and provide people with different watching experience is the main issue we think about. In ordinary car shows, visitors see many cars directly on the booth and after a long time they will feel boring and tired. To change the method of watching cars and intrigue people’s more interest is cruicial for this new show of Audi A8L. We try to use glass slices in different directions to create different vision environment around the car. Through several layers of glasses, people will see the car image showing in different gradations. This special visual effect can add some mystery to the car and attract more people to get close of it to see more clearly.We tried different methods of dividing an ordinary house space in several slices. At last we choose to use the radiation method to create more rich and varied visual effects.


Chinese Ancient Landscape , Xia Xiaowan Paint On 24 Pieces of 6mm Glass, 2007

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Plan of Audi A8L Pavilion

This project is not a building with specific function. It is more alike an installation art work. It goes back to the basic interest of to see and to be seen with a simple construction. This is a pavilion for a car’s show, and also a micro park full of fun and childhood memory. It can easily remind you of the simple game named ‘hide and seek’. It is a low-key show without exaggerated expression. By several glass slices, this pavilion has changed the tradition way of showing and watching. The car is hidden in the transparent pavilion which can make the image of the car distorted and fascinating with the reflection and refraction of glasses in different angles. This pavilion will entice your intense interest and curiosity to look inside. This new method of watching can not only bring much fun of seeing in different angles, but also make a more successful show for Audi client. To realize this project with proper materials, we have made many different trials on glass division for the convenience of installation and safety consideration. There are 50 pieces of glasses in total for this project and each piece of glass is in different shape and has different cutting angles.

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Elevations of Glazing Slices

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Photography after construction

Basement Detail 84


Three Doorways

Two Curve Doorways

One Doorway

One Triangle Doorway

Different doorway trials for the real construction

For real construction we meet a problem that the glass can’t be cut into a too large piece for safety and construction reasons, so we need to sub-divide every glass slices into more small pieces. However, more divisions will damage the whole visual image of the pavilion. The final solution we choose is to keep only one doorway and make it in triangle shape to reduce the division junctures to the maximal extent. This choice is also based on different trials of sub-division methods. The new triangle doorway also change gradually to create a special visual effect in gradation. At last, different pieces of glasses are connected by steel clasps to form an integrated one which is finally fixed on a steel basement.

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Tianci Han’s GSD | Tsinghua Catalog of Design & Research Works

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Research 89


Blocks - research for 3D massing strategy of gridded cities Seminar Class, 2012-2013 Spring Semester Instructor: Joan Busquets Solo work

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Gridded cities actually have the most simply and boring urban form. It is repetitive and accumulative in a simple method. However, the orthogonal grid as an abstract structure is also the most powerful and effective urban approach to deal with complicated spatial and social issues. The orthogonal grid is the most neutral and abstract structure which can provide multiple and diverse possibilities for people to develop the city with their own desires and complicated social rules. That is why the mix-used gridded cities have the similar urban structure, while have totally different street views, building forms and urban experiences.

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3D modeling of 6 Mix-used urban blocks

For different cities in different cultures, the methods to organize and mix multiple functions are also different. It depends on the specific urban density and developing mode. Trying to get a better and clearer understanding of different types of 3D massing strategies for different function spaces, my research will cover typical blocks in six cities, which are categorized based on its height from low to high. Beijing and Kyoto have long history of urban development and the mix-use of low-rise traditional blocks is formed organically during a long time. For Madrid and Taipei’s modern residential blocks, they are planned as residence zones but they still keep the ground floor as public use with multiple functions for convenience to live there. Blocks picked up for Hong Kong and New York are from the densest urban areas. They are both super high-rise with complex 3D massing strategies with different functions in a single building. These trans-cultural choices as mix-used urban samples for research have different forms and historical developments, but they share the same experience when we walk in these different areas in terms of sense of scale and urban diversity. The reasons behind the similar phenomena of mix-using and different methods of massing organization are worth of research and helpful for our future architecture and urban design.

Locations of 6 mix-used urban blocks

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Beijing

Kyoto

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One of the reasons for Beijing and Kyoto to have mix-used blocks in traditional context is the large modernism building which replaced the original houses. That means the old residential units have been combined together as a larger parcel to be developed as a commercial or business office building. To compare the function ratios of Beijing block and Kyoto block together, we can see that they are similar to share the same FAR about 1.5 and the main function of the blocks is residential. The main strategy for mix-using is focused on how to embed other commercial functions in small-scaled residential spaces. Most of them are placed in front of the original house and organized along the street around the block.


Madrid

For most residential blocks planned in modern era, there are many other functions embedded in the same block except for residence.

Taipei

Small commercial spaces and necessary religious places can meet people’s basic demand for living. Different with two-dimensional organization for lowrise blocks, there larger residential blocks using the simple massing strategy in vertical dimension with public functions on the ground floor and residential part on the top. It is three-dimensional bottom-up relationship.

Madrid Statistics

Taipei Statistics

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For the block of Carnegie Center in Manhattan, every single tower building has the uniform facade and exterior looking, but the interior space is developed with multiple functions and flexible divisions.

New York

To maximize the use of a single building getting the largest commercial interest, the blocks in central areas of super-dense cities like New York and Hong Kong are more functionally diverse in 3D space.

Hong Kong

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New York Statistics

Hong Kong Statistics


For all the six urban blocks analyzed before, people can walk in these areas with rich urban experiences with different functions.

No matter how large and how high the block is, they share the similar scale and diversity for ground space which is close to the pedestrian system on the street. The average spatial division for these shops, restaurants and entrance spaces are small and humane in the width about 6-10 meters.

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Mini-malls - and Mini-mallism, Urban Observations for Los Anegeles Research Work, 2013-2014 Spring Semester Instructor: Michael Maltzan & Mia Lehre Site: Los Angeles, California Solo work

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If we think about LA in a typological way, we can find that it can be easily categorized by several elemental typologies like parking lots, gasoline stations, mini-malls, apartments or private house. They look identical to each other. They also work in the city in an easy and repetitive way to just copy themselves endlessly. However, we don’t think LA is a boring city. On the contrary, it is quite diverse and dynamic. Mini-mall is one of the most important urban figures which make sure this large city can work well.

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59th St.

59th St.

5th Ave.

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7th Ave. 53rd St.

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Furthermore, if we think mini-malls like some crucial public spaces in different neighbourhood, they work kind of as the civic grounds where people meet and talk to each other. It can be even understood as a kind of specific ritual spaces in Los Angeles.

102City of Monads, New York

47th St.

Mini-mall Series by Catherine Opie 47th St.

560m

Manhattan Theatre District - Times Square 560m


Hoover St.

Hollywood

Koreatown

Jefferson Harbor Fwy.

inglewood

griffith park

The research about mini-malls focuses on three sample areas including Hollywood, Koreatown and Jefferson. These three areas are located in the main area of plains of Id from Hollywood Hill to South Los Angeles which is like a flat urban carpet. From the mapping works we can find the mini-malls frequently occur along the main avenues or boulevard and most of them are located at the block corners as a L-shaped mix-use building.

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Mini-malls at the block corner

Hollywood

35m 30m

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The distribution of mini-malls in the city is crucial because it determines how convenient you get access to it and how important it is as a part of urban life in LA. Generally minimalls can be divided into three essential elements, a L-shaped building, a parking lot and a billboard. The billboard for mini-malls is small but also crucial because is highly communicative with all the commercial information on it. You can also read other social information from it like which ethnic group you are located in and how well the neighborhood is developed. The everywhere distribution of minimalls in LA make them possible to work as kind of guidebook in this city.


36 m 33 m

36 m 33 m

Two Mini-malls in Jefferson

Koreatown

Following the billboards or forms of mini-malls you can recognize where you are going by these threedimensional pins on the real city. For myself, I take a bus to the office every day from MacArthur Park, by reading the billboards in mini-malls I can get known when I should press the button for stop requesting.

43 m 43 m

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Mini-mall is a also good vehicle to think about the issue of urban resolutions. It is tricky that these identical objects can form such a diverse urban discourse. If we look at mini-malls in an urban scale, they do look like with each other in an identical way, but if we zoom in and get a higher resolution we can get more information which makes them distinct. It is also related to the driving experience. When driving at a high speed, people can only get very low resolution but when slowing down people can read more about the city or urban typologies in a higher resolution. When stopping driving, people can get the highest resolution to sense every detail about the atmosphere or real place.

168m 93m

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The issue about urban resolution is also related to the driving experience. When driving at a high speed, people can only get very low resolution but when slowing down people can read more about the city or urban typologies in a higher resolution. When stopping driving, people can get the highest resolution to sense every detail about the atmosphere or real place. In this way, the same mini-mall can play different roles in different levels of urban resolution. In low-resolution level, they are identical elements to form the urban skeleton and in highresolution level they provide diverse spatial experiences or atmospheres in a detailed way.

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43 m 43 m

Minimalls are normally designed as single story or two-story buildings with small shops, restaurants and offices. Generally mini-malls can be divided into three essential elements, a L-shaped building, a parking lot and a billboard. The billboard for mini-malls is small but also crucial because is highly communicative with all the commercial information on it.

Mini-malls and Urban Resolution

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The other wonderful transformation of mini-mall is ‘Dumb Starbucks’ which became big news among native LA people. During a weekend in February, some guys used one shop in a mini-mall in Loz Feliz to provide free coffee and everything about the coffee shop is copied from Starbucks except for the word ‘Dumb’. It’s kind of parody or spoof towards Starbucks but for my understanding it’s more alike an art performance. This mini-mall has been transformed into a contemporary are gallery. This can actually inspire us a lot about rethinking or reusing the usual typological things in Los Angeles. There is still a great potential to imagine the new roles of ‘mini-malls’ in the future.

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8m 7m

Mini-malls and Walking Figures

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7m

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Tianci Han’s GSD | Tsinghua Catalog of Design & Research Works

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Other Works 113


Bricks - research for aggregation methods of digital units Seminar Class, 2012Fall Semester & 2013 Fall Semester Instructor: Andrew Witts, Ingeborg Rocker

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A minimal surface is a surface that is locally area-minimizing, that is, a small piece has the smallest possible area for a surface spanning the boundary of that piece. Minimal surfaces necessarily have zero mean curvature, i.e. the sum of the principal curvatures at each point is zero. Particularly fascinating are minimal surfaces that have a crystalline structure, in the sense of repeating themselves in three dimensions, in other words being triply periodic.

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For Schoen’s F-RD surface, unit cell with tetrahedral symmetry. It may be viewed as a central chamber with tubes to alternating corners of tAhe cube. This is actually only an eighth of a lattice cell; to get a lattice cell, reect in the cube faces. Through simple transformations of mirroring and scaling we can get a complicated geometry which is a single continuous surface. Each surface shares the same boundary with the adjacent one. By this way, the basic surface unit can be organised both in a 2D way and 3D way. Furthermore, through digital control, the edge of basic surface unit can be varied through different controling points. The more controling points the surface gets the more smooth edge it would have.

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Global Geometry in 3D Grid

Local Geometry

Global Geometry in 3D Grid 117


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Structure Improvement

Perspective 1 Ceramic Units Study Structure 1

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LABEL (number and position as you wish)

Perspective 1

Perspective 1

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Two Types of Units

Two Types of Units

Perspective 1

Two Types of Units

Perspective 1

ON THE BRI(N)CK

Final Project

Tianci Han

Final Project

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Final Project


Little Los Angeles - a nostalgia for the present in the future Studio work, 2013-2014 Spring Semester Instructors: Michael Maltzan & Mia Lehre Site: Los Angeles, California Collaboration with Kangil Ji and Karol Malik

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In the future we will be nostalgic for the present. As Los Angeles confronts the need to densify, we propose a strategy to do so in a fashion that preserves and amplifies the experience of the city today, and makes good on its longstanding promise of a lifestyle of convenience and rich experience. The result is an exotic form that blurs the perception of “ground� while paying homage to the lines of desire, movement, climate, and program that typify Los Angeles.

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Large House

Korean Food Fancy Motel Cheap Gas

LA DREAM

Apartment

Apartment Shop Gas station

House

Motel Mini-mall

Mini-mall

LA REALITY 124


The Line of Desire

125


Expanding (Mini-mall) Journey from South to North (Fairfax Ave)

Nudging (Street Shop)

Twisting (Signs on rooftop)

Widening (Traffic light)

Punching (Everywhere)

Banding (Gas station)

Journey from East to West (Wilshire Blvd) Subtracting (Apartment)

Zigzagging (Gentle hill)

Cantilevering (Steep hill)

Fundamental to our phenomenological interpretation of the city is the idea that it is built by an urbanism of desire, connecting programs through continuous surface and the impression of horizontal movement. We observe that Los Angeles is topographically complex but feels “flat” from the perspective of the user because it is constructed on a continuous paved surface, with little to no threshold between parking and the contents of its structures. We also observe that the city strives towards the synoptic view: the hillside house that frames the panoramic urban spread below. And so, the first engine of the project is a continuous paved Spine, lifted off the ground plane and compressed through switchbacks, along which residences are arranged. The spine becomes the crest of a constructed topography, serving as a plinth or “thickened ground” into which a wealth of other programs are intercalated, all connected to arterial roads and the Spine itself through grading and exterior ramps. The second driver of the project is the ground plane itself. The adjacency of the site to the Los Angeles River offers the opportunity to lead in a system of channels, carved to maximize cooling winds during peak summer heat. We slice the building by the channel and further sculpt the profile of its facades to provide light and shading from the sun. The result is an exotic form that blurs the perception of “ground” while paying homage to the lines of desire, movement, climate, and program that typify Los Angeles.

126

Rotating (Bunker hill)

Overlapping (Hollywood hill)


Design Process

0 (F.A.R)

0.5 (F.A.R)

35% (Built Area) 100 (# of Houses)

? Existing condition

1.5 (F.A.R)

0.5 (F.A.R)

1.3 (F.A.R)

0.5 (F.A.R)

Raising land - Folded Roads Cutting land-mass - River Channel & Wind Corridor

Cutting Land-mass - River Channel & Wind Corridor

Connecting

- Continuous surface

1.2 (F.A.R)

0.5 (F.A.R)

Connecting - Continuous Surface

Mixing

- Mixed programs along continuous surface

1.2 (F.A.R)

65% (Built Area) 100 (# of Houses)

0.5 (F.A.R)

Mixing - Mixed programs along continuous surface

127


Bridview

Spine

Landscape paths

Architectural islands

Ramps and stairs

128


Green Roofs / Sunken courtyards

Folded multimodal spine -Primary residential access -Folded Roads -Ramps/stairs spiral around building envelope to provide continuous movement

Architectural Islands Canopy Infi ltration -Building slab -Three canopy roles, deployed on 20’ grid 1. Heat- and pollution-tolerant street trees along Sepulveda Boulevard and the 101 (replacing spontaneous vegetation lost due to landforming) 2. 15-20’-tall trees forming bosques and plazas. 3. Densifi ed upland and lowland vegetation -Sedge, Willow, and Alder in riparian habitats.

Ground Permeability and Circulation - Enclosed ground fl oor provides building access - Open ground fl oor serves as connective tissue, interfacing with street grid and the central spine. - Non-parking space is at the same grade but uses differentiated paving to provide dwelling room for pedestrians and ground-floor connectivity between buildings. -Jogging trails encircle the site.

Channel Cut - Drawing water from the Sepulveda Basin and stormwater swales north of the site, the artifi cial channel serves as both generator of microclimate and connective space throughout the site. -Some fi ll is kept on-site and mounded to provide planting and programmatic space, as well as different moments of prospect and refuge.

129


A

17 27 8

8

B

33

17

13

30

14 14 6

17 15

26 21

C

10

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30 12

17

29 34

D 17

6

20

8 32 14 13

24

13

17

22

17 12

7

9

25 18 7 21 15 20

20 38

18 9

7

12

29 17

16 16

25

30 21 11

17 24 13

20 38 26

10 11 47 32 16

35 21 9

10 14 23 23

F

24

24 11

10

10

20

16

10

17

31

9

22

18

20 24

G 13

19

5 6

9

23

17

25

130

20 39

9

16


1

A B C D E F G H I

32 16

21 9

10

2 Sections

-Mixture of urban programs and LA experiences Living

E

Parking / Mechanics / Toilet Offices Shopping Culture Civic (Library, Community Center, etc) Education 22

Sports

3 11

9

23

25 30

29 25

20 24 13

9

23

25

131 13

20


CINEMA

GALLERY SHOPPING

GALLERY

SCHOOL

CINEMA

SPORTS

CLINIC SHOPPING

OFFICE

OFFICE

OFFICE

Chunk model of Little Los Angeles

CINEMA

APARTMENT CLINIC

GALLERY SHOPPING MOTEL OFFICE

MOTEL

4th Floor

5th Floor

GALLERY

SCHOO

CINEMA

SPORTS

CLINIC

SHOPPING

OFFICE

OFFICE

2nd Floor

OFFICE

3rd Floor GALLERY

CINEMA

CLINIC

GALLERY SHOPPING

OFFICE

132

Ground Floor

MOTEL

GYM

CINEMA In the future we will be nostalgic for the prese As Los Angeles confronts the need to densify SPORTS so in a fashion that preserves and amplifies th andAPARTMENT makes good on its longstanding promise and rich OFFICE experience. The resultSHOPPING is an exotic for “ground” while paying homage to the lines of d MOTEL program that typify Los Angeles.


GALLERY

CINEMA

GYM SPORTS

SHOPPING

OFFICE

L

CLINIC

OFFICE

MOTEL

GALLERY

CINEMA

GYM SPORTS

SHOPPING

OFFICE

OL

CLINIC

OFFICE

MOTEL

Plans of the chunk model

ent. y, we propose a strategy to do he experience of the city today, e of a lifestyle of convenience rm that blurs the perception of desire, movement, climate, and 133


Tianci Han’s GSD | Tsinghua Catalog of Design and Research Works

Graduate School of Design Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 Tel: +1 734 834 4252 E-mail: than@gsd.harvard.edu

134


EDUCATION Graduate School of Design, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA • Program of MArch 2 Date Attended: 09/2012-Present, Date Expected: 06/2014 School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, Beijing, P.R.China • Master of Architecture Date Attended: 09/2010-Present, Date Expected: 07/2012 GPA: 86.8 • Bachelor of Architecture Date Attended: 09/2006-07/2010, Date Received: 07/2010 GPA: 86.9

EMPLOYMENT Internship in SO-IL, Brooklyn, New York 7/2013-8/2013 Internship in Cui Kai Architecture Studio, China Architecture Design and Research Group 9/2011-12/2011 • P22 and T13 Office Buildings of Ordos ‘20+10’ . Dongsheng District, Ordos, Inner Mongolia, China. Internship in Yung Ho Chang Atelier FCJZ, Beijing 1/2011-4/2011 • Shanghai Jiading Cultural and Creative Industry Park, Jiading District, Shanghai, China. • Audi House, Jiading District, Shanghai, China

RESEARCHES & EXHIBITIONS • Methodology For the Optimization of Atrium Design In P22A Office Building, Ordos 20+10, Based On Daylighting Research 9/2010-6/2012 Project Leader: Cui Kai, China Architecture Design and Research Group, Zhang Xin • Research on the Method of Side Lighting Calculation, for Revise of National Standard for Daylighting Design of Buildings, GB50033 12/2010-11/2011 Project Leader: Lin Ruoci, Zhang Xin, Department of Standard and Norms, Ministry of Housing and Urban-rural Development of the People’s Republic of China. • 02/2013-04/2013 Double-Sided Aperture, Academic work for seminar of ‘On the Bri[n]ck’ TRANS/hitos 2013 Exhibition of Architecture and Interior Design in Ceramics, Alicante, Spain. • 12/2011-2/2012 Internship work in Atelier FCJZ, ‘Shanghai Jiading Cultural and Creative Industry Park’. 2011 Shenzhen/Hongkong Bi-city Biennial of Urbanism/Architecture, Shenzhen, China • 11/2011 Han Tianci, Jia Xuezi, ‘Fuji Town’, Top 30 Winners of ‘Array’ Ecological Competition. National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan • 9/2010 Han Tianci, Jia Xuezi, ‘Embassy Expo’. Seoul Design Fair 2010, Seoul, Korea.

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136


137


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Portfolio 2014  

Tianci Han's Catalog of GSD | Tsinghua Works

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